• Critical Thinking & Argumentation PHIL 113

    An introduction to non-formal methods of analyzing and formulating arguments, including treatment of such concepts/topics as: the nature of argument, induction, deduction, validity, soundness, aspects of language which tend to interfere with logical thought, definition, role of emotion, types of disagreement, and fallacies. The course also emphasizes the practical application of sound reasoning in both evaluating arguments and making arguments of one's own about matters of issues facing society. 4 credits

  • Introduction to Philosophy PHIL 115

    A general introduction to the nature of philosophical analysis. Lectures, readings, and discussions will focus on representative issues and thinkers from the main areas of philosophy (such as the nature of truth, reality, morality, politics, and religion). 4 credits

  • Ethics PHIL 119

    The course provides a systematic introduction to the major thinkers and their positions on the main issues of ethics, i.e.: What is morality? What are moral values? How do moral judgments differ from other types of statements? Are there objective, universal, absolute moral standards? If so, what are they, and what is their basis? 4 credits