• Astronomy I SCI 111

    This course introduces non-science majors to modern astronomy. It presents a broad view of astronomy suitable for students who may have taken their last science and math course several years ago. Together with the laboratory component (SCI-L111), this course aims to give those students a flavor of how researchers think, how they experiment, and how they form a view of the physical world. The ambition of this course is to make students realize that they can take part in this scientific enterprise provided they learn some techniques and adopt a scientific approach to analyzing the universe. Topics covered in this course range from the study of the light to the Solar System. Other characteristics of this course are heavy use of audio-visual materials often including computer animations and simulations, and intensive use of astronomy and astrophysics related INTERNET-based resources. 3 credits. Prerequisites: It will be assumed that you are familiar with arithmetic and basic algebra. If you can solve 2x+13=5 for x, then you will do fine in this course. SCI-L111 is a mandatory co-requisite for this course.

  • Astronomy I Lab SCI L111

    The laboratory provides a hands-on approach to learning scientific methodology and critical thinking in the context of astronomy and physics. The lab activities are somewhat different from traditional labs in several ways: (a) Labs sessions held at Mons Observatory on Tenerife (Canary Islands). (b) This course is mainly concerned with practical aspects of the telescopic observations in Astronomy. (c) Labs are a mix of working with real equipment and simulations (virtual experiments). (d) The lab activities are arranged in a way that encourages students to make the connection between the objective, the methodology, and the analysis and interpretation of the experiment. (e) Several leading questions are mingled with the lab instructions to insure that students do not merely follow instructions but understand them. (f) Although students have to express their results mathematically, the main focus lies in conceptually understanding the underlying science and discovering fundamental laws. The overall aim is to provide students with some tools of how to do science, and excite them in making discoveries of their own. 1 credit. Must be taken concurrently with SCI 112.

  • Astronomy II SCI 112

    This course introduces non-science majors to modern astronomy. It presents a broad view of astronomy suitable for students who may have taken their last science and math course several years ago. Together with the laboratory component (SCI-L112), this course aims to give those students a flavor of how researchers think, how they experiment, and how they form a view of the physical world. The ambition of this course is to make students realize that they can take part in this scientific enterprise provided they learn some techniques and adopt a scientific approach to analyzing the universe. Topics covered in this course range from the study of stars to galaxies, and cosmology. Other characteristics of this course are heavy use of audio-visual materials often including computer animations and simulations, and intensive use of astronomy and astrophysics related INTERNET-based resources. 3 credits. Prerequisites: It will be assumed that you are familiar with arithmetic and basic algebra. If you can solve 2x+13=5 for x, then you will do fine in this course. SCI-L112 is a mandatory co-requisite for this course.

  • Astronomy II Lab SCI L112

    The laboratory provides a hands-on approach to learning scientific methodology and critical thinking in the context of astronomy and physics. The lab activities are somewhat different from traditional labs in several ways: (a) Labs sessions held at Mons Observatory on Tenerife (Canary Islands). (b) This course is mainly concerned with practical aspects of the telescopic observations in Astronomy.(c) Labs are a mix of working with real equipment and simulations (virtual experiments). (d) The lab activities are arranged in a way that encourages students to make the connection between the objective, the methodology, and the analysis and interpretation of the experiment. (e) Several leading questions are mingled with the lab instructions to insure that students do not merely follow instructions but understand them. (f) Although students have to express their results mathematically, the main focus lies in conceptually understanding the underlying science and discovering fundamental laws. The overall aim is to provide students with some tools of how to do science, and excite them in making discoveries of their own. 1 credit. Must be taken concurrently with SCI 112.

  • Environmental Biology BIO 106

    An introduction to basic evolutionary, behavioral and ecological principles. Readings and discussions emphasize the ways that humans are affected by ecological processes and principles as well as how humans and their technology affect ecosystems. This course will not fulfill requirements for a major or a minor in Biology. Madrid Campus only. 4 credits

  • Environmental Science with Lab SCI 103/L103

    An introduction to basic evolutionary, behavioral and ecological principles. Readings and discussion emphasize the ways that humans are affected by ecological processes and principles as well as how humans and their technology affect ecosystems. Laboratory exercises illustrate topics covered in SCI 103. Field testing and analysis of environmental samples. 4 credits

  • General Chemistry I CHEM 111

    Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Topics include introductions to atomic structure, periodic table, nature of chemical bonds, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, acid-base systems, chemical equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, kinetics, and chemistry of selected elements. 3 credits

  • General Chemistry I Lab CHEM L111

    The basic principles of chemistry illustrated through laboratory investigation. Qualitative analysis is emphasized. 1 credit

  • General Chemistry II CHEM 112

    Continuation of the discussion of the fundamental principles of chemistry. Topics include introduction to solutions, kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base systems, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. 3 credits

  • General Chemistry II Lab CHEM L112

    Continuation of the illustration of the basic principles of chemistry through laboratory investigation. Quantitative analysis, particularly volumetric analysis, is emphasized. 1 credit

  • The Built World SCI 171

    The most basic needs of humans have not changed - water, food, and shelter - but the means of meeting these needs has. In this course, we will examine how technology-driven societies operate by studying how cities are built and how they function. Topics will include water supply and distribution systems; transportation systems (including road and bridge design and construction); building design, construction, and operation (including skyscraper and sustainable building design), and waste removal systems (municipal and industrial wastewater removal and treatment, solid waste removal and treatment). This is not a course about little gadgets and widgets; this is a course about big engineering marvels; and it emphasizes applications of science - how things work - rather than scientific theory. 4 credits

  • Science & Life in the 21st Century SCI 181

    This is a four credit, non-lab, science course that examines the central scientific problems confronting the 21st century. The course studies particular topics and teaches the necessary science around these topics to provide a good understanding of the issues. The topics currently are: Energy, Science and Economic Decisions, Sustainability of Life on Earth, Health and Science. 4 credits