Undergraduate

  • PHIL-113 Critical Thinking and Argumentation

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to non-formal methods of analyzing and formulating arguments, including treatment of such concepts/topics as: the nature of argument, induction, deduction, validity, soundness, aspects of language which tend to interfere with logical thought, definition, role of emotion, types of disagreement, and fallacies. The course also emphasizes the practical application of sound reasoning in both evaluating arguments and making arguments of one's own about matters of issues facing society. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • PHIL-115 Introduction to Philosophy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A general introduction to the nature of philosophical analysis. Lectures, readings, and discussions will focus on representative issues and thinkers from the main areas of philosophy (such the nature of truth, reality, morality, politics, and religion). 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • PHIL-H115 Honors Introduction to Philosophy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A general introduction to the nature of philosophical analysis. Lectures, readings, and discussions will focus on representative issues and thinkers from the main areas of philosophy (such the nature of truth, reality, morality, politics, and religion). 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • PHIL-119 Ethics

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A systematic introduction to the major thinkers and their positions on the main issues of ethics, such as: What is morality? What are moral values? How should we live our lives? Are there objective, universal, absolute moral standards? If so, what are they, and what is their basis? 1 term - credits. Normally offered every year.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • PHIL-H119 Honors Ethics

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A systematic introduction to the major thinkers and their positions on the main issues of ethics, such as: What is morality? What are moral values? How should we live our lives? Are there objective, universal, absolute moral standards? If so, what are they, and what is their basis? Prerequisite: Philosophy majors, minors, or honor students only. 1 term -4 credits.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • PHIL-E119 Service Learning Component

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    Service Learning Component

  • PHIL-120 Ethics and Civic Life

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In this class you will be introduced to the perspectives and methods of politics, philosophy, and economics and see how these three disciplines present distinct but interconnected dimensions of current social and political issues. All students in this course will engage in service learning with placement in governmental or non-governmental organizations to explore how the issues discussed in class are reflected in actual policy activities.

  • PHIL-123 Social Ethics: The Good Life

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of contemporary Western society, particularly in the United States, in relation to philosophical attempts to define the good life. Current books that exhibit a philosophical approach towards important contemporary social issues will be discussed, as well as classics in philosophy. Topics may include: civic virtue, consumerism, current events, economic justice, popular culture (film, music, television), religion and secularism, etc. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • PHIL-E123 Service Learning Component

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    Service Learning Component

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • PHIL-H123 Honors Social Ethics: The Good Life

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of contemporary Western society, particularly in the United States, in relation to philosophical attempts to define the good life. Current books that exhibit a philosophical approach towards important contemporary social issues will be discussed, as well as classics in philosophy. Topics may include: civic virtue, consumerism, current events, economic justice, popular culture (film, music, television), religion and secularism, etc. Prerequisite: Philosophy majors, minors, or honor students only. 1 term -4 credits.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • PHIL-127 Contemporary Moral Issues

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A critical examination of a number of contemporary moral issues such as: abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, capital punishment, cloning, drug legalization, environmental ethics, euthanasia, genetic engineering, gun control, pornography, same-sex marriage, suicide, war and terrorism, etc. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • PHIL-E127 Service Learning Component

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    Service Learning Component

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • PHIL-210 History of Ancient & Medieval Philosophy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The study of philosophical thought from the period of the ancient Greek philosophers through the Medieval thinkers, including such philosophers as Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Zeno, Parmenides, Pythagoras, Protagoras, Augustine, Aquinas, Anselm, and Abelard. An introductory course designed to equip the student with a well grounded understanding and appreciation of Philosophy. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • PHIL-211 History of Modern Philosophy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A study of the prominent modern thinkers, such as Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. The course is an historical survey of the key concepts, problems and developments in modern philosophy including rationalism, empiricism, and skepticism. The following themes central to Modern philosophy will be addressed: the nature of reality; the limits of human knowledge; self and self-identity; mind and body; freedom in theory and practice; reason vs. sentiment in ethics. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • PHIL-212 Formal Logic

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to formal (or semi-formal) study of the basic types of deductive arguments (propositional and syllogistic logic). 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Quantitative Reasoning

  • PHIL-219 Philosophy of Art

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    What counts as art? What is beauty? Are there objective standards of beauty? This course examines the nature of aesthetic experience, art, beauty, and creativity. Through the classic and contemporary readings, the students will be introduced to philosophical issues concerning the meaning of art, artistic representation, perceptions of art, interpretation, and criticism. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their own experience of art and explore the relationships among the artist, the audience, the artwork, and the world. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every third year.

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • PHIL-223 Philosophy in Literature

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An inquiry into some philosophical themes in modern literature. Existential reality, immortality, faith and nature, morality and reason will be explored through the creative word of modern authors. Special emphasis will be placed on recurrent themes and their philosophical belief structure and meaning. 1 term - 4 credits.

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • PHIL-228 Feminist Philosophy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is an introduction to the philosophy of feminist thought. Feminist theories of epistemology, metaphysics and morality will be examined as critiques of traditional philosophy,. Feminist perspectives and methodologies include radical, liberal, postmodern, as well as more recent trends in ecofeminism. Special emphasis will be placed on explicit and implicit practices of alienation and exclusion as they have unfolded in the gendering of thought, truth, and reality. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every third year. C b

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Cultural Diversity BFA

  • PHIL-235 The Meaning of Life

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The question about the meaning of life is among the oldest and most perplexing questions of humanity. What do we live for? Which beliefs, values, and experiences sustain meaningful, fulfilling existence? Are we authors of our own destinies or powerless pawns in an unfathomable cosmic game? Does death render all our efforts superfluous? While our main focus will be philosophical, students will also explore the multiplicity of perspectives on life-meaning through the works of artists, poets, theologians, and psychologists. We will approach the question of the meaning of life both as an exciting intellectual endeavor and an existential challenge of great practical importance.

  • PHIL-250 Social & Political Philosophy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of persistent debates in political and social philosophy, such as the meaning of property and welfare, the tensions between liberty and equality, censorship and freedom of expression, the relation of church and state, the possibility of political education and civic virtue, legitimacy of the state and revolution, war and problems of end and means, addressing historic injustice, such as racism, genocide, or sexism, among other topics. The class will focus on no more than two such themes. Students will read both classic and contemporary writings to address both the historical roots and the contemporary treatment of these questions. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • PHIL-251 Philosophy of Race & Gender

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Prejudice of many kinds, such as racism and sexism, is so embedded in our social institutions, and is so traditional and pervasive that we often fail to notice it. In this course, we will deal with the history and nature of racism and sexism, as well as with possible solutions to these problems, including affirmative action and busing. Also to be discussed will be homosexuality, pornography and sex roles. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C a

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A

  • PHIL-253 The Philosophy of America

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A systematic exploration of thinking of and about America, from the founding of the republic to American issues and traditions of thought that reflect upon the founding principles and the unfolding American experiment. The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution will be studied with an eye to their philosophical content and sources. Other works, primary and secondary, that help to illuminate these documents and their philosophical significance will also be read. The course may also examine works of philosophers and other thinkers who address conflicts over the meaning of founding principles in the course of the nation's history, from the struggle over slavery to America's contemporary role in the world. In addition to the founding documents, authors and texts may include: Locke, The Federalist Papers, Jefferson, Adams, Madison, Washington, de Tocqueville, Emerson, Douglass, Lincoln, Stanton, Thoreau, James, and Dewey, as well as contemporary authors. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every third year.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • PHIL-255 Science, Myth, and Society

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Both mythology and science arise from the human need to explain the world, to understand its laws, and give an account of its origin. This course focuses on the controversial relationship between myth and science and explores their historical roots, their social influence and their respective views of reality, human nature, and origin of the universe. Both historical controversies and contemporary debates, such as evolution vs. intelligent design, will be considered. Topics in the philosophy of science, such as the nature and scope of the scientific method, will also be addressed. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • PHIL-260 Philosophy of Religion

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course analyzes and interprets fundamental religious concepts and beliefs, examines the rational support for religious faith, and addresses the relation between religion and society. Fundamental questions concerning the nature and existence of God, salvation, and immortality will be explored, and for this the primary focus will be Western religious conceptions but may broaden to include other world religions. Other topics may include: whether all religions can be equally valid and true; the relation of religion and the state; the status of miracles; the history and psychology of religion; the conflict between religion and science. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • PHIL-261 Eastern Philosophy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The exposition and critical evaluation of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Islam. Special attention is given to foundation principles as well as to the similarities and differences of each of these philosophies to basic ideas in Western philosophy. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Cultural Diversity BFA,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requireme

  • PHIL-262 Buddhism

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An historical survey of Buddhist philosophy. We will explore Buddhist origins, central teachings, devotional and meditational practices, ritual and institutions as developed from classical to modern times. Special attention given to the philosophical diversity of the Buddhist world view. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Cultural Diversity BFA,Asian Studies,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • PHIL-263 Native American Religion

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is an examination of Native American (Indian) religious experience, both the similarities and differences among the myths and rituals of the major tribes which comprise the background of our nation's history of Western migration and settlement. The emphasis will be on understanding how life was experienced by these peoples through a close look at the philosophical meanings of their mythology and ethics. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C a

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A

  • PHIL-265 Women in Spirituality

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An exploration into the various dimensions and ideologies concerning the role of the feminine in relation to the Divine. Belief systems, myths and archetypes from ancient Goddess worship to 20th century feminist theology will be examined in terms of the philosophical content and psychological consequences. Special emphasis will be placed on feminist metaphysical structures for understanding consciousness and Reality. Classes will be conducted by means of lectures, primary and secondary texts and class discussions. Normally offered alternate years. Cultural Diversity A

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity BFA,Cultural Diversity Opt A

  • PHIL-267 Chinese Philosophy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A survey of the main developments in Chinese Philosophy. The course begins with the early dynastic concept of humanism and then turns to Confucius and Mencius. Having developed the central Confucian doctrines, students next examine the Taoist response to Confucianism in the writings of Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu. The course then considers Zen Buddhism, which is called Ch'an Buddhism in China, where it originated. In particular, students study the concept of sudden enlightenment before turning to the Neo-Confucian scholars.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B

  • PHIL-309 Philosophy of Freedom

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: One Philosophy course or consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Focuses on the paradoxical relationship between freedom and responsibility and how that affects our thinking about freedom in the individual, social and political sphere. Both classical and contemporary thinkers will be considered. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every other year.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHIL-E309 Service Learning Component

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    Service Learning Component

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • PHIL-314 20th Century Philosophy

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: PHIL 211 or consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines one or more of the following major philosophical movements of this century: Pragmatism, Phenomenology, Existentialism, Logical Positivism, Analytic (Linguistic) Philosophy, Postmodernism and Critical Theory (Post-Analytic Philosophy). Prerequisite: PHIL 211 or consent of instructor. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • PHIL-316 Existentialism

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An overview of the existentialist tradition. Primary focus on issues and problems arising from the existentialist reaction to classical philosophy. Topics include: paradoxes and contradictions of human nature and human condition; radical freedom, commitment, and responsibility; existential anxiety, meaninglessness and the rejection of God; authenticity and self-deception; individuality and community. Philosophers to be discussed will include Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, Camus, Dostoevsky, and Heidegger. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every other year.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • PHIL-317 Independent Research

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on philosophical research and writing. It is designed as an independent research course to allow students the opportunity to focus on a topic of their choice and develop critical skills in writing and research methods. Students will be required to produce a research paper of a length commensurate with the number of credits in the course, complete with abstract, thesis, outline, bibliography, and primary and secondary sources. Students will be expected to follow MLA guidelines. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 term -1-4 credits (variable). Normally offered on an as-needed basis.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • PHIL-319 Topics in Applied Ethics

    Prerequisites:

    PHIL 119, or 123 or 127

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will address in depth one or more specific issues in applied ethics. Topics will vary and may range from applied issues in political thought, such as just war theory or transitional justice, to specific questions in professional ethics or social policy, such as end-of-life care, economic justice, or the role of technology in the human future. Prerequisite: PHIL 119, or 123, or 127. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every other year.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B

  • PHIL-330 African Philosophy and Religion

    Prerequisites:

    One course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores indigenous African systems of thought, modern academic African philosophy, African social and political theory, and contemporary debates centered on questions of identity, modernity, essentialism and historicity within the African context. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every third year. C b

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B

  • PHIL-362 Environmental Ethics

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: PHIL 119, or 123, or 127.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of the moral issues involved in the interaction of humans with their natural environment. Topics include: the environmental crisis, human-centered vs. nature-centered ethics, intrinsic value in nature, obligations to future generations, the importance of preserving endangered species and wilderness, radical ecology, eco-feminism, and the role of social justice in environmental issues. Prerequisite: PHIL 119, or 123, or 127. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered every year.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • PHIL-363 Bio and Medical Ethics

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: Phil 119, or 123, or 127.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of the moral problems facing health-care practitioners, their patients, and others involved with the practice of medicine in today's society. Issues include euthanasia, the ethics of medical experimentation, the use of reproductive technologies, genetic counseling and genetic engineering, truth-telling and confidentiality in doctor-patient relationships, the cost and availability of medical care. Prerequisite: PHIL 119, or 123, or 127. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered every third year.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • PHIL-364 Business Ethics

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: Phil 119, or 123, or 127

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of the ethical questions in the working life and policies of the business and professional sectors of society. The focus will vary, but common themes will include: the role of commerce in civil society; the relation of business to conceptions of economic and social justice; the meaning and application of codes of ethics; obligations of corporations and professional organizations to shareholders and stakeholders; responsibilities to clients and colleagues; workplace conduct; the nature of success and conflicts between legal and moral obligations; the impact of globalization. The course will employ a variety of readings, including ethical theory and specific case studies. Prerequisite: PHIL 119, or 123, or 127. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered every other year.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • PHIL-401 History of Ethics and Political Philosophy 1: Ancient and Medieval

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A survey of major works and themes of moral and political philosophy from ancient Greece to the late medieval period. Topics covered will include the nature of moral duties, the connection between happiness and morality, citizenship and virtue, the meaning of a good life, the attractions and limitations of moral relativism, the foundations of legitimate government, arguments for and against democracy, realism and idealism in statecraft, and the relationship between law and ethics. Authors may include the Pre-Socratic thinkers, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, and Aquinas, among others. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered every year in the fall.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHIL-402 History of Ethics & Political Philosophy II

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A continuation of PHIL 401, covering the early modern era to the dawn of the 20th century. Authors may include Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche, among others. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered every year in the spring.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHIL-414 Topics in Philosophy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A detailed exposition and evaluation of a specific topic or of the views of one major philosophical thinker or group of thinkers. Readings from both primary and secondary sources. Prerequisite: PHIL 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • PHIL-416 Plato: Profiles in Philosophy

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: PHIL 210 or consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A detailed study of Platonic texts and issues. Works studied will vary but will often include dialogues such as the Apology, Euthyphro, Phaedo, Republic, and Symposium. Themes may include, among others: the nature of philosophy and its relation to society; the dialogue form and the character of Socrates; the difference between truth and opinion; the meaning of virtue; justice and the ideal regime; the theory of forms and the nature of reality; love, death, and transcendence. Prerequisite: PHIL 210 or consent of instructor. 1 term ? 4 credits. Normally offered every third year.

  • PHIL-418 Kant: Profiles in Philosophy

    Prerequisites:

    PHIL 211

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of Kant's ethics and theory of knowledge, including the following topics: structures of our knowledge of nature and the empirical world; the limits of rationality; the possibility of any knowledge of God, the soul and other metaphysical entities; the antinomies (paradoxes) of pure reason; Kant's theory of unconditional morality based on duty; the idea of the categorical imperative; autonomy and universal moral law; the problem of evil. Selections from Kant's political writings will also be introduced. Prerequisite: PHIL 211 or consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every third year.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • PHIL-423 Advanced Formal Logic

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: PHIL 212 or consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In this course, students will put to work the logical theory developed in Formal Logic (Phil 212). In particular, students will use First-Order Logic to investigate computability and computation theory. Goedel's First and Second Incompleteness Theorems are a particular focus in the course. Prerequisite: PHIL 212 or consent of instructor. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • PHIL-425 The Shield of Achilles: War and Peace From Troy to Sarajevo

    Prerequisites:

    Take PHIL-119, PHIL-123, or PHIL-127; or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course, co taught by Fred Marchant (English) and Nir Eisikovits (Philosophy) examines how literature, film, and other forms of cultural expression have made sense (or not) of war. Organized in an approximate chronological order, the works examined will be responses to ancient conflicts as well as to the wars of the last century (including the two World Wars, post-colonial struggles, and the contemporary war on terror.) Our goal in this endeavor will be broad cultural understanding of how we imagine, remember, forget, memorialize, and question the warfare of recent times.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • PHIL-440 Stay the Hand: Philosophical and Literary Readings on Law and Violence

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An interdisciplinary course examining the idea of law and its function in human society, with a special focus on issues of violence, war, peace, and justice. The course will examine law as it represented, enacted, and discussed in various literary and philosophical writings from the ancient world to the present, to include various Biblical texts, Sophocles's Antigone, Aeschylus's Oresteia, Plato's Apology, Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice, Melville's Billy Budd, Toni Morrison's Beloved, among many others.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • PHIL-510 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: PHIL 210 and 211 and consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Students meet with a department member to pursue advanced studies in areas of particular interest to them.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • PHIL-513 Internship in Applied Ethics

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: PHIL 119 or 123 or 127 and consent of instructor

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Students in this course will serve as interns in a department-approved position with a service provider, professional organization, government agency, or non-governmental organization whose work is relevant to issues in applied ethics. A faculty mentor will meet with students regularly to develop individually designed programs of readings and to discuss this material and its relation to the internship experience. In addition to the substantial time commitment to the internship, course requirements will usually include a journal and a research project. PHIL 119 or 123 or 127 and consent of instructor. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered every year.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • PHIL-514 Advanced Topics in Philosophy

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: PHIL 210 or PHIL 211 and consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Students with sufficient background in philosophy and a special interest in areas of philosophy which cannot be covered in regularly offered courses will be guided by senior members of the Department. Students working on Honors in Philosophy must take this course in the first semester of their senior year to prepare a thesis proposal. PHIL 210 or PHIL 211 and consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PHIL-515 Senior Symposium

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: PHIL 210 and 211 and consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is a required course for all students in the major, to be taken in the Spring Semester of their senior year. Students will prepare a portfolio of their previous coursework, collaborate with the faculty symposium leader on a selection of texts to read in common with other seniors, and prepare one paper for delivery at the Senior Symposium, usually held in late April. Students seeking Honors in Philosophy must take this course to complete the senior thesis. PHIL 210 and 211 and consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered Spring Semester every year.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PHIL-HE123 Service Learning Component

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    Service Learning Component

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • PPE-401 Political Economy

    Prerequisites:

    Take 1 of the following courses- PHIL 119, PHIL 123 OR PHIL 127. AND take 2 of the following courses- GVT 110, GVT 225 EC 101 EC 102 PHIL 250, STATS 240, STATS 250, GVT 201, OR PHIL 212.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This interdisciplinary class brings together the fields of politics, philosophy, and economics at a high academic level. You will be confronted with hard questions about the sources, ends, and limits of government; the usefulness and troubles of free markets; the proper distribution of economic advantages in society; and what works best for building a just and efficient system of economic institutions.

  • RS-111 Introduction to World Religions: Western Traditions

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will explore the comparative history and structure of Western religious traditions, broadly understood, and their impact on other world religions, while attempting to recognize the similarities and the differences among them. Traditions to be studied include Greek and Roman religion, the monotheistic faiths (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as Zoroastrianism, Sikhism and Bahaism). We will also explore the impact of the Western religions on indigenous traditions, such as African religion, Native American religion, and Pacific Island religion. Attention will be given to the reading of original texts when available. Requiring students to observe religious ceremonies will enhance practical understanding of many of the above traditions. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

  • RS-112 Introduction to World Religions: Eastern Traditions

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will examine a variety of Eastern religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shintoism. Possible connections to be explored will be the impact of these traditions on others, such as Pacific Islands and African religion, as well as the growing place of Eastern religion in the West. This course will explore the history and structure of each tradition, while attempting to recognize the similarities and the differences among them. Attention will be given to the reading of original texts when available. Requiring students to observe religious ceremonies will enhance practical understanding of many of the above traditions. Normally offered every year. Cultural Diversity B

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Asian Studies,Diverse Perspectives

  • RS-301 Reason and Revelation

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Traces the evolution of Judaism, Christianity and Islam to the High Middle Ages to explore the role of Neo-Platonism and Aristotelianism in clarifying and explaining dogma. Particular attention will be paid to ideas about the ways of knowing and rational proofs of God's existence in Philo of Alexandria, Augustine, Anselm, Ibn Rushd (Averroes), Aquinas and Maimonides. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered in alternate years.

  • RS-510 Independent Study

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Students meet with a department member to pursue advanced studies in areas of particular interest to them.

Graduate

  • AHE-625 Organization & Administration of Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides a broad overview of the American higher education landscape and serves as the primary vehicle for introducing students to the complex nature of college and university administration. The interplay between organizational characteristics, structures, and modes of governance will be explored as a means of elucidating the practical application of administrative theories in higher education.

  • AHE-626 Legal Aspects Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides students with a practical, working understanding of the legal foundations that govern institutions of higher educations. Using the case study method, it examines legal problems facing college and university administrators including tort liability, rights of teachers and students, free speech issues, contracts, tenure, confidentiality of records, and legal aspects of hiring and discrimination. Students will learn the current state of the law and acquire appropriate skills and resources necessary to make sound decisions in their professional practice, utilizing their knowledge of student development theories and the practical application of law and policy in higher education. Some emphasis will be placed on those areas of significance to the student affairs professional.

  • AHE-628 Financial Aspects Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines financial management and fiduciary practices internal to institutions of higher education. It provides an introduction to the sources of higher education funding, budgeting and disbursement, control mechanisms, and the role of finance in strategic planning. It also provides students with information they need to better understand and participate more effectively in the funding, budgeting, and revenue/expenditure processes in higher education. Students examine the role of strategic planning and resource allocation in public and private colleges/universities. Various topics, issues, and trends in the financial arena of higher education are also explored.

  • AHE-632 Diversity Issues in Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides students with the opportunity to examine theoretical scholarship and empirical research on race, class, and gender in American higher education. The overall goal of this course is to assist future practitioners in the field in developing an ability to critically evaluate institutional and departmental approaches to diversity in higher education. Students will explore such issues as affirmative action, sexual harassment, access and financial aid practices, and the relationship of diversity to learning outcomes.

  • AHE-634 Student Development: Theory and Practice

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will explore theories, rationales, and methods of student development in higher education, as well as the organization and administration of student personnel services. Students will explore the history of student affairs and develop an understanding of the various functional areas and competencies associated with student affairs work. In addition, students will become familiar with a variety of theorists who have shaped the profession and incorporate relevant theories into program planning and assessment.

  • AHE-635 The American College/University Student

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The course is an in-depth examination of post-secondary students at all levels utilizing available statistics and other resources to describe various campus cultures and explore student attitudes toward society in general and the post-secondary experience in particular. Focus is given to exploring trends and changes in the enrollment characteristics of college students and addressing the attitudes and values of campus sub groups and cultures. Consideration is given to methods of locating resources on students and to measuring the effect of post-secondary education.

  • AHE-640 Reading & Research

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides an opportunity for students to research a topic of special interest in higher education and write a related comprehensive research paper that integrates scholarly resources on the topic. The course enables students to gain research competence in a selected area of interest relative to the field of higher education.

  • AHE-642 College and University Culture

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of college and university cultures in American higher education. Students will gain an understanding of the properties of campus culture, including norms of behavior, values, stories, physical artifacts, sagas, myths,symbols, and architecture, all of which guide and shape institutional behavior. In addition, students will examine the cultural norms of behavior of various institutional stakeholders - faculty, staff, students, and administrators - and develop an understanding of how campus culture affects each of these groups. In order to become more familiar with the ethos of institutional functioning and behavior, students will conduct a small-scale independent research project, employing qualitative research techniques, to investigate and analyze a particular campus subculture.

  • AHE-643 Leadership in Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to leadership characteristics and theories in higher education. The course examines various leadership styles endemic to the college and university environment, focusing on those relevant to the president, vice presidents, department chairs, deans, faculty, and students. Trait-factor, group, transformational, situational, and other theories of leadership are explored in the context of team-building, participatory decision-making, staff development, resource allocation, and future planning.

  • AHE-645 Practicum in Administration

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The practicum experience provides for the practical application of administrative skills in an appropriate field placement under the guidance of a site supervisor at an institution of higher education. The experience helps students gain exposure to various fields of work, and it provides an opportunity for students to observe, experience, and understand employer/employee relationships within the higher education environment. Students will apply theories learned in the classroom to a wide array of professional projects. Students enrolled in the course will meet as a class to discuss practicum-related issues.

  • AHE-647 Critical Issues in Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In-depth research into and discussion of a range of pressing issues and problems such as affirmative action, executive compensation, international higher education and globalization, online/distance learning, for-profit higher education, and Internet issues. The goal of this course is to help students gain a general knowledge of some of the most salient higher education issues in the United States and develop skills to analyze and manage emerging issues they may encounter as professionals in the field.

  • AHE-648 Research in Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary for locating sources of information and doing effective descriptive research in higher education. Students will design and execute field research on structures and problems of specific post-secondary institutions.

  • AHE-649 History of Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the development of institutions and practices of higher education from their medieval origins to the present, concentrating on the American experience and identifying key trends in theory, organizations curriculum, and sociology. Not offered on a regular basis.

  • EHS-625 Organization & Administration of Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides a broad overview of the American higher education landscape and serves as the primary vehicle for introducing students to the complex nature of college and university administration. The interplay between organizational characteristics, structures, and modes of governance will be explored as a means of elucidating the practical application of administrative theories in higher education.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • EHS-626 Legal Aspects Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides students with a practical, working understanding of the legal foundations that govern institutions of higher educations. Using the case study method, it examines legal problems facing college and university administrators including tort liability, rights of teachers and students, free speech issues, contracts, tenure, confidentiality of records, and legal aspects of hiring and discrimination. Students will learn the current state of the law and acquire appropriate skills and resources necessary to make sound decisions in their professional practice, utilizing their knowledge of student development theories and the practical application of law and policy in higher education. Some emphasis will be placed on those areas of significance to the student affairs professional.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • EHS-632 Diversity Issues in Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides students with the opportunity to examine theoretical scholarship and empirical research on race, class, and gender in American higher education. The overall goal of this course is to assist future practitioners in the field in developing an ability to critically evaluate institutional and departmental approaches to diversity in higher education. Students will explore such issues as affirmative action, sexual harassment, access and financial aid practices, and the relationship of diversity to learning outcomes.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • EHS-634 Student Development: Theory and Practice

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will explore theories, rationales, and methods of student development in higher education, as well as the organization and administration of student personnel services. Students will explore the history of student affairs and develop an understanding of the various functional areas and competencies associated with student affairs work. In addition, students will become familiar with a variety of theorists who have shaped the profession and incorporate relevant theories into program planning and assessment.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • EHS-645 Practicum in Administration

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The practicum experience provides for the practical application of administrative skills in an appropriate field placement under the guidance of a site supervisor at an institution of higher education. The experience helps students gain exposure to various fields of work, and it provides an opportunity for students to observe, experience, and understand employer/employee relationships within the higher education environment. Students will apply theories learned in the classroom to a wide array of professional projects. Students enrolled in the course will meet as a class to discuss practicum-related issues.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • EHS-649 History of Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the development of institutions and practices of higher education from their medieval origins to the present, concentrating on the American experience and identifying key trends in theory, organizations curriculum, and sociology. Not offered on a regular basis.

  • PHIL-604 20th- Century Philosophy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines one or more of the following major philosophical movements of this century: Pragmatism, Phenomenology, Existentialism, Logical Positivism, Analytic (Linguistic) Philosophy, Postmodernism and Critical Theory (Post-Analytic Philosophy).

  • PHIL-609 Philosophy of Freedom

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Focuses on the paradoxical relationship between freedom and responsibility and how that affects our thinking about freedom in the individual, social and political spheres. Both classical and contemporary thinkers will be considered. Normally offered every other year.

  • PHIL-614 Topics in Philosophy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A detailed exposition and evaluation of a specific topic or of the views of one major philosophical thinker or group of thinkers. Readings from both primary and secondary sources. Normally offered every year.

  • PHIL-616 Plato: Profiles in Philosophy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is an in-depth examination of the philosophy of Plato, starting with a focus on the Philosopher's identity as discovered by sympathetically understanding Socrates' dialogic role in opposition to the Sophists of the day. Recent Platonic scholarship will be introduced to the student, and a detailed explanation of how Plato is no longer understood as an Idealist will be offered after a close look at the text The Republic, The Statesman, and the Symposium. Emphasis will be on student journals and role playing with regard to Socrates' verbal behavior.

  • PHIL-617 Kant: Profiles in Philosophy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An examination of Kant's ethics and theory of knowledge, including the following topics: structures of our knowledge of nature and the empirical world; the limits of rationality; the possibility of any knowledge of God, the soul and other metaphysical entities; the antinomies (paradoxes) of pure reason; Kant's theory of unconditional morality based on duty; the idea of the categorical imperative; autonomy and universal moral law; the problem of evil. Selections from Kant's political writings will also be introduced. Normally offered every third year.

  • PHIL-619 Topics in Applied Ethics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will address in depth one or more specific issues in applied ethics. Topics will vary and may range from applied issues in political thought, such as just war theory or transitional justice, to specific questions in professional ethics or social policy, such as end-of-life care, economic justice, or the role of technology in the human future. Normally offered every other year.

  • PHIL-622 Existentialism

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An overview of the existentialist tradition. Primary focus on issues and problems arising from the existentialist reaction to classical philosophy. Topics include: individuality and freedom, humans in society, death, morality, immortality, and the rejection of God. Philosophers to be discussed will include Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre and Heidegger. Normally offered every other year.

  • PHIL-623 Advanced Formal Logic

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In this course students will put to work the logical theory developed in Formal Logic (Phil 212). In particular students will use First-Order Logic to investigate computability and computation theory. Goedel's First and Second Incompleteness Theorems are a particular focus in the course. Normally offered alternate years.

  • PHIL-625 The Shield of Achilles: War and Peace From Troy to Sarajevo

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course, co taught by Fred Marchant (English) and Nir Eisikovits (Philosophy) examines how literature, film, and other forms of cultural expression have made sense (or not) of war. Organized in an approximate chronological order, the works examined will be responses to ancient conflicts as well as to the wars of the last century (including the two World Wars, post-colonial struggles, and the contemporary war on terror.) Our goal in this endeavor will be broad cultural understanding of how we imagine, remember, forget, memorialize, and question the warfare of recent times.

  • PHIL-630 African Philosophy and Religion

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores indigenous African systems of thought, modern academic African philosophy, African social and political theory, and contemporary debates centered on questions of identity, modernity, essentialism and historicity within the African context. Normally offered every third year.

  • PHIL-640 Law Like Love: the Literature and Philosophy of Law

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An interdisciplinary course examining the idea of law and its function in human society, with a special focus on issues of violence, war, peace, and justice. The course will examine law as it represented, enacted, and discussed in various literary and philosophical writings from the ancient world to the present, to include various Biblical texts, Sophocles' Antigone, Aeschylus's Oresteia , Plato's Apology, Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice, Melville's Billy Budd, Toni Morrison's Beloved, among many others.

  • PHIL-662 Environmental Ethics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An examination of the moral issues involved in the interaction of humans with their natural environment. Topics include: the environmental crises, human-centered vs. nature-centered ethics, intrinsic value in nature, obligations to future generations, the importance of preserving endangered species and wilderness, radical ecology, ecofeminism, and the role of social justice in environmental issues. Normally offered every year.

  • PHIL-663 Bio and Medical Ethics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An examination of the nature of life and the moral problems facing researchers, health-care practitioners and their patients, and others involved with the practice of medicine in today's society. Issues include euthanasia, the ethics of medical experimentation, the use of reproductive technologies, genetic counseling and genetic engineering, truth-telling and confidentiality in doctor-patient relationships, the cost and availability of medical care, and the possibilities for engineering life and a trans-human nature. Normally offered every third year.

  • PHIL-664 Business Ethics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An examination of the ethical questions in the working life and policies of the business and professional sectors of society. The focus will vary, but common themes will include: the role of commerce in civil society; the relation of business to conceptions of economic and social justice; the meaning and application of codes of ethics; obligations of corporations and professional organizations to shareholders and stakeholders; responsibilities to clients and colleagues; workplace conduct; the nature of success and conflicts between legal and moral obligations; the impact of globalization. The course will employ a variety of readings, including ethical theory and specific case studies. Normally offered every other year.

  • PHIL-701 History of Ethics and Political Phil. I: Ancient and Medieval

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A survey of major works and themes of moral and political philosophy from ancient Greece to the late medieval period. Topics covered will include the nature of moral duties, the connection between happiness and morality, citizenship and virtue, the meaning of a good life", the attractions and limitations of moral relativism, the foundations of legitimate government, arguments for and against democracy, realism and idealism in statecraft, and the relationship between law and ethics. Authors may include the Pre-Socratic thinkers, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, and Aquinas, among others. Normally offered every year in the fall.

  • PHIL-702 History of Ethics and Political Phil. II : Modern

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: PHIL 701

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A continuation of PHIL 701, covering the early modern era to the dawn of the 20th century. Authors may include Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche, among others. Prerequisite: PHIL 701. Normally offered every year in the spring.

  • PHIL-713 Internship in Applied Ethics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students in this course will serve as interns in a department-approved position with a service provider, professional organization, government agency, or non-governmental organization whose work is relevant to issues in applied ethics. A faculty mentor will meet with students regularly to develop individually designed programs of readings and to discuss this material and its relation to the internship experience. In addition to the substantial time commitment to the internship, course requirements will usually include a journal and a research project. Normally offered every year.

  • PHIL-714 Masters' Thesis Supervision

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is intended for graduate students in the Ethics and Public Policy Masters' Program who have elected to write a formal thesis (instead of taking part in an internship). Students will prepare a thesis proposal in consultation with an assigned faculty advisor before they register for this course. The proposal will be approved by an ad -hoc faculty committee. Students will use this course to write the thesis in regular consultation with the faculty advisor, and usually during the summer following their first year of study. The final draft must be approved at a formal defense by the ad hoc committee.

  • PHIL-720 Practicum in Teaching Ethics

    Prerequisites:

    PHIL 701 and Instructor's Consent

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is intended for graduate students in programs associated with the Philosophy Department as an introduction to methods in teaching ethics. The student will take an undergraduate ethics course, with the permission of the course's instructor, doing the course readings and attending classes. The course instructor will devise a mentoring program in consultation with the student, which may include some or all of the following, under the instructor's supervision: workshops with students; office hours with students; sample lectures, facilitating classroom discussion; review (but not grading) of student papers. Written work may include assignments on the pedagogical questions arising from both the materials themselves and the work with students, as well as other projects. Prerequisites: PHIL 701 and consent of the instructor. 3 credits. Offered every semester.

  • PHIL-910 Independent Study in Philosophy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Independent study in philosophy

  • PPE-701 Political Economy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This interdisciplinary class brings together the fields of politics, philosophy, and economics at a high academic level. You will be confronted with hard questions about the sources, ends, and limits of government; the usefulness and troubles of free markets; the proper distribution of economic advantages in society; and what works best for building a just and efficient system of economic institutions.

  • RS-601 Reason and Revelation

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Traces the evolution of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam to the High Middle Ages to explore the role of Neo-Platonism and Aristotelianism in clarifying and explaining dogma. Particular attention will be paid to ideas about the ways of knowing and rational proofs of God's existence in Philo of Alexandria, Augustine, Anselm, Ibn Rushd (Averroes), Aquinas and Maimonides. Normally offered in alternate years.