Undergraduate

  • CHEM-101 Chemical Concepts Contemporary Issues I

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Principles of chemistry with illustrations from everyday life. Basic chemical concepts are used to decode consumer product labels and form a basis for understanding contemporary issues. Specifically designed to satisfy the Science requirement when taken with CHEM 102, L101, L102. May not be used by science majors for science credit. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM L101 required. 3 hours lecture. 1 term - 3 credits. Normally offered Fall/Summer I.

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • CHEM-L101 Chemical Concepts Contemporary Issues Lab I

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 101

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Principles of chemistry and its applications demonstrated through experimentation. Experiments may include field testing and analysis of ocean and river water, testing of household products and sunscreens, determination of calorie content of foods, and molecular modeling with computers. May not be used by science majors for science credit. 2-hour laboratory. Normally offered Fall/Summer I.

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • CHEM-102 Chemical Concepts Contemporary Issues II

    Prerequisites:

    It is strongly recommended that students enrolling in this course have some acquaintance of basic chemical principles either on the college or the pre-college level. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM L102

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A continuation of CHEM 101, including topics in organic chemistry, biochemistry, polymer chemistry, ecology, air and water pollution, food and food additives, pharmaceuticals, and forensic science. Basic Chemical concepts are used to decode consumer product labels and form a basis for understanding contemporary issues. Specifically designed to satisfy the science requirement. May not be used by science majors for science credit. Prerequisite: CHEM 101, CHEM 111 or pre-college chemistry. 3 hours lecture. Normally offered Spring/Summer II.

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • CHEM-L102 Chemical Concepts Contemporary Issues Lab II

    Prerequisites:

    It is strongly recommended that students enrolling in this course have some acquaintance of basic chemical principles either on the college or the pre-college level. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 102

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    A continuation of CHEM L101. Experiments may include making plastics and drug products, analyzing food products, making a model of DNA, crime lab analysis procedures, making aspirin, and the study of flavors and fragrances using molecular models. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 102 required. May not be used by science majors for science credit. Prerequisites: CHEM 101 and CHEM L101. 2-hour Laboratory. 1 term - 1 credit. Normally offered Spring/Summer II.

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • CHEM-103 Chemical Concepts Contemporary Issues IIA

    Prerequisites:

    It is strongly recommended that students enrolling in this course have some acquaintance of basic chemical principles either on the college or the pre-college level.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Topics include organic chemistry, biochemistry, polymer chemistry, ecology, air and water pollution, food and food additives, pharmaceuticals, and forensic science, with an emphasis on their application to current issues. Specifically designed to satisfy the non-laboratory science requirement for the B.A. degree. Science related information searches and writing assignments will be based on current topics from the semester's work. 3 hours lecture. It is strongly recommended that students enrolling in this course have some acquaintance of basic chemical principles either on the college or the pre-college level.

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ

  • CHEM-105 Chemical New Product Development

    Prerequisites:

    MGT 101

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course addresses the crucial intersection between chemistry and business, and the impact of these fields on society. It provides an introduction to important chemistry concepts and practices of business management. Primary focus is on understanding the chemistry principles behind some of the consumer products in our everyday lives, and using this knowledge to create and evaluate ideas for new products. The course also introduces the business aspects involved in the development and marketing of new products. An important component of the course is in making effective presentations; this component concludes the course, culminating in team presentations of a new chemical product to panel of executives and peers. This course satisfies the Sawyer Business School Science requirement.

  • CHEM-111 General Chemistry I

    Prerequisites:

    Placement at MATH 104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH 104 must take MATH 104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-L111.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Topics include introductions to atomic structure, stoichiometry, the periodic table, the nature of chemical bonds, and chemical reactions. This course is recommended for science and engineering majors or those considering careers in the health sciences.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

  • CHEM-L111 General Chemistry I Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 111.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Introduction to the basic principles of chemistry through discovery laboratory experiments. Students will be introduced to safe laboratory practices and basic techniques such as determining mass and volume, representing data in the form of tables and graphs, and synthesizing and isolating a metal complex. Workshop activities include understanding modern approaches to the scientific method, reading and understanding the scientific literature, and building molecular models. This laboratory is designed around the foundational laboratory skills practiced by science students in a wide variety of majors. 4-hour laboratory.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

  • CHEM-112 General Chemistry II

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 111/L111; CHEM-L112 must be taken concurrently.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I. Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Topics include introductions to thermochemistry, gases, solution chemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base systems, and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of CHEM 111 and CHEM L111. 3 hours of lecture 1 term - 3 credits.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • CHEM-L112 General Chemistry II Lab

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 112 must be taken concurrently;

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I Lab. Students apply the basic principles of chemistry through discovery laboratory experiments. Quantitative analysis is emphasized. Students will be introduced to basic analytical techniques such as gravimetric analysis, the application of Beer's Law, and acid-base titrations. This laboratory is designed around the foundational laboratory skills practiced by science students in a wide variety of majors. 4-hour laboratory.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • CHEM-211 Organic Chemistry I

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 112

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Basic theories of structure, bonding, and chemical reactivity as specifically applied to modern organic chemistry. Topics include functional groups, acid/base chemistry, nomenclature, resonance, spectroscopy, and stereochemistry. Significant emphasis placed on the use of the arrow formalism to indicate the location and movement of electrons; serves as a basic introduction to organic mechanisms. Prerequisite: CHEM 112, L112 Concurrent enrollment in CHEM L211 required unless L211 has been previously completed. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM L211 required. 3 hours lecture. 1 term - 3 credits. Normally offered Fall, days/Summer I, evenings.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • CHEM-L211 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 211.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory exercises providing an introduction to synthetic organic chemistry techniques, including melting point determination, distillation, crystallization, extraction, chromatographic separations, and infrared spectroscopy. A component of this laboratory course incorporates discussions of experimental design within the context of environmentally benign (green) organic chemistry. Reports are prepared in professional style. Prerequisite: CHEM 112, L112. Concurrent enrollment in 211 required. 4-hour laboratory. 1 term - 1 credit. Normally offered Fall/Summer, days and evenings.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • CHEM-212 Organic Chemistry II

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 211 CHEM L211

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Builds on the core competencies acquired in Organic Chemistry I, includes detailed discussions of organic mechanisms of substitution, elimination, and addition reactions. Significant emphasis is placed on organic synthesis, structure determination, and spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CHEM 211, L211. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM L212 required. 3 hours lecture. 1 term - 3 credits. Normally offered Spring, days/Summer II, evenings.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • CHEM-L212 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 211/L211

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Builds on the core competencies acquired in Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. Significant emphasis is placed on the characterization of organic molecules via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A component of this laboratory course incorporates discussions of experimental design within the context of environmentally benign (green) organic chemistry. Reports are prepared in professional style. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 212 required. 4-hour laboratory. Normally offered Spring/Summer II, days and evenings.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • CHEM-314 Instrumental Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 211; CHEM L314 must be taken concurrently.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Theory and application of analytical instruments: ultraviolet, visible, fluorescence, atomic and emission spectroscopy; chromatographic methods; electrochemical measurements. Prerequisites: CHEM 211; CHEM L314 must be taken concurrently. 3 hour lecture. 1 term - 3 credits. Normally offered Fall/Spring, days.

    Term:

    Alternates Fall & Spring

  • CHEM-L314 Instrumental Analysis Lab

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM L211; CHEM 314 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory experiments in chemical analysis using instrumental techniques, including spectroscopy and chromatography. Data collection and evaluation includes computer-based methods. Reports are prepared in professional style. Prerequisites: CHEM L112; CHEM 314 must be taken concurrently. 4-hour Laboratory. 1 term - 1 credit. Normally offered Fall/Spring.

    Term:

    Alternates Fall & Spring

  • CHEM-331 Biochemistry I

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 212/L212 or permission of instructor. CHEM L331 must be taken concurrently.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the foundations of biochemistry, including the structure, organization and behavior of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Topics include enzyme kinetics, membrane structure and signal-transduction pathways. Students will be introduced to the biochemical literature and computer-based bioinformatics techniques. Prerequisites: CHEM 212/L212 or permission of instructor. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM L331 required. 3 hours of lecture per week. Offered every Fall, days only.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • CHEM-L331 Biochemical Techniques I

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 331. Take CHEM-212 or permission of instructor.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory course introducing biochemical techniques. Topics include purification of DNA and proteins, agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, protein quantitation and detection, and enzyme kinetic assays. lab work will be written up in the style of a professional journal article. Offered every Fall, days only.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • CHEM-332 Biochemistry II

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 331

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores the principles of bioenergetics and metabolism of biological compounds. Coverage includes intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, oxidative phosphorylation, and synthesis of purines and pyrimidines. Additional topics include the regulation and integration of metabolism. Lectures will be supplemented with discussions of the biochemical literature. Prerequisites: CHEM 331. 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of recitation per week. Offered every Spring, days only.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • CHEM-355 Environmental Chemistry

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 211, or permission of instructor

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A study of the chemical processes (including biologically mediated ones) that affect the cycling and ultimate fate of chemicals in the environment. Topics include air, water, and soil chemistry as well as energy and climate change. The effects of pollutant loads on natural systems and the remediation and treatment methods used to minimize pollutant loads are investigated. 3 hour lecture. Normally offered spring, odd numbered years.

    Term:

    Alternates Fall & Spring

  • CHEM-L355 Environmental Chemistry Lab

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 355 must be taken concurrently. Take CHEM-L211;

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate principles covered by topics in CHEM 355. Prerequisites: CHEM L211, concurrent enrollment in CHEM 355 required. 4-hour laboratory. Normally offered spring, odd numbered years.

    Term:

    Alternates Fall & Spring

  • CHEM-375 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 212

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Topics in inorganic chemistry including bonding theories, chemical structures, symmetry and group theory, kinetics and mechanisms of reactions, and spectroscopy. Advanced topics may include bioinorganic chemistry, organometallics, or materials chemistry. 3 hours lecture. Normally offered spring, even numbered years.

    Term:

    Alternates Fall & Spring

  • CHEM-L375 Advanced Inorganic Laboratory

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 375 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate principles covered by topics in CHEM 375. Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 375 required. 4-hour laboratory. Normally offered spring, even numbered years.

    Term:

    Alternates Fall & Spring

  • CHEM-390 Advanced Organic Chemistry

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: CHEM 212.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Expands on topics introduced in Organic Chemistry I and II; depending on student interest, may include in-depth discussions of carbonyl chemistry, industrial organic chemistry, organometallic chemistry and biomolecules. Prerequisite: CHEM 212, concurrent enrollment in CHEM L390 required. 3 hours of lecture per week. Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Alternates Fall & Spring

  • CHEM-411 Physical Chemistry I

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 112; MATH 166;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Principles of thermodynamics and its general applications to physical and chemical change; introduction to the kinetic theory of gases and concepts of statistical mechanics. 3 hours lecture. 3 hour lecture. Normally offered Fall, days.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • CHEM-L411 Physical Chemistry Laboratory I

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 411 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory exercises covering classical experiments in thermodynamic and instrumental measurements. Significant emphasis will be placed on experimental design and data analysis skills in addition to technical writing skills as demonstrated by laboratory reports prepared in the professional style. 4-hour laboratory. Normally offered Fall, days.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • CHEM-412 Physical Chemistry II

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 411

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Applications of thermodynamics to solutions, chemical equilibrium and electrochemistry; chemical kinetics will be covered. Quantum chemistry and the application of spectroscopy to molecular structure. 3 hours lecture. Normally offered Spring, days.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • CHEM-L412 Physical Chemistry Lab II

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM L411; CHEM 412 must be taken concurrently.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory exercises using spectroscopic techniques (optical and electrochemical) to explore kinetic and thermodynamic and quantum mechanical properties of chemical systems. Emphasis will be placed on experimental design and data analysis skills in addition to technical writing skills as demonstrated through reports prepared in the professional style. 4-hour laboratory. Normally offered Spring, days.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • CHEM-428 Research & Seminar I

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 212; CHEM L212; Instructor's Consent required

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Independent study under the direct supervision of the chemistry faculty. Students are required to attend departmental seminars, write a professional research report, and give an oral presentation on their project for review by the chemistry faculty. Depending on the project undertaken, students may obtain ECR credit. Prerequisites: CHEM 212 and CHEM L212 and by permission of the instructor. 1 terms - 1 to 4 credits. Normally offered every Fall.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • CHEM-429 Research & Seminar II

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 212 and CHEM L212 and by permission of the instructor.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Independent study under the direct supervision of the chemistry faculty. Students are required to attend departmental seminars, write a professional research report, and give an oral presentation for review by the chemistry faculty. Depending on the project undertaken, students may obtain ECR credit. Prerequisites: CHEM 212 and CHEM L212 and permission of the instructor. 1 term - 1 to 4 credits. Normally offered every Spring.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • CHEM-L432 Advanced Biochemistry Research Laboratory

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM-331; CHEM-L331

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Advanced biochemistry laboratory course where students learn experimental design, data analysis, and critical analysis of the scientific literature through the development of independent research projects. Projects vary from year to year, but may include recombinant DNA techniques, purification and quantitation of DNA and proteins, protein detection, enzyme kinetics, and bioinformatics. Research will be written up in the style of a professional scientific journal article and presented as a poster. Students will attend scientific talks at local universities. Satisfies the Expanded Classroom Requirement (ECR). Offered in Spring, days only, every year or every other year.

    Term:

    Alternates Fall & Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • CHEM-453 Introduction to Toxicology

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisites: CHEM 212 and BIO 111

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The study of toxic actions of chemicals on biological systems, with discussion of general principles, methodology, and selected topics. Topics will include forensic toxicology, environmental and occupational toxicology, pesticides, neurotoxicants, and carcinogenesis. CHEM 332 and BIO 403 strongly recommended. 3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of recitation per week. Normally offered every other year.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • CHEM-510 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Advanced study of a special topic in chemistry, by arrangement with the chemistry faculty.

  • FS-303 Introduction to Forensic Science

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Application of the principles of forensic science in evaluating physical evidence, with emphasis on its role in criminal investigation. Class experiences may include guest lectures and field trips. 3-hour lecture. Normally offered Fall/Spring Does not satisfy University Natural Science requirement.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FS-L303 Introduction to Forensic Science Lab

    Prerequisites:

    FS 303 concurrently and instructor's permission

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory experiences related to the collection and analysis of physical evidence as performed by forensic science professionals. Experiments may include forensic microscopy, drug analysis, forensic serology, physical patterns, fingerprint and firearm evidence analysis techniques. 3-hour laboratory. Normally offered Fall/Spring.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • FS-403 Trace Evidence

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: FS 303 and FS L303 or instructor's permission

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course covers the examination of trace materials, other than DNA sources, by visual microscopic analysis through advanced instrumental analysis. The collection, preservation, analysis, report preparation, and evidential significance for court testimony are described. Examples of common materials, such as textile fibers, paints and glass are used to describe the process of comparison and chemical identification of a known versus a questioned specimen(s) suspect of being associated with a crime scene. Instrumental demonstrations are provided. Prerequisites: CHEM 314, CHEM L314, FS 303 and FS L303 or instructor's permission. 3-hour lecture. Normally offered in alternate years.

    Term:

    Alternates Fall & Spring

  • FS-L403 Microscopy Lab for Trace Analysis

    Prerequisites:

    Chem 314 & L314; FS 303 & L303 or instructor's consent

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This class complements FS 403, Trace Evidence, and consists of lectures and laboratory exercises using microscopical analysis. An emphasis is placed on visual light microscope theory and usage. Stereoscopic and polarized light microscopes (PLMs) are located at individual student workstations. A comparison microscope is also available. Additionally, microscopes utilizing spectroscopic detection are studied and used. Infrared microscopy experiments are conducted on trace materials such as fibers, paint and glass. Prerequisites: CHEM 314, CHEM L314, FS 303 and L303 or instructor's permission. Student must be concurrently enrolled in FS 403. 3-hour laboratory. 1 term - 1 credit. Normally offered in alternate years.

    Term:

    Alternates Fall & Spring

  • FS-428 Criminalistics Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's permission is required for registration

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    The practicum involves participation in government crime laboratories, private forensic laboratories, private analytical chemical laboratories (including biomedical laboratories), a forensic science project at Suffolk University or other laboratories where the student can demonstrate that he or she can acquire skills applicable to forensic analysis. Students are encouraged to seek a practicum sponsor that suits his/her skills and interests; assistance may be provided by the Forensic Science Program faculty. However, the Forensic Science faculty member teaching FS 436 must approve any outside practicum sponsor for this course, and if a suitable outside sponsor is not found, the student will fulfill this requirement through a forensic science project at Suffolk University. Participation at the laboratories is subject to requirements of the particular laboratory and will be open only to those students approved by the Forensic Science Committee. Ten contact hours per week, or 140 hours total, a project plan, regular project reports, and a final written and oral report are required. This course replaces CHEM-428. Normally offered Fall/Spring/Summer. ECR approved.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • FS-429 Criminalistics Practicum II

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's permission is required for registration

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    The practicum involves participation in government crime laboratories, private forensic laboratories, private analytical chemical laboratories (including biomedical laboratories), a forensic science project at Suffolk University or other laboratories where the student can demonstrate that he or she can acquire skills applicable to forensic analysis. Students are encouraged to seek a practicum sponsor that suits his/her skills and interests; assistance may be provided by the Forensic Science Program faculty. However, the Forensic Science faculty member teaching FS 436 must approve any outside practicum sponsor for this course, and if a suitable outside sponsor is not found, the student will fulfill this requirement through a forensic science project at Suffolk University. Participation at the laboratories is subject to requirements of the particular laboratory and will be open only to those students approved by the Forensic Science Committee. Ten contact hours per week, or 140 hours total, a project plan, regular project reports, and a final written and oral report are required. This course replaces CHEM-429. Normally offered Fall/Spring/Summer. ECR approved.

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • FS-508 Physical Evidence Testimony

    Prerequisites:

    FS 303 and a signature from the Forensic Science Advising Committee.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Provides forensic scientists with legal and practical information concerning courtroom testimony. Topics include: Rules of Evidence of significance to forensic experts; the requirement of scientific reliability as a prerequisite to testimony; ethical considerations; preparation and relationship with the attorney calling an expert; persuasive courtroom behaviors and strategies; basic Fourth Amendment issues for experts; civil liability for forensic experts. Classes include lectures, discussions and simulations and are held in a courtroom. Offered occasionally; most recently offered summer 2006.

    Term:

    Occasional

  • SCI-101 Intro to Physical Science I

    Prerequisites:

    One course of MATH 104,121,128(formerly 132),130,134, or 165; SCI L101 taken concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Topics in the physical sciences treated at a level appropriate for non-science majors. Newton's laws, circular motion, heat, electricity and magnetism, optics, and atomic physics are discussed with problem sets required to illustrate the concepts.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • SCI-L101 Physical Science Lab I

    Prerequisites:

    SCI 101 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory experiments and exercises to illustrate the principles covered in Science 101. On-time attendance is mandatory for pre-lab lectures. Weekly lab write-ups completed during the lab.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • SCI-102 Intro to Physical Science II

    Prerequisites:

    One course of MATH 104 OR MATH 121 OR MATH 130 OR MATH 132 OR MATH 134 OR MATH 165. SCI l102 Must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Continuation of topics in the physical sciences for nonscience majors. Nuclear physics, chemical reactions, organic compounds, latitude and longitude, study of the solar system, astronomy, and cosmology are all covered.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • SCI-L102 Physical Science Lab II

    Prerequisites:

    SCI 102 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory experiments and exercises to illustrate the principles covered in Science 102. On-time attendance is mandatory for pre-lab lectures. Weekly lab write-ups completed during the lab.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • SCI-103 Environmental Science

    Prerequisites:

    SCI-L103 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Case study approach to the fundamentals of science applied to environmental degradation, ecosystems, geological processes, population dynamics, deforestation and biodiversity, climate change, ozone depletion, air soil, and water resource management, pollution and risks to health, economics and the environment, politics and the environment, and ethics and the environment.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • SCI-H103 Honors Environmental Science

    Prerequisites:

    SCI-L103 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Case study approach to the fundamentals of science applied to environmental degradation, ecosystems, geological processes, population dynamics, deforestation and biodiversity, climate change, ozone depletion, air soil, and water resource management, pollution and risks to health, economics and the environment, politics and the environment, and ethics and the environment.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • SCI-L103 Environmental Science Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Must take SCI-103 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory exercises to illustrate the topics covered in Science 103. Field-testing and analysis of environmental samples. Field trip required.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • SCI-L105 Composite Science Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of the department, transfer student status- 2 credits

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    Combination of lecture and lab involving subject matter in the Physical Sciences (not Life Sciences). This is intended for transfer students who have received course credit in the physical sciences from another school and who still need to satisfy a two credit laboratory requirement.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • SCI-L106 Composite Science Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of the department, transfer student status- 1 credit

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Combination of lecture and lab involving subject matter in the Physical Sciences (not Life Sciences). This is intended for transfer students only who have received course credit in the physical sciences from another school and who still need to satisfy a one credit laboratory requirement.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • SCI-108 Introduction to Cancer Care

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will introduce the students to the top ten U.S. adult cancers, as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes, detection, and prevention. Psychosocial aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be described. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, and bone marrow transplants. The goals and objectives of the course will be met through the use of various teaching tools including but not limited to: PowerPoint presentations, videos, guest lectures, and a poster project with a presentation component. Cognitive assessment of the students will be accomplished through homework, quizzes, exams, and a group poster and oral presentation. Students with any type of academic background are welcome.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-111 Astronomy I

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 104 OR MATH 121 OR MATH 130 OR MATH 134 OR MATH 165. SCI L111 must be taken concurrently.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    History of Astronomy from the ancients to Newton; light; telescopes; sun, earth, moon planets, comets, asteroids, meteors; space programs, science and technology in society. For non-science majors.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • SCI-L111 Astronomy Lab I

    Prerequisites:

    SCI 111 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory experiments and exercises to illustrate the principles discussed in science 111. Observational exercises using the Celestron telescope, astrophotography exercises, and computer simulations.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • SCI-112 Astronomy II

    Prerequisites:

    SCI L112 CONCURRENTLY

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Astronomy of the cosmos; sun, stars, interstellar materials, galaxies, pulsars, quasars, black holes; nature of time relativity, cosmology. For non-science majors.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-L112 Astronomy Lab II

    Prerequisites:

    SCI 112 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory experiments and exercises to illustrate the principles discussed in Science 112. Observational exercises using the Celestron telescope, astrophotography exercises, and computer simulations.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,SCI TECH ENGNR,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • SCI-113 A Habitable Earth Within the Solar System

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course introduces non-science majors to concepts that are central to making our planet habitable. It presents Earth in context of the solar system with a broad view of global climate change and energy resources in a quest to better understand the workings our planet. This course on Earth and Planetary Science is suitable for students who may have taken their last science and math course several years ago, or are just curious about knowing facts on major issues that pertain to the future of our planet. Together with a reading component, this course aims to give students a flavor of how researchers think, investigate and develop conclusions that directly affect our political and economic future. Topics covered in this course range from the solar system to the study of search for other habitable Earth-like planets, search for extraterrestrial life, and evolution of life on Earth. Other characteristics of this course are heavy use of audio-visual materials often including computer animations and simulations, in-class experiment demonstration, and intensive use of INTERNET-based resources.

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ

  • SCI-161 Physical Science

    Prerequisites:

    One course from MATH 104 OR MATH 121 OR MATH 130 OR MATH 134 OR MATH 165 or permission of Dept. Chair. Students who have taken SCI 101/L101 or SCI 102/L102 are not eligible to take SCI 161.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is a one-semester, non-lab introduction to the physical sciences. The student will obtain a good understanding of a wide variety of topics covered in selected chapters of the text (measurements, Newton's laws, energy, heat and global warming, wave motion, electricity and magnetism, atomic physics, nuclear physics, chemical reactions, and astronomy) and will be able to solve problems illustrating the most important concepts. Students who have taken SCI 101/L101 or SCI 102/L102 are not eligible to take SCI 161.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ

  • SCI-165 Inner Workings of Physics Universe

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    About 15 billion years ago, (data indicate) the big bang occurred and the universe was born. With it came physical laws and a spectacular array of consequences that lead to the universe as we know it. This non-lab , 4 credit course explores the inner workings of the physical universe in terms of the scientific inquiry which lead to Newton's laws, an understanding of energy, waves, light, electricity, atomic structure, chemical reactions, nuclear physics, particle physics, relativity, and the big bang theory. During the course, students will learn to make use of modern resources to access scientific and technical literature to research a scientific topic. They will learn to distinguish between science and technology (e.g. quantum mechanics and nanotechnology, the discovery of the Higgs boson and the large hadron collider that made it possible, etc.) and to understand how the science, technology, and engineering disciplines play a crucial role in recognizing and solving problems of society and the world that we share.

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-171 The Built World: How Humans Engineer Environments

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The most basic needs of humans have not changed - water, food, and shelter - but the means of meeting these needs has. In this course, we will examine how technology-driven societies operate by studying how cities are built and how they function. Topics will include water supply and distribution systems; transportation systems (including road and bridge design and construction); building design, construction, and operation (including skyscraper and sustainable building design), and waste removal systems (municipal and industrial wastewater removal and treatment, solid waste removal and treatment). This is not a course about little gadgets and widgets; this is a course about big engineering marvels; and it emphasizes applications of science - how things work - rather than scientific theory.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-H171 The Built World: How Humans Engineer Environments- Honors

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The most basic needs of humans have not changed - water, food, and shelter - but the means of meeting these needs has. In this course, we will examine how technology-driven societies operate by studying how cities are built and how they function. Topics will include water supply and distribution systems; transportation systems (including road and bridge design and construction); building design, construction, and operation (including skyscraper and sustainable building design), and waste removal systems (municipal and industrial wastewater removal and treatment, solid waste removal and treatment). This is not a course about little gadgets and widgets; this is a course about big engineering marvels; and it emphasizes applications of science - how things work - rather than scientific theory.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-173 Geographic Information Science (GIS) The Power of Digital Maps

    Prerequisites:

    SCI L173 Must be taken concurrently Knowledge of Windows type Application

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Geographic Information Science (GIS) link information (number of fire hydrants on a block) to features on a map (e.g., a point representing street address) that has a designated geographic location (as designated by global coordinates). Unlike paper maps, GIS software allows the production of interactive maps that allows the user to layer data, to indicate spatial patterns, to analyze trends, and to combine different features of the mapped area in novel ways. For example, a business person may wish to use GIS to determine the optimum location of retail outlet (based on the mapped demographics of a neighborhood), while an environmental engineer may use GIS to describe the location of outfalls to see how they correlate to areas of stream pollution. In this course, students will be introduced to maps, map vocabulary and attributes, and GIS mapping through a series of mapping exercises. A knowledge of Windows-type applications is presumed.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • SCI-L173 GIS Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken concurrently with SCI-173

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This laboratory illustrates concepts and methods taught in SCI 173. In this lab students will be introduced to maps, map vocabulary and attributes, and GIS mapping through a series of mapping exercises. A knowledge of Windows-type applications is presumed.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • SCI-181 Science and Life in the 21st Century

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is a four credit, non-lab, science course that examines the central scientific problems confronting the 21st century. The course studies particular topics and teaches the necessary science around these topics to provide a good understanding of the issues. The topics currently are: Energy, Science and Economic Decisions, Sustainability of Life on Earth, Health and Science.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ

  • SCI-184 Contemporary Science and Innovation

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is a 4 credit, project based science course that examines the central scientific problems confronting the 21st century. The course consists of lectures, class discussions, field trips, and in-class hands-on activities designed to familiarize the student with different concepts of the lectures. The current focus is on sustainable energy production. A final team project related to the course topics will be given. This is the version of SCI 183 without a separate lab component. Students who have taken SCI 183, L183 are not allowed to take this course.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-201 Physics for Future Presidents

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course presents a topical introduction to the key principles and concepts of physics in the context of the world events and natural phenomena that confront world leaders and that require informed decisions and responses. Energy, health, counter-terrorism, remote sensing, space programs, nuclear proliferation, and a host of other modern challenges have technological and scientific dimensions, the understanding of which is essential to avoiding disastrous policy decisions. This course considers the application of physics to these societal challenges. The material is covered at a level and pace that a future world leader should be able to handle; the emphasis is on the development of physical reasoning skills, and not on detailed, mathematical problem solving.

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • SCI-210 Life of Gems

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will provide undergraduate students of various disciplines with an introduction to gems and crystals using interactive, evidence-based teaching approaches. Crystalline forms of matter are critical to our existence. Using innovative teaching strategies of in-class hands-on demonstration, supplemented with visuals of crystal details, the course provides students insights into the formation, alteration and unique properties that make crystals invaluable. Topics range from the study of proteins and nucleic acids to the interior of planets. The in-class lectures will provide a basic guide that will serve as a platform for individually catered in-depth study. Therefore, the course is open to advanced students as well, who can pick up higher level of information for discussion and class projects.

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ

  • SCI-251 Intro to Coastal Geology

    Prerequisites:

    Intro Math and must take SCI-L251 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Coastal environments will be analyzed with an emphasis on the important environmental characteristics of these areas. Management and environmental problems within the coastal and offshore areas such as beach erosion, beach access, and oil spills will be considered. One required field trip.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • SCI-L251 Intro Coastal Geology I Lab

    Prerequisites:

    SCI 251 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    An introduction to laboratory and field techniques used in the geological study of coastal environments. Field trips will be taken to local coastal areas.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS

  • SCI-HL103 Honors Environmental Science Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Must take SCI-103 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory exercises to illustrate the topics covered in Science 103. Field-testing and analysis of environmental samples. Field trip required.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BA BFA & BSJ,NATURAL SCIENCE FOR BS