Honors Program Courses

  • ACCT-H201 Honors Acct Dec Making I

    Prerequisites:

    WRI 102 or SBS 220; ISOM 120; MATH 128 or higher; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Designed to provide a user of accounting information with the skills to appraise and manage a business. Students are introduced to the accounting cycle, the financial statements, and the theory underlying accounting as information. Coverage addresses current accounting topics, including relevant ethical and international issues found in the financial press.

  • ACCT-H202 Honors Acct for Dec Making II

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT 201; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Enables students to apply the concepts and skills from the preceding course. They learn how to analyze the financial condition and performance of a firm, and how to use accounting information in business planning, decision-making, and control. Relevant current ethical and competitive issues found in the financial press are discussed in the course.

  • BLE-H214 Honors Principles of Business Law

    Prerequisites:

    GPA of 3.2 or above required.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An introduction to the field of business law including an overview of the organization and operation of the American legal system, including the court system and legal procedure, together with brief coverage of selected business law topics such as contracts as examples of the legal system in practice. Particular attention is given to the ways in which business law manifests important social and ethical precepts.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • BLE-H215 Honors Business Ethics and Law

    Prerequisites:

    GPA of 3.2 or above required.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Business ethics is applied ethics. This course deals with the roles and responsibilities of business in a global society; teaches models of ethical decision-making that incorporate multiple points of view, including diverse cultural worldviews and legal perspectives; and addresses those factors that contribute to and constrain ethical behavior in and by organizations. Students will then apply these concepts to current business problems, such as anti-trust, accounting fraud, deceptive advertising, and environmental dumping.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • FIN-H310 Honors Business Finance

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT-201, EC-101; MATH-130, MATH-134, MATH-161, or MATH-165; junior standing and a GPA of 3.3 or higher

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focus on basic financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FIN-H435 Honors the Global Financial Crisis: Causes, Economics, and Solutions

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 200(formerly FIN 310); Junior standing; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course analyzes the origins and consequences of the current financial situation from a variety of different economic and political perspectives. It offers students the opportunity to explore the chain of events that preceded the global financial crisis, monitor markets on a real-time basis (using Bloomberg) and provides a forum to discuss solutions and independently generate ideas. Among the main topics covered are asset pricing, derivative securities, financial engineering, risk management and the role of financial institutions, central banks and government agencies in global markets.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ISOM-H120 Honors Information Technology and Productivity

    Prerequisites:

    Griffin Fellows Honors Students Only; GPA of 3.2

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    OPEN TO GRIFFIN FELLOWS AND HONOR STUDENTS ONLY GPA of 3.2 or above required.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-H201 Honors Data & Decisions Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 128 or higher; STATS 240 or STATS 250; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    OPEN TO GRIFFIN FELLOWS AND HONOR STUDENTS ONLY GPA of 3.2 or above required.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ISOM-H310 Honors Management Info System

    Prerequisites:

    WRI 102; Junior standing; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    OPEN TO GRIFFIN FELLOWS AND HONOR STUDENTS ONLY GPA of 3.2 or above required.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • P.AD-H201 Honors Social Change

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will examine social change in the U.S. and abroad. The course will also examine the role of business, nonprofits, and the public sector in addressing social problems. Topics studied may include the Industrial Revolution, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, environmentalism, and the gay and lesbian movement.

  • ENT-H300 Legal and Financial Risk With Startups

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Expand upon your feasibility plan from ENT 280, or identify a new opportunity, and learn about the financial and legal considerations that need to be addressed to determine whether or not your opportunity is a go or no go with respect to moving your opportunity forward towards business plan development. Legal topics include: business organization, employment practices, taxation and independent contractors, intellectual property, contracts and governance. Financial topics include: verifying the business model and related cost structure, making credible assumptions, preparing forecast financial statements, all leading to a final presentation pitching the feasibility of your opportunity.

  • ENT-H326 Writing the Business Plan

    Prerequisites:

    Take ENT-300 ACCT-201 ACCT-202;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Use your knowledge from your entrepreneurship courses and experience up to this point to create a viable business plan that will lend credibility to the viability of your potential audience, which may include investors, financial institutions, suppliers, family or friends. In this course, you will write a business plan that shapes your opportunity into a model that resembles a venture. You will then defend the plan addressing the venture's business model, management team, organization, customers, markets, competitors, operations, and risk, all leading to financials that will determine the amount of capital you will need, as well as financing alternatives.

  • ENT-H350 Social Entrepreneurship

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Social entrepreneurs are people who harness their energy, talent and commitment to make the world a more humane, safe and just place. This is accomplished by applying vision, passion, persistence and leadership to the creation of businesses that are focused on a mission of social responsibility. While the social mission is important, so is the fact that the business funding the mission must be sustainable via revenue generation, market need, and operational efficiency. Creating balance between business effectiveness and serving the needs of the community the business is dedicate to helping, provides a unique challenge to social entrepreneurship to stay entrepreneurial in terms of the business model, thus providing the necessary resources to the social mission.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • ENT-H419 E-Project Opportunity

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 101 MKT 210 FIN 310 MGT 317 ISOM 319 ENT 315 ENT 326

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This capstone course is held in an experiential setting to help entrepreneurial majors develop and practice their business skills working with real startups or small business under pro bono consulting arrangements. This course is a transition from student to professional under the supervision of a faculty member, coach and advisor. Students will learn to assess client situations, develop alternatives and identify and defend solutions, at times within the client organization. Prerequisites: SOM 101 or MGT 101, MKT 210 or MKT 310, FIN 310, MGT 317, ISOM 319, ENT 315, ENT 326 and Senior standing. 1 term - 3 credits.

  • MGT-H302 Honors Creativity for Business and Life Success

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This highly interactive and experiential course will help you to develop your creative skills for business and life success. Corporate leaders consider creativity [1] to be an essential skill for the twenty-first century workforce. However, according to a recent Conference Board study [2], college graduates lack the creativity and innovation skills needed to succeed in the workplace. The Council on Competitiveness warns that companies that do not embrace innovation (and creativity) as a core business value will fall to global competition.[3] We will discuss profoundly important meaning of life issues that will serve to clarify your thinking and help you align your values and belief-systems with what you do on a daily basis at work and throughout your life. A substantial body of evidence indicates that people tend to be more creative when working on projects that interest them, and most creative when passionately immersed in their endeavors. We will focus on enhancing creativity in the workplace to achieve defined organizational needs, to add economic value to the organization, and to create social value as well. We will also focus on helping you to understand and apply a wide array of creative processes and tools to develop your creative competencies and skills. We will use breakout groups, role plays, experiential exercises, and discussions to facilitate your learning. Since we assume that your life is a work of art and you are the artist, this course is an invitation to you to explore and define what you want to create in your life. [1] The Conference Board defines creativity/innovation as the ability to demonstrate originality, inventiveness in work, communicate new ideas to others, and integrate knowledge across disciplines. [2] Are They Ready To Work: Employers' Perspectives on the Basic Knowledge and Applied Skills of New Entrants to the 21st Century Workforce. 2006. [3] Innovate America: Thriving in a World of Challenge and Change. July, 2004. Nation

    Term:

    Occasional

  • MGT-H317 Honors in Organizational Behavior

    Prerequisites:

    ENG 102,SOM 101 or MGT 101, must have completed 45 credits Honors section, GPA of 3.2 or higher

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the application of sociological, psychological and anthropological concepts in domestic and international business settings. Attention is given to the study of human behavior in organizational settings, the organization itself, human interaction, and small group process.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • MGT-H401 Honors Analytical Skills

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); Junior standing; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is premised on the fact that whereas a manager needs analytical skills to discover optimal solutions to business problems, a broad array of negotiation skills is needed to implement these solutions. This experiential course is designed to improve your skills in all phases of negotiation: understanding prescriptive and descriptive negotiation theory as it applies to dyadic and multiparty negotiations, to buyer-seller transactions and the resolution of disputes, to the development of negotiation strategy, and to the management of integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process. The course is based on a series of simulated negotiations in a variety of contexts including one-on-one, multi-party, cross-cultural, third-party and team negotiations. Please note that given the experiential nature of the course, attendance is mandatory and will be strictly enforced beginning from the first class session.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • MGT-H429 Honors Strategic Management

    Prerequisites:

    FIN 310;MKT 310;MGT 317;SOM 101 or MGT 101;ISOM 319; SR standing; Honors section; GPA 3.2

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Covers and integrates administrative processes and decision-making under uncertainty in business areas of marketing, accounting, management, finance, personnel, and production. It also focus- es on strategic and policy issues from the view- point of senior management in both domestic and international corporations. Case discussions help develop the conceptual framework for analysis and implementation of strategy and policy decisions. Prerequisites: FIN 310, MKT 310, MGT 317, SOM 101 or MGT 101, ISOM 319 Senior standing; Honors section, GPA 3.2 and higher. 1 term - 3 credits.

  • MKT-H210 Honors- Principles of Marketing

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-101 or WRI-103; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course addresses the topics that remain relevant and important, while simultaneously emphasizing new thinking and approaches to marketing practices. Students need to be prepared to operate in the complex and dynamic marketing world of the future, they need to develop the capacity to think and act like marketers in a difficult and uncertain environment. This requires the ability to assess complex and changing marketing situations, to determine the best marketing strategies for these situations, and to execute the strategies effectively. This course serves two purposes: as a foundation for those intending to major/minor in marketing, and potentially as the sole background in marketing for other majors/minors.

  • MKT-H317 Honors Consumer Behavior

    Prerequisites:

    MKT 210; 3.2 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is open to students with a GPA of 3.2 or higher. This honors course is a focused and challenging learning experience. As a result, you will be introduced to advanced concepts, ideas, and project experiences that will place you in a highly desirable position for internships, future career opportunities, and graduate school. In this course we focus on people as consumers of products, services, and experiences. We do so by drawing upon theories of consumption in fields as diverse as psychology, sociology, economics, and anthropology. Students engage in projects that link theory to insights on consumer buying, using and disposing behavior and the application of these insights in marketing programs. In the process they become more critical consumers. The classes are discussion based and active participation from students is expected.

  • MKT-H318 Honors Marketing Tools and Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    MKT 210; STATS 250; 3.2 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is open to students with a GPA of 3.2 or higher. This honors course is a focused and challenging learning experience. As a result, you will be introduced to advanced concepts, ideas, and project experiences that will place you in a highly desirable position for internships, future career opportunities, and graduate school. The objective of this course is to provide students with a solid and user-friendly foundation for making better marketing and business decisions. Hands-on training with tools such as Excel and SPSS provides a meaningful learning experience and reinforces concepts learned in other courses in the Business School. Topics include marketing math and statistical analysis for marketing research. After taking Marketing Tools, students are well prepared to integrate analytical skills in business consulting projects used in upper level courses (MKT 319 and MKT 419)

  • MKT-H319 Honors Marketing Research

    Prerequisites:

    MKT 210; STATS 250; MKT 318; 3.2 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This honors course extends the learning in other MKT courses, in particular MKT 318. You will learn advanced concepts and ideas pertaining to scientific research methodology in the context of marketing applications. Topics include planning and designing research studies, qualitative inquiry, survey design, principles of measurement, sample design, and statistical data analysis. The course is heavily project based with extensive use of SPSS for statistical data analysis. The objective of this course is to provide students with a solid and user-friendly foundation for making better marketing and business decisions. After taking Marketing Research, students are well prepared to design and carry out research to address business questions regarding problems and opportunities in upper level courses (MKT 419 and MGT 429)

  • MKT-H419 Honors Marketing Policies & Strategies

    Prerequisites:

    MKT 210; MKT 317; MKT 318; MKT 319; 3.2 GPA; Senior standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is open to students with a GPA of 3.2 or higher. This honors course is a focused and challenging learning experience. As a result, you will be introduced to advanced concepts, ideas, and project experiences that will place you in a highly desirable position for internships, future career opportunities, and graduate school. In this capstone course, marketing majors apply lessons learned across the curricula of the Marketing Department and Sawyer School. Students test their level of marketing knowledge by working to solve challenging integrated cases for developing marketing strategy and programs. In particular, students analyze both qualitative and quantitative information, evaluate alternative courses of action, and then make strategic recommendations for resolving the issues in each case.

  • MKT-H432 Honors Marketing in Emerging Markets

    Prerequisites:

    MKT 317; 3.2 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on cultural consumption trends both at home and abroad. In particular it compares and contrasts the emerging markets of India and China with more established Western markets. The course is organized in two self-contained modules around a theme. The first module focuses at the market level and examines what happens to the culture when East meets West. The second module analyzes the challenges companies face in staying competitive in rapidly evolving economies. Each class in a module advances your understanding of the theme through an engaging and challenging mix of readings, assignments, and case studies. This is an intensive Honors level course and requires students to be self directed and motivated. Every class is important- there is no mid-term or final.

  • MKT-H444 Honors the Business of Digital Media

    Prerequisites:

    MKT 210

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Social media is transforming the way consumers work, play, and live and no one knows this better than you- the Millennial generation. But, what does this mean for business? The focus of this course is to understand the transformation of marketing practices as new social media challenge traditional media. How do businesses use the new media to create deeper and more profitable relationships with consumers? What are the new measures and metrics for assessing marketing programs in this new environment? From this course students will take away a social media vocabulary, a set of social media skills and tools, and analytical frameworks for analyzing effective social media business practices. The course is constructed on the principle of the student as an active learner where the student takes the responsibility for their own learning and works collaboratively with peers assisting in their learning. Naturally, student projects, assignments, and other activities will use social media tools including wikis and blogs.

  • SIB-H101 Honors Globalization

    Prerequisites:

    GPA 3.2 or higher.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces the nature and processes of globalization which define today's international business environment. The course employs a multidisciplinary perspective to explore the growing interdependence of nations in their trade, investment, technology flows, and business operations. Topic include business, geographic, economic, social, cultural, political, and other issues related to globalization. The course is experiential in its approach. Students will undertake a team research project exploring globalization issues with reference to a particular country, region or industry.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • ISOM-H319 Honors Operations Management

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 101 (formerly SBS 101); ISOM 201; Junior standing; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    OPEN TO GRIFFIN FELLOWS AND HONOR STUDENTS ONLY GPA of 3.2 or above required.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • SBS-H101 Honors-Business Foundations

    Prerequisites:

    Limited to students with less than 53 credits. GPA 3.3 or higher

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This honors course introduces the concepts and practices of managing profit seeking firms, as well as the challenges of managing not-for-profit and public sector organizations. Students develop an initial understanding of organizational stakeholders, the global, economic, legal, and regulatory environments, ethical challenges faced by management, and the strategic coordination of various internal functions of organizations. Students develop an integrative approach to analyzing organizations and are coached on effective presentation skill, culminating in a group presentation of a business analysis to a panel of outside managers.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • SIB-H429 Honors Strategic Management

    Prerequisites:

    MKT 210; ISOM 319; MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); Senior standing; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Covers and integrates administrative processes and decision-making under uncertainty in business areas of marketing, accounting, management, finance, personnel, and production. It also focus- es on strategic and policy issues from the view- point of senior management in both domestic and international corporations. Case discussions help develop the conceptual framework for analysis and implementation of strategy and policy decisions.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

Challenge Courses

Honors Challenge Courses are 1- or 2-credit seminar-style courses. Honors Program and other qualifying students may select from a variety of these options each semester to enhance their degree program, study an area of personal interest, or gain skills for their future career paths. Some of these courses are required for Honors Program students.

  • SBS-HC110 Honors Special Topics

    Prerequisites:

    GPA 3.2 or higher

    Credits:

    1.50- 3.00

  • SBS-HC111 Social Cognition in the Workplace

    Prerequisites:

    WRI 101; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    Social cognition investigates what people think, feel and do and how this affects their interpretation of the (social) world and how these perceptions are the products of our social interactions. This course provides an overview of several aspects of social cognition and their impact on human interaction in the workplace. How do stereotypes and prejudices affect our judgments of whom to hire or promote? Why do people make some decisions rapidly and think they are correct? How do groups influence our perceptions of people and events? How do people manage the impressions others have of them, and how does this affect their behavior as job seekers, employees, or managers?

  • SBS-HC115 Business Writing

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    In this business writing course students will be introduced to the basics of effective writing. This includes using business letters, memos, brief informal reports and e-mail exchanges to persuade and concisely convey opinions and proposals. The course will focus on both the writer's voice and use of appropriate tone and etiquette. Students will practice their writing through a semester long project encompassing various writing platforms and on-going communication with the professor. This course was designed to be very interactive and engage students through creative exercises and practice.

  • SBS-HC150 Cut to the Chase: Getting to the Point In Business Writing

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    Imagination is a key component of 21st century business writing. Increasingly the business scenario is more than a dry recital of what if or if this, then that. Good scenarios must be gripping and lively. It is not enough to assemble facts and regurgitate crunched numbers. Today the scenario must be polished and fully engaged. This goes for other types of writing too. Memos and reports must have style. This is the best way to demonstrate expertise and authority. Gripping. Lively. Polished. Engaged. How to achieve these writing goals? Our course will examine the mechanics of concise writing. We will go over the essential writing, revising, and editing skills that will allow you to create copy that gets to the point and makes its point. Be prepared to offer examples of your work, rewrite and revise them. This will not be a workshop. You will not edit your peers. You will review their work, but this will not be a roundtable writing seminar. You will learn to read your own work with a critical eye. Shorter attention spans demand better writing. This course will show you how to cut your copy to better fulfill the task before you and meet your readers' needs.

  • SBS-HC151 Cut to the Chase: Getting to the Point Baseball: a Metaphor for Social Responsibility and Ethical Behavior

    Prerequisites:

    3.2 GPA required

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Baseball is an American game that began in the mid 1800's and has evolved into a national pastime. This course will focus on the historical development of baseball along with issues past and present that have affected the game and the lives of Americans. These issues include segregation, diversity, honesty, integrity, loyalty and team play. Within the discussion about baseball, we will also cover other topics, including: academic strategies, wellness, citizenship and diversity. Throughout the course, we will read, write and engage in class discussion using baseball, the game in its current and past state, as it relates to ethical behavior and decision making and social responsibility. We will look at the fundamentals of the sport, some of the major players who have impacted the game to provide us with both good and bad role models. We will discuss recent and past issues and scandals, e.g. steroids, gambling, cheating, discrimination, financial gain and loyalty.

  • SBS-HC220 Leverage Your Internship

    Prerequisites:

    3.3 GPA required

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Learn to effectively search out relevant internships, apply effectively, and excel on the job. Students will learn important impression management techniques even before the first day, learn to recognize workplace norms and behavioral standards, and build a personal plan of exceeding expectations on the job. Students will understand how to effectively conclude an internship and leave a positive impression. A strong focus on networking before, during and after the internship will be paired with assignments to guide students in developing personal plans of action.

  • SBS-HC250 Your Intelligent Career: Examining and Joining the Global Knowledge Economy

    Prerequisites:

    3.3 GPA required

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    Applying your intelligence to your own career- and not just to the jobs you will be asked to fill- is fundamental to the health of the global, knowledge-based economy. It is also fundamental to your personal career success within that economy. Yet, it is hard to gather good advice. Organizations pursue talent management programs based on their own rather than their employee's interests. Management consultants echo the interests of the organizations that they serve. Scholars give selective advice that reflects the particular academic discipline in which they have been trained. What is needed is a broad survey of the principal tasks and challenges that present and future brainworkers will face. This course will provide such a survey, as well as a series of exercises and conversations to help students gain direct exposure to the issues they will face.

  • SBS-HC251 Gandhi's Leadership

    Prerequisites:

    3.3 GPA required

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    Leadership has a special place in the Sawyer Business School. Our mission declares: 'We create a learning environment that enables our students to emerge as successful leaders in the practice of global business and public service.' As you look around, you will see various forms and styles of leadership in the professors you meet, the student clubs you attend, your community, and the political party that you are inclined to support. As business students, these provide you with opportunities to observe learn and reflect on its applicability in the business world. Even as the daily newspapers fill us with information of violence in another part of the world, we would take time in this course to reflect on the leadership of a man who used non-violence and 'truth force' as part of his leadership style. The course will use segments of the Richard Attenborough film Gandhi to understand Gandhi's actions in South Africa and India, and derive principles of leadership. This will be compared to other leaders who were present at times of major transformations and had a role in them, such as Kemal Ataturk, Yasser Arafat, Martin Luther King, Aung San Suu Kyi, Abraham Lincoln, Nelson Mandela, Jack Welch, Lee Kwan Yew, and Mao Zedong; you will choose one (from within or outside this list) with whom you will compare Gandhi. While discussing leadership styles, we will bear in mind their applicability in an organizational context.

  • SBS-HC254 Venture Capital in the U.S. and Abroad

    Prerequisites:

    3.2 GPA required

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    Venture capital has played a major role in the financing of technology and biotechnology firms, including Human Genome, Powersoft, and E-Bay. With capital made available to such firms through venture capitalists, many are poised to become the Microsofts and Apples of tomorrow. Yet, the venture capitalist assumes a calculated risk, investing significant money in exchange for an ownership stake in these companies. This seminar will focus on how venture capitalists (VCs) finance American and international start-up companies, the qualities VCs identify to determine a winning formula for corporate success, and the pitfalls that can result during the start-up phase of a company. Students will learn the importance of due diligence when conducting management, industry, and investment research to determine a start-up company's financial attractiveness to the venture capital firm. Class activity will include role playing exercises in which students act as venture capitalists, performing due diligence on a start-up company seeking venture financing. Two guest speakers will also be scheduled to speak about their experiences in the industry. We will also explore the similarities and differences between private equity and venture capital.

  • SBS-HC255 Gandhi's Leadership

    Prerequisites:

    3.3 GPA required

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Leadership has a special place in the Sawyer Business School. Our mission declares: We create a learning environment that enables our students to emerge as successful leaders in the practice of global business and public service. As you look around, you will see various forms and styles of leadership in the professors you meet, the student clubs you attend, your community, and the political party that you are inclined to support. As business students, these provide you with opportunities to observe learn and reflect on its applicability in the business world. Even as the daily newspapers fill us with information of violence in another part of the world, we will take time in this course to reflect on the leadership of a man who used non-violence and truth force as part of his leadership style. The course will use segments of the Richard Attenborough film Gandhi to understand Gandhi's actions in South Africa and India, and derive principles of leadership. This will be compared to other leaders who were present at times of major transformations and had a role in them, such as Kemal Ataturk, Yasser Arafat, Martin Luther King, Aung San Suu Kyi, Abraham Lincoln, Nelson Mandela, Jack Welch, Lee Kwan Yew, and Mao Zedong; you will choose one (from within or outside this list) with whom you will compare Gandhi. While discussing leadership styles, we will bear in mind their applicability in an organizational context.

  • SBS-HC260 Opportunities and Career in Finance

    Prerequisites:

    3.2 GPA; 54 credits; Finance or Accounting or Economics major or minor or permission of the instructor

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course outlines the different career options that students will have once they obtain a finance or related degree. It explores the many different facets of the finance and investment industry and gives students a look at responsibilities, culture and necessary requirements for each area.

  • SBS-HC260 Opportunities and Career in Finance

    Prerequisites:

    3.2 GPA; 54 credits; Finance or Accounting or Economics major or minor or permission of the instructor

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course outlines the different career options that students will have once they obtain a finance or related degree. It explores the many different facets of the finance and investment industry and gives students a look at responsibilities, culture and necessary requirements for each area.

  • SBS-HC261 Opportunities and Career in Finance

    Prerequisites:

    3.2 GPA; 54 credits; Finance or Accounting or Economics major or minor or permission of the instructor

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    This course outlines the different career options that students will have once they obtain a finance or related degree. It explores the many different facets of the finance and investment industry and gives students a look at responsibilities, culture and necessary requirements for each area.

  • SBS-HC300 Case Analysis/Presentation

    Prerequisites:

    ENT 101 (formerly SBS 101); 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    Case Analysis/Presentation

  • SBS-HC350 Going Green: the New Road to Corporate Sustainability

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    Global warming, growing populations, and the expansion of the world's middle class through globalization have produced a planet that is hot, flat and crowded. While excessive human consumption and the increase in the use of fossil fuels contribute to these various problems, the real culprit is the failure of government, business, and individuals to recognize a real sense of urgency about the current and future draconian consequences to our world. This course is not only about environmentalism. It is about corporate sustainability which embraces the environment, biodiversity, supply chain management, corrupt business behaviors that retard internal economic development, investment behaviors, sweat shops, energy consumption, and much, much more. There is a need for the global business community to formulate and implement a global ethic that will lead to new innovation in business behaviors in an effort to turn the trend toward sustainable business practices.

  • SBS-HC351 Successful Networking

    Prerequisites:

    3.2 GPA required

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    Networking is a loosely used term, or synonym for cultivating and then maintaining contacts and relationships with those people who might be able to open a door for you. In our current economic reality networking is vital as it helps keep you informed about opportunities, trends in business and industry, experience necessary and great sources of career development; like this class for example. While the art of networking may be defined as making connections that you cultivate and keeping copious records of all your contacts; I believe there is more. I believe that networking is knowing what you want while helping others get what they want. All people with very few exceptions act in their own self-interest. For instance, my primary reason for teaching this course is to cultivate a great source of interns while at the same time getting paid. Not a bad gig. Knowing what YOU want is the first and most important step in developing an effective network. Knowing what other people want is the next step and the most difficult. Good thing there's a course about this exact subject.

  • SBS-HC352 Writing for Accountants

    Prerequisites:

    ACCT 321; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The main objective of this course is to explore what accountants write and develop the skills necessary to write these materials effectively. Specific topics to be addressed are the writing process; organizing for coherence and clarity; grammar, punctuation, and spelling; and the design of accounting documents. Also discussed will be ethical considerations, the importance of listening skills to the communication process, the preparation of oral presentations, and the ability to interact with others in a respectful and professional way.

  • SBS-HC353 Operation Management: the Key to Boston's Economic Success

    Prerequisites:

    ISOM 319; 3.3 GPA

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    The goal of the class is to explore, investigate, and address how operational principles and practices are currently utilized to differentiate successful companies that operate in several Boston area industries. The industries to be studied include: health care, tourism, transportation, technology, state government, professional sports, food services and higher education. Knowledge will be gained by visits to companies that operate within these sectors, formal lecture and when possible executive roundtable talks with respected business leaders from each industry. In lieu of requiring a text, there maybe surcharges to students when we visit operating companies. This can include subway charges or entry to guided visits at TD Garden or Fenway Park.

  • SBS-HC255 Gandhi's Leadership

    Prerequisites:

    3.3 GPA required

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Leadership has a special place in the Sawyer Business School. Our mission declares: We create a learning environment that enables our students to emerge as successful leaders in the practice of global business and public service. As you look around, you will see various forms and styles of leadership in the professors you meet, the student clubs you attend, your community, and the political party that you are inclined to support. As business students, these provide you with opportunities to observe learn and reflect on its applicability in the business world. Even as the daily newspapers fill us with information of violence in another part of the world, we will take time in this course to reflect on the leadership of a man who used non-violence and truth force as part of his leadership style. The course will use segments of the Richard Attenborough film Gandhi to understand Gandhi's actions in South Africa and India, and derive principles of leadership. This will be compared to other leaders who were present at times of major transformations and had a role in them, such as Kemal Ataturk, Yasser Arafat, Martin Luther King, Aung San Suu Kyi, Abraham Lincoln, Nelson Mandela, Jack Welch, Lee Kwan Yew, and Mao Zedong; you will choose one (from within or outside this list) with whom you will compare Gandhi. While discussing leadership styles, we will bear in mind their applicability in an organizational context.

  • SBS-HC356 Business in the European Union

    Prerequisites:

    3.2 GPA required

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    This seminar is intended to provide an analysis of the European Union, its evolution, the current environment and issues, and its future, from a business and economic perspective. As the global economy and world markets become truly integrated and interdependent, regional economic and financial blocs will dominate international organizations and their companies will emerge as strong, globally competitive industry leaders. The European Union as a single market, with a population and economy that matches (or in some ways exceeds) the U.S. will be both a formidable threat and opportunity for the United States and U.S. based companies. As U.S. firms continue to benefit from economic integration in Europe, trade and investment disputes between the U.S. and the European Union are growing, while the membership of the European Union keeps expanding. Understanding the evolution, policies and future of the European Union will be vitally important to United States businesses whether a small export/import firm or a large U.S. multinational, as well as to Asian, Latin American and other firms who seek to grow from foreign sales, operations, and alliances and compete successfully in the EU marketplace.