Certificate Program in Financial Planning


This non-degree program is offered as a flexible and affordable program for working professionals whose responsibilities are currently or expected to be related to financial planning. This certificate program requires the completion of the following eight courses (provided that the students demonstrate proficiency in prerequisites) with a “pass” grade:
  • FPP-200 Business Finance

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 128 or higher; ACCT 201; STATS 240 or 250 (can take concurrently with FPP 200)

    Description:

    This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focuses on basis financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FPP-313 General Insurance

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

    Description:

    This course includes the theory, practice and problems of risk-bearing in business and personal pursuit including life, property and casualty insurance and dealing with contract analysis and investments as well as corporate risk management.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • FPP-315 Principles of Investment

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

    Description:

    This course covers the investment of funds by individuals and institutions. Focuses on analysis of investments and security markets, and the mechanics of trading and investing. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed including stocks, bonds,futures and options.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FPP-320 Taxation

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT 202; take either FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

    Description:

    A study of basic federal taxation as it applies to individuals, partnerships and corporations. Expertise in the preparation of tax returns is developed. Prerequisite: ACCT 202 MATH 134 OR MATH 161 OR MATH 165.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FPP-401 Practical Financial Planning

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

    Description:

    This course is designed to expose the student to the wide range of financial planning tools and techniques available today to the professional financial planner as well as to the individual. By the end of the course the student should be able to construct a sensible and workable financial plan for a client.

  • FPP-422 Estate Planning

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

    Description:

    This course provides an introduction to estate planning, including a discussion of wills, intestacy, and tax consequences of estate planning techniques. The course will prepare students to discuss the necessity, objectives, and techniques of estate planning with clients. It will introduce students to the consequences of intestacy and the uses of wills. Additionally, students will learn the basic concepts of the federal estate, gift, and income tax rules that apply to certain estate plans and how to use them for the benefit of clients.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • FPP-423 Retirement Planning

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

    Description:

    This course examines financial planning for retirement and presents a comprehensive process for doing such a planning. Among the main topics covered are setting financial objectives for retirement, planning for adequate retirement income, social security and other governmental benefits, understanding qualified and non- qualified plans, pre- and post-retirement investment planning, planning for long-term care, and planning for incapacity.

It should be noted that FPP 200 is an introduction to finance. Its prerequisites are:

  • ACCT-201 Accounting for Decision Making I

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-128 or higher and WRI-102 or SBS-220

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces students to the accounting cycle, the financial statements, and the theory underlying accounting as information. Provides users of accounting information with a basic understanding of how to appraise and manage a business. Addresses current accounting topics, including relevant ethical and international issues found in the financial press.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • STATS-240 Introduction to Statistics

    Prerequisites:

    Math 128 or higher.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Topics include: data presentation, measures of central locations and dispersion, probability and probability distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression models. The use of Excel and SPSS will be emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisite: Math 130 or higher. 1 term - 4 credits (4 hours per week). Normally offered each semester.

    Type:

    Quantitative Reasoning

or

  • STATS-250 Applied Statistics

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 128 or higher

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Application of statistical analysis to real-world business and economic problems. Topics include data presentation, descriptive statistics including measures of location and dispersion, introduction to probability, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions including binomial and normal distributions, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical inference including estimation and hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression analysis. The use of computers is emphasized throughout the course. Normally offered each semester.

    Type:

    Quantitative Reasoning

  • MATH-128 Math for the Modern World

    Prerequisites:

    MATH level 2, or Mathshop, or MATH-104

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    From the ISBN on a book, to buying a car, from the size of small chips in a cell phone, to the size of the national debt, or just reading a graph in the daily newspaper, mathematics plays an important and vital role in countless areas of life and your future career and courses included. Mathematics is both an art and a tool created by humans. The common bond is a way of thinking and a way of reasoning to describe and solve problems of many types. This course uses the context of modern real life problems to introduce math needed for literacy and problem solving in contemporary life and work. It uses a minimal amount of algebra and focuses on math models, concepts and basic math manipulations. It encourages students to move from anxiety about math, to using formulas well, to thinking critically in the math context to use math to solve problems and pose new problems. Topics include scientific notation, basic financial math, linear, exponential and polynomial models and an introduction to probability. (Formerly Math 132)

Or higher

*STATS-240 or STATS-250 can be taken concurrently with FPP-200.

These eight FPP courses cover the foundation topics required by the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) Board. Students may apply for admission in fall, spring, or summer sessions. Upon completion of this certificate program, the students are eligible to take the CFP exam administered by the CFP Board, which is an integral part of the prestigious CFP certification process. For more information about the CFP exam, please refer to www.cfp.net.  

Admission to the Certificate Program requires a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution. Students applying for admission should contact the Undergraduate Admissions Office (617-573-8460) for more information. Those who have already taken the above courses from an accredited institution may waive a maximum of three courses.

Gainful Employment Disclosure

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