CPA-Ready Curriculum

You can earn an MSA degree in as few as 11 courses.

With a Suffolk MSA degree, you’ll graduate CPA-ready. That means you’ll be automatically eligible and well-prepared to sit for the CPA exam, regardless of your undergraduate major or professional experience.

Over the years, the CPA designation has become the gold standard for accountants across the business spectrum. Becoming a CPA typically leads to increased responsibilities, career opportunities, and financial rewards.

Suffolk sets you up for CPA licensure with practical, industry-driven curriculum. And your courses are enhanced with access to Wiley CPAexcel—a top-rated comprehensive CPA review software. Plus, you’ll get hands-on experience with consulting projects and case studies that prepare you for a competitive accounting position in businesses, nonprofits, and government agencies.

And with a wide range of electives in areas like public accounting, controllership (for profit/nonprofit), fraud examination, and information technology, you can customize your degree to meet your career goals.

See if you qualify for course waivers or transfer credits.

MSA Curriculum

MSA Curriculum

11-17 Courses
31-49 Credits

Program Length
10-16 months of full-time study
20-32 months of part-time study

Required Introductory Course (1 credit)

Must be taken on campus in first semester of program.

  • SBS-700 You As a Leader: Effective Career Planning

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    SBS 700 is the first required course in Suffolk's graduate programs. The course is based on the precepts of experiential learning. Based on the idea that people learn best by participating in meaningful activities, this course provides students with the opportunity to learn about and experience first-hand the many complexities of business and the role of top managers. To accomplish this, SBS 700 is composed of several distinct parts, including the completion of a self-assessment instrument and their own written career development plan. In the campus sections of SBS 700, students will work in small groups as they take on the roles of top managers in a hands-on behavioral simulation. In the online sections, students will conduct a 360 degree evaluation to provide feedback.

Management Preparation Courses (12 credits)

May be waived.
  • SBS-603 Managerial Economics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is required for MSA and MSF students and it is also a recommended elective for MBA students with a finance concentration. This course develops an understanding of the concepts, tools, and applications of economics at both the micro and macro level. The focus is on how economic analysis influences decision-making in the public and private sectors and how economic tools can enhance managerial effectiveness and organizational efficiency. The economic role of government and its impact on the business environment in a market economy, the factors that influence firm performance and competitiveness, and the role of financial institutions in the current economic environment are discussed throughout the course.

  • SBS-604 Data Analytics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to the concepts and applications of data analytics on large data sets for managerial decision making. Students will learn foundation skills needed to extract valuable information out of data, including various descriptive and predictive analytics techniques. Students develop knowledge of data visualization and interpretation coupled with conveying data, results and insights. Issues on data acquisition, storage and management will be discussed.

  • MBA-650 Value Based Financial Management

    Prerequisites:

    1 course from each of the following groups: MBA 615 OR SBS 603 OR MBA 630 MBA 640 OR ACCT 800 These courses must be taken prior to MBA 650 1 course from the following group: MBA 625 OR SBS 604 OR MBA 622 These courses may be taken prior to or concurrently with MBA 650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces the basic principles of corporate finance. The main focus is on fundamental principles such as time value of money, asset valuation, and risk and return tradeoff. Topics to be covered also include cost of capital, capital budgeting, and capital structure.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MBA-720 Collaborate (Ethics, Teams, & Project Management)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course teaches students three essential ingredients of Collaboration: Ethical Decision Making, How We Work Together, and Managing Projects. Ethical decisions are key to a company's success, its reputation, value, profitability, strategy, morale, and ability to recruit talent. Workplace behavior matters and will be examined from the perspective of leadership, critical conversations, decision making and teams. Project management is important in the context of today's complex, high-pressure work environments that thrive through collaboration and the ability to make disparate groups gel and produce quickly. This course will contain experiential components relating to Boston's world-class industries.

MSA Preparation Courses (6 credits)

May be waived.
  • ACCT-800 Graduate Financial Accounting I

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This introductory-level accounting course provides students with a solid base in accounting fundamentals, including U.S. GAAP, the conceptual framework, nature of accounts, journal entries, and ultimately, financial statements. Provides in depth coverage of the process by which accountants analyze, journalize, post, and summarize transactions. Reviews and analyzes multiple examples of current financial statement presentations. Financial ratio analysis and time value of money techniques will be integral to this learning experience. For MSA, GDPA, & MST Students this is the first course in the financial accounting sequence. For MBA students, this potential elective course builds upon concepts learned in MBA 640 which is why it should be taken after completing or waiving MBA 640.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-804 Cost and Managerial Accounting

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the concepts and practices of cost measurement: variable costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, setting goals and monitoring performance, standard costing, and variance analysis. Students learn how to work with multiple products; standard mix and mix variances; joint and by-product costing; measurement and control of overhead costs; and constructing operating, working capital, and capital budgets. Students study analysis in support of decisions, such as pricing, setting product line and customer profitability policy, sourcing of products and services, and matching costing systems to strategy. For MSA, GDPA, & MST Students this is the first managerial accounting course you will take. For MBA students, this potential elective course builds upon concepts learned in MBA 640 which is why it should be taken after completing or waiving MBA 640.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

MSA Core Courses (21 credits)

If course is “must substitute,” select an elective following the rules outlined in the MSA-Approved Electives section.

  • ACCT-801 Graduate Financial Accounting II

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-800 or MSA Program Director permission

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This is the first of two intermediate-level accounting courses that build on students' learning in ACCT 800, going in-depth into measurement and reporting of asset, liability, and stockholders' equity accounts for external financial reporting purposes. Discusses pronouncements of authoritative sources such as the SEC, AICPA, and the FASB. Introduces students to IFRS and their similarities to and differences from U.S. GAAP. Develops strong critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-802 Graduate Financial Accounting III

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-801 or MSA Program Director permission

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This is the second of two intermediate-level accounting courses. The critical thinking and problem-solving skills developed in ACCT 801 are broadened as this class tackles more complex accounting concepts, including: dilutive securities, earnings per share, investments, revenue recognition, income tax accounting, pensions and leases. Since accounting for many of these areas has been a source of substantial debate and major revisions in recent years, subject matter covered will be topical. Pertinent pronouncements of standard-setting bodies continue to be studied.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-805 Auditing and Assurance Services

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-800 or MBA-640

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the field of auditing, with a concentration in auditing historical financial statements in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, and some exposure to auditing the internal control over financial reporting of large public companies. Covers the environment, standards, regulation, and law of auditing in the US, with some exposure to the international environment. Covers audit planning, risk, and materiality assessments, audit evidence, evaluation of internal control, documentation, and audit reports. Includes researching and resolving practice-oriented problems and practice in using computer-assisted audit techniques and electronic confirmations.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-865 Accounting Information Systems

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-800 or MBA-640

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Describes various transaction processing cycles and their use in the structured analysis and design of accounting information systems. Students gain an understanding of Enterprise Resource Planning softwares, Quickbooks, database design, XBRL, implementations of internal controls, and privacy and data security issues.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACIB-872 International Accounting

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-800 or MBA-640

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Imparts an understanding of differences among nations in approaches to disclosure and choices of accounting measurement systems. Students learn about the influence of the IASB and IOSCO on multinational accounting harmonization, contrasting historical cost/purchasing power accounting with other accounting approaches, including current value accounting. Students will assess how differences in industrial and ownership structures affect accounting performance measurement. Students will also analyze risk management, accounting for derivative contracts, consolidation accounting, budgetary control, and transfer pricing in a multinational company.

    Type:

    MBA International Business

  • BLLS-800 Business Law

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the philosophy and practice of substantive law affecting the formation, operation and discharge of commercial transactions,contracts, and business associations. Topics include: agency, partnership,corporation and trust forms of association. Considers aspects of property law and international dimensions.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • TAX-801 Federal Taxation I

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Focuses on the federal income taxation of individuals with some discussion of business taxation. Explores the basic structure of individual income taxation, including the individual tax formula, income, deductions, and credits, and provides an introduction to property transactions. Emphasizes how tax laws affect everyday personal and business decisions.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Elective Courses (6 credits)

Your first two electives can be any course from the Approved MSA Electives List.  If you received any “must substitute” under the MSA Core Courses section of this document, your third elective must be an ACCT course, your fourth elective must be a TAX course, and your fifth elective must be an approved International Business course.

Capstone Course (3 credits)

Should be taken as late in the program as possible.

  • ACCT-861 Leadership in the Financial Professions

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-802 (can be taken concurrently) or program director approval

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Addresses the leadership skills and knowledge required to serve effectively as senior financial professionals in a challenging global economy. Understanding various leadership styles and their effect on accounting is a key component of this course. We examine accounting policy making and the standard setting process. Discussion includes the roles of the SEC, AICPA, FAF and FASB and also shadow policy makers such as Congress and Political Action Committees and their respective roles in creating accounting policy and practice. Students demonstrate and hone their leadership skills by making presentations to professional panelists on current issues facing the accounting profession.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Courses

  • ACCT-800 Graduate Financial Accounting I

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This introductory-level accounting course provides students with a solid base in accounting fundamentals, including U.S. GAAP, the conceptual framework, nature of accounts, journal entries, and ultimately, financial statements. Provides in depth coverage of the process by which accountants analyze, journalize, post, and summarize transactions. Reviews and analyzes multiple examples of current financial statement presentations. Financial ratio analysis and time value of money techniques will be integral to this learning experience. For MSA, GDPA, & MST Students this is the first course in the financial accounting sequence. For MBA students, this potential elective course builds upon concepts learned in MBA 640 which is why it should be taken after completing or waiving MBA 640.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-801 Graduate Financial Accounting II

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-800 or MSA Program Director permission

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This is the first of two intermediate-level accounting courses that build on students' learning in ACCT 800, going in-depth into measurement and reporting of asset, liability, and stockholders' equity accounts for external financial reporting purposes. Discusses pronouncements of authoritative sources such as the SEC, AICPA, and the FASB. Introduces students to IFRS and their similarities to and differences from U.S. GAAP. Develops strong critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-802 Graduate Financial Accounting III

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-801 or MSA Program Director permission

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This is the second of two intermediate-level accounting courses. The critical thinking and problem-solving skills developed in ACCT 801 are broadened as this class tackles more complex accounting concepts, including: dilutive securities, earnings per share, investments, revenue recognition, income tax accounting, pensions and leases. Since accounting for many of these areas has been a source of substantial debate and major revisions in recent years, subject matter covered will be topical. Pertinent pronouncements of standard-setting bodies continue to be studied.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-803 Advanced Financial Accounting

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT 801;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Builds on all previous courses in the ACCT 800-series. Focuses on accounting for business combinations/consolidations and partnerships.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-804 Cost and Managerial Accounting

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the concepts and practices of cost measurement: variable costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, setting goals and monitoring performance, standard costing, and variance analysis. Students learn how to work with multiple products; standard mix and mix variances; joint and by-product costing; measurement and control of overhead costs; and constructing operating, working capital, and capital budgets. Students study analysis in support of decisions, such as pricing, setting product line and customer profitability policy, sourcing of products and services, and matching costing systems to strategy. For MSA, GDPA, & MST Students this is the first managerial accounting course you will take. For MBA students, this potential elective course builds upon concepts learned in MBA 640 which is why it should be taken after completing or waiving MBA 640.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-805 Auditing and Assurance Services

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-800 or MBA-640

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the field of auditing, with a concentration in auditing historical financial statements in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, and some exposure to auditing the internal control over financial reporting of large public companies. Covers the environment, standards, regulation, and law of auditing in the US, with some exposure to the international environment. Covers audit planning, risk, and materiality assessments, audit evidence, evaluation of internal control, documentation, and audit reports. Includes researching and resolving practice-oriented problems and practice in using computer-assisted audit techniques and electronic confirmations.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-806 Fraud Examination

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-800 or MBA-640

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the pervasiveness and genres of fraud and explores the motivations, opportunities, and rationalizations that facilitate fraudulent behavior. Covers methods of detection, investigation, and prevention of financial statement frauds and other types of financial-related frauds.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-824 Financial Reporting and Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-650 and ACCT-801 or program director approval

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Explores the assessment of corporate strategy in respect to creation and retention of value, identification and management of risk, and valuation of companies and financial securities. Students develop a framework for analyzing corporate performance and projecting future performance, assessing quality of accounting and disclosure, and examining research relevant to financial reporting and analysis and equity prices in the public financial markets.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-825 Management Decisions and Control

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-804 and ACCT-800 or MBA-640 or program director approval

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Evaluates the importance of financial information in developing corporate strategies and assessing key performance areas. Students develop a framework to design accounting systems that comply with the corporate strategy and help managers to identify key performance indicators. Students learn how to balance financial and non-financial performance measures. Students also research and study organizational issues around the link between managerial incentives and performance measures.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-861 Leadership in the Financial Professions

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-802 (can be taken concurrently) or program director approval

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Addresses the leadership skills and knowledge required to serve effectively as senior financial professionals in a challenging global economy. Understanding various leadership styles and their effect on accounting is a key component of this course. We examine accounting policy making and the standard setting process. Discussion includes the roles of the SEC, AICPA, FAF and FASB and also shadow policy makers such as Congress and Political Action Committees and their respective roles in creating accounting policy and practice. Students demonstrate and hone their leadership skills by making presentations to professional panelists on current issues facing the accounting profession.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-865 Accounting Information Systems

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-800 or MBA-640

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Describes various transaction processing cycles and their use in the structured analysis and design of accounting information systems. Students gain an understanding of Enterprise Resource Planning softwares, Quickbooks, database design, XBRL, implementations of internal controls, and privacy and data security issues.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-871 Not-For-Profit and Governmental Accounting

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-640 or ACCT-800

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Covers unique aspects of financial reporting in not-for-profit organizations and governmental units. Topics include fund accounting, encumbrance accounting, GASB pronouncements, cost accounting, and budgetary control for government and its agencies, healthcare, educational, religious and other not-for-profit organizations. Students learn how to apply the cost benefit analysis in the resources allocation process, program planning, budgeting and reporting systems.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-910 Directed Individual Study in Accounting

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's approval

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Enables a student-initiated directed study project. The student and faculty advisor must concur on a written proposal and final report. The project must be approved by the dean of academic affairs prior to registration.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACIB-872 International Accounting

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-800 or MBA-640

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Imparts an understanding of differences among nations in approaches to disclosure and choices of accounting measurement systems. Students learn about the influence of the IASB and IOSCO on multinational accounting harmonization, contrasting historical cost/purchasing power accounting with other accounting approaches, including current value accounting. Students will assess how differences in industrial and ownership structures affect accounting performance measurement. Students will also analyze risk management, accounting for derivative contracts, consolidation accounting, budgetary control, and transfer pricing in a multinational company.

    Type:

    MBA International Business

  • BLLS-800 Business Law

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the philosophy and practice of substantive law affecting the formation, operation and discharge of commercial transactions,contracts, and business associations. Topics include: agency, partnership,corporation and trust forms of association. Considers aspects of property law and international dimensions.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MBA-640 Corporate Financial Reporting and Control

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course deals with the structure and information content of the three principal financial statements of profit-directed companies, namely the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows. It develops skill in using accounting information to analyze the performance and financial condition of a company, and to facilitate decision making, planning and budgeting, and performance appraisal in a managerial context. This course also contains an experiential component by offering guided inquiry and real company cases.

  • SBS-888 Suffolk Free Tax Preparation Clinic

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    SBS 888 is a zero-credit course for graduate students volunteering with the Suffolk Free Tax Preparation Clinic, a tax preparation program that assists community members to complete their tax returns. Students will complete the required training and certification exams during class time before engaging in tax preparation service and, for more experienced volunteers, mentoring of fellow volunteers during the semester, and assisting with site coordination, including at least two Saturdays.

  • TAX-801 Federal Taxation I

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Focuses on the federal income taxation of individuals with some discussion of business taxation. Explores the basic structure of individual income taxation, including the individual tax formula, income, deductions, and credits, and provides an introduction to property transactions. Emphasizes how tax laws affect everyday personal and business decisions.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • TAX-802 Federal Taxation II

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents further consideration of tax issues as they affect the sole proprietor, including the Alternative Minimum Tax, nontaxable exchanges, basis rules, and passive activities.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • TAX-861 Tax Research

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Covers tax research methods, including identifying and defining tax questions, locating appropriate authority, and interpreting statutes, cases, and rulings. Emphasizes effective communication of research findings and recommendations, and proper administration, ethics and responsibilities of tax practice.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • TAX-862 Taxation of Corporations

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces concepts, principles and practices of taxation of corporations and their shareholders. Covers the effects of taxation on corporate formation, capital structures, distribution and liquidation.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • TAX-863 Taxation of Pass-Through Entities

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents concepts, principles, and practices of taxation of partnerships and S-corporations, including the use of pass-through entities for tax planning.

    Term:

    Summer

  • TAX-864 Tax Practice and Procedures

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Explores strategies of tax practice before the Internal Revenue Service. Covers tax deficiencies, assessments, claims for refunds, rulings, statutes of limitation, penalties, interest assessed, and appeals.

    Term:

    Summer

  • TAX-865 International Taxation Outbound

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 and TAX-861 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course studies the U.S. taxation of U.S. persons with non-U.S. income and/or activities. Covers foreign tax credit and foreign tax credit limitation, individuals with earned foreign income, controlled foreign corporations, Subpart F, investment in U.S. property, and transfer pricing. Also address compliance and disclosure requirements.

    Term:

    Summer

    Type:

    MBA International Business

  • TAX-866 State & Local Taxation

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 and TAX-861 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course strikes a balance between theoretical concepts and practical, real-world issues and covers the interrelationships between the federal and state taxation systems. Includes the coverage of sales and use taxes, corporate income, franchise taxes, and excise taxes.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • TAX-867 Advanced Topics in Corporate Tax

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 and TAX-862 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines tax-free and taxable acquisitions/reorganizations in relation to various acquisitive and reorganizational transactions as well as consolidated returns. Covers continuity of enterprise and interest issues in conjunction with the tax treatment accorded a transaction, as well as carryover, basis and compliance provisions.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • TAX-868 Estate Planning

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Includes a review and analysis, from an estate planning prospective, of legal principles critical to the development of an effective dispositive plan with a primary focus on past, current and proposed Federal tax law principles (under the income, gift, and estate tax statutes) pertinent to the development of a variety of estate plans. In addition, the course includes the discussion of particular estate planning problems and techniques for the purpose of determining the most effective means of achieving the client's goals.

    Term:

    Summer

  • TAX-871 Taxation of Estates, Trusts and Gifts

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Identifies concepts, principles and practices of the transfer taxation of decedents' estates, trusts and lifetime gifts. Covers valuation of property subject to estate and gift taxes, Generation Skipping Transfer Taxes, and the use of trusts for tax planning.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • TAX-874 International Taxation Inbound

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 and TAX-861 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Studies U.S. taxation of non-U.S. persons with activities in the United States. Covers source of income, business investment, and financial planning from a tax perspective for non-U.S. persons doing business in the United States. Also addresses withholding, treaty implications, and compliance and disclosure requirements.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    MBA International Business

  • TAX-876 Tax Policy

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801, TAX-861, and 1 additional TAX course or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the history and evolution of the tax policy and budget process in the United States and the players in that process. Considers the issues of fairness, simplicity and efficiency in the context of the current tax system and evaluating past and current tax policy to make recommendations to craft new policy. Emphasizes the ethical dimensions involved in the tax policymaking process.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • TAX-879 Personal Financial Planning

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents the legal, economic, cash flow, tax, investment and insurance ramifications of life and death. Emphasizes tools and techniques necessary to maximize benefits generated from net worth, cash flow, and employment, and minimize the loss resulting from unforeseen contingencies, death, and retirement. Students participate in class discussions and are required to submit a written financial plan for a hypothetical client.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • TAX-910 Individual Study in Taxation

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    1.00- 3.00

    Description:

    Enables a student-initiated directed study project. The student and faculty advisor must concur on a written proposal and final report. The project must be approved by the dean of academic affairs prior to registration.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Electives

MSA Elective Tracks

With a wide range of electives in areas like public accounting, controllership (for profit/not-for-profit), fraud examination, taxation, finance, and information technology, you can customize your degree to meet your career goals.

Approved electives by discipline:

Accounting

  • ACCT-803 Advanced Financial Accounting

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT 801;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Builds on all previous courses in the ACCT 800-series. Focuses on accounting for business combinations/consolidations and partnerships.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-806 Fraud Examination

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-800 or MBA-640

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the pervasiveness and genres of fraud and explores the motivations, opportunities, and rationalizations that facilitate fraudulent behavior. Covers methods of detection, investigation, and prevention of financial statement frauds and other types of financial-related frauds.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-824 Financial Reporting and Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-650 and ACCT-801 or program director approval

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Explores the assessment of corporate strategy in respect to creation and retention of value, identification and management of risk, and valuation of companies and financial securities. Students develop a framework for analyzing corporate performance and projecting future performance, assessing quality of accounting and disclosure, and examining research relevant to financial reporting and analysis and equity prices in the public financial markets.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-825 Management Decisions and Control

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-804 and ACCT-800 or MBA-640 or program director approval

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Evaluates the importance of financial information in developing corporate strategies and assessing key performance areas. Students develop a framework to design accounting systems that comply with the corporate strategy and help managers to identify key performance indicators. Students learn how to balance financial and non-financial performance measures. Students also research and study organizational issues around the link between managerial incentives and performance measures.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-871 Not-For-Profit and Governmental Accounting

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-640 or ACCT-800

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Covers unique aspects of financial reporting in not-for-profit organizations and governmental units. Topics include fund accounting, encumbrance accounting, GASB pronouncements, cost accounting, and budgetary control for government and its agencies, healthcare, educational, religious and other not-for-profit organizations. Students learn how to apply the cost benefit analysis in the resources allocation process, program planning, budgeting and reporting systems.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Taxation

  • TAX-802 Federal Taxation II

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents further consideration of tax issues as they affect the sole proprietor, including the Alternative Minimum Tax, nontaxable exchanges, basis rules, and passive activities.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • TAX-861 Tax Research

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Covers tax research methods, including identifying and defining tax questions, locating appropriate authority, and interpreting statutes, cases, and rulings. Emphasizes effective communication of research findings and recommendations, and proper administration, ethics and responsibilities of tax practice.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • TAX-862 Taxation of Corporations

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces concepts, principles and practices of taxation of corporations and their shareholders. Covers the effects of taxation on corporate formation, capital structures, distribution and liquidation.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • TAX-863 Taxation of Pass-Through Entities

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents concepts, principles, and practices of taxation of partnerships and S-corporations, including the use of pass-through entities for tax planning.

    Term:

    Summer

  • TAX-864 Tax Practice and Procedures

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Explores strategies of tax practice before the Internal Revenue Service. Covers tax deficiencies, assessments, claims for refunds, rulings, statutes of limitation, penalties, interest assessed, and appeals.

    Term:

    Summer

  • TAX-865 International Taxation Outbound

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 and TAX-861 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course studies the U.S. taxation of U.S. persons with non-U.S. income and/or activities. Covers foreign tax credit and foreign tax credit limitation, individuals with earned foreign income, controlled foreign corporations, Subpart F, investment in U.S. property, and transfer pricing. Also address compliance and disclosure requirements.

    Term:

    Summer

    Type:

    MBA International Business

  • TAX-866 State & Local Taxation

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 and TAX-861 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course strikes a balance between theoretical concepts and practical, real-world issues and covers the interrelationships between the federal and state taxation systems. Includes the coverage of sales and use taxes, corporate income, franchise taxes, and excise taxes.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • TAX-867 Advanced Topics in Corporate Tax

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 and TAX-862 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines tax-free and taxable acquisitions/reorganizations in relation to various acquisitive and reorganizational transactions as well as consolidated returns. Covers continuity of enterprise and interest issues in conjunction with the tax treatment accorded a transaction, as well as carryover, basis and compliance provisions.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • TAX-868 Estate Planning

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Includes a review and analysis, from an estate planning prospective, of legal principles critical to the development of an effective dispositive plan with a primary focus on past, current and proposed Federal tax law principles (under the income, gift, and estate tax statutes) pertinent to the development of a variety of estate plans. In addition, the course includes the discussion of particular estate planning problems and techniques for the purpose of determining the most effective means of achieving the client's goals.

    Term:

    Summer

  • TAX-871 Taxation of Estates, Trusts and Gifts

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Identifies concepts, principles and practices of the transfer taxation of decedents' estates, trusts and lifetime gifts. Covers valuation of property subject to estate and gift taxes, Generation Skipping Transfer Taxes, and the use of trusts for tax planning.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • TAX-874 International Taxation Inbound

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 and TAX-861 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Studies U.S. taxation of non-U.S. persons with activities in the United States. Covers source of income, business investment, and financial planning from a tax perspective for non-U.S. persons doing business in the United States. Also addresses withholding, treaty implications, and compliance and disclosure requirements.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    MBA International Business

  • TAX-876 Tax Policy

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801, TAX-861, and 1 additional TAX course or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the history and evolution of the tax policy and budget process in the United States and the players in that process. Considers the issues of fairness, simplicity and efficiency in the context of the current tax system and evaluating past and current tax policy to make recommendations to craft new policy. Emphasizes the ethical dimensions involved in the tax policymaking process.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • TAX-879 Personal Financial Planning

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents the legal, economic, cash flow, tax, investment and insurance ramifications of life and death. Emphasizes tools and techniques necessary to maximize benefits generated from net worth, cash flow, and employment, and minimize the loss resulting from unforeseen contingencies, death, and retirement. Students participate in class discussions and are required to submit a written financial plan for a hypothetical client.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

Business Law

  • MBA-730 Innovate: Entrepreneurial Thinking, IT, And Business Law

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to three essential ingredients of innovation: Entrepreneurial Thinking, Information Technology in an Age of Disruption, and Law as Framework. Entrepreneurial thinking is a critical element in the creation, growth, and sustainability of an organization. In new ventures, entrepreneurs drive innovation with limited resources and within a flat organization. Information technology, strategically selected and implemented, can provide a significant, competitive advantage. Students will survey the increasingly complex, evolving, and highly competitive business environment in which ethical, legal, economic, and regulatory forces are continuously reshaping the global marketplace both to create and limit competitive opportunities. This course will contain experiential components, relating to Boston's world-class industries.

  • BLLS-830 Managing in the International Legal Environment

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 680 or MBA 730

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the complex interactions among legal, political, economic and cultural forces. Students discuss contemporary international conflicts in the areas of trade,expropriation, political risk analysis, foreign direct investment, anti-dumping and countervailing duty laws, export control laws,extraterritoriality and taxation of income.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    MBA International Business

  • BLLS-871 Corporate Crime and Financial Fraud

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents an in-depth study of corporate crime and financial fraud. Examines accounting devices and schemes employed to defraud stakeholders, failure of industry watchdogs, and the regulatory and legislative environment. Topics include:corporate governance, corporate finance, corporate compliance programs, ethical misconduct by outside legal, accounting,investment and banking professionals, Sarbanes Oxley Act, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act,Organizational Sentencing guidelines, mail fraud, wire fraud, money laundering,conspiracy, securities violations, qui tam litigation(whistleblowers)and financial accounting crimes.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

Information Systems

  • MBA-730 Innovate: Entrepreneurial Thinking, IT, And Business Law

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to three essential ingredients of innovation: Entrepreneurial Thinking, Information Technology in an Age of Disruption, and Law as Framework. Entrepreneurial thinking is a critical element in the creation, growth, and sustainability of an organization. In new ventures, entrepreneurs drive innovation with limited resources and within a flat organization. Information technology, strategically selected and implemented, can provide a significant, competitive advantage. Students will survey the increasingly complex, evolving, and highly competitive business environment in which ethical, legal, economic, and regulatory forces are continuously reshaping the global marketplace both to create and limit competitive opportunities. This course will contain experiential components, relating to Boston's world-class industries.

  • ISOM-801 Solving Business Problems Using Advanced Excel

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Analyzes various real world business problems and explores the full scope of MS Excel's formulas, functions and features to create data models and present solutions. Students analyze data, design custom charts, graphs, PivotTables and Pivot charts, create three-dimensional workbooks, build links between files and endow worksheets with decision-making capabilities. Students conduct What-If Analysis, utilizing Scenario Manager, Solver, Data Tables and Goal Seek. This course provides the skills necessary to pass the Microsoft Office Specialist Certification in Excel.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-821 Data Management and Modeling

    Prerequisites:

    This course was formerly ISOM-815

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the importance of information as an organizational resource, role of big data in organizations, and the application of tools to provide high quality information. Students will be able to select the most appropriate data management tool (e.g., SQL vs. non-SQL databases) to business scenarios. Develops the skills needed to succeed in today's big data environment through the application of data management techniques, cases and exercises. Students will become proficient in designing databases using entity relationship modeling and normalization, in building and querying databases of various sizes with Access and SQL (an industry standard), preparing high quality data and applying data visualizing techniques. Students will complete a series of business-oriented hands-on exercises, prepare cases, and complete projects on database design and big data.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-825 Enterprise Data Management

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Provides students with an understanding of the nature of enterprise integration and enterprise software, business process reengineering, the implementation within organizations, and strategies for maximizing benefits from enterprise systems. To manage complex business processes in today's multi-national, wired and wireless world, firms need integrated software packages to manage their global business. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems are used to support a wide range of business functions for all companies across industries. With ERP systems, business managers are able to make decisions with accurate, consistent, and current data. Intensive lab projects on the SAP ERP System with real life business scenarios are utilized to reinforce understanding of enterprise systems functionality and business process concepts.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ISOM-827 Data Warehouse and Business Intelligence

    Prerequisites:

    Take ISOM-815

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course teaches students how to build and maintain data warehouses, and how to analyze and use this data as a source for business intelligence and competitive advantage. Students study data mining concepts and the use of analytics tools and methods for producing business knowledge. Topics include extraction, transformation and loading; decision support systems; text, web and data mining models as well as data presentation/visualization including dashboards, scorecards and various charts. Students build a data warehouse and practice the extraction and filtering process used to produce high quality data warehouses. Students will use tools such as MS Excel, SAP Lumira, Tableau and SAP Business Warehouse.

  • ISOM-835 Predictive Analytics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Predictive analytics make predictions about unknown future events. It is crucial for companies to ask the right questions, perform rigorous analysis, and take actions that will result in the most desirable outcomes. This course develops students' capability in applying the core concepts and techniques of predictive analytics to identify opportunity, recognize patterns, predict outcomes, and recommend optimal actions within the context of organizational decision-making. Topics include: business analytics life cycle, data pre- processing, linear and nonlinear regression, tree-based methods, model assessment and selection, and resampling methods.

  • ISOM-837 Data Mining and Business Insights

    Prerequisites:

    Take ISOM-835

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is built upon the predictive modeling course and covers a broad collect of data mining and business intelligence techniques, including logistic regression, discriminant analysis, support vector machines, clustering methods, network analysis, association rule mining, text mining, etc. It focuses on turning data into business intelligence and eventually use data and analytics to create business value. The course takes a holistic approach of business analytics, starting from identifying and defining business questions, evaluating data quality, cleaning and preparing data to selecting models, interpreting outcomes, and communicating analysis and results to technical and management audiences. Throughout the course, students are involved in hands-on analysis using large sets of real data from a variety of industries. A term project and a formal presentation of the project are required.

  • ISOM-840 Security and Privacy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the fundamental principles of information and big data security. Security vulnerabilities, threats and risks will be analyzed. Common types of computer attacks and counter-attacks will be identified. Security technologies such as biometrics, firewalls, intrusion detection systems and cryptography systems will be applied in conjunction with human based safeguards. Business continuity and disaster recovery planning will be covered. Students will then learn how to design and build a layered security defense combining several of the above controls to address the different challenges to data security. The managerial concerns of security and privacy of information will be stressed including the legal and privacy issues. Best practices for planning and auditing security and privacy will then be covered.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-845 Business Intelligence and Data Analytics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces business intelligence and data analytics. Business intelligence and data analytics help organizations in strategic and operational decision making by improving performance management, optimizing customer relations, monitoring business activity, and improving decision support. On a macro-level, the class will discuss business cases for the adoption of business intelligence and data analytics. We will discuss technologies and processes for gathering, storing, accessing, and analyzing data to provide users with better insights and business decisions. On a micro-level, students will use a variety of tools to build their skills in analyzing data to solve business problems. In summary, this course provides a conceptual understanding of business data resources and the development of capabilities for data preparation, warehousing, selection, description, mining, interpretation, visualization, communication, and innovation.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ISOM-851 Supply Chain Management: Design and Analysis

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the fundamental principles and concepts for effective management of supply chains via performance such as procurement, facilities, inventory, transportation, and pricing. No company can do better than its supply chain, a complex network of organizations that collaboratively manage transformation processes to deliver final products/services to customers. Managing a supply chain is a tremendous challenge for most firms which, paradoxically, can also be a crucial source of competitive advantage. This is also a how-to course with an extensive use to Excel for supply chain managers and analysts who can benefit from experiencing hands-on familiarity with modeling supply chain applications along wih data analysis and interpretation.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-861 Project Management

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the basic principles, tools and technique of the Project Management Life Cycle with practical real-life examples and scenarios. The basic concepts will be studied within the framework of the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK (R)Guide) guidelines set forth by the Project Management Institute (PMI). Other project management framework will be described though not in detail. The course will attempt to help students understand the relationship between good project management and successful software management, development and implementation, and the best practices at each stage of project planning, execution, control and closure. The course will also help build skills to research, analyze and report project management case studies that illustrate the topics covered in this course. PMP(R) and (PMBOK(R)Guide) are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

Finance

  • FIN-800 Financial Statement Analysis and Valuation

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An in-depth analysis of financial statements, this course is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of business entity. This course also analyzes financial services industry: bank financial statement analysis with an emphasis on off- balance sheet lending and borrowing, capital structure issues, and innovations in mortgage-backed securities and asset-based financing techniques are covered. Additionally, the tax implications of various derivative securities is studied.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-801 Money & Capital Markets

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • FIN-808 General Theory in Corporate Finance

    Prerequisites:

    Take MBA 650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course extends the body of knowledge acquired in MBA 650. Students expand knowledge of dividend theory, capital structure theory, capital budgeting, long-term financing decisions, cash management and corporate restructuring, market efficiency, and risk and liability management.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-810 Investment Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students examine markets for investment procedures, valuation models, basic analytical techniques, and factors influencing risk/return tradeoffs. This course emphasizes the professional approach to managing investment assets. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, options, and futures.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-812 Capital Budgeting

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students examine techniques and decision-making rules for the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects by corporations and the interaction of investment and financing.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-814 Options and Futures

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students explore the pricing of options and futures contracts, the characteristics of the markets in which these contracts are traded, options and futures strategies, and the application of these contracts in the hedging of financial positions. In addition, students are exposed to swap markets and a variety of swaps.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-816 Risk Management in Banking and Finance

    Prerequisites:

    Take MBA-650;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The course introduces students to the structure and management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course discusses tools for identifying, measuring, evaluating, and managing risks, such as interest rate, credit, foreign exchange, liquidity, market, sovereign, and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and discusses important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-818 Financial Econometrics

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students are introduced to mathematical statistics and basic econometrics. They study fundamental econometric tools as well as hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, linear regressions, simultaneous equations, and models of qualitative choice.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-825 International Finance

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course covers corporate financial decisions in an international setting with a focus on foreign exchange management and capital budgeting.

  • FIN-831 Portfolio Management

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 810

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • FIN-845 Private Capital Markets

    Prerequisites:

    Take MBA-650;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course addresses the financial needs of private businesses, focusing on the financial motives and needs of private company owners and their advisors. The course is an opportunity to present private finance as a complement to corporate finance/public finance so as to prepare students to better serve or participate in making better financing decisions in the marketplace of privately held businesses.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • FIN-880 Investment Banking

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students analyze the main functions of investment banks such as origination, syndication, and distribution of security issues. They examine pricing of new issues and secondary offerings by investment banks, mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, valuation of closely held companies, and restructuring of distressed companies. The role of investment bankers in restructuring industry and financing governments and ethical issues faced by investment bankers will be studied.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • FIN-881 Real Estate Finance

    Prerequisites:

    Take MBA-650;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students are introduced to the language and principles of real estate. Includes an overview of decision-making in the field, with particular emphasis on investment and asset management.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • FIN-882 Applied Risk Management

    Prerequisites:

    FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • FIN-884 Fixed Income Securities

    Prerequisites:

    Take FIN-810

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The course is designed to provide information on various types of fixed income securities and markets, theories and concepts of the term structure of interest rates and valuation of fixed income securities, measurement and management of risk for traditional bonds and bonds with embedded options, understanding of the role of derivatives such as mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, swaps and exotic options, credit analysis and bond rating, portfolio management and performance evaluation. This course is generally offered as an intensive elective.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • FIN-887 Fundamental Equity Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    Take FIN-810;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students examine fundamental equity analysis as the convergence of a number of skills such as accounting, financial, and strategic analysis with detective work and experience. Students practice communicating and defending an argument, use a business analysis framework that helps tie together strategy and finance, practice model building and practical approach to profitability in the markets.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

Entrepreneurship

  • MBA-730 Innovate: Entrepreneurial Thinking, IT, And Business Law

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to three essential ingredients of innovation: Entrepreneurial Thinking, Information Technology in an Age of Disruption, and Law as Framework. Entrepreneurial thinking is a critical element in the creation, growth, and sustainability of an organization. In new ventures, entrepreneurs drive innovation with limited resources and within a flat organization. Information technology, strategically selected and implemented, can provide a significant, competitive advantage. Students will survey the increasingly complex, evolving, and highly competitive business environment in which ethical, legal, economic, and regulatory forces are continuously reshaping the global marketplace both to create and limit competitive opportunities. This course will contain experiential components, relating to Boston's world-class industries.

  • MGES-800 Business Startups

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In this introductory course you will learn a deliberate process of opportunity recognition. You will learn how to generate ideas that fit within your and your team's mindset, as well as your knowledge, skills and abilities intended to improve the likelihood of success. Once your opportunity is identified, you will determine its level of feasibility from the conceptual stage, industry and competitive analysis, through legal and financial risk areas, leading to a go or no go decision. Topics include the individual and team mindset, identifying, growing and seizing opportunities, the founder and the team, and growth strategies. Financial topics include verifying the cost structure, making credible assumptions, identifying financial needs and sources, and preparing forecast financial statements, leading to a final presentation pitching the feasibility of your opportunity.

  • MGES-802 Corporate Entrepreneurship

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Corporate entrepreneurship refers to alternative approaches that existing firms use to innovatively generate new products, new services, new businesses and new business models. This course emphasizes the cultivation of each student's ability to evaluate innovations and business models for development in a corporate setting. It emphasizes various kinds of internal corporate ventures and multiple external collaborative approaches that include corporate venture capital investments, licensing and different types of alliances and formal joint ventures. Special emphasis will be placed on skills needed to promote and manage corporate entrepreneurship, including opportunity recognition, selling an idea, turning ideas into action, developing metrics for venture success and strategies for aligning corporate entrepreneurial projects with company strategies and growth opportunities and managing the conflicts that may arise between existing businesses and corporate entrepreneurial ventures. Students will also learn to identify the elements of an organization's culture, structure and reward and control systems that either inhibit or support the corporate entrepreneurship, and analyze how corporate entrepreneurial activities relate to a company's ability to drive innovation throughout the organization.

  • MGES-826 Writing the Business Plan

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Create a viable business plan that will determine the potential of your opportunity to your audience of management, employees, investors, financial institutions, and other potential stakeholders. In this course, you will explore your opportunity deeper in order to prepare and defend a business plan that addresses the opportunity and its effect on a startup or existing organization, all leading to risk-reward analyses that will determine the amount of capital/funding you will need and how you will finance your opportunity.

  • MGES-844 Problem Solving for Small Businesses

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Small businesses are confronted with situations that may have a profound impact on the success and failure of the entity. Too often, small business founders and owners do not have the macro-level understanding of the effect of their decision making process, and that of their management team and employees. Today, small business comprise more than half of all employment and are the growth engine of the next economy. In this case-driven course, you will understand the various aspects of business with a focus on established small businesses and the associated challenges of success and failure. This course will cover the challenges associated with startups, growing and turnaround situations. You will learn how to identify problems and develop solutions that confront small businesses through case analysis, presentation, and assessment where you will have the opportunity to analyze a situation as manage, owner, investor, or other stakeholders.

Organizational Behavior

  • MGOB-810 Emotional Intelligence

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces learners to the concepts of Emotional Intelligence (EI). Learners will assess their own EI, examine how their EI impacts their performance in the workplace, and develop a plan to improve their own emotional intelligence. In addition, learners will study how EI concepts are applied in organizations via their use in selection, training, management development, coaching, and performance evaluation.

  • MGOB-820 Career Strategy

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 610 or MBA 710

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students explore the nature of careers in the new economy. They learn how individual career strategy relates to the business strategy and competitiveness of employer firms. They also investigate possibilities for inter-firm career mobility and how individual enterprise, learning, and networking can influence industrial and economic prosperity.

  • MGOB-855 Conflict & Negotiation

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course emphasizes the theory and skills of win-win negotiation. Students assess their own negotiation styles, analyze the process of negotiation, and apply theory-based skills for integrating problem solving approaches to negotiation. The course utilizes a mix of teaching tools, including readings, lectures, cases, exercises, videotapes, and role-playing.

  • MGOB-860 Leadership and Team Building

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 610 or MBA 710

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course takes multiple approaches to the exploration of leadership. Emphasis is put on individual self-awareness as a critical precursor to leadership success. A wide range of activities, exercises, cases, and simulations are used to develop understanding of the dynamics of leadership. Team building, both as an activity and a topic for study, is used as the model to develop, practice, and improve individual leadership skills.

  • MGOB-865 Leading Change

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 610 or MBA 710

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In this applied and experiential course, students will learn how to lead change efforts by collaborating with a community organization to address a change dilemma(s) they face. To do this, we will explore the defining conceptual frameworks of change management. We will examine the dynamics of envisioning change, assessing the need for change, developing intervention strategies, implementation considerations, understanding and managing resistance, and assessing the impact of change on the organization, its members, and other key stakeholders. In addition, students will learn, apply, and receive constructive feedback on their application of the methods and technologies used in the practice of leading change agents through service learning in community organizations. They will frame organizational issues and identify how to enter into, diagnose, and intervene in dynamic organizational settings.

  • MGOB-866 Managing Failure for Success

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course brings to light one of the most important yet vastly unmentionable topics of management: Failure. We will examine various aspects of failure from a sense making perspective at the organizational and individual levels, within emphasis on the latter. Examples of course questions include: What is failure? How do I usually handle it? Can I change if I want to? How? We will adopt an action learning pedagogical perspective so that students may enjoy the difference between mere knowing and understanding of material, on the one hand, and acting upon their understanding, on the other hand, to detect and possibly correct their frameworks for personal groundings, meaning-making, and failure handling strategies. There are no formal academic prerequisites for the course, except a desire for personal mastery and a white belt mentality.

 Strategy

  • MGSM-833 Corporate Innovation

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is designed to provide you the tools to analyze your organization's competitive situation and develop innovative strategies and proposals that disrupt your competition and are game changers for your industry. You will also learn how to develop blue ocean strategies that create new growth opportunities and bring new customers into your industry. Next, you will learn how to assess existing business models and design business models supportive of your overall innovation-based strategy offerings. Lastly, you will learn how to access and leverage external sources of innovative ideas through the processes of open innovation, including crowd sourcing and co creation and their application in diverse industry settings.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGSM-834 Mergers and Acquisitions

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is designed to examine the underlying theoretical foundations and practice of decisions central to corporate strategy development. Since this subject is important to scholars in strategic management, financial economics, and public policy, it is approached from an integrative, interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include: the history of merger waves in America and comparative global trends; types of mergers; merger financial and economic motives; strategic and managerial motives; acquisition processes; synergy of the diversified corporate portfolio; empirical evidence of merger success; post-merger integration; divestment; takeover defense strategies; leveraged buyouts; and public policy issues. Students will develop conceptual and analytical skills required for effective merger and divestment analysis through class lectures, selected readings, case discussions, and guest speakers.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

International Business

  • MBA-740 Immerse- Travel Seminar

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The Immersion course provides an opportunity for students to link their program work to hands-on experience and visits to real-life global companies. The highly experiential, intensive course combines classroom learning with a direct business and cultural experience. Students will work in teams directly for a client or several clients, solving real challenges, using their analytical skills, knowledge, and experience to develop feasible solutions. Required for all MBA students, the course will be offered globally or nationally to accommodate a variety of student needs.

    Type:

    GRAD Travel Seminar

  • BLLS-830 Managing in the International Legal Environment

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 680 or MBA 730

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the complex interactions among legal, political, economic and cultural forces. Students discuss contemporary international conflicts in the areas of trade,expropriation, political risk analysis, foreign direct investment, anti-dumping and countervailing duty laws, export control laws,extraterritoriality and taxation of income.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    MBA International Business

  • FIN-825 International Finance

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course covers corporate financial decisions in an international setting with a focus on foreign exchange management and capital budgeting.

  • MGES-842 Global Innovation & New Product Development in Virtual Team

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Corporations place high importance on innovation and new product development for competitiveness and profitability. Since many companies are operating in a global environment, there's a need to find ways to harness the talent of people at multiple locations. This course is designed to teach global innovation and new product development using virtual team and connectivity techniques involving multiple locations/countries, while equipping students with the necessary knowledge, expertise and capabilities towards this goal. This course may also be conducted with Suffolk Law School students.

    Type:

    MBA International Business

  • MGIB-835 International Strategy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course addresses the creation of competitive advantage in a multinational firm. Topics include: analysis of the nature of globalization, the formulation and implementation of international strategy, market entry and organizational forms, and the management of global operations.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    MBA International Business

  • MGIB-837 Strategic Context of International Business

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-780

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Business firms around the world regularly engage in strategic interactions with stakeholders and particularly with governments. These interactions allow firms not only to manage risks from adverse policies and stakeholder positions, but also to shape governmental behavior and relations with other stakeholders to enhance the creation and capture of value. At the same time, the complexity of the nonmarket environment and controversies regarding the ethics of firm behavior in this space has limited attention to this crucial element of strategy. This course will provide a framework for the analysis of the nonmarket environment across countries and the development of integrated strategies combining market and nonmarket action, from the perspective of multinational firms.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    MBA International Business

  • TAX-865 International Taxation Outbound

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 and TAX-861 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course studies the U.S. taxation of U.S. persons with non-U.S. income and/or activities. Covers foreign tax credit and foreign tax credit limitation, individuals with earned foreign income, controlled foreign corporations, Subpart F, investment in U.S. property, and transfer pricing. Also address compliance and disclosure requirements.

    Term:

    Summer

    Type:

    MBA International Business

  • TAX-874 International Taxation Inbound

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 and TAX-861 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Studies U.S. taxation of non-U.S. persons with activities in the United States. Covers source of income, business investment, and financial planning from a tax perspective for non-U.S. persons doing business in the United States. Also addresses withholding, treaty implications, and compliance and disclosure requirements.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    MBA International Business

Approved electives by career path:

For-profit controllership

  • TAX-862 Taxation of Corporations

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces concepts, principles and practices of taxation of corporations and their shareholders. Covers the effects of taxation on corporate formation, capital structures, distribution and liquidation.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ACCT-824 Financial Reporting and Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-650 and ACCT-801 or program director approval

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Explores the assessment of corporate strategy in respect to creation and retention of value, identification and management of risk, and valuation of companies and financial securities. Students develop a framework for analyzing corporate performance and projecting future performance, assessing quality of accounting and disclosure, and examining research relevant to financial reporting and analysis and equity prices in the public financial markets.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-808 General Theory in Corporate Finance

    Prerequisites:

    Take MBA 650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course extends the body of knowledge acquired in MBA 650. Students expand knowledge of dividend theory, capital structure theory, capital budgeting, long-term financing decisions, cash management and corporate restructuring, market efficiency, and risk and liability management.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-810 Investment Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students examine markets for investment procedures, valuation models, basic analytical techniques, and factors influencing risk/return tradeoffs. This course emphasizes the professional approach to managing investment assets. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, options, and futures.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-812 Capital Budgeting

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students examine techniques and decision-making rules for the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects by corporations and the interaction of investment and financing.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

 Not-for-profit controllership

  • ACCT-871 Not-For-Profit and Governmental Accounting

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-640 or ACCT-800

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Covers unique aspects of financial reporting in not-for-profit organizations and governmental units. Topics include fund accounting, encumbrance accounting, GASB pronouncements, cost accounting, and budgetary control for government and its agencies, healthcare, educational, religious and other not-for-profit organizations. Students learn how to apply the cost benefit analysis in the resources allocation process, program planning, budgeting and reporting systems.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

 Forensic Accounting

  • ACCT-806 Fraud Examination

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-800 or MBA-640

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the pervasiveness and genres of fraud and explores the motivations, opportunities, and rationalizations that facilitate fraudulent behavior. Covers methods of detection, investigation, and prevention of financial statement frauds and other types of financial-related frauds.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • BLLS-871 Corporate Crime and Financial Fraud

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents an in-depth study of corporate crime and financial fraud. Examines accounting devices and schemes employed to defraud stakeholders, failure of industry watchdogs, and the regulatory and legislative environment. Topics include:corporate governance, corporate finance, corporate compliance programs, ethical misconduct by outside legal, accounting,investment and banking professionals, Sarbanes Oxley Act, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act,Organizational Sentencing guidelines, mail fraud, wire fraud, money laundering,conspiracy, securities violations, qui tam litigation(whistleblowers)and financial accounting crimes.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • CJ-687 Justice & the Community Courts

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the administration of justice in the community courts. Topics include the role of the judge; relationships between prosecutors, defense lawyers, and the courts; the relationship between the courts and the police; the pros and cons of plea bargaining' the goals of sentencing; and the clash between victim's rights and defendant's rights. Difficult kinds of cases will be addressed, such as cases of domestic violence, child sexual abuse, and crime relating to substance abuse. Questions concerning judicial accountability and the role of judges in the community will also be raised.

  • CJ-704 Legal Issues in Criminal Justice System

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines two subjects throughout the semester: substantive criminal law (e.g. what is money laundering, the insanity defense, conspiracy?); and criminal procedure: 4th Amendment (search and seizure), 5th Amendment (due process, self-incrimination, double jeopardy, etc.), 6th Amendment (right to a lawyer, public trial, etc..), 8th Amendment (cruel and unusual punishment), 14th Amendment (due process, equal protection of law), 1st Amendment (interaction of criminal law with free expression and with religious rights), and 2nd Amendment (firearms). Unlike other similar undergraduate and graduate courses, this one emphasizes principles and case summaries, de-emphasizes actual cases and case names, and does not entail teaching how to brief (summarize) cases.

    Term:

    Occasional

 Information Technology

  • ISOM-821 Data Management and Modeling

    Prerequisites:

    This course was formerly ISOM-815

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the importance of information as an organizational resource, role of big data in organizations, and the application of tools to provide high quality information. Students will be able to select the most appropriate data management tool (e.g., SQL vs. non-SQL databases) to business scenarios. Develops the skills needed to succeed in today's big data environment through the application of data management techniques, cases and exercises. Students will become proficient in designing databases using entity relationship modeling and normalization, in building and querying databases of various sizes with Access and SQL (an industry standard), preparing high quality data and applying data visualizing techniques. Students will complete a series of business-oriented hands-on exercises, prepare cases, and complete projects on database design and big data.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-825 Enterprise Data Management

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Provides students with an understanding of the nature of enterprise integration and enterprise software, business process reengineering, the implementation within organizations, and strategies for maximizing benefits from enterprise systems. To manage complex business processes in today's multi-national, wired and wireless world, firms need integrated software packages to manage their global business. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems are used to support a wide range of business functions for all companies across industries. With ERP systems, business managers are able to make decisions with accurate, consistent, and current data. Intensive lab projects on the SAP ERP System with real life business scenarios are utilized to reinforce understanding of enterprise systems functionality and business process concepts.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ISOM-840 Security and Privacy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the fundamental principles of information and big data security. Security vulnerabilities, threats and risks will be analyzed. Common types of computer attacks and counter-attacks will be identified. Security technologies such as biometrics, firewalls, intrusion detection systems and cryptography systems will be applied in conjunction with human based safeguards. Business continuity and disaster recovery planning will be covered. Students will then learn how to design and build a layered security defense combining several of the above controls to address the different challenges to data security. The managerial concerns of security and privacy of information will be stressed including the legal and privacy issues. Best practices for planning and auditing security and privacy will then be covered.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

 Tax Specialist

  • TAX-802 Federal Taxation II

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents further consideration of tax issues as they affect the sole proprietor, including the Alternative Minimum Tax, nontaxable exchanges, basis rules, and passive activities.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • TAX-862 Taxation of Corporations

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces concepts, principles and practices of taxation of corporations and their shareholders. Covers the effects of taxation on corporate formation, capital structures, distribution and liquidation.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • TAX-863 Taxation of Pass-Through Entities

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents concepts, principles, and practices of taxation of partnerships and S-corporations, including the use of pass-through entities for tax planning.

    Term:

    Summer

  • TAX-865 International Taxation Outbound

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 and TAX-861 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course studies the U.S. taxation of U.S. persons with non-U.S. income and/or activities. Covers foreign tax credit and foreign tax credit limitation, individuals with earned foreign income, controlled foreign corporations, Subpart F, investment in U.S. property, and transfer pricing. Also address compliance and disclosure requirements.

    Term:

    Summer

    Type:

    MBA International Business

  • TAX-866 State & Local Taxation

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 and TAX-861 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course strikes a balance between theoretical concepts and practical, real-world issues and covers the interrelationships between the federal and state taxation systems. Includes the coverage of sales and use taxes, corporate income, franchise taxes, and excise taxes.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

 Internal Auditing

  • ACCT-806 Fraud Examination

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-800 or MBA-640

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the pervasiveness and genres of fraud and explores the motivations, opportunities, and rationalizations that facilitate fraudulent behavior. Covers methods of detection, investigation, and prevention of financial statement frauds and other types of financial-related frauds.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-821 Data Management and Modeling

    Prerequisites:

    This course was formerly ISOM-815

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the importance of information as an organizational resource, role of big data in organizations, and the application of tools to provide high quality information. Students will be able to select the most appropriate data management tool (e.g., SQL vs. non-SQL databases) to business scenarios. Develops the skills needed to succeed in today's big data environment through the application of data management techniques, cases and exercises. Students will become proficient in designing databases using entity relationship modeling and normalization, in building and querying databases of various sizes with Access and SQL (an industry standard), preparing high quality data and applying data visualizing techniques. Students will complete a series of business-oriented hands-on exercises, prepare cases, and complete projects on database design and big data.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-845 Business Intelligence and Data Analytics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces business intelligence and data analytics. Business intelligence and data analytics help organizations in strategic and operational decision making by improving performance management, optimizing customer relations, monitoring business activity, and improving decision support. On a macro-level, the class will discuss business cases for the adoption of business intelligence and data analytics. We will discuss technologies and processes for gathering, storing, accessing, and analyzing data to provide users with better insights and business decisions. On a micro-level, students will use a variety of tools to build their skills in analyzing data to solve business problems. In summary, this course provides a conceptual understanding of business data resources and the development of capabilities for data preparation, warehousing, selection, description, mining, interpretation, visualization, communication, and innovation.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ISOM-861 Project Management

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the basic principles, tools and technique of the Project Management Life Cycle with practical real-life examples and scenarios. The basic concepts will be studied within the framework of the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK (R)Guide) guidelines set forth by the Project Management Institute (PMI). Other project management framework will be described though not in detail. The course will attempt to help students understand the relationship between good project management and successful software management, development and implementation, and the best practices at each stage of project planning, execution, control and closure. The course will also help build skills to research, analyze and report project management case studies that illustrate the topics covered in this course. PMP(R) and (PMBOK(R)Guide) are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • MGOB-855 Conflict & Negotiation

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course emphasizes the theory and skills of win-win negotiation. Students assess their own negotiation styles, analyze the process of negotiation, and apply theory-based skills for integrating problem solving approaches to negotiation. The course utilizes a mix of teaching tools, including readings, lectures, cases, exercises, videotapes, and role-playing.

Public Accounting - Audit

  • ACCT-803 Advanced Financial Accounting

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT 801;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Builds on all previous courses in the ACCT 800-series. Focuses on accounting for business combinations/consolidations and partnerships.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-806 Fraud Examination

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-800 or MBA-640

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the pervasiveness and genres of fraud and explores the motivations, opportunities, and rationalizations that facilitate fraudulent behavior. Covers methods of detection, investigation, and prevention of financial statement frauds and other types of financial-related frauds.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • TAX-802 Federal Taxation II

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents further consideration of tax issues as they affect the sole proprietor, including the Alternative Minimum Tax, nontaxable exchanges, basis rules, and passive activities.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • TAX-862 Taxation of Corporations

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces concepts, principles and practices of taxation of corporations and their shareholders. Covers the effects of taxation on corporate formation, capital structures, distribution and liquidation.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • BLLS-871 Corporate Crime and Financial Fraud

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents an in-depth study of corporate crime and financial fraud. Examines accounting devices and schemes employed to defraud stakeholders, failure of industry watchdogs, and the regulatory and legislative environment. Topics include:corporate governance, corporate finance, corporate compliance programs, ethical misconduct by outside legal, accounting,investment and banking professionals, Sarbanes Oxley Act, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act,Organizational Sentencing guidelines, mail fraud, wire fraud, money laundering,conspiracy, securities violations, qui tam litigation(whistleblowers)and financial accounting crimes.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ISOM-801 Solving Business Problems Using Advanced Excel

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Analyzes various real world business problems and explores the full scope of MS Excel's formulas, functions and features to create data models and present solutions. Students analyze data, design custom charts, graphs, PivotTables and Pivot charts, create three-dimensional workbooks, build links between files and endow worksheets with decision-making capabilities. Students conduct What-If Analysis, utilizing Scenario Manager, Solver, Data Tables and Goal Seek. This course provides the skills necessary to pass the Microsoft Office Specialist Certification in Excel.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-840 Security and Privacy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the fundamental principles of information and big data security. Security vulnerabilities, threats and risks will be analyzed. Common types of computer attacks and counter-attacks will be identified. Security technologies such as biometrics, firewalls, intrusion detection systems and cryptography systems will be applied in conjunction with human based safeguards. Business continuity and disaster recovery planning will be covered. Students will then learn how to design and build a layered security defense combining several of the above controls to address the different challenges to data security. The managerial concerns of security and privacy of information will be stressed including the legal and privacy issues. Best practices for planning and auditing security and privacy will then be covered.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-845 Business Intelligence and Data Analytics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces business intelligence and data analytics. Business intelligence and data analytics help organizations in strategic and operational decision making by improving performance management, optimizing customer relations, monitoring business activity, and improving decision support. On a macro-level, the class will discuss business cases for the adoption of business intelligence and data analytics. We will discuss technologies and processes for gathering, storing, accessing, and analyzing data to provide users with better insights and business decisions. On a micro-level, students will use a variety of tools to build their skills in analyzing data to solve business problems. In summary, this course provides a conceptual understanding of business data resources and the development of capabilities for data preparation, warehousing, selection, description, mining, interpretation, visualization, communication, and innovation.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ISOM-861 Project Management

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the basic principles, tools and technique of the Project Management Life Cycle with practical real-life examples and scenarios. The basic concepts will be studied within the framework of the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK (R)Guide) guidelines set forth by the Project Management Institute (PMI). Other project management framework will be described though not in detail. The course will attempt to help students understand the relationship between good project management and successful software management, development and implementation, and the best practices at each stage of project planning, execution, control and closure. The course will also help build skills to research, analyze and report project management case studies that illustrate the topics covered in this course. PMP(R) and (PMBOK(R)Guide) are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

Public Accounting - Tax 

  • TAX-802 Federal Taxation II

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents further consideration of tax issues as they affect the sole proprietor, including the Alternative Minimum Tax, nontaxable exchanges, basis rules, and passive activities.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • TAX-862 Taxation of Corporations

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces concepts, principles and practices of taxation of corporations and their shareholders. Covers the effects of taxation on corporate formation, capital structures, distribution and liquidation.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • TAX-863 Taxation of Pass-Through Entities

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents concepts, principles, and practices of taxation of partnerships and S-corporations, including the use of pass-through entities for tax planning.

    Term:

    Summer

  • TAX-865 International Taxation Outbound

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 and TAX-861 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course studies the U.S. taxation of U.S. persons with non-U.S. income and/or activities. Covers foreign tax credit and foreign tax credit limitation, individuals with earned foreign income, controlled foreign corporations, Subpart F, investment in U.S. property, and transfer pricing. Also address compliance and disclosure requirements.

    Term:

    Summer

    Type:

    MBA International Business

  • TAX-866 State & Local Taxation

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 and TAX-861 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course strikes a balance between theoretical concepts and practical, real-world issues and covers the interrelationships between the federal and state taxation systems. Includes the coverage of sales and use taxes, corporate income, franchise taxes, and excise taxes.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • BLLS-871 Corporate Crime and Financial Fraud

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents an in-depth study of corporate crime and financial fraud. Examines accounting devices and schemes employed to defraud stakeholders, failure of industry watchdogs, and the regulatory and legislative environment. Topics include:corporate governance, corporate finance, corporate compliance programs, ethical misconduct by outside legal, accounting,investment and banking professionals, Sarbanes Oxley Act, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act,Organizational Sentencing guidelines, mail fraud, wire fraud, money laundering,conspiracy, securities violations, qui tam litigation(whistleblowers)and financial accounting crimes.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ISOM-845 Business Intelligence and Data Analytics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces business intelligence and data analytics. Business intelligence and data analytics help organizations in strategic and operational decision making by improving performance management, optimizing customer relations, monitoring business activity, and improving decision support. On a macro-level, the class will discuss business cases for the adoption of business intelligence and data analytics. We will discuss technologies and processes for gathering, storing, accessing, and analyzing data to provide users with better insights and business decisions. On a micro-level, students will use a variety of tools to build their skills in analyzing data to solve business problems. In summary, this course provides a conceptual understanding of business data resources and the development of capabilities for data preparation, warehousing, selection, description, mining, interpretation, visualization, communication, and innovation.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

Public Accounting - Consulting/Advisory

  • FIN-800 Financial Statement Analysis and Valuation

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An in-depth analysis of financial statements, this course is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of business entity. This course also analyzes financial services industry: bank financial statement analysis with an emphasis on off- balance sheet lending and borrowing, capital structure issues, and innovations in mortgage-backed securities and asset-based financing techniques are covered. Additionally, the tax implications of various derivative securities is studied.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-801 Solving Business Problems Using Advanced Excel

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Analyzes various real world business problems and explores the full scope of MS Excel's formulas, functions and features to create data models and present solutions. Students analyze data, design custom charts, graphs, PivotTables and Pivot charts, create three-dimensional workbooks, build links between files and endow worksheets with decision-making capabilities. Students conduct What-If Analysis, utilizing Scenario Manager, Solver, Data Tables and Goal Seek. This course provides the skills necessary to pass the Microsoft Office Specialist Certification in Excel.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • MGSM-834 Mergers and Acquisitions

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is designed to examine the underlying theoretical foundations and practice of decisions central to corporate strategy development. Since this subject is important to scholars in strategic management, financial economics, and public policy, it is approached from an integrative, interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include: the history of merger waves in America and comparative global trends; types of mergers; merger financial and economic motives; strategic and managerial motives; acquisition processes; synergy of the diversified corporate portfolio; empirical evidence of merger success; post-merger integration; divestment; takeover defense strategies; leveraged buyouts; and public policy issues. Students will develop conceptual and analytical skills required for effective merger and divestment analysis through class lectures, selected readings, case discussions, and guest speakers.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

Approved Electives for CPA Exam Preparation

FAR


  • ACCT-803 Advanced Financial Accounting

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT 801;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Builds on all previous courses in the ACCT 800-series. Focuses on accounting for business combinations/consolidations and partnerships.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-871 Not-For-Profit and Governmental Accounting

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-640 or ACCT-800

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Covers unique aspects of financial reporting in not-for-profit organizations and governmental units. Topics include fund accounting, encumbrance accounting, GASB pronouncements, cost accounting, and budgetary control for government and its agencies, healthcare, educational, religious and other not-for-profit organizations. Students learn how to apply the cost benefit analysis in the resources allocation process, program planning, budgeting and reporting systems.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

REG

  • TAX-802 Federal Taxation II

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents further consideration of tax issues as they affect the sole proprietor, including the Alternative Minimum Tax, nontaxable exchanges, basis rules, and passive activities.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • TAX-862 Taxation of Corporations

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces concepts, principles and practices of taxation of corporations and their shareholders. Covers the effects of taxation on corporate formation, capital structures, distribution and liquidation.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • TAX-863 Taxation of Pass-Through Entities

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents concepts, principles, and practices of taxation of partnerships and S-corporations, including the use of pass-through entities for tax planning.

    Term:

    Summer

  • TAX-867 Advanced Topics in Corporate Tax

    Prerequisites:

    TAX-801 and TAX-862 or approval of the MST Director

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines tax-free and taxable acquisitions/reorganizations in relation to various acquisitive and reorganizational transactions as well as consolidated returns. Covers continuity of enterprise and interest issues in conjunction with the tax treatment accorded a transaction, as well as carryover, basis and compliance provisions.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

BEC 

  • FIN-810 Investment Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students examine markets for investment procedures, valuation models, basic analytical techniques, and factors influencing risk/return tradeoffs. This course emphasizes the professional approach to managing investment assets. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, options, and futures.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-840 Security and Privacy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the fundamental principles of information and big data security. Security vulnerabilities, threats and risks will be analyzed. Common types of computer attacks and counter-attacks will be identified. Security technologies such as biometrics, firewalls, intrusion detection systems and cryptography systems will be applied in conjunction with human based safeguards. Business continuity and disaster recovery planning will be covered. Students will then learn how to design and build a layered security defense combining several of the above controls to address the different challenges to data security. The managerial concerns of security and privacy of information will be stressed including the legal and privacy issues. Best practices for planning and auditing security and privacy will then be covered.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • MBA-730 Innovate: Entrepreneurial Thinking, IT, And Business Law

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to three essential ingredients of innovation: Entrepreneurial Thinking, Information Technology in an Age of Disruption, and Law as Framework. Entrepreneurial thinking is a critical element in the creation, growth, and sustainability of an organization. In new ventures, entrepreneurs drive innovation with limited resources and within a flat organization. Information technology, strategically selected and implemented, can provide a significant, competitive advantage. Students will survey the increasingly complex, evolving, and highly competitive business environment in which ethical, legal, economic, and regulatory forces are continuously reshaping the global marketplace both to create and limit competitive opportunities. This course will contain experiential components, relating to Boston's world-class industries.

4+1 Program

If you’re earning an undergraduate business degree at a U.S. institution, you may qualify to earn your MSA, MST, MSF, or MSFSB in as few as 10-12 months, or your MSA/MST or MSA/MSF in as few as 16 months.

How to Apply

  • You must officially apply to the MSA, MST, MSF, MSFSB, dual MSA/MST, or dual MSA/MSF program during the final semester of your senior year of undergraduate study. (Applications from recent graduates will also be considered.)
  • If you have at least a 3.3 cumulative GPA in your final semester of your senior year, you can waive the GMAT or GRE requirement.
  • Top students automatically will be considered for merit-based fellowship awards (no separate application required).