Undergraduate

  • FIN-200 Business Finance

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 128 or higher; ACCT 201; STATS 240 or STATS 250 (can take concurrently with FIN 200); Sophomore standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focuses on basic financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation. Formally FIN 310.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-H200 Honors Business Finance

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 128 or higher; ACCT 201; STATS 240 or STATS 250(can take concurrently with FIN H200); Sophomore standing; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focuses on basic financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation. Formally FIN 310.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Honors

  • FIN-210 Personal Finance

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The course can be viewed as a survival guide or a road map to the universe of financial instruments available as well as the basic tools needed to make informed decisions. The course is intended to address the concerns of individuals in determining their financial needs and managing their financial resources. Finance 210 is a free elective only and may not be counted towards the finance major or minor.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-310 Business Finance

    Prerequisites:

    EC-101 and ACCT-201 and MATH-130 or higher and at least 24 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focuses on basic financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-H310 Honors Business Finance

    Prerequisites:

    EC-101 and ACCT-201 and MATH-130 or higher and at least 54 credits, and at least a 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focus on basic financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Honors

  • FIN-311 Intermediate Finance

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Intermediate Finance expands on basic financial concepts and introduces more advanced topics. Material emphasizes solutions to problems of capital structure, investment and financing. Other major topics include distribution policy, working capital management, derivative corporate securities, and corporate restructuring.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-313 General Insurance

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course includes the theory, practice and problems of risk bearing in business and personal pursuits including life, property and casualty insurance and dealing with contract analysis and investments as well as corporate risk management.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • FIN-315 Principles of Investments

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course covers the investment of funds by individuals and institutions. Focuses on analysis of investments and security markets, and the mechanics of trading and investing. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, futures, and options.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-317 Real Estate

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course focuses primarily on real estate investment and many different approaches are discussed. The course examines related areas of law, finance, insurance, taxation, appraisal and brokerage.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-319 Money and Capital Markets

    Prerequisites:

    EC 101; EC 102; Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course covers characteristics, structure and function of money and capital markets with a focus on the recent events relating to financial markets and their impact on the corporate financing behavior and the interrelationship among the various financial markets. Also, each type of financial institution and its internationalization are discussed.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-401 Practical Financial Planning

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310), Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is designed to expose the student to the wide range of financial planning tools and techniques available today to the professional financial planner as well as to the individual. By the end of the course the student should be able to construct a sensible and workable financial plan for a client.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • FIN-409 Securities Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 315

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is focused on the security analysis of stocks with the goal of managing the Suffolk University student-run portfolio. The material is pertinent to the security analyst - particularly the equity analyst who must issue a buy, hold or sell recommendations on stocks. By the end of the course, the student should feel competent in writing a thorough, credible equity research report or investment analysis that meets the highest standards of professionalism.

  • FIN-410 Analysis of Financial Statements

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310), Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course covers the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. It is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of a business entity. It also covers comparative financial statements and trend and ratio analysis.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • FIN-411 Futures and Options

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 315; Junior standing;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is an in-depth analysis of derivatives: futures, options, and swaps. The course explains why these securities exist, where and how they are traded, how to employ them in managing risk, and how to accurately price them. It also covers the use of these derivatives in the context hedging or speculation.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • FIN-413 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 315, Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is an advanced course in investment analysis stressing efficient frontier and diversification. Also studies portfolio construction and management, and the tradeoff of risk versus return.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • FIN-415 Capital Budgeting

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 311 or permission of instructor, Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course develops the practical techniques and decision rules in the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects. Teaching is oriented towards discussion of readings and case studies. Readings should provide students with understanding of capital budgeting techniques, and case studies should allow them to apply the techniques to real-world problems with the help of the computer.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • FIN-417 Multinational Financial Management

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); Junior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course covers the financing, investment and working capital management process of multinational corporations, considering such variables as exchange risk, political risk, accounting regulations and tax laws.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-419 Problems of Managerial Finance

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 311; Two FIN major required or elective courses; Senior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is an in-depth study of current finance theory and methodology applicable to the firm through case analyses, computer work and recent publications. It is a capstone course where students learn how to integrate financial theories and principles to reach optimal financial decisions in practice.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-422 Estate Planning

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides an introduction to estate planning, including a discussion of wills, intestacy, and tax consequences of estate planning techniques. The course will prepare students to discuss the necessity, objectives and techniques of estate planning with clients. It will introduce students to the consequences of intestacy and the uses of wills. Additionally, students will learn the basic concepts of the federal estate, gift and income tax rules that apply to certain estate plans and how to use them for the benefit of clients.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • FIN-423 Retirement Planning

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines financial planning for retirement and presents a comprehensive process for doing such a planning. Among the main topics covered are setting financial objectives for retirement, planning for adequate retirement income, social security and other governmental benefits, understanding qualified and non- qualified plans, pre- and post-retirement investment planning, planning for long-term care, and planning for incapacity.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • FIN-432 Financial Institutions

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200(formerly FIN 310); FIN 319

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course analyzes the role of financial institutions, such as commercial banks, savings and loans, and mutual savings banks in the economy. Topics covered also include dynamic changes in functions of financial institutions and increasing influence of alternative institutions like hedge fund, private equity fund, and venture capitalist.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • FIN-H435 Honors The Global Financial Crisis: Causes, Economics, and Solutions

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200(formerly FIN 310); Junior standing; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course analyzes the origins and consequences of the current financial situation from a variety of different economic and political perspectives. It offers students the opportunity to explore the chain of events that preceded the global financial crisis, monitor markets on a real-time basis (using Bloomberg) and provides a forum to discuss solutions and independently generate ideas. Among the main topics covered are asset pricing, derivative securities, financial engineering, risk management and the role of financial institutions, central banks and government agencies in global markets.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Honors

  • FIN-H445 Honors Quantitative Analysis and Trading of Financial Instruments

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200(formerly FIN 310); Junior standing; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The course covers fundamental valuation techniques for a host of financial instruments. Topics include: cash flow discount techniques, pricing, price volatility, duration and duration management with futures. The course also covers fundamentals of spread theory and spread volatility as well as the use of DTS for beta management in fixed income portfolios. The course concludes with an overview of risk fundamentals, tracking error management for indexing purposes, theory of hedging and risk models. Examples drawn from ongoing economic and financial issues are used to illustrate topics and concepts throughout the course.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Honors

  • FIN-450 Mutual Funds

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200(formerly FIN 310);

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to the mutual fund industry and its evolution into the brokerage business. The course focuses on developing this foundation knowledge through classroom discussions and case analysis with guest experts in the various aspects of mutual funds.

  • FIN-475 Case Studies in Financial Planning

    Prerequisites:

    senior standing required as well as instructor's approval

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines professional issues in financial planning, including ethical considerations, regulation and certification requirements, written communication skills, and professional responsibility. Students are expected to utilize skills obtained in other courses and work experiences in the completion of a comprehensive personal finance case, other mini-case studies, and calculation templates.

  • FIN-510 Independent Study in Finance

    Prerequisites:

    instructor's (full time), chair's, dean's approval

    Credits:

    1.00- 6.00

    Description:

    Independent study allows students to expand their classroom experience by completing research in an area of interest not already covered by Suffolk courses. The student designs a unique project and finds a full-time faculty member with expertise in that topic who agrees to sponsor it and provide feedback as the proposal is refined. A well designed and executed research project broadens and/or deepens learning in a major or minor area of study and may also enhance a student's marketability to potential future employers. Students cannot register for an Independent Study until a full proposal is approved by the faculty sponsor, department chair, and academic dean. Many Independent study proposals require revisions before approval is granted; even with revisions independent study approval is NOT guaranteed. Students are strongly encouraged to submit a proposal in enough time to register for a different course if the proposal is not accepted. For complete instructions, see the SBS Independent/Directed Study Agreement and Proposal form available online.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-550 Special Topics Finance

    Prerequisites:

    FIN-315; see department for course topic

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is an in-depth analysis of timely special issues in finance. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled. Additional prerequisites are based upon the individual topic.

  • FIN-560 Finance Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    Must obtain approval from FIN dept

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    Required of all Finance majors. Majors will have an approved 150 hours of finance experience. Experience may be acquired through internship, part- or full-time employment or cooperative education. Zero Credit

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FPP-200 Business Finance

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 128 or higher; ACCT 201; STATS 240 or 250 (can take concurrently with FPP 200)

    Description:

    This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focuses on basis financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FPP-310 Business Finance

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 130 or above; EC 101; ACCT 201; STATS 240 or 250 (can take concurrently with FIN 310)

    Description:

    This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focuses on basis financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FPP-313 General Insurance

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

    Description:

    This course includes the theory, practice and problems of risk-bearing in business and personal pursuit including life, property and casualty insurance and dealing with contract analysis and investments as well as corporate risk management.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • FPP-315 Principles of Investment

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

    Description:

    This course covers the investment of funds by individuals and institutions. Focuses on analysis of investments and security markets, and the mechanics of trading and investing. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed including stocks, bonds,futures and options.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FPP-320 Taxation

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT 202; take either FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

    Description:

    A study of basic federal taxation as it applies to individuals, partnerships and corporations. Expertise in the preparation of tax returns is developed. Prerequisite: ACCT 202 MATH 134 OR MATH 161 OR MATH 165.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FPP-401 Practical Financial Planning

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

    Description:

    This course is designed to expose the student to the wide range of financial planning tools and techniques available today to the professional financial planner as well as to the individual. By the end of the course the student should be able to construct a sensible and workable financial plan for a client.

  • FPP-422 Estate Planning

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

    Description:

    This course provides an introduction to estate planning, including a discussion of wills, intestacy, and tax consequences of estate planning techniques. The course will prepare students to discuss the necessity, objectives, and techniques of estate planning with clients. It will introduce students to the consequences of intestacy and the uses of wills. Additionally, students will learn the basic concepts of the federal estate, gift, and income tax rules that apply to certain estate plans and how to use them for the benefit of clients.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • FPP-423 Retirement Planning

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

    Description:

    This course examines financial planning for retirement and presents a comprehensive process for doing such a planning. Among the main topics covered are setting financial objectives for retirement, planning for adequate retirement income, social security and other governmental benefits, understanding qualified and non- qualified plans, pre- and post-retirement investment planning, planning for long-term care, and planning for incapacity.

  • FPP-475 Case Studies in Financial Planning

    Prerequisites:

    FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines professional issues in financial planning, including ethical considerations, regulation and certification requirements, written communication skills, and professional responsibility. Students are expected to utilize skills obtained in other courses and work experiences in the completion of a comprehensive personal finance case, other mini-case studies, and calculation templates.

  • SBS-HC320 Utilizing Real Time Data, News, Analytics and Research

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    Students will gain hands-on and real-world experience using information and technology utilized by leading decision makers in business. Expose students to real-time platforms for financial and global business news, data, analytical tools and research. Students can deepen both their research and classwork, while learning how to analyze markets, assess economic scenarios and interpret the key news developments that impact the global economy. Bring the pace and excitement of real-time business and macro/micro econometrics into the classroom. Real-time trading applications will be introduced and utilized extensively throughout the course. Students will have multiple opportunities to participate in local and national virtual trading and analysis competitions. Integrate theoretical curriculum from prior courses and teach practical applications that can also be helpful in later courses. Examples drawn from ongoing economic and financial issues will be used to illustrate topics and concepts throughout the course. Guest speakers will be scheduled to speak about certain topics and their experiences.

    Type:

    Honors