MSBA Curriculum

MSBA Curriculum

Program Length

11 courses
10-16 months of full-time study
20-30 months of part-time study

The MSBA program features one required 1-credit course, seven core courses, and three electives. Students must take courses on campus unless permission to take courses online is granted by the Academic Program Director. 

Electives (9 credits)

Students must complete 9 credits of electives, 800 level or higher, within the Sawyer Business School and from the approved electives lists. All courses listed within each of the concentrations, in additional to select electives, will meet the electives requirement.

Required Courses (1 credit) 

  • SBS-700 You As a Leader: Effective Career Planning

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    SBS 700 is the first required course in Suffolk's graduate programs. The course is based on the precepts of experiential learning. Based on the idea that people learn best by participating in meaningful activities, this course provides students with the opportunity to learn about and experience first-hand the many complexities of business and the role of top managers. To accomplish this, SBS 700 is composed of several distinct parts, including the completion of a self-assessment instrument and their own written career development plan. In the campus sections of SBS 700, students will work in small groups as they take on the roles of top managers in a hands-on behavioral simulation. In the online sections, students will conduct a 360 degree evaluation to provide feedback.

Business Analytics Core Courses (21 credits) 

  • SBS-604 Data Analytics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to the concepts and applications of data analytics on large data sets for managerial decision making. Students will learn foundation skills needed to extract valuable information out of data, including various descriptive and predictive analytics techniques. Students develop knowledge of data visualization and interpretation coupled with conveying data, results and insights. Issues on data acquisition, storage and management will be discussed.

  • ISOM-801 Solving Business Problems Using Advanced Excel

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Analyzes various real world business problems and explores the full scope of MS Excel's formulas, functions and features to create data models and present solutions. Students analyze data, design custom charts, graphs, PivotTables and Pivot charts, create three-dimensional workbooks, build links between files and endow worksheets with decision-making capabilities. Students conduct What-If Analysis, utilizing Scenario Manager, Solver, Data Tables and Goal Seek. This course provides the skills necessary to pass the Microsoft Office Specialist Certification in Excel.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-821 Data Management and Modeling

    Prerequisites:

    This course was formerly ISOM-815

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the importance of information as an organizational resource, role of big data in organizations, and the application of tools to provide high quality information. Students will be able to select the most appropriate data management tool (e.g., SQL vs. non-SQL databases) to business scenarios. Develops the skills needed to succeed in today's big data environment through the application of data management techniques, cases and exercises. Students will become proficient in designing databases using entity relationship modeling and normalization, in building and querying databases of various sizes with Access and SQL (an industry standard), preparing high quality data and applying data visualizing techniques. Students will complete a series of business-oriented hands-on exercises, prepare cases, and complete projects on database design and big data.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-825 Enterprise Data Management

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Provides students with an understanding of the nature of enterprise integration and enterprise software, business process reengineering, the implementation within organizations, and strategies for maximizing benefits from enterprise systems. To manage complex business processes in today's multi-national, wired and wireless world, firms need integrated software packages to manage their global business. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems are used to support a wide range of business functions for all companies across industries. With ERP systems, business managers are able to make decisions with accurate, consistent, and current data. Intensive lab projects on the SAP ERP System with real life business scenarios are utilized to reinforce understanding of enterprise systems functionality and business process concepts.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ISOM-827 Data Warehouse and Business Intelligence

    Prerequisites:

    Take ISOM-815

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course teaches students how to build and maintain data warehouses, and how to analyze and use this data as a source for business intelligence and competitive advantage. Students study data mining concepts and the use of analytics tools and methods for producing business knowledge. Topics include extraction, transformation and loading; decision support systems; text, web and data mining models as well as data presentation/visualization including dashboards, scorecards and various charts. Students build a data warehouse and practice the extraction and filtering process used to produce high quality data warehouses. Students will use tools such as MS Excel, SAP Lumira, Tableau and SAP Business Warehouse.

  • ISOM-835 Predictive Analytics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Predictive analytics make predictions about unknown future events. It is crucial for companies to ask the right questions, perform rigorous analysis, and take actions that will result in the most desirable outcomes. This course develops students' capability in applying the core concepts and techniques of predictive analytics to identify opportunity, recognize patterns, predict outcomes, and recommend optimal actions within the context of organizational decision-making. Topics include: business analytics life cycle, data pre- processing, linear and nonlinear regression, tree-based methods, model assessment and selection, and resampling methods.

  • ISOM-837 Data Mining and Business Insights

    Prerequisites:

    Take ISOM-835

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is built upon the predictive modeling course and covers a broad collect of data mining and business intelligence techniques, including logistic regression, discriminant analysis, support vector machines, clustering methods, network analysis, association rule mining, text mining, etc. It focuses on turning data into business intelligence and eventually use data and analytics to create business value. The course takes a holistic approach of business analytics, starting from identifying and defining business questions, evaluating data quality, cleaning and preparing data to selecting models, interpreting outcomes, and communicating analysis and results to technical and management audiences. Throughout the course, students are involved in hands-on analysis using large sets of real data from a variety of industries. A term project and a formal presentation of the project are required.

*SBS-604 Data Analytics may be waived with credit substitution. 

Electives

 Electives (9 credits)

Students must complete 9 credits of electives, 800 or level or higher, within the Sawyer Business School and from the approved electives list. All courses listed within each of the concentrations, in addition to select electives, will meet the electives requirement.

A concentration does not need to be completed to meet the degree requirements of the MSBA. If a student is interested in completing a concentration to complement the MSBA curriculum focus, they may complete a concentration in accounting, finance, healthcare management or marketing. To successfully complete a concentration, select electives must be taken from the same concentration area.

A concentration does not appear on your diploma but is reflected on your transcript.

Concentration and Approved Electives

You can specialize your MSBA degree by pursuing one of these four concentrations:

Accounting Concentration (9 credits)

Required courses: 

  • MBA-640 Corporate Financial Reporting and Control

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course deals with the structure and information content of the three principal financial statements of profit-directed companies, namely the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows. It develops skill in using accounting information to analyze the performance and financial condition of a company, and to facilitate decision making, planning and budgeting, and performance appraisal in a managerial context. This course also contains an experiential component by offering guided inquiry and real company cases.

  • ACCT-805 Auditing and Assurance Services

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-800 or MBA-640

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the field of auditing, with a concentration in auditing historical financial statements in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, and some exposure to auditing the internal control over financial reporting of large public companies. Covers the environment, standards, regulation, and law of auditing in the US, with some exposure to the international environment. Covers audit planning, risk, and materiality assessments, audit evidence, evaluation of internal control, documentation, and audit reports. Includes researching and resolving practice-oriented problems and practice in using computer-assisted audit techniques and electronic confirmations.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ACCT-806 Fraud Examination

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-800 or MBA-640

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the pervasiveness and genres of fraud and explores the motivations, opportunities, and rationalizations that facilitate fraudulent behavior. Covers methods of detection, investigation, and prevention of financial statement frauds and other types of financial-related frauds.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Finance Concentration (9 credits)

Required Course:

  • MBA-650 Value Based Financial Management

    Prerequisites:

    1 course from each of the following groups: MBA 615 OR SBS 603 OR MBA 630 MBA 640 OR ACCT 800 These courses must be taken prior to MBA 650 1 course from the following group: MBA 625 OR SBS 604 OR MBA 622 These courses may be taken prior to or concurrently with MBA 650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces the basic principles of corporate finance. The main focus is on fundamental principles such as time value of money, asset valuation, and risk and return tradeoff. Topics to be covered also include cost of capital, capital budgeting, and capital structure.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Select two of the following: 

  • FIN-814 Options and Futures

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students explore the pricing of options and futures contracts, the characteristics of the markets in which these contracts are traded, options and futures strategies, and the application of these contracts in the hedging of financial positions. In addition, students are exposed to swap markets and a variety of swaps.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-816 Risk Management in Banking and Finance

    Prerequisites:

    Take MBA-650;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The course introduces students to the structure and management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course discusses tools for identifying, measuring, evaluating, and managing risks, such as interest rate, credit, foreign exchange, liquidity, market, sovereign, and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and discusses important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-818 Financial Econometrics

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students are introduced to mathematical statistics and basic econometrics. They study fundamental econometric tools as well as hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, linear regressions, simultaneous equations, and models of qualitative choice.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-890 Risk Assessment and Simulation

    Prerequisites:

    Take MBA-650

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides an integrated framework for analyzing and measuring risk with a computer simulation approach. A common set of computational tools will be applied across several different financial applications ranging from options pricing to portfolio design. Extensive time will be spent on estimating and simulating 'Value at Risk' which has been a standard for measuring risk in large financial institutions. We will also compare this with other traditional methods as well as other modern methods, such as extreme value theory at quantifying risk. Computationally intensive methods, such as bootstrapping, and Monte Carlo analysis will be used extensively throughout the course with MATLAB as the primary programming tool.

Healthcare Management Concentration (9 credits)

Required Courses: 

  • HLTH-701 Introduction to the U.S. Healthcare System

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course presents an overview of the origins, components, organization, and operation of the health system in the United States. It is an introduction to the major health issues and institutions, including the settings in which health services are delivered, providers of these services, and the public and private payers for services.

  • HLTH-828 Population Health

    Prerequisites:

    HLTH 701;

    Credits:

    1.50

    Description:

    Healthcare industry trends point toward increasing need for meaningful measurement of the health of populations- from the population of patients who use a particular health service to the populations of nations. Healthcare managers must measure the need and demand for health services as well as the quality, safety and effectiveness or services. This course provides the fundamental information and enables students to develop the skills to apply principles and techniques of epidemiology in planning, delivering and evaluating health services.

  • HLTH-850 Health Information Systems

    Prerequisites:

    HLTH-701;

    Credits:

    1.50

    Description:

    This course covers health information and a range of healthcare IT applications as well as topics related to IT planning and management. Applications include medical records, order entry, decision support, and emerging applications. Planning and management topics include data security, IT cost, systems interoperability, project management, IT implementation, and governance.

Select one of the following electives: 

  • HLTH-702 Health Economics

    Prerequisites:

    HLTH-701;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides a framework for understanding the economics of the U.S. healthcare industry. The industry is experiencing great pressure to reduce costs, even as it strives to do better at both improving the health of the population and engaging patients in their care. This course enables students to apply the perspectives and tools of health economics to the tasks of understanding and improving the business of healthcare. Students analyze and evaluate current and evolving healthcare markets, public policies, payment methods, mechanisms for bearing and sharing financial risk, and the economic impact of changes in technology and the health professions. Students participate in envisioning the future and designing better ways for healthcare leaders, managers and policy makers to meet the challenges facing the industry.

  • HLTH-830 Healthcare Operations Management

    Prerequisites:

    Take HLTH-701 and either HLTH-812 or SBS-604. MHA and MSBA students only.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students are introduced to concepts and analytic tools and techniques in operations management, such as project management, process improvement, queuing theory, forecasting, capacity planning, and supply chain management. Students will be challenged to examine the distinctive characteristics of health services operations, understand process improvement and patient flow, and explore the means for making optimal managerial decisions. In-class exercises, applied concept assignments, guest speakers, and exams are used to help students understand ways to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare organizations.

  • HLTH-845 Big Data Analytics for Health and Healthcare

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The American healthcare system is a paradox. It costs far more than any other country's system but often delivers less in terms of good health. Part of the problem is that its information infrastructure and use of data are not up to par with other industries or with the challenges it faces. The new science of analytics provides critical intelligence to produce innovative solutions through its use of data science, information technology, and deep knowledge of the sector. This course focuses on the three most promising areas of health analytics: business intelligence, community health, and behavior change. It draws upon the best analytics from within the health and healthcare sectors as well as from other sectors including banking, sports, politics, and retail. The classes, both in the classroom and online, include a mix of lectures, discussions, application labs, guest speakers, a field trip to a leading health technology firm, and a class project to work with a health organization to design an analytics solution.  By the end of the course, students will have built competencies in obtaining information from multiple data sources, analyzing metrics, applying analytic tools, using systems thinking to frame and solve problems, evaluating the pros and cons of various analytics approaches, and creating solutions through the use of case narratives, use cases, and client presentations.

Marketing Concentration (9 credits)

Required Course: 

  • MBA-660 Marketing: the Challenge of Managing Value

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    At its core, marketing is about providing consumer value. The practice of doing this is changing constantly-driven by rapid and far-reaching changes in technology; globalization; and the evolution of consumer values, practices, and lifestyles. This course will present themes, theories, and trends that are critical for: 1. understanding the business of creating, capturing and sustaining value; 2. introducing students to the global, consumer, and technological realities of marketing in the 21st Century; and 3. providing students with a sound foundation to explore marketing in further depth in upper-level elective courses. This course also contains an experiential component. .

Select two of the following electives: 

  • MKT-810 Marketing Research for Managers

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-625, OR SBS-604, OR MBA-622; AND MBA-660

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the role of research in marketing decision-making, including the cost and value of information. The course uses cases and problems to explore problem definition, research design, sampling, questionnaire design, field methods, data analysis and reporting.

  • MKT-814 Strategic Marketing

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 660

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is designed to provide you with both a sound theoretical and an applied approach to developing and implementing marketing strategy at multiple levels of the organization - corporate, division, strategic business unit, and product. Special emphasis will be placed on dealing with contemporary marketing issues in the highly competitive global environment. The course presentation will combine lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and a semester-long, team-based project.

  • MKT-818 Global Product Innovation: From Concept to Commercialization

    Prerequisites:

    MBA-660

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    SBS graduate level Global Product Innovation (GMC) offers exciting, valuable, and practical global product innovation experience with international educational and/or corporate partners. This project-based course is organized by the Suffolk Marketing Department and an overseas partner school. Teams, consisting of Suffolk Business students and students from the partner school, work on new product or service development and marketing projects targeting one or multiple international markets. The focus will be on the marketing function's input to the innovation process during the pre-launch and launch stages, covering a wide range of issues (such as global market selection, concept generation and evaluation, design and positioning, test marketing, and product launch and tracking). Students will collaborate via virtual teaming technology throughout the semester and report product or service design and marketing plan to the business clients or entering the SBS New Product Competition in the end of the semester. Through a hands-on product innovation project in the global context, students will develop an understanding of the global market dynamism, the diversity of global consumer needs and business practices, and the challenges and advantages of cross-cultural team collaboration.

  • MKT-855 Digital Marketing Challenges

    Prerequisites:

    MBA 660

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The foundational course in the digital marketing track this course focuses on the consumer of digital media and five big picture marketing strategy challenges confronting marketers in the new digital (mobile +social) marketing era. Challenge 1: Marketing to a smarter, more engaged, empowered consumer; Challenge 2: Marketing to a networked, collaborative, and more social consumer; Challenge 3: Marketing to a more distracted and fickle consumer; Challenge 4: Marketing to a unique, individual consumer; and Challenge 5: Marketing to prosumers or producer-consumers. The course takes on these big picture challenges thorough a deep engagement with and critical analysis of readings and cases. Given this focus the course demands thorough preparation for class and active engagement in the class discussion. The evaluation is assignment and project based.

 Additional Approved MSBA Electives:

  • ISOM-840 Security and Privacy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the fundamental principles of information and big data security. Security vulnerabilities, threats and risks will be analyzed. Common types of computer attacks and counter-attacks will be identified. Security technologies such as biometrics, firewalls, intrusion detection systems and cryptography systems will be applied in conjunction with human based safeguards. Business continuity and disaster recovery planning will be covered. Students will then learn how to design and build a layered security defense combining several of the above controls to address the different challenges to data security. The managerial concerns of security and privacy of information will be stressed including the legal and privacy issues. Best practices for planning and auditing security and privacy will then be covered.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-845 Business Intelligence and Data Analytics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces business intelligence and data analytics. Business intelligence and data analytics help organizations in strategic and operational decision making by improving performance management, optimizing customer relations, monitoring business activity, and improving decision support. On a macro-level, the class will discuss business cases for the adoption of business intelligence and data analytics. We will discuss technologies and processes for gathering, storing, accessing, and analyzing data to provide users with better insights and business decisions. On a micro-level, students will use a variety of tools to build their skills in analyzing data to solve business problems. In summary, this course provides a conceptual understanding of business data resources and the development of capabilities for data preparation, warehousing, selection, description, mining, interpretation, visualization, communication, and innovation.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ISOM-851 Supply Chain Management: Design and Analysis

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the fundamental principles and concepts for effective management of supply chains via performance such as procurement, facilities, inventory, transportation, and pricing. No company can do better than its supply chain, a complex network of organizations that collaboratively manage transformation processes to deliver final products/services to customers. Managing a supply chain is a tremendous challenge for most firms which, paradoxically, can also be a crucial source of competitive advantage. This is also a how-to course with an extensive use to Excel for supply chain managers and analysts who can benefit from experiencing hands-on familiarity with modeling supply chain applications along with data analysis and interpretation.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-861 Project Management

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the basic principles, tools and technique of the Project Management Life Cycle with practical real-life examples and scenarios. The basic concepts will be studied within the framework of the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK (R)Guide) guidelines set forth by the Project Management Institute (PMI). Other project management framework will be described though not in detail. The course will attempt to help students understand the relationship between good project management and successful software management, development and implementation, and the best practices at each stage of project planning, execution, control and closure. The course will also help build skills to research, analyze and report project management case studies that illustrate the topics covered in this course. PMP(R) and (PMBOK(R)Guide) are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ISOM-910 Directed Individual Study

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor Permission

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This elective course option involves a student initiated written proposal to a willing and appropriate full-time faculty member for a directed study project. The project should be completed during one semester. The faculty member and student must concur on a written proposal, final project and grading criteria. Approval by the Department Chair and the Dean is necessary before registration.

  • ISOM-920 IS & OM Internship

    Prerequisites:

    SBS-700, MBA-615, MBA-625, MBA-635, MBA-640, MBA-650 MBA-660, and Instructor's approval. Limited to MBA students only.

    Credits:

    0.00- 3.00

    Description:

    A semester long internship in a company, non-profit organization or public agency in the Boston Metropolitan area, usually requiring the equivalent of at least one day per week on site. A final written report and presentation is mandatory. Completion of the first year of the MBA program and/or good academic standing and permission of the instructor or the Dean's Office.

  • MBA-740 Immerse- Travel Seminar

    Prerequisites:

    Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The Immersion course provides an opportunity for students to link their program work to hands-on experience and visits to real-life global companies. The highly experiential, intensive course combines classroom learning with a direct business and cultural experience. Students will work in teams directly for a client or several clients, solving real challenges, using their analytical skills, knowledge, and experience to develop feasible solutions. Required for all MBA students, the course will be offered globally or nationally to accommodate a variety of student needs.

    Type:

    GRAD Travel Seminar

*ISOM 910 and ISOM 920 require program director approval before either course can be taken. Additionally students are limited to one directed study and/or one internship course to meet their degree requirements. 

Waiver/Transfer

Waiver Policy

MSBA core courses may be waived but credits must be substituted with an approved elective.

For MSBA core courses to be considered as waived with an approved elective for substitution, a student must successfully complete equivalent academic coursework at the undergraduate/graduate level in the seven years prior to MSBA matriculation ("B" or better) and provide official transcripts (with English translations, if applicable).

Review of any coursework taken previously from an AACSB-accredited MSBA program will be completed on a case-by-case basis. The credits cannot apply to a previously completed degree and must be substituted with an approved elective. Only courses for which an earned grade of B or better and taken within five years prior to enter the MSBA program will be considered. 

All waivers with substitution are evaluated upon a student's acceptance into the MSBA Program.

All MSBA students must complete a minimum of 31 credits in the Sawyer Business School (10 courses and SBS 700). Students previously enrolled in a SBS graduate program, and who successfully completed MBA 600, SBS 600, or SBS 700 with a "P" grade or grade of B or better, are not required to retake the course; therefore are only required to complete a minimum of 30 credits in the Sawyer Business School.