Undergraduate

  • ENVE-101 Engineering Practice

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to environmental engineering through a weekly lecture series given by professionals in the field of who will discuss their work and the different projects that they contributed to. There will also be field trips to points of interests such as waste water treatment plants and green buildings.

  • ENVE-104 Introduction to Environmental Engineering

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is the basis course for environmental engineering and provides students with an overview of current and future environmental issues and concerns, practice in material and energy balance calculations, introduction to unit operations and treatment trains and their design, and ideas in sustainable design.

  • ENVE-220 Design and Design Tools

    Prerequisites:

    ENVE-104; PHYS-151

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course applies design tools (AutoCAD primarily and others as necessary for specified design problems) to design problems specified by the instructor.

  • ENVE-226 Organic Compounds in the Environment: Origin and Fate

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM-112 OR PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the common families of organic compounds and their fate in the environment. Topics include organic nomenclature, characteristic chemistry of functional groups, the origin of anthropogenic organic compounds in the environment, and their ultimate fate. Processes studied include bioaccumulation, biomagnification, biodegradation, decomposition (including photochemical processes), air transport, groundwater transport, water transport, and accumulation and reaction in sediments.

  • ENVE-271 Air Quality and Air Pollution Control

    Prerequisites:

    ENVE 104, MATH 166 AND PHYS 152

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The focus of this course is on relative source contribution, regulatory standards, known health effects, and measurement techniques for criteria pollutants and specific air toxics. An emphasis on regulatory control strategies and the design of engineering controls is provided. Engineering Elective.

  • ENVE-325 Geographical Information Science

    Prerequisites:

    Approved computer programming course or permission of instructor.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides the fundamentals of geographic information science (GIS) including the history of automated mapping. A review of the necessary hardware and software elements used in GIS is presented. Hands-on exercises with computerized mapping software are required.

  • ENVE-L325 Geographic Information Science Lab

    Prerequisites:

    concurrently with ENVE 325

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Required companion computer laboratory to be taken concurrently with ENVE 325. Prerequisite: Approved computer programming course or permission of instructor.

  • ENVE-361 Fluid Mechanics

    Prerequisites:

    ENVE-104 AND MATH-265 AND PHYS-152

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The basic equations of fluid statics and dynamics are covered in this course. Course topics include Archimedes' principle, Bernoulli's equation, and their applications; fluid kinematics, Eulerian and Lagrangian flow descriptions, and Three-dimensional flows; Reynolds transport theorem, finite control volumes, and differential analysis and modeling; and viscous flow in pipes, flow over immersed bodies, and open channel flow.

  • ENVE-365 Hydrology

    Prerequisites:

    ENVE 104 AND MATH 166 and ENVE 361.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The following topics are considered in this course: the hydrologic cycle, precipitation processes, soil moisture, infiltration, groundwater, rainfall-runoff processes, utilization of water resources, and frequency analysis. Engineering Elective.

  • ENVE-375 Heat and Thermodynamics

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-265 and PHYS-152

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course covers the elements of thermodynamic systems, the laws of thermodynamics, the parameters and concepts of thermodynamic analyses (heat, work, internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, reversibility, more), and their application to ideal gases and heat engines. Topics include statistical mechanics, phase transitions, chemical equilibrium, Gibb's equation, the Nernst equation, and heterogeneous systems.

  • ENVE-401 Environmental Engineering Measurements

    Prerequisites:

    Take ENVE 104; Take ENVE-226, CHEM-355, OR CHEM-211; Take BIO-273, MATH-341, OR ECE-325;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course describes the theory of measurement techniques used in analyzing environmental quality parameters and provides a detailed experimental understanding of air, water, and soil instrumentation for pollution measurement. Topics include criteria pollutants, sources, sinks, chemistry, and health effects of each pollutant.

  • ENVE-410 Water and Wastewater Systems

    Prerequisites:

    Take CHEM-112; Take ENVE-226, CHEM-355, OR Chem-211; Take ENVE-361; or permission of the instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course considers the design of water and wastewater unit operations in treatment systems. Topics include water supply, water transmission and distribution systems, drinking water treatment, wastewater collection, and wastewater treatment.

  • ENVE-415 Green Engineering

    Prerequisites:

    Take ENVE-361 and ENVE-375,CHEM 211 or ENVE 226

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course presents the principles of green engineering and their application to process engineering, building design. Sustainable and renewable energy systems are a particular emphasis of the course. Topics include risk concepts, evaluating exposures, green chemistry, life cycle analysis, industrial ecology, and environmental sensors. Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry Option, ENVE 361, ENVE 375. CHEM 211 or ENVE 226 Engineering Electives. 1 term - 4 credits.

  • ENVE-450 Environmental Engineering Project

    Prerequisites:

    Course # formerly ENVE 411

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course provides the senior engineering student with meaningful problem analysis and design experience. The project and its documentation must illustrate use of fundamental elements of the design process: establishment of objectives and criteria, synthesis, analysis, testing, and evaluation. The project report must address realistic constraints including economic factors, safety, aesthetics, ethics, and social impacts. A public oral presentation before faculty and peers is also required. (Course # formerly ENVE 411). ECR

  • ENVE-510 Environmental Engineering Independent Study

    Credits:

    1.00- 6.00

    Description:

    This is an independent study in environmental engineering. Topics will vary.

  • ECE-101 Digital Electronics

    Prerequisites:

    ECE L101 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces the elements and tools of digital design. The course covers Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, Logic gates and digital circuits, analysis and design of combinational and sequential circuits, and timing issues. Adders, decoders, multiplexers, flip-flops, counters, and registers are implemented using TTL or CMOS ICs as well as VHDL-programmed FPGAs. Formerly ECE 203

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-L101 Digital Electronics-Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 101 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Illustrates the concepts of ECE-101. Exercises in various forms of Combinational and Sequential Logic design. Use of test equipment. Design projects will include a digital security system, use of PSPICE to verify feasibility of some designs. FPGA board citing Xilinx, software development tools from Xilinx and other third parties are introduced. Offered yearly. Formerly ECE L203

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-105 Circuit Theory I

    Prerequisites:

    ECE L105 must be taken concurrently; MATH 165 may be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Basic elements and analysis techniques of DC circuits. Coverage includes resistors, capacitors, inductors, and sensors ; independent and dependent sources. Ohm's law, power, energy, and power transfer. Kirchoff's voltage and current laws; Nodal and Loop analyses; Thevenin and Norton equivalents; step and transient responses of first-order systems; time constants. Emphasis on functional circuits. Prerequisite: Must be taken concurrently with ECE L105. Must take MATH 121(must have a minimum grade of C in preqs.) 1 term - 3 credits.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-L105 Circuit Theory Lab I

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 105 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Circuit Theory Lab I is designed to supplement the Circuit Theory I course.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-205 Circuit Theory II

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 105 with C or better; MATH 166 & PHYS 152 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Analysis and design of lumped networks. Resistive elements, superposition, nodal analysis, dependent sources, equivalence theorems. Energy storage in elements, dynamics of first and second order networks, transient responses, phasors, sinusoidal steady state analysis, steady state power analysis, three phase power circuits. Offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-L205 Circuit Theory II Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 205 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Illustrates the concepts of ECE 205. Simulations with PSPICE, LABVIEW, NXT Robotics, INCSYS Power Simulator, Mathematica; construction and design. First order, second order transients, ideal and non-ideal transformer circuits, sinusoidal steady state circuits, power grid simulation. Offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-206 Solid State Devices and Circuits

    Prerequisites:

    ECE L206 must be taken concurrently; ECE 205(must have a minimum grade of C in preqs.)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Review of Thevenin and Norton Equivalent circuits. Frequency Domain analysis and Bode Plots. Representation of an active device by its Gain, Input and Output Resistance. Thorough coverage of op amps - circuits, applications, and inherent limitations. Introduction to semiconductor physics and the PN junction. Diode circuits, applications, and models. Zener diodes and power supplies. Ripple estimations. The Bipolar Junction Transistor - large and small signal analyses. Active, cutoff, and saturation region characterization. Hybrid Pi and T models. Basic transistor configurations - common collector, common base, and common emitter - along with their characteristics, applications, and tradeoffs. Estimation of bandwidth using open circuit time constants. Prerequisite: ECE 205. Must have at least a C in this. Co-requisite: ECE L206

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-L206 Solid State Devices & Circuits Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 206 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Solid State Devices & Circuits Lab is designed to supplement the Solid State Devices & Circuits course.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-225 Linear Systems

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 166 and ECE 205 with a minimum grade of C; ECE L225 Concurrently.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Classification of systems, differential equations, linear algebra, discrete mathematics, derivation of the system model, state variable description, impulse response, convolution, frequency response of discrete and continuous systems. Fourier Series,Fourier transforms, Fourier methods of discrete signals, Laplace transforms, Z transform, analysis of control systems.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-L225 Linear Systems Lab

    Prerequisites:

    MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY WITH ECE 225

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Linear Systems lab is designed to supplement the Linear Systems course. Matlab simulation of linear systems, Hardware Implementation of Analog Filters, measurement of the transfer function.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-288 Measuring the World

    Credits:

    4.00

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • ECE-306 Solid State Devices, Power and Circuits

    Prerequisites:

    ECE-206 with a minimum grade of C. ECE L306 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Continuation of Solid State Dev & Circuits I, with emphasis on MOSFET field effect transistors; Physical structure, I-V characteristics, modeling, use as a switch and CMOS inverter, biasing circuits, and basic amplifier configurations - common drain, common gate, and common source. Differential Amplifiers - BJT and MOSFET implementations, along with small and large signal analysis. Multistage circuits, active loads. Design of current source and current mirrors. Internal capacitance and high frequency limitations. Low midband, and high frequency analyses of transistor amplifiers. Miller effect. Open and Short Circuit Time Constants. Cascade and Cascode configurations. Frequency response of amplifiers. Significant circuit design activities. Course tightly coupled to ECE-L306.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-L306 Solid State Devices, Power and Circuits Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 306 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Illustrates the concepts of ECE 306. Exercises that help meld the practical aspects with the theoretical concepts taught in ECE 306. Biasing and design of MOSFET amplifiers. Construction of differential and multistage amplifiers. Investigation of different current source implementations. Simulation of bandwidth improvement using Cascode structures. Course concludes with a multistage design challenge using MOSFETs to reach a specified gain, output impedance and bandwidth objective provided by the instructor.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-307 Electric Power Systems - Analysis and Design

    Prerequisites:

    MA166; ECE 205; ECE 206 and ECE 403 helpful, but not required

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is a first course in understanding the components that compose the high power grid. Generation of power; transmission line characteristics, load impacts. Real and reactive power along with compensation techniques. Transformers. Synchronous generators and motors. Power flow. Power quality. Transient and dynamic stability issues. Handling faults, overvoltage and surge protection. Electronic control by high power devices such as thyristors, relays, and circuit breakers. HVDC examined. Recent developments and opportunities in the Power field. A strong emphasis placed on problems solving and representative exercises.

  • ECE-310 Special Topics in Engineering

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 206 and MATH 166 with a minimum grade of C

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Selected topics in Computer Engineering or Electrical Engineering. Offered to upper level students by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: ECE 206 and MATH 166, or instructors' approval. 1 term - 4 credits. Minimum grade of C in prerequisites.

  • ECE-311 Embedded Systems

    Prerequisites:

    ECE-203 and ECE 206 with a minimum grade of C AND ENS 333 OR CMPSC F131 with a minimum grade of C; Must take ECE L311 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will introduce the fundamentals of embedded micro controllers for system level applications: fundamental elements - sensors or transducers, microcontrollers, and the interfacing to external components. Procedural methods for design of the complete embedded system are developed. Programming using assembly, and C languages is utilized. Must take ECE L311 concurrently. Prerequisites: ECE 203 AND ECE 206, AND ENS-333 or CMPSC F131 (minimum grade of C in prereqs.) 1 term - 3 credits.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-L311 Embedded Systems Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Must take ECE 311 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Embedded Systems Lab is designed to supplement the Embedded Systems course.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-325 Statistics for Engineering and Science

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 166 with a minimum grade of C; Must take ECE L325 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Understanding the fundamentals of probability and statistics of experimental data. Measures of central tendency, variation, probability, events, Bayes Rule, discrete and continuous random variables, discrete and continuous distributions including the binomial distribution, normal distribution, chi-square distribution and student distribution, covariance, central limit theorem, hypothesis testing, linear regression, signal processing statistics (EE students), categorical data analysis (non-EE students). Use of Mathematica's statistical packages central to this course. Final project is a project with Biology measuring rat whisker resonance.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-L325 Statistics for Engineering and Science Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE L325 MUST BE TAKEN WITH ECE 325

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Engineering Statistics and Probability lab is designed to supplement the Engineering Statistics and Probability course.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-335 Control Systems

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 225; Min Grade of C in Prereq. ECE L335 Concurrently.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduction to feedback control systems; control system characteristics (stability, sensitivity, disturbance rejection, steady-state accuracy, transient response); stability analysis; root-locus analysis and design; frequency-response analysis and design; analysis and design of digital control systems. Normally offered bi-yearly.

  • ECE-L335 Control Systems Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 335 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Control Systems lab is designed to supplement the Control Systems course.

  • ECE-390 Data & Computer Communications Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 225 with a minimum grade of C;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Basic principles and topics in data communication, local area networks, wide area networks, communication architectures and protocols. Data transmission, encoding, multiplexing, circuit switching, packet switching, frame relays, and asynchronous transfer mode are also discussed. The TCP/IP protocol suite is studied and a project involving configuring, implementing, and installing a network is carried out during the semester. Prerequisite: ECE 225 or instructor's approval. 1 term - 3 credits. Must be taken concurrently with ECE L390.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-L390 Data & Computer Communications Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken concurrently with ECE 390

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Data and Computer Communications lab is designed to supplement the Data and Computer Communications course.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-403 Applied Electromagnetics

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 205 and MATH 265 with a minimum grade of C; ECE L403 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Electrostatics and magnetostatics, including Coulomb's law, Gauss's law, Biot-Savart law and Ampere's law, vector operations in rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, divergence theorem and Stokes theorem, electric fields in materials, Lorentz force, magnetic torque, Faraday's law, Maxwell's equation, wave propagation, transmission lines with Smith charts, rectangular waveguides, Hertzian dipole antenna; examples related to power when applicable.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-L403 Applied Electromagnetics Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken concurrently with ECE 403

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Applied Electromagnetics Lab is designed to supplement the Applied Electromagnetics course.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ECE-410 Communication Systems

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 206, ECE 225 and MATH 265 with a minimum grade of C; L410 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Coverage of a variety of basic communication systems, their theory of operation, and the analysis of their performance. Review of linear systems, Fourier and Laplace Transforms, and Frequency Domain analysis as needed. Graphical convolution of analog signals. Digital Baseband modulation techniques. Receiver design with an introduction to Stochastics. Digital Bandpass modulation and demodulation techniques. Analog communication systems including AM, FM, and PM approaches. Consideration of Noise and the resultant system performance. Multiplexing and information compression. ECE 410 and ECE L410 must be taken concurrently.

  • ECE-L410 Communications Systems Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 410 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Illustrates the concepts of ECE 410. Exercises will focus both on communication system components and in the construction of a complete communication system. Introduction to FSK, DTMF, Phase lock loops, AM and FM modulation, oscillators, A/D and D/A conversion and the Nyquist rate. Wireless transmissions. Troubleshooting of non-working systems. Students have flexibility in the design and construction a full communication system which includes digitization, rearrangement in parallel and serial formats, transmission over a distance, and reconstruction back to its original analog form.

  • ECE-411 Senior Project I

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 205, ECE 306, ECE 225, MATH 265; permission of the instructor may be required.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The Senior Project provides a significant opportunity for students to direct all of their previous training and learning towards one major endeavor. It has been modified from previous years to extend over two semesters (instead of one) to facilitate a more comprehensive effort in both the planning and execution of the project. Although resources and guidance are provided for each student, this course still requires them to take full responsibility to plan their time, manage, and implement their project. In Part I the student creates their project proposal. Over a fourteen-week period the student is subjected to the practical stress of completing and delivering in professional fashion a project of their own choosing (with endorsement from an appropriate faculty advisor or industrial mentor). This period includes the following objectives: selection and careful definition of a project; a review of background information; a selection of the desired approach with justification; identification of resources needed; an outline of the project implementation timetable with desired milestones; a delineation of how the completed project performance might be evaluated. Weekly progress reports and meeting with their advisor are required. A formal proposal document is reviewed by department members (and possibly Industrial constituents) and may go through numerous iterations to be deemed 'acceptable'. Along the way informal oral presentations of both the 'general' and 'technical' aspects of their project will be presented to the rest of their peer group. A formal presentation of the project proposal is made to an audience of peers, faculty, and outside advisors. Prerequisites: ECE 205, ECE 306, ECE 225, MA265; permission of the instructor may be required. ECR

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ECE-412 Senior Project II

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 411

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In Part II the student implements, documents, and presents their completed project. Having defined their project, students gather the resources necessary and proceed to execute their designs. This period will include the construction, testing, troubleshooting, refinement, and evaluation of their project. A formal presentation of the project is made. A professional caliber documentation of the project is also required, and may go through numerous iterations of review. The final project report must consider most of the following: environmental impact, sustainability, manufacturability, ethics, health and safety issues, and political concerns. Time management, prioritization of process, formal communication, overcoming obstacles and meeting deadlines are monitored by the project advisor. Weekly reports and meetings are expected. The advisor also serves as a resource for the student. However, full responsibility for the success of the project rests on the student. Cross-disciplinary projects are encouraged. ECR

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ECE-413 Wireless Networks

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken concurrently with ECE L413. ECE 225 with minimum grade of C. ECE 390 recommended.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores key topics in the field of wireless communications and networking including wireless technologies and architectures, wireless networks and protocols, and wireless LANs. Topics include antennas and propagation, signal encoding techniques, spread spectrum, error control techniques, satellite communications, cellular and cordless systems, wireless protocols, and wireless LAN technology. This course is intended for senior students who have had some prior exposure to data communications concepts.

  • ECE-L413 Wireless Networks Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken concurrently with ECE 413.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Wireless Networks lab is designed to supplement the Wireless Networks course.

  • ECE-414 Senior Project Proposal

    Prerequisites:

    Take ECE-101, ECE-206, MATH-165;

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The aim of this course is for students to generate a thoughtful and well -written senior project proposal. This course will provide guidelines and critiquing for that purpose. By the end of the course, students will have narrowly identified their project, performed a review of current available related technology, and selected the approach they will pursue. They will also establish a parts list, timetable, set of milestones, and basis or procedure for determining an answer to the question how good is it? At the end of the course they will formally present their project and write a comprehensive project proposal document. Once accepted, they are permitted to take ENS 415 Senior Project. Note that this course is focused on the process of creating a viable proposal. Enough flexibility exists that students may either implement the project they documented in this course when they take ENS 415, or may pursue an alternative project if desired. Also note that this course replaces ECE 411 for the graduating class of 2016.

  • ECE-415 Senior Project

    Prerequisites:

    Take ECE-414;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    For the senior project the student implements, documents, and presents their completed project of the proposal generated in ENS 414. Having defined their project, students gather the resources necessary and proceed to execute their designs. This period will include the construction, testing, troubleshooting, refinement, and evaluation of their project. A formal presentation of the project is made. A professional caliber documentation of the project is also required, and may go through numerous iterations of review. The final project report must consider most of the following: environmental impact, sustainability, manufacturability, ethics, health and safety issues, and political concerns. Time management, prioritization of process, formal communication, overcoming obstacles and meeting deadlines are monitored by the project advisor. Weekly reports and meetings are expected. The advisor also serves as a resource for the student. However, full responsibility for the success of the project rests on the student. Cross-disciplinary projects are encouraged. Note: Replaces ECE 412 for the graduating class of 2016.

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ECE-430 Digital Signal Processing

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 225, ECE 203 with minimum grade of C; ECE L430 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Discrete signals and systems, digital simulation of analog systems, Z transforms, recursion equations, finite-order systems, Fourier transforms, line spectra and Fourier series, discrete Fourier series and Fast Fourier Transforms (FTT), sampling and interpolation, mean-square approximations, non-recursive and recursive filters, selected topics on algorithms, design and applications of digital signal processing. There will be an end-of-semester design project that will involve students' creativity, design of open ended projects, formulation of alternative solutions, detailed system description, realistic constraints (economic factors, safety, reliability, aesthetics ethics, and social impact).

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-L430 Digital Signal Processing Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 430 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Illustrates the concepts of ECE 430. This laboratory course uses MATLAB, Simulink, and the Texas Instruments 6713 DPS board to design, test and implement various projects. The students will also learn how to use FPGA boards to design and implement various DSP systems. There will be a design project at the end of the course designed to synthesize what the students have learned.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ECE-510 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

    Credits:

    1.00- 6.00

    Description:

    This is an independent study in electrical and computer engineering. Topics will vary.

  • ENS-103 Introduction to Engineering

    Prerequisites:

    ENS L103 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides exposure to engineering practice, with particular focus on electrical engineering components such as circuit elements and systems. It seeks to go beyond the mathematics and provide an intuitive appreciation of functional devices. Examples taken from a broad swath of technological history illustrate significant crossroads, decisions, and inventiveness. Emphasis is placed on learning to think as an engineer - assessment of problems, candidate solution tradeoffs, and implementations. Frequent exercises in creative engineering design will be used. Students will be required to design several elementary devices, such as a magnet, a capacitor, a timing device, and a motor, which they will enter in a competition for overall strength, compactness, accuracy, or speed. Sometimes assignments relate to "survival on an island" concerns, such as communication or drinking water. Students also learn about reverse engineering by selecting, building, troubleshooting, and presenting an electronic kit of their choice. A term paper determining the engineering behind a topic of their choice will also be written and presented. On occasion (see ENS L103) there will be team competitions between various smaller groups in the class.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • ENS-L103 Intro to Engineering Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken Concurrently w/ ENS-103

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Lab is designed to provide opportunities to gain familiarity with engineering tools. Students will be introduced to parts (e.g. learn the resistor color code), test equipment (multimeters, prototyping trainers, signal generators, and oscilloscopes), and construction techniques (wiring, soldering, troubleshooting). Although it varies from year to year, Class Projects can be built during the Lab sessions. In the past these have included a 25 Watt electric generator, various door lock systems (both mechanical and electronic), and an AM transmitter and receiver (all projects made from scratch). It is likely that 2010-2011 may introduce some robotic creations for a competition. Electronic kits and motors can also be built and serviced in the Lab. There is an adjoining machine shop, which can be utilized (with supervision), for fabricating items. Individual creativity is encouraged, and informal problem solving sessions occasionally occupy lab time. However, the lab is accessible outside of the traditional scheduled time.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    SCI TECH ENGNR

  • ENS-201 Engineering Mechanics

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 151

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Forces, statics, and dynamics of rigid bodies, stress and strain analysis, kinematics, computer aided analysis. Focus on professional standards in practice for design of structures.

  • ENS-L202 Technical Communication

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102, PHYS 152 AND L152;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Emphasis on clarity, precision, accuracy, and conciseness in scientific writing. Assignments include a team-based design-contest proposal, an oral presentation on current scientific topics, a team-based design of an experiment with a write-up and an oral presentation, a paper on engineering ethics concerning the Challenger and an instruction manual. Memo writing, summary writing, and resumes are also included.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • ENS-220 Design and Design Tools

    Prerequisites:

    Take ENVE-104 and PHYS-151;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course applies design tools (AutoCAD primarily and others as necessary for specified design problems) to design problems specified by the instructor.

  • ENS-333 Programming for Engineers

    Prerequisites:

    ENS L333 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will introduce programming concepts in the context of solving engineering problems. Emphasis will be placed on applying the high-level programming skills learned to particular platforms such as embedded systems. Students will implement various microcontroller programming exercises as well as an end of the semester project.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • ENS-L333 Programming for Engineers Lab

    Prerequisites:

    ENS 333 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The Programming for Engineers lab is designed to supplement the Programming for Engineers Course.