About

German is the official language of Germany and Austria and one of the official languages of Switzerland. It is also widely spoken in Eastern Europe. Today’s Germany has the largest population and the most powerful economy in the European Union. The capital, Berlin, centrally located in the newly expanded EU, is becoming a vibrant metropolis with an avant-garde cultural scene – augmenting traditional strengths in the areas of museums, music, and theater. Other cities such as Cologne, Dresden, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Leipzig, and Munich cultivate a similar mix of the old and the new, as do Vienna, the capital of Austria, and Zürich, the Swiss German hub. The cultural, scientific, and technological achievements of the German-speaking peoples are known and valued throughout the world.

Minor Requirements

Minor Requirements: 6 courses, 24 credits


Prerequisites (2 courses, 8 credits)

  • GER-201 Intermediate German I

    Prerequisites:

    GER 102 or instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Four-skills approach (speaking, listening, reading, writing) utilizing authentic texts, recordings, and visual media. Grammar review, vocabulary expansion, and intensive practice. One language laboratory session per week.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    BA FOREIGN

  • GER-202 Intermediate German II

    Prerequisites:

    GER 201 or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Continuation of skills development from 201. One language laboratory session per week.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    BA FOREIGN

Advanced Courses (4 courses, 16 credits)

  • SF-104 Berlin and Vienna: Cradles of Modernity

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Does cultural identity come from language, history, or both? German is spoken in the capital cities of Germany and Austria, but no one would confuse a Berliner with a Viennese. We will try to find out what is behind this conundrum by studying dramas, stories, and historical texts; examining buildings and works of art; and viewing films.

  • GER-216 Masters of German Literature in English Translation

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Discussion of works by major authors from the 18th century to the present. Drama, fiction, and poetry. The specifically German contributions as related to the European context. Lessing, Goethe, Schiller, Heine, Buchner, Schnitzler, Kafka, T. Mann, Hesse, Brecht, Seghers, Grass, Boll, Wolf and/or others.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities Literature Requirement

  • GER-301 German Civilization

    Prerequisites:

    GER 202 or instructor consent

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A survey of civilization in the German-speaking countries from the Reformation to German unification (1871). Major figures, movements, and periods. Art, literature, music, and philosophy in the context of political and economic developments. Normally offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BA FOREIGN

  • GER-302 German Civilization II

    Prerequisites:

    GER 202 or consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A survey of civilization in the German-speaking countries from the late 19th century to the present. Major figures, movements, and periods. Art, literature, music, philosophy, and popular culture in the context of political and economic developments.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BA FOREIGN

  • GER-303 Advanced Conversation

    Prerequisites:

    GER 202, or Instructors consent

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Further development of speaking ability in various contexts (e.g., informal conversation, debate, discussion of current events in the German-speaking countries). Short texts and audio- visual materials as a basis for classroom activities.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    BA FOREIGN

  • GER-304 Advanced Composition

    Prerequisites:

    GER 202 or consent of the instructor

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Additional training in writing German. Practice in various modes (e.g., essay, poetry, dramas, short fiction). Some translation into English. Special attention paid to grammatical points where needed.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    BA FOREIGN

  • GER-306 German Cinema

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A survey of films produced in the German speaking countries from the 1920's to the present. Includes the Weimar republic, the Nazi period, postwar production from both East and West Germany, and new trends since reunification. Film esthetics and socio-historical context. All films shown in German with English subtitles.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • GER-310 Masterpieces of German Literature

    Prerequisites:

    GER 202 or Instructor's Permission

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A reading of major works in the context of cultural trends and historical developments. Includes such texts as Goethe's Faust, Grimm's fairy tales, a selection of poetry, dramas, and short prose pieces, and at least one novel. GER 301 or GER 302 strongly recommended.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities Literature Requirement,BA FOREIGN

  • GER-412 Contemporary Germany

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A survey of German culture, politics, and society from the end of World War II to the present day. Discussion of such topics as the post-fascist mentality, economic efficiency, re-education, Americanization, division and it's legacy, high culture, entertainment for the masses, environmental movements, pacifism, and multiculturalism.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • GER-419 East Germany and the Cold War

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    When the German Democratic Republic was founded in 1949, observers in the West viewed it as an artificial construct created to serve the needs of the Soviet empire. The self-image of the GDR as created by its leadership revolved around the idea of an anti-fascist German state designed as a bulwark against any revival of National Socialism. Over a generation after the fall of the Berlin Wall, it is possible to undertake a dispassionate analysis of the forty-year history of the 'other' German state as manifested in its cultural identity and political role during the Cold War. Cross- list with GVT 472/872

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GER-420 The Greens and Environmentalism

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The rise of the Green Party, from it's grass-roots beginnings to participation in the federal government. Background on the development of green consciousness in Germany and Europe since the early 20th century. Present governmental policies and programs (e.g. alternative energy sources, organic farming, recycling, dismantling of nuclear power). Cross-list with ENST 420/GVT 420/620.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

Related Disciplines:

A maximum of two courses from other departments can be counted toward the minor with the approval of the chair. Other courses may be permitted at the discretion of the advisor. The courses include the following:

  • ARH-312 Art of the Northern Renaissance

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Painting, sculpture, and architecture of the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries in Northern Europe, viewed in their historical context. Issues included the invention of oil painting, the development of woodcut and engraving, the effect of the Reformation on art, and the relationship to the Renaissance in Italy. Artists include van Eyck, Durer and Brueghel.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    BFA Humanities Requirement,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-407 German History 1517 - 1871

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores the social, political and cultural development of the German-speaking population of central Europe from the beginning of the Reformation to the proclamation of the Second Reich, with major attention to the Wars of Religion, the emergence of Prussia and its competition with Austria, and the development of German nationalism.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-411 Europe, 1815 - 1914

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The political, economic, social and cultural development of the principal European states from 1815-1914. Topics include: restoration and resistance after the Congress of Vienna; the evolution of the rising European middle class; the revolutions of 1848; the effects of industrialization and urbanization; nationalism and imperialism; socialism, feminism, and conservative reaction; Modernist culture and the rise of the Avant-garde; the political and diplomatic antecedents to World War I.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-412 Europe in the 20th Century

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The political, economic, social and cultural developments of the principal European states since 1900. Topics include: World War I; the social and economic dislocations of the 1920s and 1930s; the rise of Fascism and National Socialism; World War II; the remains of colonialism; modernization and Americanization since the 1960s; the European Union; Europe after the Cold War; and throughout the twentieth century, the importance of class and class conflict, nationalism, and war in shaping the European experience.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-414 Nazi Germany

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    German and European preconditions; the Versailles Treaty and the failure of the Weimar Republic; Hitler's ideas, collaborators and institutions; Nazi foreign and domestic policy; World War II and the concentration camps.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • HST-426 Politics and Culture in Europe 1919-1939

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the social and political development of European society between the two world wars, primarily through the literature, art, and films of the period. Topics include: the dissolution of pre-1914 middle class society; deviance and sexuality in the 1920s; the role of decadence in art and the Fascist response to deviance in life and art; women, workers, and the new technology; the rise of Fascism; political engagement and polarization throughout European society in the face of economic and social crisis.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-434 The New Europe Since 1945

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The course will focus on the Soviet Union, Germany and their neighbor states, beginning with an exploration of the contradictory genesis of Glasnost and Perestroika in economic stagnation and in the liberation tradition of socialism. It examines the impact of these movements and their related dislocations on the Europe of the late 1980s and 1990s, as well as their implications for the new Europe of the twenty-first century.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • PHIL-211 History of Modern Philosophy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A study of the prominent modern thinkers, such as Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. The course is an historical survey of the key concepts, problems and developments in modern philosophy including rationalism, empiricism, and skepticism. The following themes central to Modern philosophy will be addressed: the nature of reality; the limits of human knowledge; self and self-identity; mind and body; freedom in theory and practice; reason vs. sentiment in ethics. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • PHIL-418 Kant: Profiles in Philosophy

    Prerequisites:

    PHIL 211

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of Kant's ethics and theory of knowledge, including the following topics: structures of our knowledge of nature and the empirical world; the limits of rationality; the possibility of any knowledge of God, the soul and other metaphysical entities; the antinomies (paradoxes) of pure reason; Kant's theory of unconditional morality based on duty; the idea of the categorical imperative; autonomy and universal moral law; the problem of evil. Selections from Kant's political writings will also be introduced. Prerequisite: PHIL 211 or consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every third year.

    Term:

    Occasional

AP and Other Credit:

  • Incoming students who receive a score of “4” or “5” on the AP German examination have fulfilled the prerequisite for the minor.

  • A maximum of two courses taken at other institutions or as part of a study abroad program in a German-speaking country may apply toward the minor.