Major Requirements

The Information Systems (IS) major consists of a minimum of 21 credit hours, including four (4) required and three (3) elective ISOM courses.

Major Required Courses, 4 Courses, 12 Credits

  • ISOM-313 Systems Analysis & Design

    Prerequisites:

    ISOM-210(formerly ISOM-310)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Covers the concepts, techniques and tools used in the analysis and design of business information systems. Topics include: the system development cycle, modeling, prototyping and project management. Additionally, the course focuses upon using Object Oriented analysis and design techniques including the UML. Emphasizes the analysis of business operations as well as the interaction between information systems professionals and end-users. A term project applying these concepts and techniques is required.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-314 Object Oriented Programming

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Develops problem solving and basic programming skills through a variety of business application assignments. Introduces fundamental control and data structures using the Java programming language. Students learn about the concepts of object-oriented / event-driven programming principles. The course builds skills in the areas of programming logic, Class and Object concepts, and system development. Testing and debugging techniques and the writing of well-structured code are emphasized.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-423 Database Management

    Prerequisites:

    ISOM-210(formerly ISOM-310)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Provides an understanding of the role of information and databases in information systems and their role as an organizational resource. Students learn to design databases using normalization and entity-relationship diagrams, develop data models and to build applications with database management systems such as MS Access and SQL. Techniques are examined and applied to realistic business problems through hands-on exercises and projects.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-424 IS Strategy, Management and Acquisition

    Prerequisites:

    ISOM-313, ISOM-314, and ISOM-423 and at least 84 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Explores the issues and approaches in managing the information systems function in organizations and how the IS function integrates/supports/enables various types of organizational capabilities. It takes a management perspective in exploring the acquisition, development, and implementation of plans and policies to achieve efficient and effective information systems. The course addresses issues relating to defining the high level IS infrastructure and the systems that support the operational, administrative, and strategic needs of the organization. The remainder of the course is focused on developing an intellectual framework that will allow leaders of organizations to critically assess existing IS infrastructures and emerging technologies as well as how these enabling technologies might affect organizational strategy. The ideas developed and cultivated in this course are intended to provide an enduring perspective that can help leaders make sense of an increasingly globalized and technology intensive business environment.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Major Elective Courses, 3 Courses, 9 Credits

  • ISOM-130 Data Science and Analytics

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101(formerly SBS-101)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Provides students with a comprehensive introduction to the core concepts, applications and tools of data acquisition, preparation, querying, analytics, and data management. Students gain hands-on experience using real data to perform these functions. Topics include: data life cycle, big data, analytics, data collection, preparation, organization and storage, aggregation and summary, and presentation/visualization. Students use tools such as MS Excel, MS Access, SQL, and SAS Visual Analytics.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-212 Web Design

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the concepts, vocabulary, and procedures associated with website and mobile application design. Includes modules on website evaluation, information architecture, customer and task analysis, usability testing, typography, color composition, screen layout, and navigation design, and digital content editing. Also covers important web design themes such as accessibility, globalization, personalization and trust. Students gain hands-on design experience using an assortment of readily available development tools such as Wix, Yapp, and Microsoft's Expression Web software.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-215 Mobile App Development

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Provides a comprehensive introduction to mobile app technology and design concepts. This is an introductory course and assumes no prior programming experience. Students learn how to design, build, and optimize cross-platform mobile app using HTML5 standards. Students will also learn how to convert HTML5 apps into native apps for various mobile platforms. Students use CSS3, JavaScript and several JavaScript frameworks and techniques such as jQuery, jQuery Mobile, and AJAX. In addition, students will use Web services, such as Google Maps, and Web Application Programming Interfaces (Web APIs) to integrate content into their apps.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-230 Big Data, Business Intelligence and Analytics

    Prerequisites:

    STATS-240 or STATS-250 or Instructor Permission

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Provides an understanding of the business potential of big data; how to build and maintain data warehouses, and how to analyze and use this data as a source for business intelligence and competitive advantage. Students study data mining concepts and the use of analytics tools and methods for producing business knowledge. Topics include: extraction, transformation and loading; decision support systems; analytics , text, web and data mining models as well as data presentation/visualization including dashboards, cockpits and scorecards. Students build a data warehouse and practice the extraction and filtering process used to produce high quality data warehouses. Students will use tools such as MS Excel, MicroStrategy (Salesforce), SQL and SAP Business Warehouse.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-231 Automatic for the People: Turn Data Into Insight/W R~python

    Prerequisites:

    STATS-240 or STATS-250

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces a detailed overview of statistical learning for data mining, inference, and prediction in order to tackle modern-day data analysis problems. This course is appropriate for students who wish to learn and apply statistical learning tools to analyze data and gain valuable hands-on experience with R. Statistical learning refers to a vast set of tools for modeling and understanding complex datasets. Exciting topics include: Regression, Logistic Regression, Linear Discriminant Analysis, Cross-Validation, Bootstrap, Linear/Non-Linear Model Selection and Regularization, Support Vector Methodology, and Unsupervised Learning via Principal Components Analysis and Clustering Methods. Students learn how to implement each of the statistical learning methods using the popular statistical software package R via hands-on lab sessions.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-244 Web Application Development

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Equips students with the principles, methodology and skills required to define, develop and deploy a fully functional dynamic web application. Students learn to customize the content, appearance, and delivery of their website using industry-standard web development tools. Class discussion will focus on web development issues for organizations as well as the role played by development tools such as HTML5, CSS3, and PHP scripting. Each class will include hands-on lab work. A term project is used to wrap the course content together.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ISOM-330 Applied Predictive Analytics

    Prerequisites:

    ISOM-130, ISOM-230, and STATS-240 or STATS-250

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    When companies make decisions, they do so with the future in mind and essentially are predicting that their decisions will achieve desired results. Predictive analytics allow people to ask and answer questions that can predict demand and/or outcomes and obtain results that lead to reasoned action. This course develops students' capability in applying the core concepts and techniques of predictive analytics for opportunity identification and risk assessment within the context of organizational decision-making. Students will use data-driven approaches to develop predictive analytical models. Students will create and use data models and techniques, apply trendlines to fit models to data, perform what-if analysis, construct data tables, evaluate scenarios, apply forecasting techniques, simulation and risk analysis. Students will learn to use various presentation and visualization tools to communicate results. Topics include: predictive analytics life cycle, opportunity/issue identification, data preparation, modeling, analysis, forecasting, simulation, risk assessment, and operationalization of predictive analytics. Students will use tools such as MS Excel, SPSS and SAS Visual Analytics.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-331 Global Electronic Commerce

    Prerequisites:

    ISOM-210(formerly ISOM-310)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the role of e-commerce and e-business in the global business environment. Considers user, technological, strategic, economic, social, and cultural factors in the development and deployment of effective websites and mobile applications. Students discuss readings and cases to examine current e-commerce situations, opportunities, and challenges. Students develop websites to simulate collaboration and competition among online businesses.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-340 Security & Privacy

    Prerequisites:

    ISOM-210(formerly ISOM-310) and at least 54 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the basics of information security & privacy including the legal and ethical issues. Common types of computer attacks and counter-attacks are addressed. Security technologies such as biometrics, firewalls, intrusion detection systems and cryptography systems will be analyzed and several lab exercises on the same are used to connect theory to practice. Best practices for planning and auditing security and privacy will also be covered.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-341 Project Management

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Provides a comprehensive introduction to project management. Projects provide businesses a time-delimited tool for improving, expanding, and innovating - the primary means for converting strategy into action. Project management success differentiates top performing firms. The course will focus on discussion and analysis of business situations that convey core project management skills. In particular, this course focuses on the challenge of managing projects in today's complex, high-pressure work environments. This course can be credited toward PMI Project Management Professional (PMP) certification.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-414 Object-Oriented Programming Development with Java

    Prerequisites:

    ISOM-314 and at least 54 credits or Instructor Permission

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces object-oriented programming (OOP) and development using the Java programming language. It covers the basics of OOP including class hierarchies, inheritance, objects, streams, constructors, and GUI components. The course also covers the design, development, and deployment of applets, web applications, and applications that are not deployed via the Internet. Several programming projects, which strengthen the understanding of object based and event driven programming, are required. By the end of the course, students will possess a strong working competency in object oriented programming using Java.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ISOM-440 ERP System & Process Reengineering

    Prerequisites:

    ISOM-210(formerly ISOM-310) and at least 54 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Provides a conceptual, as well as, a mechanical understanding of enterprise integration and enterprise software, business process reengineering and strategies for maximizing benefits from enterprise systems. Students lean to examine complex issues in organizational changes including implementation challenge; risks, costs, and benefits; learning and knowledge management. Hands-on lab projects on the ERP System (provided by SAP) are utilized to reinforce understanding of important enterprise systems and business process concepts. This course is part of the SAP Student Recognition Certificate Program.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ISOM-510 Independent Study in IS & OM

    Prerequisites:

    ISOM-210(formerly ISOM-310) or ISOM-201 and Instructor Permission

    Credits:

    1.00- 3.00

    Description:

    Independent study allows students to expand their classroom experience by completing research in an area of interest not already covered by Suffolk courses. The student designs a unique project and finds a full-time faculty member with expertise in that topic who agrees to sponsor it and provide feedback as the proposal is refined. A well designed and executed research project broadens and/or deepens learning in a major or minor area of study and may also enhance a student's marketability to potential future employers. Students cannot register for an Independent Study until a full proposal is approved by the faculty sponsor, department chair, and academic dean. Many Independent study proposals require revisions before approval is granted; even with revisions independent study approval is NOT guaranteed. Students are strongly encouraged to submit a proposal in enough time to register for a different course if the proposal is not accepted. For complete instructions, see the SBS Independent/Directed Study Agreement and Proposal form available online.

  • ISOM-550 Special Topics of IS & OM

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisites dependent on topic.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An in-depth analysis of timely and special issues in information systems or operations management. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled. Prerequisites are dependent on specific topic.

    Term:

    Occasional

Additional Major Information 

Some major courses are offered only once during an academic year. It is the students’ responsibility to work with their academic advisor to develop a program of study that ensures courses are taken in the proper sequence and all prerequisites are satisfied.  The IS major consists of 4 required and 3 elective courses.  Six of the seven major courses must be ISOM department courses.  Students may transfer a maximum of two courses towards their IS major of which no more than one is a major required course.  Prior approval is required for using a non-ISOM course as a major elective.

Information Systems/Information Technology Practicum

Practical information systems experience prepares students for real-world challenges in the workplace.  All IS majors must complete 150 hours of approved professional information systems experience before graduation.  The 150 hours of work experience may be obtained in one or more positions as an intern, part- or full-time employee or volunteer.  Prior approval of your position by the IS Practical Experience Coordinator is required.  This is accomplished by completing the IS Practicum Approval Form.

Most students satisfy this graduation requirement by completing ISOM 560: IS Practicum, a noncredit, tuition-free, pass/fail course.  Students should enroll in ISOM 560 the semester when they expect to complete their 150 hours or the subsequent semester.  Students may also satisfy this practicum requirement by enrolling in ISOM 520: IS Internship (1 to 3 credits based on the number of hours worked).  ISOM 520 requires junior standing and is a graded course that can only be used as a free elective (cannot be used as a major elective).


BSBA Degree Requirements

I. BSBA Degree Requirements

The completion of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (BSBA) degree includes:

  • A minimum of 124 semester hours of coursework and satisfaction of all degree requirements;
  • 2.0 overall cumulative average;
  • 2.0 average in major and minor fields of study; 
  • A minimum of 30 semester hours of business coursework must be completed at Suffolk University; and,
  • An overall minimum of 45 semester hours of coursework must be completed at Suffolk University to be eligible to be considered for degree.

Students are responsible for knowing and complying with specific degree requirements. Any exception to the Program of Study requires written approval from Michele Rosenthal, Director, Undergraduate Programs, Sawyer Business School.

Full-time students normally complete their degree requirements in four years. A student may shorten the time required by attending summer sessions. Part-time students normally take five to seven years to complete the requirements, depending on the course load carried.

Course descriptions may be updated periodically to reflect changes since the last published catalog.

Recommended Four-Year Course Sequence

Below is an overview of the courses and experiential requirements that BSBA students must complete and the year they are required or suggested to do so. The Business School’s curriculum is designed to enable students to acquire knowledge and skills cumulatively, building from introductory material to more specialized or advanced study in areas of major concentration. Prerequisites have been established for courses that require preparation in order for students to benefit fully from the learning experience. Students should meet with their advisors to review their program of study.

Students are responsible for taking courses in the prescribed sequence as necessary. This means:

  • All prerequisites must be satisfied.
  • Students must have satisfactorily completed 54 credits in order to register for upper division courses in the Business School (Business School undergraduate courses numbered 300 or higher, unless otherwise stated).
  • Students must have completed all freshman and sophomore required courses prior to registering in junior-level courses. In particular, students are expected to have completed required writing and quantitative courses before the junior year. 

Note: Students who entered Suffolk prior to Fall 2014 are under a different program of study and should refer to their program evaluation and/or the catalog from that year for specific requirements. The Undergraduate Academic Advising Center can provide information about completing requirements where courses are no longer offered, or additional options now exist.

Freshman Year Requirements:

  • SBS-100 careerSTART

    Prerequisites:

    Students must have completed less than 30 credits.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    SBS 100 engages students in a series of activities, discussions, and programs on campus to explore their interests and strengths and learn how courses and co-curricular experiences together help them achieve their goals. Students also develop innovation, team, and presentation skills, get involved on campus, and learn about campus resources and services that aid in a successful college experience. This is the first in a four-year sequence of career courses.

  • WRI-101 First Year Writing I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study and practice of the writing process and revision in terms of expository writing modes for an academic audience.

  • WRI-102 First Year Writing II

    Prerequisites:

    WRI 101.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study and practice of argumentative and research writing through further work with writing process and revision and the critical reading of a variety of texts.

  • ENT-101 Business Foundations

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to foundational concepts in business, including functional areas, the life cycle, competition, stakeholders and ethical considerations. Students develop critical thinking by learning and using a problem solving process through a business situation analysis model to analyze various situations that confront managers and founders of small, medium, and large organizations. Students will also develop tools for analysis, allowing them to critically view business in a new and thoughtful way. The class culminates with student- teams presenting a detailed analysis and recommendations to a panel of executives and persuading them that the recommended strategy is not only feasible, but also practical for the stakeholders involved.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Creativity and Innovation (3 cr.)

Numerous courses are offered to meet this requirement. Search for course options by using the course type "CI."

Math (4 cr.)

Choose one based on your Math placement score:

  • MATH-128 Math for the Modern World

    Prerequisites:

    MATH level 2, or Mathshop, or MATH-104

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    From the ISBN on a book, to buying a car, from the size of small chips in a cell phone, to the size of the national debt, or just reading a graph in the daily newspaper, mathematics plays an important and vital role in countless areas of life and your future career and courses included. Mathematics is both an art and a tool created by humans. The common bond is a way of thinking and a way of reasoning to describe and solve problems of many types. This course uses the context of modern real life problems to introduce math needed for literacy and problem solving in contemporary life and work. It uses a minimal amount of algebra and focuses on math models, concepts and basic math manipulations. It encourages students to move from anxiety about math, to using formulas well, to thinking critically in the math context to use math to solve problems and pose new problems. Topics include scientific notation, basic financial math, linear, exponential and polynomial models and an introduction to probability. (Formerly Math 132)

  • MATH-130 Topics in Finite Mathematics

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-104, or MATH-121, or MATH level 3

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Linear Modeling (for example, using linear functions to model supply/demand situations), graphing, linear programming, financial functions (compound interest, annuities, and amortization of loans) sets, Venn diagrams, counting and combinatorics, discrete probability, conditional probability, Bernoulli experiments, Bayes theorem. Several sections offered each semester. *This course cannot be applied toward a departmental concentration in Mathematics by Sawyer Business School students.

  • MATH-134 Calculus for Management & Social Sciences

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-104, MATH-121 or MATH level 4

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A one-semester introduction to differential and integral calculus. Theory is presented informally and topics and techniques are limited to polynomials, rational functions, logarithmic and exponential functions. Topics include a review of precalculus, linear regression, limits and continuity, derivatives, differentiation rules, implicit differentiation, related rates, applications of derivatives to graphing, minima/maxima, applications of the derivative, marginal analysis, differential equations of growth and decay, anti-derivatives, the definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, area measurements. This course cannot be used to satisfy core or complementary requirements by students majoring in chemistry, computer science, engineering, mathematics, or physics. Several sections offered each semester. *This course cannot be applied toward a departmental concentration in Mathematics by Sawyer Business School students.

  • MATH-165 Calculus I

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-121 with a minimum grade of C or MATH level 5

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Functions, limits and continuity; instantaneous rate of change, tangent slopes, and the definition of the derivative of a function; power, product, and quotient rules, trig derivatives, chain rule, implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; applications(curve sketching, limits at infinity, optimization, differentials); other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions, exponential and log functions, hyperbolic trig functions); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Requirements also recommended to be taken during the Freshman Year:

  • STATS-250 Applied Statistics

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 128 or higher

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Application of statistical analysis to real-world business and economic problems. Topics include data presentation, descriptive statistics including measures of location and dispersion, introduction to probability, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions including binomial and normal distributions, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical inference including estimation and hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression analysis. The use of computers is emphasized throughout the course. Normally offered each semester.

    Type:

    Quantitative Reasoning

Social, Cultural and Global Diverse Perspectives (one course)

Numerous courses are offered to meet this requirement. Search for course options by using the course type "PERSP."

Globalization Requirement (one course)

Choose one of the three courses offered to meet this requirement. However, Global Business majors must take SIB 101. All other BSBA students may choose from the following:
  • SIB-101 Globalization

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces the nature and processes of globalization which define today's international business environment. The course employs a multidisciplinary perspective to explore the growing interdependence of nations in their trade, investment, technology flows, and business operations. Topic include business, geographic, economic, social, cultural, political, and other issues related to globalization. The course is experiential in its approach. Students will undertake a team research project exploring globalization issues with reference to a particular country, region or industry.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • HST-149 Empires & Globalization in World History I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is the first of the two-course series of Empires and Globalization in World History. Course discusses the origins and development of globalization and capitalism from the perspective of economic history. Major issues include the formation of the medieval trade system, the development of finance and capitalism in the early modern ages, and economic changes prior to the Industrial Revolution. The specific topics may change every year due to new academic developments and publications. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-150 Empires & Globalization in World History II

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is the second of the two-course series of Empires and Globalization in World History. Course discusses the origins and development of globalization and capitalism from the perspective of economic history. Major issues include state-making, wars, and the rivalry among early modern empires, economic development, the Industrial Revolution and the formation of the global trade system. The specific topics may change every year due to new academic developments and publications. Cultural Diversity B

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities Literature Requirement

Sophomore Year Requirements

  • SBS-200 careerEXPLORE

    Prerequisites:

    SBS 100. Prerequisite will be waived with 30 or more transfer credits from another institution.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    SBS 200 fosters active exploration of career interests, jobs and fields. Students build introductory career management, information seeking, and self-presentation skills. Students refine oral and written communication through class presentations, networking, research, and writing a resume and cover letter. This is the second in a four-year sequence of career courses.

  • SBS-220 Business Writing

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 101 (formerly SBS 101); WRI 102 or WRI 103;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The world is constantly changing and businesses as well as individual employees must adapt. In order to effectively leverage future communication technologies and media, you must be a critical reader and have strong foundational writing and editing skills. In this course, current business news will be read for its content and to understand the interplay of language and purpose. You will learn to write effectively for business by focusing on your audience, purpose, tone, and the design of various business documents and by revising and refining your writing.

  • ACCT-201 Accounting for Decision Making I

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-128 or higher and WRI-102 or SBS-220

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces students to the accounting cycle, the financial statements, and the theory underlying accounting as information. Provides users of accounting information with a basic understanding of how to appraise and manage a business. Addresses current accounting topics, including relevant ethical and international issues found in the financial press.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-202 Accounting for Decision Making II

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-201

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Enables students to apply the concepts and skills from ACCT 201. They learn how to analyze the financial condition and performance of a firm, and how to use accounting information in business planning, decision-making, and control. Topics include cost-volume-profit analysis, costing systems, variance analysis, and the budget process. Discusses relevant current ethical and competitive issues found in the financial press.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MKT-220 Business Research Methods

    Prerequisites:

    STATS 240 or STATS 250

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Business Research Methods is a general introduction to both quantitative and qualitative business research methods. Topics covered include the purpose of research, defining research and research problems, defining an hypothesis, problem solving and knowledge discovery, methods of quantitative and qualitative research, conducting literature reviews, designing appropriate methodologies, evaluating outcomes, analysis and communicating the results. Students will use Excel and SPSS to support research analysis, implementing what was learned in statistics and going beyond as they learn new data analysis techniques. Students will discuss and present research ideas and processes orally both informally and formally.

Requirements also recommended to be taken during the Sophomore Year:

  • EC-102 Global Macroeconomics

    Prerequisites:

    Non-CAS majors need to have completed at least 16 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the workings of the national and the global economy. It will describe the determination of Gross Domestic Product, the problems of unemployment, inflation, and the determination of economic growth. It will also describe and analyze the determination of the country's exchange rate, the balance of payments, and international borrowing and lending. A particular focus will be on understanding economic fluctuations (booms, busts, and recessions) in the domestic economy and its effects on other economies. It will analyze the role of the government and the effects of government spending and taxation on the economy. Furthermore, it will describe and analyze the determination of the quantity of money and interest rates in the economy and the role of the country's central bank. It examines the basis and pattern of international trade and the effects of a country's trade policy on the economy.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • BLE-215 Business Ethics and Law

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Business ethics is applied ethics. Explores the roles and responsibilities of business in a global society. Teaches models of ethical decision-making that incorporate multiple points of view, including diverse cultural worldviews and legal perspectives. Addresses factors that contribute to and constrain ethical behavior in and by organizations. Students apply concepts to current business problems, such as anti-trust, accounting fraud, deceptive advertising, and environmental dumping.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-201 Data and Decisions Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-128 or higher and STATS-240 or STATS 250.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces fundamental quantitative methods of using data to make informed management decisions. Topics include: decision modeling, decision analysis, regression, forecasting, optimization, and simulation, as it applies to the study and analysis of business problems for decision support in finance, marketing, service, and manufacturing operations. Practical business cases and examples drawn from finance, marketing, operations management, and other management areas are used to provide students with a perspective on how management science is used in practice. Excel spreadsheets are used extensively to implement decision models.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGT-217 Organizational Behavior

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 101 (formerly SBS 101); WRI 102 (formerly ENG 102) or WRI 103 (formerly ENG 103) or SBS 220

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the application of sociological, psychological and anthropological concepts in domestic and international business settings. Attention is given to the study of human behavior in organizational settings, the organization itself, human interaction, and small group process.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MKT-210 Principles of Marketing

    Prerequisites:

    WRI 101 or WRI 103

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    As part of the core curriculum for the BSBA, this course provides a comprehensive, innovative, managerial, and practical introduction to marketing. Students will learn and apply basic concepts and practices of modern marketing as used in a wide variety of settings. Technological advances, rapid globalization, economic shifts and cultural and environmental developments are causing profound changes in the marketplace. As the marketplace changes, so must the marketers who serve it. These new developments signify a brand new world of opportunities for forward thinking marketers. In response to these new developments, the focus of this course is on four major themes that go to the heart of modern marketing theory and practice: 1. Building and managing profitable customer relationships; 2. Building and managing strong brands; 3. Harnessing new marketing technologies in this digital age; and 4. Marketing in a socially responsible way around the globe.

  • ISOM-210 Management Information Systems

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-101 and ENT-101 and at least 24 completed credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the rise of information-enabled enterprises and the role of information technologies/information systems (IT/IS) and e-commerce as key enablers of businesses and social changes globally. Topics include: the effective application of IT/IS to support strategic planning, managerial control, operations and business process integration in the digital economy, IT/IS related issues of ethics, and piracy and security in the information society.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-200 Business Finance

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 128 or higher; ACCT 201; STATS 240 or STATS 250 (can take concurrently with FIN 200); Sophomore standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focuses on basic financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation. Formally FIN 310.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Requirements to be completed by the end of the junior year

  • SBS-300 careerBUILD

    Prerequisites:

    SBS 200. Prerequisite will be waived with 45 or more transfer credits from another institution.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    SBS 300 deepens students' career information and skills with a focus on professionalism. Students refine career documents based on personal branding with a focus on articulating the experiences, learning, and skills gained in previous internships, volunteer and work experiences, courses, and club or performance roles. Students use technology, personal networks and professional organizations to develop job search skills. This is the third in a four-year sequence of career courses.

  • EC-101 Applied Microeconomics

    Prerequisites:

    Non CAS majors need to have completed at least 16 credits.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to foundational principles of microeconomic theory, with an emphasis on applications of concepts to management decision-making in specific industry and market settings. It describes and analyzes the interaction of supply and demand and the behavior of the prices of goods, services. It explains the determinations of costs, output, strategic pricing, and governance by firms under conditions of perfect and imperfect competition in a global economy. In addition, it describes the supply demand for factors of production and the impact of taxes and government regulation and intervention on firms and consumers.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • MGT-360 Leadership 360 Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); does not count toward the Management Major, nor the minor for BSBA students

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Leadership 360 Practicum provides a fundamental understanding of the principles of leadership and the core competencies, traits and behaviors that enable effective leadership. Students will conduct an in-depth self-examination of skills, abilities, personality, attitudes, values, and behaviors to increase self-awareness of their leadership competencies. Students will learn relevant leadership theories and introductory project management principles and techniques. They will apply leadership and project management skills in a mini-team project with a not-for-profit organization that seeks solutions to a specific challenge, leading to a project implementation plan. Students will present formally to the client; feedback to the presenters will reinforce their oral communication skills. This course is a requirement for all BSBA majors.

  • BLE-214 Principles of Business Law

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the field of business law. Provides an overview of the organization and operation of the American legal system, court system and legal procedure. Examines selected business law topics such as contracts, torts, criminal law,agency, and business organizations. Attention is given to the ways in which business law manifests important social and ethical precepts.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-319 Operations Management

    Prerequisites:

    ENT-101(formerly SBS 101) and ISOM-201 and at least 54 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces concepts and tools for managing operations in service/ manufacturing organizations where inputs such as raw material, labor, or other resources are transformed into finished services and/or goods. Strategic and tactical issues of operations management (OM), including: operations strategy, product and process design, capacity planning, quality management, inventory management, queueing theory and work force management are addressed. Quantitative models, analytical tools and case studies are used to analyze operational problems that business managers face in both local and global settings.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Requirements to be completed by the end of senior year

  • SBS-400 careerLAUNCH

    Prerequisites:

    90 credit hours required.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    SBS 400 is the culminating career and professional experience for seniors. It focuses on career entry and transition, networking for career and job success, impression management, and related life-long learning skills. Students articulate and reflect on academic, work, and co-curricular experiences from the perspective of professionals entering or advancing their careers. This is the final course in a four-year sequence of career courses.

  • SIB-429 Strategic Management

    Prerequisites:

    MKT 210; ISOM 319; MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); Senior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course covers and integrates administrative processes and decision making under uncertainty in business areas of marketing, accounting, management, finance, personnel, and production. It also focuses on strategic and policy issues from the viewpoint of senior management in both domestic and international corporations. Case discussions help develop the conceptual framework for analysis and implementation of strategy and policy decisions.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Science, Technology and Engineering (4 cr.)

Choose 1 STE (Science, Technology, and Engineering) science course. In the case of a course that is a lecture plus a lab, the student must complete both components to earn credit for the STE requirement. Numerous courses are offered to meet this requirement. Search for course options by using the course type "STE."

Experiential Components to be done anytime:

Global Engagement Experience

The Global Engagement requirement has a range of options including courses, study or work abroad, and certain service learning or engagement projects. Students choose one that best matches their personal and career interests. This requirement is explained in detail on the BSBA website.

Choose one:
Approved Suffolk courses can be found by using the course search system and entering course type “GLOBL.” Students should review the course details and note prerequisites; the location of the course (Boston or Madrid campus); and if the course involves a travel fee, off-campus activities, or other requirements. [Note: SBS-160, SBS-170, and SBS-180 have special purposes as described below. These carry no academic credit, do not require any tuition, and will be graded pass/fail.]

Study Abroad: When you register for study abroad through Suffolk’s Center for International Education, you will be concurrently registered for SBS 160 Global Engagement – Study Abroad. This zero-credit, co-requisite requires several reflective writing assignments. Madrid students who take a course that is tagged as ‘course type’ GLOBL may request to waive the reflective writing assignments in SBS 160.

Other courses: Students may submit a Global Engagement Petition to have another course count toward this requirement if it involves travel outside the US or an out-of-class research or service-learning project involving extensive interaction with others whose country of origin differs from their own and the course meets the Diverse Perspectives learning objectives. Exceptions: SIB 101, MKT 220 and MGT 360 do NOT count toward this requirement. Some courses that meet the Creativity & Innovation requirement or the Diverse Perspectives requirement may double count for Global Engagement. These will be found by following the search procedure outlined above.

Global Leadership Exchange trip: Students may submit a Global Engagement Petition to count participation in the Global Leadership Exchange trip through the Student Leadership and Involvement Office toward the Global Engagement Requirement. This request will be approved for students who demonstrate professional and appropriate behavior in all interactions within the host country and participate in the group discussions and reflections while on the trip. Students will then be registered for and noted as completing the zero-credit course: SBS 180 Global Engagement – general.

Global Internship or volunteer job: Students may submit a Global Engagement Petition to propose that the requirement be met through a relevant internship or volunteer position in a country other than their own. This can be done on the Madrid campus, through organizations that find placements for students (e.g., AIESEC), or by setting up the experience on their own. Students may submit a Global Engagement Petition to propose that the experience counts toward the Global Engagement Requirement. If approved, they register for SBS 170 Global Engagement – Work Abroad. This zero-credit co-requisite requires several reflective writing assignments.

Other Options: Students may submit a Global Engagement Petition to propose an alternative experience that meets the learning goals for the Global Engagement Requirement, which is not covered by the other options above. These may include extensive interaction via academic research projects, independent studies, volunteer or service projects with others whose culture, ethnicity or country of origin is different from their own in ways that meet the learning goals of this requirement. Students may be required to submit additional documentation about the experience, contact information for site supervisors, and/or proof of involvement. If approved, students would then register for SBS 180 Global Engagement– general. This zero-credit co-requisite requires several reflective writing assignments related to the experience.

Local Engagement Experience

The Local Engagement requirement has a range of options, including courses, co-curricular projects, tutoring, community service, and other engagement projects. Students choose one that best matches their personal and career interests. This requirement is explained in detail on the BSBA website.

Choose one:

Approved Suffolk course: Options can be found by using the course search system and entering course type “LOCAL.” Students should review the course details and note prerequisites and other requirements. [Note: SBS-120, SBS-121, SBS-122, SBS-125, SBS-126, SBS-127 and SBS-130 have special purposes, carry no academic credit, do not require any tuition, and are graded pass/fail.

Other courses: Students may submit a Petition Form for Local or Global Engagement to have another course count toward this requirement if it involves an out of class research or service-learning component that meets the learning objectives. Exceptions: MGT 419, MGT 200, and courses required for the BSBA business core may not count toward this requirement. Some courses that meet the Creativity & Innovation requirement or the Diverse Perspectives requirement may double count for Local Engagement. These will be found by following the search procedure outlined above.

Alternative Spring Break: Students participating in an Alternative Spring Break trip may register for SBS 121 Local Engagement – ASB. This zero-credit, co-requisite is coordinated by the Center for Community Engagement and is used to confirm that you completed the requirement.

Pre-approved community service programs: Students who volunteer 20 hours in one semester in a program as noted below register for the appropriate zero-credit, co-requisite course:

  • Students participating in programs offered by Suffolk University’s Center for Community Engagement (CCE, formerly S.O.U.L.S.) may concurrently register for SBS 120 Local Engagement – CCE, which is a zero-credit, co-requisite that requires several reflective writing assignments related to the experience. The CCE will monitor volunteer hours.
  • Students who volunteer through the Center for Entrepreneurship may concurrently register for SBS 125 Local Engagement – Entrepreneurship, which is a zero-credit, co-requisite that requires several reflective writing assignments related to the experience. The Center for Entrepreneurship will monitor volunteer hours.
  • Honors students who volunteer through the Honors Program may concurrently register for SBS 126 Local Engagement – Honors, which is a zero-credit, co-requisite that requires several reflective writing assignments related to the experience. The Director of the Honors Program will monitor volunteer hours.
  • Beta Alpha Psi members who volunteer through that program may concurrently register for SBS 127 Local Engagement – Beta Alpha Psi, which is a zero credit co-requisite that requires several reflective writing assignments related to the experience. The faculty advisor will monitor volunteer hours.
  • Jumpstart: Students who volunteer at Jumpstart for the full academic year may register for SBS 122 Local Engagement – Jumpstart. This zero credit co-requisite is used to confirm that you completed the requirement. Registration is only during the spring semester and is overseen by the Jumpstart coordinator.

Other Options: Students may submit a Petition Form for Local or Global Engagement to propose an alternative experience that meets the learning goals for the Local Engagement Requirement, which is not covered by the other options above. These include, but are not limited to: internships in not-for-profits; practicum or fieldwork assignments, academic research projects or independent studies working directly with a local population; and volunteer or service projects sponsored by professional, religious or other organizations. BEFORE beginning the experience, students are encouraged to review the petition form and inquire about their proposed option to confirm if the experience will count. Students may be required to submit additional documentation about the experience, contact information for site supervisors, and/or proof of involvement. If approved, students would then register for SBS 130 Local Engagement – general. This zero-credit, co-requisite requires several reflective writing assignments related to the experience.

II. Major Requirements Minimum (18-24 HRS)


III. Other credits and Free Electives (Credit varies)

In addition to completing all degree program and major requirements, students have free elective (“other”) credits that they may use to complete a minor, explore topics of interest by taking courses in the College of Arts & Sciences or the Business School, take honors challenge courses, or use toward a second major. Many transfer students bring in credits that are applied as free electives when there is no program equivalent. The number of free elective credits to be completed varies by major, number of transfer credits, and other factors. Note: BSBA students must complete a total of 124 credits to graduate. Students should refer to their program evaluation for credit counts, and discuss free elective options with their advisors.