Undergraduate

  • ALS-264 Introduction to Law and Legal System

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduction to civil, criminal and constitutional law, with special focus on procedural law and the federal and state court systems. Limitations of the courts, forms of remedies, the law of equity and institutional sources of American law will also be studied. Introduction to judicial cases and brief writing. Normally offered each semester.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • ALS-265 Law and Ethics

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Ethical issues are central in law for lawyers, paralegals, judges, jurors and anyone working within or touched by the legal system. This course examines philosophical questions, practical issues, and social theories of law, primarily through the use of legal materials, to analyze legal ethical theory. The course considers how major theories are characterized within the American legal system, including the presumption of innocence, due process guarantees, the right to counsel, and other fundamental legal concepts. Normally offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • ALS-266 Criminal Law

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines criminal law in the United States from a broad perspective. It will present the general principles and doctrines that affect the whole criminal law, such as elements of criminal offenses, defenses to crime, and perspectives on crime and criminal law. In addition, students will learn the elements of specific crimes, such as homicide, criminal sexual conduct, terrorism and related crimes, crimes against public morals, and crimes against property. Discussions of the direction of the criminal law and constitutional limitations on government will be presented as preparation for future study.

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A

  • ALS-360 Fundamentals of Paralegal Practice

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces the student to the responsibilities of paralegals and to the culture of the legal profession. Topics include the development of paralegalism as a profession, the definition of the practice of law, ethical considerations, interviewing techniques, legal research, law office management, and client relationships. Normally offered each semester.

  • ALS-361 Legal Research & Writing I

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    How to use the law library, perform legal research, write legal analysis in memorandum form, and use computers as a research tool. Initial focus is on learning how to find legal materials, including federal and state case law, statutory law, and administrative law. Use of finding tools such as digests, encyclopedias, and CALR will be studied, as will Shepardizing. Focus also on legal writing, from letters through case analysis. Normally offered fall semester. Sophomore Status Required

  • ALS-362 Litigation

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The Rules of Civil Procedure dictate the steps taken in state and federal lawsuits. This course will acquaint students with rules and the practical requirements of the rules, from filing a complaint to clarifying a judgment and to the duties of paralegals in a litigation office. Normally offered each semester.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • ALS-363 Law of Contracts

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The existence and validity of a contract is determined by specific rules. Students will learn about formation through offer and acceptance, contract enforceability, the necessity of consideration, and breach of contract and will draft contract provisions as a paralegal might in a law office. Normally offered each semester. Sophomore status required.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • ALS-365 Wills and Probate

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-264 or ALS-360 or Instructor's permission

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    State laws affect the disposition of an individual's estate at death, and upon death, the estate must be probated in court. Focus on estate information gathering, drafting of wills, and the probate of estates for those with and without wills. Emphasis on the role of the paralegal in a law office handling wills and probate. Prerequisites: ALS 360 or 363 or permission of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered yearly.

  • ALS-366 Corporate Law

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-264 or ALS-360 or instructor's permission

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Corporations are unique business entities and specialized citizens of the state. This course will examine the special rules for establishing and maintaining a corporation, including the nature of corporations and their legal relationships with governments, individuals, and other business entities. Students will learn about the role of paralegals in corporate law offices, including document management and production, corporate litigation processes, and maintaining corporate compliance. Normally offered alternate years.

  • ALS-368 Real Estate Law

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will present common law real estate principles and the effect of federal agencies on the buying and selling of real property. Sample forms including leases, purchase and sale agreements, and closing forms are reviewed and drafted. Normally offered alternate years.

  • ALS-369 Family Law

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-264 or ALS-360;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Family law includes marriage, divorce, support, custody, property division, and abuse prevention petitions. Essentially an area of state law, it is often the backbone of general practice law firms. The role of paralegals in a family law office will be studied. Normally offered yearly.

  • ALS-370 Administrative Law and Worker's Compensation

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-360 or ALS-362

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Federal and state administrative agencies such as FTC, NLRB, and EEOC are extensive sources of law. Familiarity with these agencies is useful in many areas where a paralegal might work. Additionally, Worker's Compensation law is uniquely suited to assist the student in acquiring a practical understanding of the administrative law area, and its legal, administrative, economic, and social foundations will be studied. Normally offered alternate years.

  • ALS-371 Law of Bankruptcy, Credit and Debt

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-264 or ALS-360;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Federal and state statutes protect consumers in many ways. This course will deal with such important laws as the Truth in Lending Act, the federal Bankruptcy code, and Massachusetts 93A, Consumer Protection Statute to gain a thorough understanding of the protections available to consumers and those contemplating bankruptcy. The paralegals role in consumer law and bankruptcy will be studied.

  • ALS-373 Education Law

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course provides a basic overview of key issues in contemporary education law and policy. Relevant local, state, and federal laws will be reviewed as well as education policy issues, including civil rights, student safety and discipline. This course will also cover the core educational entitlements granted to all students with disabilities in the public education system. It will focus on the substantive legal protections designed to ensure that students with disabilities receive a Free and Appropriate Public Education, and on the various procedural protections for students and parents. The course will cover major federal legislation such as the IDEA, ADA and Section 504, as well as major Supreme Court and other important cases. The course will cover fundamental legal issues balancing the interests of the public, schools, students, and parents. Additionally, since paralegals have become an important part of education law enforcement and practice, several assignments will focus on practical paralegal work.

  • ALS-374 Torts: Personal Injury Law

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Many civil suits arise when the negligence of an individual creates injury to another. Elements of negligence law and specific types of cases such as automobile accidents and medical malpractice will be studied, with an emphasis on practical aspects of drafting and research for the prospective paralegal. Normally offered yearly.

  • ALS-375 Technology and the Law

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-362

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The role of computers and software in the law office as it affects the paralegal Lectures and hands-on applications will focus on the changing technology of computer hardware through fact scenarios that students will use to track changes from introduction to resolution in litigation. Focus on software applications involving word processing, spreadsheets, billing, diary and scheduling, research, and use of the Internet. Normally offered alternate years.

  • ALS-376 Business Entities and Securities Law

    Prerequisites:

    ALS 264 OR ALS 360 or permission of Instructor

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The special legal nature and requirements of many kinds of business entities, including sole proprietorships, partnerships, non-profit organizations, and franchises are studied, together with the role paralegals might play in assisting or creating these entities. Additionally, an introduction to the statutes and regulations of the federal securities law and blue sky laws, with special emphasis on the responsibilities paralegals can assume in this area, will be studied. Normally offered alternate years.

  • ALS-377 Pol of Regulation, Product Liability Litigation & Tort Reform

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The law dictates that corporations, arguably the most influential institutions of our time, can have only one goal: to maximize profits for their shareholders. Corporations have no general legal or moral obligation to the well-being of society or individual consumers. This means that, if corporations are to be restrained from maximizing profit by harming the public good, they must be regulated. When regulation fails, and dangerous products make it into the marketplace, consumers who are harmed can bring product liability lawsuits. Despite these facts, massive deregulation has occurred in the U.S. and tort reform threatens the ability of consumers to bring product liability lawsuits. Using the food and tobacco industries as case studies, we will examine the history of deregulation and tort reform and answer the following question: How can law and government be used to protect society and consumers by regulating a system programmed to ignore the welfare of everyone except shareholders?

  • ALS-378 Advanced Litigation & Trial Practice

    Prerequisites:

    ALS 362, or permission of instructor

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Building on the skills introduced in ALS 362, Civil Litigation, this course will provide a thorough study of the rules of evidence, the process of discovery, and the preparation of a case for a trial, as well as the roles of arbitration, mediation, and negotiation in litigation and other legal disputes. Theory will be combined with practical applications for prospective paralegals, such as deposition abstracting, gathering and preserving evidence, and techniques on how to prepare a case for ADR. Normally offered yearly.

  • ALS-381 Paralegal Internship

    Prerequisites:

    Senior standing and at least 15 hours of paralegal courses, or instructor's permission.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A one-semester internship in either a law office, a governmental agency, insurance company, or a for-profit or non-profit corporation, depending on the positions available during each semester. Once a week seminars will discuss such topics as ethical considerations in a law office, experiences gained as a paralegal interns, and seeking paralegal employment. For specific placements/information, students must contact the Director of Paralegal Studies prior to the start of each semester. Prerequisites: Senior status and at least 15 hours of Paralegal Studies or permission of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered spring and summer. ECR

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ALS-383 Immigration Law

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-264 or ALS-360;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study of the immigration and nationality laws of the United States focusing on the interplay of the administrative agencies which administer those laws: Justice Department, Labor Department, and State Department. Topics include the immigrant selection system; the issuance of non-immigrant visas; grounds for excluding aliens and waiver of excludability; grounds for removal; change of status, and refugee and asylum status. Special emphasis on the paralegal's role in representing and communicating sensitively with aliens. Normally offered yearly.

  • ALS-384 Intellectual Property

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-264 or ALS-360;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A survey of the law of the protection of ideas, trade secrets, inventions, artistic creations, and reputation. The course will briefly review the bases for patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret protection, the distinction among the various forms of intellectual property, and the statutory and common law methods of enforcing rights. Normally offered yearly.

  • ALS-385 Legal Research & Writing II

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-361;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Building on the skills in ALS 361 - Legal Research & Writing I, this course continues the focus on learning how to find legal materials and how to summarize research results. Writing skills will be strengthened through various exercises and revisions. Skill development in legal analysis, writing legal memoranda, and using computer assisted legal research with Westlaw and Lexis will be emphasized. Normally offered spring semester.

  • ALS-390 Employment & Labor Law

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-264 or ALS-360; or instructor's permission

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The nature of the employment relationship and and overview of constitutional and federal statutory provisions that affect the employment relationship will be studied. Particular emphasis on the Civil Rights Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Statutory provisions regarding benefits and employment-related entitlements will also be studied. Normally offered yearly.

  • ALS-391 Domestic Violence, Abuse & Neglect

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-264 or ALS-360; or instructor's permission

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An opportunity to learn the history of domestic violence including battering, child abuse and child neglect, and the legal response to it. Focus will be on Massachusetts Law and its response, especially the Abuse Prevention Act, its application and enforcement, and on laws protecting children from abuse and neglect. Filings, law office issues and special issues in dealing with battered women and abused and neglected children will be included with the psychological issues, cultural issues, and advocacy possibilities. Normally offered yearly. Sophomore status required. Cultural Diversity A

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A

  • ALS-396 International Law

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-264 or ALS-360 or instructor's permission

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    With the globalization of the world economy, legal professional and business people require knowledge of international law more than ever. This course offers students a survey of selected materials in public international law. Covered will be the practical and theoretical issues of international law, from the Law of the Sea to business implications to definitions of war and international concepts of justice. Normally offered yearly.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • ALS-510 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's consent required

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Individual program of reading and research on an approved topic under the supervision of a member of the department. Only for qualified juniors or seniors. Offered every semester.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • ENST-321 Introduction to Permaculture

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Permaculture is the design of food systems and social structures to provide for human needs while restoring ecosystem health. Examining the interconnections between environmental, social and economic components, Permaculture is informed by the disciplines of systems ecology, ecological design and ethno-ecology.

  • GVT-110 Introduction to American Democracy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to the American political system and constitutional framework. Focus will be on the interplay of various institutions (the Presidency, Congress and the Judiciary) in creating public policies. Contemporary public issues will be discussed, as will the role of political theory in shaping American democracy. Attention will be given to the role of the news media, public opinion, political ideology, political parties and interest groups in the American system.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-H110 Honors Intro to American Democracy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Special honors section of GVT 110. Offered every fall.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-115 Evolution of the Global System

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The goal of this course is to introduce the student to the main actors, social facts and processes that shaped the international system in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. By analyzing the spread of industrialization, the race for colonies, the thrust of imperialism, and the rapid growth of nationalism, among other factors, this course explains the contradictory and simultaneous trends of unprecedented levels of prosperity and violence in Europe and beyond. While the course examines the role of the United States in the international system, particularly in light of its dominant role since the early twentieth century, it also emphasizes the developments taking place in other regions such as Asia, Africa and Latin America. This will allow students to understand the global arena as a space of complex interconnections involving varieties of forms of production, national political cultures and idiosyncratic traditions. This course sets the foundations for other courses in International Relations and Regional Studies

  • GVT-120 Research Methods

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Building on the skills learned in GVT 110, students will be introduced to the subfields of political science and learn to analyze political writings. Focus will be on the use of the scientific method for research on politics and government. Students will learn the steps in writing a research paper, including developing the research question and selecting a research design. Attention will be given to the use of statistical analysis and public opinion polling in political research.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-H120 Honors Research Methods

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A special honors section of Research Methods. Students will be introduced to the subfields of political science and learn to analyze political writings. Focus will be on the use of the scientific method for research on politics and government. Students will learn the steps in writing a research paper, including developing the research question and selecting a research design. Attention will be given to the use of statistical analysis and public opinion polling in political research.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-201 Statistics for Political Science

    Prerequisites:

    Sophomore Standing GVT 110 and 120 and Math 128 or higher.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is an introduction to statistics and empirical research methods generally used in political science. The course will emphasize the use of statistics and its value in substantive political science research. Statistics is a tool for drawing conclusions and making inferences from observable evidence. As well, the specification of conditions under which evidence is observed affects the conclusions and arguments that political scientists draw about how social and political processes work. The purpose of this course is to equip students with tools to interpret and conduct original data analysis, critique and make an argument based on data, and provide a view into the process of political science research and how political scientists use statistical methods and research design to answer substantive questions about politics. Since most applied data analysis utilizes data management software, students will learn how to use SPSS as a tool for conducting data analysis. Prerequisites: Sophomore Standing, GVT 110 and 120 and Math 130 or instructor's consent. 1 term - 4 credits.

    Type:

    Quantitative Reasoning

  • GVT-203 Women in World Politics

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The relationship of women to their political culture and structures. The role of women seen in theory (e.g., Marxism, American feminism, existentialism) and in global comparative analysis. Cultural Diversity B

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • GVT-204 Women in American Politics

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of women's place in the Constitution; policy concerns; and political participation. Attention will be given to women's societal roles and attitudes towards women of different classes and races and the ways in which these roles and attitudes influence women's political participation. Attention will also be given to the theories and perspectives of the current women's movement as they influence policy considerations. Cultural Diversity A

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • GVT-208 Politics / Religion

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores what major religions say about the status and responsibilities of the state and how, in turn, selective states have, in theory and practice, structured the place of religions in political life. Particular attention is given to issues of politics and religion in the United States. Cultural Diversity A

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-223 American Politics & Institutions

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110 or GVT 120 or instructor's permission

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will provide an examination of the institutions that are involved in the American policy-making process. The student will learn about the presidential, (as opposed to the parliamentary) system that exists in the United States. The course will focus on a relationship between the President and Congress and how that relationship impedes or facilitates the public policy process, including the budgetary process. The course will include a discussion of the president's role as head of the executive branch, and the implementation of congressional policies. Attention will be given to the role of the judiciary in the policy process. Normally offered every year.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-224 Introduction to Public Policy

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110 and GVT 120 or instructor's permission

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to the process by which public policies are made in the United States. The class will focus on agenda-setting and policy formulation at the federal level, and will include a discussion of the various actors in governmental institutions that impact public policy. Several policy issues will be used as examples to illustrate the process. Some comparisons will be made to state and local policymaking. Normally offered every year.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-225 U.S. Constitutional Law & Civil Liberties

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines a range of contemporary issues introducing students to the U.S. Constitution and the fundamental concepts of constitutional law. Students discuss and analyze topics including separation of powers, federalism, freedom of speech, the death penalty, gun control, and civil rights. We will explore current constitutional challenges and their relationship to law and society.

  • GVT-240 Acts of Courage and Political Conscience

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will explore the actions and words of a range of individuals who dared to be different in the hope of having an impact on U. S. politics and society. The expression of their views and actions may have initially been rejected. In other cases, their views served as catalysts for change.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-243 American Constitutional Law

    Prerequisites:

    not open to freshmen

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The growth of Constitutional law and the role of the Supreme Court is examined by analysis of court decisions dealing with Judicial Review, Federalism, Presidential and Congressional powers. Normally offered every year.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-244 Civil Liberties

    Prerequisites:

    Not open to Freshmen

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Analysis of Supreme Court decisions in regard to political and civil rights including freedom of speech, press, assembly and religion, obscenity, race and sex discrimination, and criminal procedure. Normally offered every year.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-245 Courts, Public Policy, and Legal Research

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the public policy-making role of the court system and examines questions such as whether and how courts can spur political and social reform. The direct and secondary effects of key court decisions will be examined. Case studies may focus on issues like civil rights and pro-choice court cases and political activism. The course will also examine the basics of policy-related legal research.

  • GVT-253 State and Local Government

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110/120 OR INSTRUCTOR'S CONSENT

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The development, structure and functions of state governments with emphasis on the government of Massachusetts; the various forms of local government in cities and towns; analysis of the relationships between local, state and federal governments. Normally offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-261 Theory & Practice of International Relations

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110, and GVT 120 or consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Review of major approaches to the study of international relations. Definition of concepts such as power, nationalism, imperialism, and dependency. Special attention to the use of force and conflict resolution. Special class project. Normally offered every year.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-H261 Honors Theory & Practical International Relations

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110, and GVT 120 or consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Review of major approaches to the study of international relations. Definition of concepts such as power, nationalism, imperialism, and dependency. Special attention to the use of force and conflict resolution. Special class project. Normally offered every year.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-275 Ancient & Medieval Political Theory

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the political ideas of major thinkers of Western civilization, beginning with the ancient Greek philosophers and continuing through the 14th Century. Theorists studied (in English translation) include, among others, Plato, Aristotle, Thucydides, Cicero, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, and Christine de Pizan. One term, 4 semester hours.

  • GVT-276 Modern Political Theory

    Prerequisites:

    Sophomore standing

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the political ides of the major thinkers of Western civilization from the time of Machiavelli to the present. Theorist studied (in English translation) include, among others, Machiavelli, Bodin, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Mill, Marx, Wollstonecraft, Beauvoir, and Dewey. One term, 4 semester hours. No Prerequisites.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-278 Literature & Politics

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will examine novels with an expressed political theme introduced by the author. The theme may be either a central part of the plot, or secondary to the main plot. The class will focus on American as well as foreign works. The class is open to non-majors. Normally offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-279 Minority Politics in the United States

    Prerequisites:

    Sophomore Status Required

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is designed to provide an intensive survey of minority politics in the political development of the United States. We will focus on the historical and contemporary experiences of several groups in American politics. In particular, the course will look at four groups that, for reasons of race, have been subjected to systematic discrimination and political subordination in U.S. history: American Indians, African Americans, Latino Americans, and Asian/Pacific Americans. In this course we will work toward an understanding of American politics from the point of view of politically active and engaged persons of color. This course will also take a close look at the future of race and ethnicity in American politics. It is a fundamental premise of this course that an understanding of race and minority politics is necessary to comprehensively understand American political development and many important issues in contemporary American politics. Cultural Diversity A

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-280 Law, Public Policy, and Psychology

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The law affects and is affected by public policy. Beyond this, the law affects, and is affected by, many other disciplines. Understanding the evolving relationship among public policy, law and psychology in the US is integral to both disciplines. This course explores contemporary forensic psychology's role in the legal system - e.g., jury selection; expert witnesses; biases; crime control vs. due process, etc. through readings, class discussion, occasional audio-visual material and guest speakers if and when appropriate and available. Normally offered every other year.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-281 Intro to Comparative Politics

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110 and GVT 120 or consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines various methods of comparing political systems. Institutions such as executive departments, legislatures, court systems and local governmental systems are examined comparatively. It includes analysis of the impact of different economic systems on political/governmental institutions, and on economic circumstances that impact government. It also looks at political socialization both in terms of process and comparative content. An effort is made to include countries from all regions of the world. Normally offered every year.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-H281 Honors Intro to Comparative Politics

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110 and GVT 120 or consent of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines various methods of comparing political systems. Institutions such as executive departments, legislatures, court systems and local governmental systems are examined comparatively. It includes analysis of the impact of different economic systems on political/governmental institutions, and on economic circumstances that impact government. It also looks at political socialization both in terms of process and comparative content. An effort is made to include countries from all regions of the world. Normally offered every year.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-283 Challenges to Development in the Global South

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Theories dealing with the process of political change in countries of the Third World: the impact of the military, traditional culture and institutions, economic problems, strong personalities and other factors on political life and institutions. Prerequisite: Not open to freshmen. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. Cultural Diversity B

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science

  • GVT-284 Intro to Peace & Conflict: Horn of Africa & International Security

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course analyzes both ongoing and potential conflicts as well as conflict fault-lines in the Horn of Africa region and their implication to International Security. It inquires into the nature of regional conflicts and security complexes and explores ways of resolving them in a peaceful manner. In so doing, it examines such international security threats as state failure, Islamic terrorism, and piracy in the light of the dynamics and evolution of the debates on International Security as well as the transformations in the main global, continental, and regional security institutions such as UN, AU, and IGAD. Based upon International Relations perspectives, it analyzes the traditional definitions of security at the national, regional and international levels of analysis since 1945. Likewise, it studies how states and international institutions have revisited the concepts, policies and strategies of security in the post Cold War and post 9/ 11 world, from realist perspectives to the Copenhagen School of security studies.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-302 Public Relations and Lobbying

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Methods and practices of interest groups trying to influence legislative and administrative decision making; methods and practices of public agencies trying to influence governmental policies; the military industrial complex and other cases on federal and state levels. Normally Offered every third year.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-306 Women & Public Policy

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This hybrid course will examine the political leadership and influence of women within political institutions and on public policy. The course is divided into two parts: Part 1 will examine women in politics, with particular attention given to the intersectional realities of race, class, gender identity, and ideological orientation. Specific policy areas, including reproductive choice, housing, pay equity, and domestic relations, will be discussed in Part 2. Prerequisite: Open to non-majors; not open to freshmen. Normally offered alternate years. Cultural Diversity A

    Type:

    Social Science,Cultural Diversity Opt A,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-307 Globalization of Gender Politics

    Prerequisites:

    Not open to freshmen

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the interaction between gender and globalization. It discusses the centrality of gender in international development by focusing on gender as one of the most critical factors that affect the success or the failure of globalization. Critically reviewing general theories of globalization, the course presents a historical overview of gender and development. It then explores selected topics: global restructuring and feminization of the labor force, gender in multinational corporations, gender and international migration, sex-tourism, AIDS, and the impact of the state, religion, and culture in creating social dislocations and inequalities. Finally, we will consider strategies of change and diverse forms of resistance by women. Offered as needed. Cultural Diversity B

    Type:

    Social Science,Cultural Diversity Opt B,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-308 International Security

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 281 and GVT 261

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the dynamic evolution of the debates on International Security as well as the transformations in the main global and regional security institutions such as UN and NATO. Based upon International Relations perspectives, it analyzes the traditional definitions of security at the national, regional and international levels of analysis since 1945. Likewise, it studies how states and international institutions have revisited the concepts, policies and strategies of security since the end of the Cold War and after the September 11 events, from realist perspectives to the Copenhagen School of security studies. Offered every year.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-310 Global Political Economy

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 281 and GVT 261 or instructors consent

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores the main premises and approaches to study Global Political Economy. After analyzing the history and development of the international system, it studies how states and markets are interconnected in the creation and reform of economic and political international institutions in the globalization process. It also focuses on the most acute problems of the current international system in the area of IPE, namely, environmental degradation, external debt, poverty, increasing gap between rich and poor countries, and trade conflicts. Offered every year.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-311 Politics of the Arab-Israeli Conflict

    Prerequisites:

    Open to Juniors and Seniors

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An analysis of the origins and the local, regional, and international dimensions of the Palestinian-Israeli-Arab conflict, this course will examine the conflict through the eyes of the major protagonists and the roles played by them from the early twentieth century to the present: Zionists/Israelis, Palestinians and other Arabs, British, Americans, Soviets. We will also explore the questions of why this conflict has captured the world's attention and why it has gone unresolved since World War II. Finally, we will examine the possibilities and attempts for resolution of what appears to be an intractable human tragedy.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-314 Media, Chaos, and Culture That Changed America

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The overall goal of this course is to understand why 1968 is considered one of the most tumultuous years in the 20th century as regards the news media; music and theater; television and film censorship; and in the shift in culture and mores of an entire subset of the population. The course will focus on specific touchstones that elucidate the communication to both the mainstream public, know broadly as the Silent Majority, and the new emerging 'boomers', whose values and attitudes still drive the media ten years into the 21st century. Students will learn how a single year of media can change forever how one part of a culture views itself, while at the same time discovering how another part of that same culture continues to resist those changes 40 years later. Students will learn how many of the seeds of ideas they take for granted in 2011, including educational and sports equality (Title 9) for women; environmental sensitivity, and gay rights were planted in the print, films and music of 1968, but didn't bloom until the years which followed. Guest speakers, films and lectures will be used to reinforce material from the texts.

    Type:

    BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,Social Science

  • GVT-323 Political Survey Research

    Prerequisites:

    OPEN TO JUNIORS & SENIORS

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Everything needed to design, carry out, and interpret a political survey. Topics covered will include questionnaire design, sampling, interviewing, coding data, and univariate and bivariate analysis of the results. Multivariate analysis will be discussed but not studied in-depth. An actual survey will be conducted as a class project. Normally offered every year.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-324 The 1st Amendment in the Internet Age

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Defamation, privacy, copyright, pornography, incitement to lawless conduct and harassment are six areas in which first Amendment freedoms historically have been constrained to some degree. The constraints have been worked out largely through judicial decisions issued over the last century. This course would look at the traditional interests that were balanced to produce the constraints, the Internet's impact on those interests and whether the impact suggests the need for rebalancing.

    Type:

    BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,Social Science

  • GVT-328 American Law, Government and Policy

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisites: Not open to freshmen

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course provides and overview of the legal system in the United States of America, in connection with the role of the Federal and State government and their policy. This course is designed for undergraduate and graduate students. During the semester, we will explore a variety of issues involving the legal system of the United States and how it effects local and federal government.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-333 Conspiracy in American Politics and Culture

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This basis of this course will be in-depth examinations of various conspiracies in American Politics and Culture, beginning with the Salem Witch Trials through the Lincoln Assassination Conspiracy and the Sacco & Vanzetti case through the present day. Present day conspiracies will include an examination of the JFK and RFK Assassinations, the Pentagon Papers case, the Watergate Conspiracy, the Iran/Contra scandal, Whitewater and the Vast Right Wing Conspiracy," the World Trade Center bombing, the Oklahoma City Bombing, Global Warming, and the 9/11 Investigation.

    Type:

    BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,Social Science

  • GVT-335 Law, Politics and Public Health

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Law is one of the primary tools used to protect public health in the United States. This course will use various case studies (tobacco industry, food industry, health care policy, etc.) to explore innovative uses of the law in diverse areas related to public health. Students will learn about the ways in which attorneys, public officials, politicians, and public health practitioners work together to make public health policy. Normally offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-336 Political Leadership

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course begins with the premise that leadership is a continuous process, and that leadership can be studied, analyzed, and learned, across the public (as well as private for profit, and private non-profit) sectors. The first half of the course will, following the Northouse, Burns, and Gardner texts, delve into various theories of leadership, including the traits, skills, style, and situational approaches. We will also cover gender differences in leadership studies, and leadership ethics. The second half of the course will deal with transformational leadership, and real life (historical and recent) examples of political leadership, including Nelson Mandela, J. Robert Oppenheimer, George Washington, Margaret Thatcher, and others. There will also be in-class discussions on current challenges in public policy, asking students to envision what leadership skills they have studied that could come into play in solving these public policy challenges. During the second half of the course, students will be required to interview a leader of their choice, and, utilizing the material covered during the course, write a paper based on the interview.

    Type:

    BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,Social Science

  • GVT-337 Public Policy & Business

    Prerequisites:

    Not open to freshmen

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Public policy-makers' interests in formulating and implementing policy in the areas of environmental protection, consumer protection, equal employment opportunity, health care, taxation and competition with a focus on business responsibility will be critically analyzed. Costs and benefits to the public and business will be evaluated. Prerequisite: Open to non-majors; not open to freshmen. Normally offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-339 Community Advocacy

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110 OR GVT 120

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course represents a unique opportunity for students to develop a general understanding of the relationship between politics and the community; a systematic and holistic way of viewing and analyzing the impact of community- based, community-wide organizations and efforts. Normally offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-340 Moot Court

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Moot Court consists of simulated arguments in front of the Supreme Court of the United States. Students brief approximately 20 Supreme Court cases and apply them to a hypothetical case before the Court. Students form written and oral arguments based on two constitutional questions in the hypothetical. Two person teams will develop legal oral arguments in favor of their clients. Students learn how to compose written briefs, develop a knowledge of case law, learn how to effectively respond to questioning, and develop forensic skills, and courtroom demeanor. Moot Court is a great preparation course for undergraduate students planning to attend law school.

  • GVT-343 State Court Process & Policy

    Prerequisites:

    Junior status or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Contemporary state court processes, progress and problems including trial and appellate court practice, procedure and participants; plea bargaining, alternative dispute resolution; policy making. Normally offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-345 Public Policy Writing

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course provides an introduction to the importance of written communication in the public discourse and in public decision-making. The course will examine some of the tools for producing relevant, useful material in the professional public policy analysis arena. The course will also study the various kinds of written communication the policy makers and advocates regularly utilize. The course also provides an introduction to the constraints that surround effective communication in public policymaking. Students will engage in drafting several different kinds of public policy analyses.

    Type:

    BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,Social Science

  • GVT-346 The American Presidency

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110 AND GVT 120 OR INSTRUCTOR'S CONSENT

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Perspectives on the role and problems of the presidency in American political life; the nature and difficulties of presidential influence and effectiveness, presidential authority within our system of government, and the impact of presidential character. Normally offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-347 Legislative Politics

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110 and GVT 120 or instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The structure and functioning of legislatures. Particular emphasis on the U.S. Congress, how it works and how it compares with other legislatures. The role of legislatures in a democracy. Normally offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-350 Inside Massachusetts Community Courts

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The object of this course is to teach the students the history of the District and Municipal Courts of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the important role they play in their respective communities throughout the state. The course will explore the various departments within each court and the functions they perform individually and as part of the overall court system. Through a combination of lecture, guest speakers, courtroom observation and journal keeping, students will learn and see first-hand how the local community courts dispenses justice, solves problems and makes a positive contribution to the communities they serve.

    Type:

    BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,Social Science

  • GVT-352 Constitutional Reform

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110, 120, 243, and 244 or instructor's permission

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A critical analysis of whether our constitutional system is adequate to effectively resolve the new and complex problems of governance in this century. The strengths and weaknesses of governmental structure created by the U.S. Constitution will be examined. Past and current amendment proposals will receive special attention. Normally offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-353 Politics in Film

    Prerequisites:

    SOPH STANDING REQUIRED

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A country's popular culture offers significant and accurate insights into the political values, attitudes and beliefs of its people at a given point in time. One form of popular culture, films, can be a powerful disseminator of political messages. This course will examine a number of different eras and political themes as they have been reflected through films in the U.S. Open to non-majors.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-355 American Parties & Politics

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110 AND GVT 120, or instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Historical overview of party development in the U.S. and of ideological and political trends as reflected in voting behavior. Recent developments in party structure, electoral strategies and political style. The party crisis vs. the art of political campaigning. Normally offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-357 Power & Politics in America's Cities

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110/120 OR INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION Junior status or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This online course is uniquely designed to examine the power dynamics and struggles that characterize the urban political landscape. Mayor leadership and corruption, community engagement and apathy, and resource and public service expansion and retraction will be critically examined as key elements that can help some cities grow and hasten the decline of others. Within an online environment we will study the dynamic cities of New York City, Chicago, Atlanta, Boston, Cleveland, Detroit, and New Orleans. Additionally, we will examine broader trends that emerge from and examination of cities by size and region.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-358 Politics and the Media

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110 OR GVT 120

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will explore the influence of the media on contemporary political issues and public opinion; and the use of media in political campaigns, advertising, etc. Topics may include the impact of talk radio", the issue of the media bias, the role of television, the Hollywood connection", etc. Normally offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-359 Hockey, International Development & Politics

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This class examines the way in which national identity, global and regional economics and international development intersect. It uses the professionalization of the sport of hockey and its subsequent spread around the globe as its case. It will look at the rise of the pro game, the way in which it shapes national identity in the Canadian case, the way in which the pro business model has changed in response to broad socio-economic changes in North America and geo-political shifts around the globe, especially in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-360 Elections and Voting

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    How are elections administered in the United States? Do Americans have confidence in the electoral process? Should they? Why or why not? This course will examine elections in the United States in detail -- from how they are funded to how they are administered to how voters behave. Students will have a choice of either serving as poll workers during the November election or organizing and conducting research of potential voters. Students will gain hands-on experience in actual research design, election administration, and non-partisan get-out-the-vote activities. In addition, students will gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between attitudes, opinion, and voting behavior in American politics and institutions. ECR

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-363 American Foreign Policy

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 281 and GVT 261

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A decision-making approach to understanding the domestic and institutional context of U.S. foreign policy. Includes analysis of continuity and change since WWII using case studies of critical decisions, e.g., Korea, Cuba, Vietnam, etc. Not open to freshmen. Prerequisites: GVT 110, GVT 120, GVT 261 or instructor's consent. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-366 Massachusetts Legislative Process

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110 OR GVT347; SOPH STANDING

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines fundamental framework, legislative oversight of the Executive Branch and basic functions of the Massachusetts Legislative. Special emphasis will be placed on gaining a practical understanding of the Massachusetts legislative process. Students are encouraged to explore the methods by which the major legislative measures are undertaken, various roles of legislative leaders, committee hearings and the procedures that are used under the Massachusetts General Laws. Open to non-majors. Offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-367 Politics of Spain

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is designed to provide students with a basic grounding in political institutions and processes in contemporary Spain. Political developments are presented in their socio-economic context, with special emphasis on the Spanish transition from a dictatorship to a democracy. Attention is also given to the issue of the Basque and Catalan nationalism, as well as the process of European integration. Prerequisite: GVT 281 or instructor's consent. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years at the Madrid Campus.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-H367 Honors Politics of Spain

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is designed to provide students with a basic grounding in political institutions and processes in contemporary Spain. Political developments are presented in their socio-economic context, with special emphasis on the Spanish transition from a dictatorship to a democracy. Attention is also given to the issue of the Basque and Catalan nationalism, as well as the process of European integration. Prerequisite: GVT 281 or instructor's consent. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years at the Madrid Campus.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-372 Coastal Zone Management

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's Consent

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course presents a survey of a coastal environment, its physical characteristics, natural systems, economic uses, and development pressures. Lectures examine strategies formulated in the U.S. for land and water resource management in the coastal zone. The roles of federal, state and local government, environmental groups and resource users are also explored. Finally, by comparing coastal zone management problems in the U.S. to those elsewhere in the world, students gain a global perspective. Normally offered every years. The course available through the Marine Studies Consortium and will be taught on the campus of one of the Consortium's member institutions.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-382 Crisis and Integration in Europe

    Prerequisites:

    Junior status or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Why did 17 European countries surrender the sovereign control of their currency and create the Euro? Will Turkey become a member of the European Union? Will Europeans continue free riding the security protection of the United States? Is the integration process another layer of bureaucracy or an institutional instrument to dean with the permanent crises in Europe? There are some of the questions guiding the discussions in the class.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-383 African Politics

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110 and GVT 120

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The political development of Africa in colonial and post-colonial periods. Analysis of the evolution of governmental institutions includes economic, social and personal factors; political forces at work in present day Africa. Not open to freshmen. Normally offered alternate years. Cultural Diversity B

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science

  • GVT-384 The U.S. and the International Relations of the Middle East

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will explore the role played by the United States in the Middle East in the twentieth century, with emphasis on the period since World War II. Our study will begin with a decision-making approach to understanding the domestic and institutional context of America's policy toward the region, followed by an examination of that policy as it confronted radical nationalist, socialist, and Islamic movements, Soviet influence, and specific contemporary problems - the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Lebanese civil war, the Iranian revolution, the Iran-Iraq War, and the Gulf War. Open to non-majors, not open to freshmen. Normally offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-385 Central and South Asian Politics Republics

    Prerequisites:

    Not open to freshmen.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will examiner political and economic institutions of newly independent entities from Kazakhstan to the Baltics. It will include historical roots of the Soviet Union from the Russian Revolution through the Gorbachev years. Attention will be paid to Marxist theory and non-Marxist challenges for the economy of the area as well as the state. While some of attention will be paid to foreign relations of the former Soviet Union and the current regimes with Western Europe and the U.S. and elsewhere, the major emphasis will be on domestic policy on citizens of the former Soviet Union. Normally offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-387 Conflict and Reconciliation in Central America

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 281 or instructor's consent. Junior status or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    current political trends in the Caribbean and in selected Central American nations. Emphasis will be placed on comparative analysis of public policies in the region, as well as on external factors which impact on politics in the Caribbean and Central America. Students will use academic sources in their analysis, as well as novels and other literary sources for the background of their analysis. Not open to freshmen. Normally offered every third year. Cultural Diversity B

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-388 The United States and East Asia

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will examine US relations with East Asia through the lens of leading International Relations theories. We will analyze the growing regional influence of China, and will also examine the foreign policies of major regional powers including South and North Korea, Japan, and Taiwan. By exploring the economic and political factors that are working to shape the dynamic East Asian regional order, we will gain an understanding of the challenges faced by the US in this economically and strategically pivotal region.

    Type:

    BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,Social Science

  • GVT-389 Politics of China

    Prerequisites:

    Junior status or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Emphasis on a particular approach to the problems of economic modernization and political development. Historical background; the revolutionary movement; present political structures and current issues. Cultural Diversity B

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science,Asian Studies

  • GVT-390 Global Politics of Resistance

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Utilizing the theoretical frameworks of Comparative Politics and International Relations, this course will focus on a critical analysis of contemporary forms of resistance politics, such as those culminating in popular struggles for peace, democracy, human rights, economic justice, gender equality, environment, and the rights of indigenous peoples.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-391 Canada: Multicultural Politics

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110/120 or Instructor's permission

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the Canadian model of incorporating diverse communities into its constitutional and political framework, including the founding British North American Act of 1867, the 1982 Constitution Act, and two later attempts at constitutional reform. Canada's role in balancing two official languages, English and French, is discussed, as is its recognition of a First Nations native-governed territory in the Arctic. This course introduces students to the Canadian polity and compares its parliamentary system with the U.S. separation of powers system. Prerequisites: GVT 110, GVT 120 or instructor's consent. Normally offered alternate years. Cultural Diversity B

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-393 Latin American Politics Today

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 281 or instructor consent

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the evolution of Latin America in the context of globalization. The first part analyzes the main political and economic trends of Latin America as a region, while the second presents the main challenges Mexico is facing today in the area of security. The third part moves forward into the detailed explanation of the transformations of the largest South American countries such as Colombia, Argentina, Chile and Venezuela, among others. The final section looks at the relationship between Latin America and the United States.

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science

  • GVT-394 Nation Building and International Intervention

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    What is the role of the international community in nation building? Who are the key nation building actors? Who should pay for nation building? How long should it take? And what are the main reasons for success and failure in nation building? This course will investigate these questions, looking especially at the cases of the former Soviet Central Asia and Afghanistan. Students will learn about one of the most pressing issues of the contemporary world, with an eye toward helping students navigate a globalized world.

    Type:

    BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,Social Science

  • GVT-398 Terrorism and Extremism in South and Central Asia

    Prerequisites:

    Junior status or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course discusses terrorism and extremism in South and Central Asia as forms of political violence and its effects on the security of the region and the world. Students will develop a working definition of terrorism and extremism and analyze tenets of states security policies. They will study the history of origin, political, economic and social causes of terrorism, the nature of Islamist terrorist organizations, their strategic goals, motivations, and the threats they pose to peace and development from the point of view of international relations and comparative politics. On the base of case studies and class discussions, students examine theories and instances of ideological, religious, and political extremism as a foundation for terrorism. Through thorough investigation of different cases students will acquire unique knowledge of the Al-Qaeda threat in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Central Asia, as well as activities of groups as the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, Lashkar-e-Taiba and others.

  • GVT-399 Ethnic Conflict, National Bldg. & International Intervention

    Prerequisites:

    SOPH STANDING REQUIRED

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The course focuses on the role of ethnic conflict and international intervention in nation building in the post-Cold War period. To understand fully these forces, theories such as colonialism, neo- and post-colonialism, and humanitarian intervention, along with social/economic conditions will be examined. Different case studies will be selected each time the course is offered. Open to non-majors.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-401 Political Marketing

    Prerequisites:

    Junior status or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This class will examine the techniques used to market political candidates, parties, issues, interest groups and think tanks in the modern American polity, as well as in Canada and the EU. The class will examine the causes and impact of the change that many observers have seen in the American polity from a civil to a consumptive political culture and question the extent to which this is a U.S. based versus more global phenomenon. At the same time, the class will aim to provide the student will a hands-on understanding of the way in which various marketing techniques are employed to sell politics. The techniques will include message development, branding, micro-targeting, and political marketing campaign strategy by looking at a series of cases from around the world. Cases examined will include the Barack Obama , Hillary Clinton and John McCain campaigns from 2008, the effort to brand the Conservative Party and New Labour in the United Kingdom.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-403 Government 2.0

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    What is the next version of government? How will emerging technologies impact how governments at all levels function? What are government leaders (elected and otherwise) doing to transform the way government operates? This course will cover the historical applications of technology in government, pointing to various models used by all levels of government (Federal, State, and Local). National and international e-Government examples and case studies will be examined to show the most and least effective implementations. It will primarily be a discussion about what Gov 2.0 has meant and will mean as new technologies emerge.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-410 Politics of Korea

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Study of the government and politics of North and South Korea, including the political systems of the two countries and relationship between them, including issues of reunification, nuclear weapons, and democratization. Offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science,Asian Studies

  • GVT-411 Politics of North and South East Asia

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on the historical origins, evolution, and current trajectory of the North Korean state. Topics include history, social structure, the interplay of culture and ideology, political economy, humanitarian issues, security, and the politics of North Korean domestic and foreign policy. We will spend considerable time analyzing North Korea's relationship with regional and world powers and examining the origins, history, and implications of their nuclear weapons program. Students will be expected to demonstrate their ability to apply theoretical and historical knowledge toward analyzing the rapidly evolving landscape of contemporary issues related to North Korea.

    Type:

    Social Science,Asian Studies

  • GVT-420 German Greens and Environmentalism

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The rise of the Green Party, from its grass-roots beginnings to participation in the federal government. Background on the development of green consciousness in Germany and Europe since the early 20th century. Present governmental policies and programs (e.g., alternative energy sources, organic farming, recycling, dismantling of nuclear power). Cross-listed GER 420 and ENST 420

    Type:

    Social Science,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • GVT-428 Congressional Parties, Leadership, & Public Policy

    Prerequisites:

    Junior status or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on the Congressional leadership, parties in Congress and their impact on political interactions, and public policy. The course will examine the relationship between the leadership in the Congress and the powerful elements in the House and Senate such as committee chairmen and the party caucuses as well as the media and lobbyists. Emphasis is on the decades long trend toward greater political polarization and its impact on the ability of the institution to respond effectively current national problems.

  • GVT-429 Congress and the Federal Budget: Procedure, Politics & Public Policy

    Prerequisites:

    Take GVT-110

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Focus is on the federal budget process, political interactions, and public policy outcomes. The budget represents nearly one-quarter of GDP making those decisions central to the functioning of our democracy and the health of our economy. Emphasis is on the Congressional budget process, appropriations process, and revenue decision-making because the Constitution establishes Congress as the guardian of the nation's purse strings.

    Type:

    BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,Social Science

  • GVT-431 Congress: the Broken Branch

    Prerequisites:

    TAKE GVT 110

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will examine the changes in the US Congress in recent years, as both party unity and party polarization have grown, with particular attention to the evolution of Senate rules as the need for a 60-vote majority has become a given.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-432 Legal Issues in Campaign and Elections

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will explore legal issues affecting campaigns and elections. Among the topics covered will be the legal requirements to qualify for the ballot, campaign finance laws, challenges to candidates and ballot questions, and election recounts. Special emphasis will be given to the 2000 Presidential Recount in Florida.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-434 Immigration Policy and Politics

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines how American governmental institutions, political actors, and processes have both shaped and responded to one of the most significant and complex issues of public policy facing the nation: immigration to the United States. This class will explore a number of intriguing and difficult policy topics related to the almost unprecedented level of immigration that the U.S. has been experiencing. The focus of the class will include the following: admissions, citizenship, deportation and detention (including that of suspected terrorists), refugee/asylum law, and highly contested issues of today, such as definitions of citizenship, immigrant rights, and border enforcement. A major objective of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to conduct their own original research in American politics by delving into some aspect of immigration as a public policy issue.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-435 Race and Public Policy

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110 OR GVT 120 OR GVT 223 OR GVT 224

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Public policy's impact on Blacks Chicano's, Native Americans Puerto Ricans, and other minority groups; how public policy has contributed to racial oppression; policies for attaining racial equality; political strategies of minority groups. Cultural Diversity A

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • GVT-438 Environmental Policy & Politic

    Prerequisites:

    This course will have a service learning component Sophomore Status required

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    From Rio to the Boston Harbor Project, this course examines the policies and politics of the environment. It examines the origins of the environmental movement in the United States focusing on the development and present function of government and non-government organizations responsible for the development and implementation of global, national, state and local environmental policies.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-439 Global Environmental Threat

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In the 20th century the general public became aware of the need for following a sustainable lifestyle. Non-governmental organizations, governmental institutions and individuals began to study environmental problems and issues to enhance the concept of conservation of nature and the protection of the planet's biodiversity among other important concepts. However, as we enter the 21st century, we are finding ourselves involved in new environmental threats such as increasingly disturbing natural disasters, eco-terrorism and endless extreme poverty. This course is aimed at learning the basic environmental aspects that affect society and nature as a whole, along with the new issues that are arising and leading scientists to continue new lines of research in the field of environmental conservation and awareness, knowing also that the key to hope lies in the field of environmental education. Offered on the Madrid Campus only.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-H439 Honors Global Environmental Threat

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In the 20th century the general public became aware of the need for following a sustainable lifestyle. Non-governmental organizations, governmental institutions and individuals began to study environmental problems and issues to enhance the concept of conservation of nature and the protection of the planet's biodiversity among other important concepts. However, as we enter the 21st century, we are finding ourselves involved in new environmental threats such as increasingly disturbing natural disasters, eco-terrorism and endless extreme poverty. This course is aimed at learning the basic environmental aspects that affect society and nature as a whole, along with the new issues that are arising and leading scientists to continue new lines of research in the field of environmental conservation and awareness, knowing also that the key to hope lies in the field of environmental education. Offered on the Madrid Campus only.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-441 Ready, Set, Run!

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    Designed to introduce students to the nuts and bolts of preparing to run for office or guiding a candidate through the process. Students learn how to file nomination papers, develop a field team, and create a general branding strategy.

  • GVT-442 Candidate Definition

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Students learn the basics of how candidates successfully introduce their candidacy to the public. From announcing the campaign to conducting meet and greets to producing candidate photos, this course guides to through the process of effectively defining the candidate.

  • GVT-443 Candidate Media Strategy 101

    Prerequisites:

    Over 54 credits required.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Students learn the fundamentals of how to maximize positive media coverage with attention paid to generating endorsements, developing non-paid media, and persuading voters.

  • GVT-450 Lobbying, the Media and Public Policy Opinion, and Politics

    Prerequisites:

    Junior status or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This class will examine the role of lobbyist and the media in influencing state and national decision makers and public policy. Focusing primarily on current issues relating to energy and environmental policy, we will discuss and critically examine all sides of today's hot topics- renewable power, climate change, sustainability and others. The goal is not to determine who is right and who is wrong, but rather to get behind the headlines and separate fact from hype and discuss how and why certain policy decisions are made and how policy makers are influenced. You'll gain an appreciation as to how public opinion, lobbyists and the media (even celebrities!) can actually change government priorities- and not always for the better, as rising public opinion and political pressure often collides with well established scientific evidence.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-452 Boston's Future: Local Politics in a Global Context

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This year, Boston's longest-serving mayor of 20 years, Thomas Menino, announced he would not seek re-election. Twelve candidates are now vying to be mayor of Boston. Boston is among the most educated cities and is an epicenter for research and development, building an innovation economy of engagement, community networks, and collaboration. Yet it faces a variety of challenges. Boston also counts itself as third most unequal cities in the United States in terms of income inequality. Can Boston sustain its success while also lifting more of its population out of poverty? This course examines these questions by focusing attention on the 2013 mayoral election. What prescriptions for success and visions for the future of Boston do the various candidates offer? What constituencies vote? How will the successful candidate craft a winning coalition? Guest speakers, including candidates, local media analysts, and policy makers will highlight key aspects of the urban issues we will examine. Neighborhood visits and a variety of readings will round out the course. For any student interested in the interplay between politics, local government and the global economy, this course is for you.

  • GVT-462 Debates on Conflicting Ideas in U.S. Foreign Policy

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 261. Junior status or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In order to understand the change and continuity in U.S. foreign policy, it is crucial to examine the debate among those who inform the ideas put forward by U.S. foreign policy experts, policymakers, and the group-whether political parties or NGOs-with which they are allies. This course will explore the importance of ideas in U.S. foreign policy from the early days of the republic with an emphasis on the post-World War II period. Prerequisite: GVT 281 or instructor's consent. Open only to Juniors and Seniors. 1 term - 4 credits.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-463 International Legal Systems

    Prerequisites:

    Junior status or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explains the main components of the international legal system. It begins by exploring the rules, principles and norms that govern the relationship among states, the different cultural and philosophical legal perspectives and the history of the international legal system. The second part of the course covers the study of the sources and subjects of the international law, the jurisdiction of states, the peaceful settlement of disputes, the use of force and the legal personality of international actors. The third part of the course addresses a number of significant topics derived from the process of globalization legal norms: human rights, humanitarian intervention, law of the sea, environmental law, and economic relations.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-465 International and Transnational Organizations

    Prerequisites:

    GVT-261

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores the institutional structures, political processes, and impact of international governmental and nongovernmental organizations. It analyzes their increasingly prominent role in efforts to resolve a wide range of global problems and contribution to strengthen the current system of global governance. While the course covers the problems of international security, global distribution of wealth, deterioration of the environmental system, and threats to social welfare, it focuses on the interaction between the United Nations System and regional organizations, on the one hand, and the role of non-governmental organizations in cooperating or competing to solve specific problems in the area of international relations.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • GVT-466 Regionalism and Sovereignty in the Global Economy

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 261

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the intertwined nature of the globalization and regionalization processes from the perspective of global political economy. The first part of the course provides the basic elements and indicators to understand the main challenges the international economy is facing such as crisis, protectionism, and underdevelopment, inter alia. The second part presents the evolution of globalization and regionalism in the past decades. The third and final section compares how the distinct regions in the world are dealing with local and global problems; particularly attention is paid to the European Union, NAFTA, Mercosur and APEC.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-467 Comparative Social Movements

    Prerequisites:

    Junior status

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This class examines the political ramifications o social movements primarily but not exclusively within the United States. It looks at ideology, beliefs and mechanisms of mobilization. Another important focus is an analysis of non-white social movements in this country and their impact on domestic politics. Among the movements to be examined are: the Pan-African movement 1919-1939 which will, to some extent, take us outside this country; the U.S. Civil Rights Movement 1955 to 1969 which covers the rise of the Black Power movement; and the U.S. Labor Movement 1900 to 1955 in terms of non-white influence on its programmatic goals. Normally offered alternate years. Cultural Diversity B

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE

  • GVT-469 International Human Rights

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 261 Junior status or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of human rights at the end of the 20th century. Attention will be given to the origin and expansion of the concept of human rights in different political systems, the links between culture and human rights and the means and mechanisms for safeguarding human rights with particular reference to the United Nations system.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-471 Topics in Democracy

    Prerequisites:

    take gvt-110, gvt-120, or instructor's consent for non majors. Junior status or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In this course, students will have an opportunity to examine the basic foundations of the democratic theory and practice. Specifically, this course will focus on building blocks of a democratic relationship between people and government, including transparency, accountability, accessibility, and opportunities for effective advocacy and participation. Both classical and modern authors who have weighed in on these issues will be discussed. Normally offered alternate years.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-472 East Germany and the Cold War

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    When the German Democratic Republic was founded in 1949, observers in the West viewed it as an artificial construct created to serve the needs of the Soviet empire. The self-image of the GDR as created by its leadership revolved around the idea of an anti-fascist German state designed as a bulwark against any revival of National Socialism. Over a generation after the fall of the Berlin Wall, it is possible to undertake a dispassionate analysis of the forty-year history of the ?other? German state as manifested in its cultural identity and political role during the Cold War.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-473 American Political Thought

    Prerequisites:

    open to juniors and seniors only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Reading and discussion of original works by significant American political thinkers. Readings vary, but might include The Federalist and works by Paine, Jefferson, Calhoun, Thoreau, Sumner, Reed, Dewey, Lippman, Goodman, King, Malcolm X, Carmichael, Hamilton, Friedan and Dillinger. Offered every year.

    Type:

    Social Science,BSJ SOCIAL SCIENCE

  • GVT-475 Radical & Revolutionary Political Thought

    Prerequisites:

    Open to Juniors and Seniors only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on those political thinkers, such as socialists, feminists, anarchists, pacifists, and ecologists, who have opposed established order and sought to change it. Topics covered include utopian visions (e.g., Owen, Morris, Bellamy, Gilman), criticism of existing institutions (Wollstonecraft, Marx, Fanon, de Beauvoir) and strategies for change (Goldman, Malcolm, Lenin, Cabral). The emphasis is on reading original theoretical works, with several writings assignments. Normally offered every third year.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-485 Politics of the Middle East

    Prerequisites:

    TAKE GVT-281 OR INSTRUCTOR'S CONSENT

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Interlocking themes making the contemporary Middle East an area of chronic conflict: Big Power rivalries; social and political change within individual countries; unity and Arab rivalry involved in Arab nationalism; the Palestinian-Israeli-Arab dispute. Normally offered alternate years. Cultural Diversity B

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science

  • GVT-H485 Honors Politics and International Relations of the Middle East

    Prerequisites:

    TAKE GVT-281 OR INSTRUCTOR'S CONSENT

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Interlocking themes making the contemporary Middle East an area of chronic conflict: Big Power rivalries; social and political change within individual countries; unity and Arab rivalry involved in Arab nationalism; the Palestinian-Israeli-Arab dispute. Normally offered alternate years. Cultural Diversity B

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Social Science

  • GVT-492 Islamic Political Thought

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    What is the relationship between philosophy and Islam? Does the divine law (Shari'a) need to be supplemented with purely rational reflections on the nature and purpose of political life? What is the place of toleration and individual rights in the Islamic legal and philosophic tradition? We will explore these and similar questions by focusing on two particularly fertile periods of Islamic thought--the encounter of Islam with Greek philosophy in the classical period and its encounter with modern secular West in late modernity.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-503 Washington Academic Seminar I

    Prerequisites:

    This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement. Instructor's consent is required.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An intensive off-campus experience, normally of two-weeks duration, arranged through a qualified agency in Washington, D.C. Topics vary. Students will be graded by both an on-site evaluator and an assigned Government Department faculty member. Students are normally required to keep a journal of the off-campus experience and to write a significant research paper based on the topic of the academic seminar upon their return.

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-504 Washington Academic Seminar II

    Prerequisites:

    Requires Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    1.00- 2.00

    Description:

    An off-campus experience, normally of one-week duration, arranged through a qualified agency in Washington D.C. Topics vary. Students will be graded by both an on-site evaluator and an assigned Government Department faculty member. A writing assignment is usually required upon completion of the seminar.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-505 Washington Seminar on National Security

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's consent required

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A two-week intensive seminar in Washington DC; the first week will focus on a look inside the defense and intelligence community in the US government; the second week will examine issues, threats, and challenges in global society. The seminar, carried out in partnership with The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars, will include briefing sessions with security officials, site visits, small group meetings, keeping a journal, and academic papers. There will also be some further academic work after you return to Suffolk. Prerequisites: Registration in this course requires advance application. The seminar is offered in May, and applications are due by March 1. Interested students should consult the instructor for further details.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-506 Political Convention Program

    Credits:

    6.00

    Description:

    An opportunity to do an internship through the Washington Center at either the Republican National Convention or the Democratic National Convention. College students will learn what goes on behind the scenes and interact with important public figures that are influential in setting public policy at various levels of government. They spend a week prior to the convention studying the electoral process, familiarizing themselves with conventions operations and preparing for their convention fieldwork assignments. In addition, they hear from a wide variety of speakers, including members of the media, party officials, and other political personalities. Students are then assigned as volunteers to assist with the work of the convention during the second week.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-507 GVT Study Trip

    Prerequisites:

    INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    APPROVAL OF DEPT. CHAIRPERSON. Specially arranged study trip to a foreign country for the purpose of obtaining knowledge through direct experience and observation. Includes prearranged site visits, meetings, required reading and written assignments. ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-509 United Nations Seminar

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course provides an introduction to the study of the role of the United Nations System in the globalization era. The course is divided in two main sections. The first is based on a series of readings, lectures and discussion on the rules, principles and norms which govern the relationship among states and the UN system; it also covers traditional topics such as the sources and subjects of international law, the jurisdiction of states, the peaceful settlement of disputes, the use of force and the legal personality of international actors, human rights, humanitarian intervention, global environment, used of armed forces, as well as economic relations. The second part of the course is based on a required study trip to the UN headquarters in order to experience a direct contact with policy-makers within the UN system in a diversity of areas such as security, aid and peacekeeping areas.

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-510 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's consent required

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Individual program of reading and research on an approved topic under the supervision of a member of the department. Only for qualified juniors or seniors. Offered every semester.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-513 The Presidency, Congress & Media

    Prerequisites:

    Junior status or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is fast-paced, highly interactive, multi-media and thought provoking. We apply the traditional academic requirements at The Washington Center, while adding the unique elements that allow you to connect with students at other universities. This course offers interesting guests, lively discussions, thoughtful debates, historic video from C-SPAN and the National Archives. As we examine and analyze the political, legislative and social issues facing our country, we will take an in-depth look at the issues and events shaping the agenda for next Congress & the next round of elections. Our focus will also include the historical process of public policy making, as well as an intense examination on the changing role of media, especially social media, in shaping public opinion.

  • GVT-515 Senior Seminar

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course is designed to provide all Government degree-seeking students with a team-taught capstone experience. In this course, we will collectively discuss and consider career, professional and academic experience for the Government major, including learning more about the fields of public policy, public service, law, nonprofit management, international development, and nongovernmental organization management. This course focuses on career entry and transition, networking for career success, impression management concept and skills, and related life-long learning skills. Students articulate and reflect on academic, work, and co-curricular experiences from the perspective of professionals entering or advancing their careers. Pre-requisite: Senior standing.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-521 Internship in Government

    Prerequisites:

    Junior standing

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Approximately 12 hours a week working in a position that offers the student significant opportunity to learn about politics and/or government. Interested students should consult instructor in advance. ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-523 Washington Internship

    Prerequisites:

    Juniors standing and instructor's permission required

    Credits:

    12.00

    Description:

    A full-time, one-semester internship in Washington, D.C. Consult the Department office for more details. ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-524 Washington Internship

    Prerequisites:

    This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

    Credits:

    8.00

    Description:

    A full-time summer internship in Washington D.C. Consult the Department for more details. ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-525 Washington Internship Seminar

    Prerequisites:

    Concurrent enrollment in GVT 523 or GVT 524

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-526 International Internship-London

    Prerequisites:

    Juniors standing; GVT 528 & GVT 529 Concurrent

    Credits:

    8.00

    Description:

    A full-time, one-semester International Internship in London.

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-527 International Internship-Brussels

    Prerequisites:

    Juniors standing; GVT 528 & GVT 529 Concurrent

    Credits:

    8.00

    Description:

    A full-time, one-semester International Internship in London.

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-528 International Seminar I

    Prerequisites:

    Concurrently with GVT 526 or GVT 530 and GVT 529

    Credits:

    4.00- 8.00

    Description:

    One of two required seminars to be taken by International interns and service learning participation. ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-529 International Seminar II

    Prerequisites:

    Concurrently with GVT 526 or GVT 530 and GVT 528

    Credits:

    4.00- 8.00

    Description:

    One of two required seminars to be taken by International interns and service learning participation ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-531 Washington/London Internship Program

    Credits:

    8.00-12.00

    Description:

    This course combines a two week seminar in Washington, DC, with a 32 hour per week political internship in London for the rest of the semester. The focus is on understanding British politics and government in a comparative context. Prerequisites: simultaneous enrollment in GVT 528 and consent of instructor. 1 term - 12 credits.

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-533 International Internship-Edinburgh

    Prerequisites:

    Juniors standing; GVT 528 & GVT 529 Concurrent

    Credits:

    8.00

    Description:

    A full-time, one-semester International Internship in London.

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-555 Senior Thesis

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's consent required

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Individual program of reading, research, writing on an approved topic under the supervision of a member of the department, for students in all tracks who meet the criteria for departmental honors and who wish to prepare a thesis for submission to the honors committee. Must be taken in the first semester of the senior year. Prerequisites: Grade point average 3.0 overall, 3.4 in major; completion of a minimum of 6 credits in Government at Suffolk University; advisor's signed consent; application approved by honors committee in spring of applicant's junior year. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every fall.

    Type:

    Social Science

Graduate

  • GVT-602 Public Relations and Lobbying

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Methods and practices of interest groups trying to influence legislative and administrative decision making; methods and practices of public agencies trying to influence governmental policies; the military industrial complex and other cases on federal and state levels.

  • GVT-603 Government 2.0

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    What is the next version of government? How will emerging technologies impact how governments at all levels function? What are government leaders (elected and otherwise) doing to transform the way government operates? This course will cover the historical applications of technology in government, pointing to various models used by all levels of government (Federal, State, and Local). National and international e-Government examples and case studies will be examined to show the most and least effective implementations. It will primarily be a discussion about what Gov 2.0 has meant and will mean as new technologies emerge.

  • GVT-606 Women and Public Policy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines women's issues and roles in the public policy process. Topics will include policies that affect women, such as child care, sex discrimination, sexual harassment, women's health care and reproductive issues. Emphasis will also be placed on women's roles in the policy process, as citizens, voters and public officials.

  • GVT-607 Globalization of Gender Politics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the interaction between gender and globalization. It discusses the centrality of gender in international development by focusing on gender as one of the most critical factors that affect the success or the failure of globalization. Critically reviewing general theories of globalization, the course presents a historical overview of gender and development. It then explores selected topics: global restructuring and feminization of the labor force, gender in multinational corporations, gender and international migration, sex-tourism, AIDS, and the impact of the state, religion, and culture in creating social dislocations and inequalities. Finally, we will consider strategies of change and diverse forms of resistance by women.

  • GVT-608 International Security

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the dynamic evolution of the debates on International Security as well as the transformations in the main global and regional security institutions such as UN and NATO. Based upon International Relations perspectives, it analyzes the traditional definitions of security at the national, regional and international levels of analysis since 1945. Likewise, it studies how states and international institutions have revisited the concepts, policies and strategies of security since the end of the Cold War and after the September 11 events, from realist perspectives to the Copenhagen School of security studies.

  • GVT-610 Politics Korea

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Study of the government and politics of North and South Korea, including the political systems of the two countries and relations between them, including issues of reunification, nuclear weapons, and democratization. Normally offered alternate years

  • GVT-611 Politics of the Arab-Israeli Conflict

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An analysis of the origins and the local, regional, and international dimensions of the Palestinian-Israeli-Arab conflict, this course will examine the conflict through the eyes of the major protagonists and the roles played by them from the early twentieth century to the present: Zionists/Israelis, Palestinians and other Arabs, British, Americans, Soviets. We will also explore the questions of why this conflict has captured the world's attention and why it has gone unresolved since World War II. Finally, we will examine the possibilities and attempts for resolution of what appears to be an intractable human tragedy.

  • GVT-614 1968- Media, Chaos, and Culture That Changed America

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The overall goal of this course is to understand why 1968 is considered one of the most tumultuous years in the 20th century as regards the news media; music and theater; television and film censorship; and in the shift in culture and mores of an entire subset of the population. The course will focus on specific touchstones that elucidate the communication to both the mainstream public, know broadly as the Silent Majority, and the new emerging 'boomers', whose values and attitudes still drive the media ten years into the 21st century. Students will learn how a single year of media can change forever how one part of a culture views itself, while at the same time discovering how another part of that same culture continues to resist those changes 40 years later. Students will learn how many of the seeds of ideas they take for granted in 2011, including educational and sports equality (Title 9) for women; environmental sensitivity, and gay rights were planted in the print, films and music of 1968, but didn't bloom until the years which followed. Guest speakers, films and lectures will be used to reinforce material from the texts.

  • GVT-620 German Greens and Environmentalism

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The rise of the Green Party, from its grass-roots beginnings to participation in the federal government. Background on the development of green consciousness in Germany and Europe since the early 20th century. Present governmental policies and programs (e.g., alternative energy sources, organic farming, recycling, dismantling of nuclear power).

  • GVT-623 Political Survey Research

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Everything needed to design, carry out, and interpret a political survey. Topics covered include questionnaire design, sampling, interviewing, coding data, and univariate and bivariate analysis of the results. Multivariate analysis will be discussed but not studied in depth. An actual survey will be conducted as a class project. Prerequisites: Open to graduate students, seniors, and juniors; previous course in political science research methods, or comparable course in another discipline and consent of instructor.

  • GVT-628 American Law, Government and Policy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides and overview of the legal system in the United States of America, in connection with the role of the Federal and State government and their policy. This course is designed for undergraduate and graduate students. During the semester, we will explore a variety of issues involving the legal system of the United States and how it effects local and federal government.

  • GVT-633 Politics in Film

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A country's popular culture offers significant and accurate insights into the political values, attitudes, and beliefs of its own people at a given time. One form of popular culture, films, can be a powerful disseminator of political messages. This course will examine a number of different eras and political themes as they have been reflected through films in the U.S.

  • GVT-638 Environmental Policy & Politics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    From Rio to the Boston Harbor Project, this course examines the polices and politics of the environment. It examines the origins of the environmental movement in the United States focusing on the development and present function of government and non-government organizations responsible for the development and implementation of global, national, state and local environmental policies.

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-639 Community Advocacy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course represents a unique opportunity for students to develop a general understanding of the relationship between politics and the community; a systematic and holistic way of viewing and analyzing the impact of community-based, community-wide organizations and efforts.

  • GVT-641 Ready, Set, Run!

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Designed to introduce students to the nuts and bolts of preparing to run for office or guiding a candidate through the process. Students learn how to file nomination papers, develop a field team, and create a general branding strategy.

  • GVT-642 Candidate Definition

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Students learn the basics of how candidates successfully introduce their candidacy to the public. From announcing the campaign to conducting meet and greets to producing candidate photos, this course guides you through the process of effectively defining the candidate.

  • GVT-643 Candidate Media Strategy 101

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Students learn the fundamentals of how to maximize positive media coverage with attention paid to generating endorsements, developing non-paid media, and persuading voters.

  • GVT-647 Legislative Process

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The structure and functioning of legislatures. Particular emphasis on the U.S. Congress, how it works and how it compares to other legislatures. The role of legislatures in a democracy.

  • GVT-648 The American Presidency

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Perspectives on the role and problems of the presidency in American political life; the nature and difficulties of the presidential influence and effectiveness, presidential authority within our system of government, and the impact of presidential character.

  • GVT-650 Lobbying, the Media and Public Policy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This class will examine the role of lobbyists and the media in influencing state and national decision makers and public policy. Focusing primarily on current issues relating to energy and environmental policy, we will discuss and critically examine all sides of today's hot topics- renewable power, climate change, sustainability and others. The goal is not to determine who is right and who is wrong, but rather to get behind the headlines and separate fact from hype and discuss how and why certain policy decisions are made and how policy makers are influenced. You'll gain an appreciation as to how public opinion, lobbyists and the media (and even celebrities!) can actually change government priorities- and not always for the better, as rising public opinion and political pressure often collides with well established scientific evidence.

  • GVT-652 Constitutional Reform

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A critical analysis of whether our constitutional system is adequate to effectively resolve the new and complex problems of governance in this century. The strengths and weaknesses of governmental structure created by the U.S. Constitution will be examined. Past and current amendment proposals will receive special attention.

    Type:

    Social Science

  • GVT-655 American Parties & Politics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Historical overview of party development in the U.S. and of ideological and political trends as reflected in voting behavior. Recent developments in party structure, electoral strategies and political style. The party crisis vs. the art of political campaigning.

  • GVT-657 Urban Politics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the political process and problems characteristic of big cities in the United States today. Students are encouraged to do individual and group research on specific urban political topics.

  • GVT-658 Politics and the Media

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will explore the influence of media on contemporary political issues and public opinion; and the use of media in political campaigns, advertising, etc. Topics may include the impact of talk radio", the issue of media bias, the role of television, the Hollywood connection.

  • GVT-659 Hockey, International Development & Politics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This class examines the way in which national identity, global and regional economics and international development intersect. It uses the professionalization of the sport of hockey and its subsequent spread around the globe as its case. It will look at the rise of the pro game, the way in which it shapes national identity in the Canadian case, the way in which the pro business model has changed in response to broad socio-economic changes in North America and geo-political shifts around the globe, especially in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union.

  • GVT-660 United Nations Seminar

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides an introduction to the study of the role of the United Nations System in the globalization era. The course is divided in two main sections. The first is based on a series of readings, lectures and discussion on the rules, principles and norms which govern the relationship among states and the UN system; it also covers traditional topics such as the sources and subjects of international law, the jurisdiction of states, the peaceful settlement of disputes, the use of force and the legal personality of international actors, human rights, humanitarian intervention, global environment, use of armed force, as well as economic relations. the second part of the course is based on a required study trip to the UN headquarters in order to experience a direct contact with policy-makers within the UN system in a diversity of areas such as security, aid and peacekeeping areas.

  • GVT-662 Debates on Conflicting Ideas U.S. Foreign Policy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In order to understand the change and continuity in U.S. foreign policy, it is crucial to examine the debate among those who inform the ideas put forward by U.S. foreign policy experts, policymakers, and the groups-whether political parties or NGOs- with which they are allied. This course will explore the importance of ideas in U.S. foreign policy from the early days of the republic with an emphasis on the post-World War II period.

  • GVT-663 International Legal Systems

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explains the main components of the international legal system. It begins by exploring the rules, principles and norms that govern the relationship among states, the different cultural and philosophical legal perspectives and the history of the international legal system. The second part of the course covers the study of the sources and subjects of international law, the jurisdiction of states, the peaceful settlement of disputes, the use of force, and the legal personality of international actors. The third part of the course addresses a number of significant topics derived from the process of globalization legal norms: human rights, humanitarian intervention, law of the sea, environmental law, and economic relations.

  • GVT-665 International and Transnational Organizations

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the institutional structures, political processes, and impact of international governmental and nongovernmental organizations. It analyses their increasingly prominent role in efforts to resolve a wide range of global problems and contribution to strengthen the current system of global governance. While the course covers the problems of international security, global distribution of wealth, deterioration of the environmental system and threats to social welfare, it focuses on the interaction between the United Nations System and regional organizations, on the one hand, and the role of non-governmental organizations in cooperating or something to solve specific problems in the area of international relations.

  • GVT-666 Globalization, Regionalization and Sovereignty

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the intertwined nature of the globalization and regionalization processes from the perspective of global political economy. The first part of the course provides the basic elements and indicators to understand the main challenges the international economy is facing such as crisis, protectionism, and underdevelopment, inter alia. The second part presents the evolution of globalization and regionalism in the past decades. The third and final section compares how the distinct regions in the world are dealing with local and global problems; particularly attention is paid to the European Union, NAFTA, Mercosur and APEC.

  • GVT-667 Comparative Social Movements

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This class examines the political ramifications of social movements primarily but not exclusively within the United States. It looks at ideology, beliefs, and mechanisms of mobilization. Another important focus is an analysis of non-white social movements in this country and their impact on domestic politics. Among the movements to be examined are: the Pan-African movement 1919 to 1939 which will, to some extent, take us outside this country; the U.S. Civil Rights Movement 1955 to 1969 which covers the rise of the Black Power movement; and the U.S. Labor Movement 1900 to 1955 in terms of non-white influence on its programmatic goals.

  • GVT-669 International Human Rights

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An examination of human rights at the end of the 20th Century. Attention will be given to the origin and expansion of the concept of human rights, the place of human rights in different political systems, the link between culture and human rights, and the means and mechanisms for safeguarding rights with particular reference to the United Nations system.

  • GVT-671 Topics in Democracy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In this course, students will have an opportunity to examine the basic foundations of the democratic theory and practice. Specifically, the course focuses on the building blocks of a democratic relationship between people and government, including transparency, accountability, accessibility, and opportunities for effective advocacy and participation. Both classical and modern authors who weighed in on these issues will be discussed.

  • GVT-672 American Foreign Policy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A decision-making approach to understanding the domestic and institutional context of US foreign policy. Includes analysis of continuity and change since WWII using case studies of critical decisions, e.g., Korea, Cuba, Vietnam, etc.

  • GVT-678 Elections and Voting

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    How are elections administered in the United States? Do Americans have confidence in the electoral process? Should they? Why or why not? This course will examine elections in the United States in detail -- from how they are funded to how they are administered to how voters behave. Students will have a choice of either serving as poll workers during the November election or organizing and conducting research of potential voters. Students will gain hands-on experience in actual research design, election administration, and non-partisan get-out-the-vote activities. In addition, students will gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between attitudes, opinion, and voting behavior in American politics and institutions.

  • GVT-682 Crisis and Integration in Europe

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Why did 17 European countries surrender the sovereign control of their currency and create the Euro? Will Turkey become a member of the European Union? Will Europeans continue free riding the security protection of the United States? Is the integration process another layer of bureaucracy or an institutional instrument to deal with the permanent crises in Europe? These are some of the questions guiding the discussions in this class.

  • GVT-684 African Politics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The political development of Africa in colonial and post-colonial periods. Analysis of the evolution of governmental institutions includes economic, social and personal factors; political forces at work in present day Africa.

  • GVT-685 Politics and International Relations of The Middle East

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Interlocking themes making the contemporary Middle East an area of chronic conflict: Big Power rivalries; social and political change within individual countries; unity and rivalry involved in Arab nationalism; the Palestinian-Israeli-Arab dispute.

  • GVT-687 Conflict and Reconciliation in Central America

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the social and economic conditions and current political trends in the Caribbean and in selected Central American nations. Emphasis will be placed on comparative analysis of public policies in the region, as well as on external factors which impact on politics in the Caribbean and central America. Students will use academic sources for the background of their analysis.

  • GVT-689 Politics of China

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Emphasis on a particular approach to the problems of economic modernization and political development. Historical background; the revolutionary movement; present political structures and current issues.

  • GVT-691 Canada: Multicultural Politics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the Canadian model of incorporating divers communities into its constitutional and political framework, including the founding British North American Act of 1867, the 1982 Constitution Act, and two later attempts at constitutional reform. Canada's role in balancing two official languages, English and French, is discussed, as is its recognition of a First Nations native-governed territory in the Arctic. This course introduces students to the Canadian polity and compares its parliamentary system with the U.S. separation of powers system.

  • GVT-693 Politics and Economics of Latin America

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduction to the government and politics of contemporary Mexico, with special attention to social and economic institutions, parties and social movements, and the influence of Mexico's revolutionary heritage. There will be some analysis of the interaction of US/Mexico relations and the impact of NAFTA on Mexican workers and the economy.

  • GVT-694 The U.S. and the International Relations of the Middle East

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will explore the role played by the United States in the Middle East in the twentieth century, with emphasis on the period since World War II. Our study will begin with a decision-making approach to understanding the domestic and institutional context of America's policy toward the region, followed by an examination of that policy as it confronted radical nationalist, socialist, and Islamic movements, Soviet influence, and specific contemporary problems - the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Lebanese civil war, the Iranian revolution, the Iran-Iraq War, and the Gulf War.

  • GVT-699 Ethnic Conflict, Nation Bldg. & International Intervention

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course focused on the role of ethnic conflict and international intervention in nation building in the post-Cold War period. To understand fully these forces, theories such as colonialism, neo- and post-colonialism, and humanitarian intervention, along with social/economic conditions will be examined. Different case studies will be selected each time the course is offered.

  • GVT-723 Graduate Internship

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This internship option is recommended for students seeking careers in professional politics or international relations. Typically, an internship will involve supervised work at a professional level in a political campaign, on a legislative staff, in an international non-governmental organization, or in a legislative relations for a governmental agency or private organization. Internship placement must be approved by the student's advisor, and will typically require at least 20 hours of work per week for the duration of a semester and the completion of a research paper based on the internship experience. The research paper must be approved by a departmental committee.

  • GVT-724 Politics of Public Policy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the politics of making public policy. How is policy made? Who is involved? What kinds of information do policy-makers rely on to make their decisions? How do political opportunities shape potential for policy change, shifts or stasis? We will examine how policy decisions are made and how policy makers cope and adapt to a diverse set of constraints. We will also focus on what political strategies can be used to improve policy-making processes and outcomes. Students will be required to interview policy makers about a specific policy and write a comprehensive policy analysis. The course is intended to have both theoretical and practical value.

  • GVT-747 Seminar in Legislation & Lobbying

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core course for the Professional Politics Concentration. Students will read and discuss current research on legislative politics and organization, including committees, interest groups and lobbying, legislative voting and decision making, and other topics. Students will conduct their own research and present it to the seminar. Prerequisites: Open to graduate students only; at least one previous course in legislatures or interest groups, or consent of the instructor.

  • GVT-755 Seminar Campaigns & Elections

    Prerequisites:

    At least one course in elections, voting behavior, or political parties.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core course for the Professional Politics Concentration. Students will read and discuss current research on campaigns and elections, voting behavior, and political parties, and will conduct their own research and present it to the seminar.

  • GVT-761 Seminar: International Relations Theory

    Prerequisites:

    OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core course for the concentration in North American Politics. This course will examine the key concepts of an approaches to world politics. Special attention will be given the application of these concepts and approaches to the relations among the nation-states of North America.

  • GVT-763 International Political Economy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to the study of international political economy (IPE). It addresses the interactive relationship between politics and economics in the historical and contemporary international system by exploring the effect of political factors on international economic relations as well as the impact of economic factors on domestic and international politics.

  • GVT-765 Seminar on Contemporary International Relations

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will focus on three main areas: a) United Nations and NGOs; b) Current Relevant Issues, and c) Regions, examining current issues and debates in each area. The courses is team-taught by full-time faculty specializing in each area.

  • GVT-772 Ethical Issues in Professional Politics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core course for the Professional Politics Concentration. The purpose of campaigns is to win, while the purpose of elections is to maintain democracy. This course will focus on the tension between these two goals, on the assumption that a healthy democracy needs a well-developed ethical sense among political professionals. The course will combine consideration of fundamental ethical principles with class discussion of hard cases. Each student will be asked to study a case and present it to the class.

  • GVT-776 Advanced Research Methods in Professional Politics

    Prerequisites:

    Open to graduate students only; previous course in political science research methods or comparable course in another discipline or instructor's consent.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core course for the MS in Political Science, Professional Politics track. The aim of the course is to give students the ability to conduct their own research and to understand and use the research of others, with a emphasis on relevant topics such as voting behavior, elections, polling, legislatures, and public policy. Both qualitative and quantitative methods will be covered including, archival research, legislative documents, election data, and multivariate analysis.

  • GVT-777 Advanced Research Methods in Political Science

    Prerequisites:

    Open to graduate students only;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core course for the MS in Political Science, Professional Politics and International Relations Tracks. The aim of this course is to give students the ability to conduct their own research and to understand and use the research of others, with an emphasis on topics relevant to professional politics, public policy, and international relations. Both qualitative and quantitative methods will be covered, including comparative case studies, archival research, field work and interviews, and multivariate analysis.

  • GVT-778 Advanced Research Methods in International Relations

    Prerequisites:

    Open to graduate students only; previous course in political science research methods or comparable course in another discipline or instructor's consent.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core course for the MS in Political Science, International Relations track. The aim of the course is to give students the ability to conduct their own research and to understand and use the research of others, with an emphasis on topics relevant to the field of international relations. Both qualitative and quantitative methods will be covered, including archival research and the use documents and data from a variety of sources.

  • GVT-801 Political Marketing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This class will examine the techniques used to market political candidates, parties, issues, interest groups and think tanks in the modern American polity, as well as in Canada and the EU. The class will examine the causes and impact of the change that many observers have seen in the American polity from a civil to a consumptive political culture and question the extent to which this is a U.S. based versus more global phenomenon. At the same time, the class will aim to provide the student will a hands-on understanding of the way in which various marketing techniques are employed to sell politics. The techniques will include message development, branding, micro-targeting, and political marketing campaign strategy by looking at a series of cases from around the world. Cases examined will include the Barack Obama , Hillary Clinton and John McCain campaigns from 2008, the effort to brand the Conservative Party and New Labour in the United Kingdom.

  • GVT-803 Washington Academic Seminar I

    Prerequisites:

    Requires instructor's consent

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An intensive off-campus experience, normally of two-weeks duration, arranged through a qualified agency in Washington, D.C. Topics vary. Students will be graded by both an on-site evaluator and an assigned Government Department faculty member. Students are normally required to keep a journal of the off-campus experience and to write a significant research paper based on the topic of the academic seminar upon their return. ECR

  • GVT-805 Washington Seminar on National Security

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A two-week intensive seminar in Washington DC; the first week will focus on a look inside the defense and intelligence community in the US government; the second week will examine issues, threats, and challenges in global society. The seminar, carried out in partnership with The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars, will include briefing sessions, with security officials, site visits, small group meetings, keeping a journal, and academic papers. There will also be some further academic work after you return to Suffolk. Prerequisites: Registration in this course requires advance application. The seminar is offered in Mar, and applications are due by March 1. Interested students should consult the instructor for further details.

  • GVT-811 Politics of North and South East Asia

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on the historical origins, evolution, and current trajectory of the North Korean state. Topics include history, social structure, the interplay of culture and ideology, political economy, humanitarian issues, security, and the politics of North Korean domestic and foreign policy. We will spend considerable time analyzing North Korea's relationship with regional and world powers and examining the origins, history, and implications of their nuclear weapons program. Students will be expected to demonstrate their ability to apply theoretical and historical knowledge toward analyzing the rapidly evolving landscape of contemporary issues related to North Korea.

  • GVT-824 The 1st Amendment in the Internet Age

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Defamation, privacy, copyright, pornography, incitement to lawless conduct and harassment are six areas in which first Amendment freedoms historically have been constrained to some degree. The constraints have been worked out largely through judicial decisions issued over the last century. This course would look at the traditional interests that were balanced to produce the constraints, the Internet's impact on those interests and whether the impact suggests the need for rebalancing.

  • GVT-828 Congress and the Federal Budget: Procedure, Politics & Public Policy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Focus is on the federal budget process, political interactions, and public policy outcomes. The budget represents nearly one-quarter of GDP making those decisions central to the functioning of our democracy and the health of our economy. Emphasis is on the Congressional budget process, appropriations process, and revenue decision-making because the Constitution establishes Congress as the guardian of the nation's purse strings.

  • GVT-830 Congressional Parties, Leadership, & Public Policy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on the Congressional leadership, parties in Congress and their impact on political interactions, and public policy. The course will examine the relationship between the leadership in the Congress and the powerful elements in the House and Senate such as committee chairmen and the party caucuses as well as the media and lobbyists. Emphasis is on the decades long trend toward greater political polarization and its impact on the ability of the institution to respond effectively current national problems.

  • GVT-831 Congress: the Broken Branch

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will examine the changes in the US Congress in recent years, as both party unity and party polarization have grown, with particular attention to the evolution of Senate rules as the need for a 60-vote majority has become a given.

  • GVT-832 Legal Issues in Campaign and Elections

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will explore legal issues affecting campaigns and elections. Among the topics covered will be the legal requirements to qualify for the ballot, campaign finance laws, challenges to candidates and ballot questions, and election recounts. Special emphasis will be given to the 2000 Presidential Recount in Florida.

  • GVT-833 Conspiracy in American Politics and Culture

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This basis of this course will be in-depth examinations of various conspiracies in American Politics and Culture, beginning with the Salem Witch Trials through the Lincoln Assassination Conspiracy and the Sacco & Vanzetti case through the present day. Present day conspiracies will include an examination of the JFK and RFK Assassinations, the Pentagon Papers case, the Watergate Conspiracy, the Iran/Contra scandal, Whitewater and the Vast Right Wing Conspiracy," the World Trade Center bombing, the Oklahoma City Bombing, Global Warming, and the 9/11 Investigation.

  • GVT-834 Immigration Policy and Politics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines how American governmental institutions, political actors, and processes have both shaped and responded to one of the most significant and complex issues of public policy facing the nation: immigration to the United States. This class will explore a number of intriguing and difficult policy topics related to the almost unprecedented level of immigration that the U.S. has been experiencing. The focus of the class will include the following: admissions, citizenship, deportation and detention (including that of suspected terrorists), refugee/asylum law, and highly contested issues of today, such as definitions of citizenship, immigrant rights, and border enforcement. A major objective of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to conduct their own original research in American politics by delving into some aspect of immigration as a public policy issue.

  • GVT-836 Political Leadership

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course begins with the premise that leadership is a continuous process, and that leadership can be studied, analyzed, and learned, across the public (as well as private for profit, and private non-profit) sectors. The first half of the course will, following the Northouse, Burns, and Gardner texts, delve into various theories of leadership, including the traits, skills, style, and situational approaches. We will also cover gender differences in leadership studies, and leadership ethics. The second half of the course will deal with transformational leadership, and real life (historical and recent) examples of political leadership, including Nelson Mandela, J. Robert Oppenheimer, George Washington, Margaret Thatcher, and others. There will also be in-class discussions on current challenges in public policy, asking students to envision what leadership skills they have studied that could come into play in solving these public policy challenges. During the second half of the course, students will be required to interview a leader of their choice, and, utilizing the material covered during the course, write a paper based on the interview.

  • GVT-850 Inside Massachusetts Community Courts

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The object of this course is to teach the students the history of the District and Municipal Courts of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the important role they play in their respective communities throughout the state. The course will explore the various departments within each court and the functions they perform individually and as part of the overall court system. Through a combination of lecture, guest speakers, courtroom observation and journal keeping, students will learn and see first-hand how the local community courts dispenses justice, solves problems and makes a positive contribution to the communities they serve.

  • GVT-852 Boston's Future: Local Politics in a Global Context

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This year, Boston's longest-serving mayor of 20 years, Thomas Menino, announced he would not seek re-election. Twelve candidates are now vying to be mayor of Boston. Boston is among the most educated cities and is an epicenter for research and development, building an innovation economy of engagement, community networks, and collaboration. Yet it faces a variety of challenges. Boston also counts itself as third most unequal cities in the United States in terms of income inequality. Can Boston sustain its success while also lifting more of its population out of poverty? This course examines these questions by focusing attention on the 2013 mayoral election. What prescriptions for success and visions for the future of Boston do the various candidates offer? What constituencies vote? How will the successful candidate craft a winning coalition? Guest speakers, including candidates, local media analysts, and policy makers will highlight key aspects of the urban issues we will examine. Neighborhood visits and a variety of readings will round out the course. For any student interested in the interplay between politics, local government and the global economy, this course is for you.

  • GVT-872 East Germany and the Cold War

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    When the German Democratic Republic was founded in 1949, observers in the West viewed it as an artificial construct created to serve the needs of the Soviet empire. The self-image of the GDR as created by its leadership revolved around the idea of an anti-fascist German state designed as a bulwark against any revival of National Socialism. Over a generation after the fall of the Berlin Wall, it is possible to undertake a dispassionate analysis of the forty-year history of the other German state as manifested in its cultural identity and political role during the Cold War.

  • GVT-889 Global Politics of Resistance

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Utilizing the theoretical frameworks of Comparative Politics and International Relations, this course will focus on a critical analysis of contemporary forms of resistance politics, such as those culminating in popular struggles for peace, democracy, human rights, economic justice, gender equality, environment, and the rights of indigenous peoples.

  • GVT-890 The United States and East Asia

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will examine US relations with East Asia through the lens of leading International Relations theories. We will analyze the growing regional influence of China, and will also examine the foreign policies of major regional powers including South and North Korea, Japan, and Taiwan. By exploring the economic and political factors that are working to shape the dynamic East Asian regional order, we will gain an understanding of the challenges faced by the US in this economically and strategically pivotal region.

  • GVT-892 Islamic Political Thought

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    What is the relationship between philosophy and Islam? Does the divine law (Shari'a) need to be supplemented with purely rational reflections on the nature and purpose of political life? What is the place of toleration and individual rights in the Islamic legal and philosophic tradition? We will explore these and similar questions by focusing on two particularly fertile periods of Islamic thought--the encounter of Islam with Greek philosophy in the classical period and its encounter with modern secular West in late modernity.

  • GVT-894 Nation Building and International Intervention

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    What is the role of the international community in nation building? Who are the key nation building actors? Who should pay for nation building? How long should it take? And what are the main reasons for success and failure in nation building? This course will investigate these questions, looking especially at the cases of the former Soviet Central Asia and Afghanistan. Students will learn about one of the most pressing issues of the contemporary world, with an eye toward helping students navigate a globalized world.

  • GVT-898 Terrorism and Extremism in South and Central Asia

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course discusses terrorism and extremism in South and Central Asia as forms of political violence and its effects on the security of the region and the world. Students will develop a working definition of terrorism and extremism and analyze tenets of states security policies. They will study the history of origin, political, economic and social causes of terrorism, the nature of Islamist terrorist organizations, their strategic goals, motivations, and the threats they pose to peace and development from the point of view of international relations and comparative politics. On the base of case studies and class discussions, students examine theories and instances of ideological, religious, and political extremism as a foundation for terrorism. Through thorough investigation of different cases students will acquire unique knowledge of the Al-Qaeda threat in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Central Asia, as well as activities of groups as the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, Lashkar-e-Taiba and others.

  • GVT-903 Washington Seminar I: DNC

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An intensive off-campus experience, normally of two-weeks duration, arranged through a qualified agency in Washington, D.C. Topics vary. Students will be graded by both an on-site evaluator and an assigned Government Department faculty member. Students are normally required to keep a journal of the off-campus experience and to write a significant research paper based on the topic of the academic seminar upon their return.

  • GVT-906 Summer Party Convention Program

    Prerequisites:

    Students must see the professor to get required Washington Center Application

    Credits:

    3.00- 6.00

    Description:

    An opportunity to do an internship through the Washington Center at either the Republican National Convention or the Democratic National convention. Graduate students will learn what goes on behind the scenes and interact with important public figures that are influential in setting public policy at various levels of government. They will spend a week prior to the convention studying the electoral process, familiarizing themselves with convention operations and preparing for their convention fieldwork assignments. In addition they will hear from a wide variety of speakers, including members of the media, party officials, and other political personalities. Students are then assigned as volunteers to assist with the work of the convention the second week. Normally offered every four years.

  • GVT-910 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's consent and approval of the Director of Graduate studies required.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Individual program of reading, research and writing on an approved topic, under the supervision of a member of the department. Topic and assignments are to be determined by the faculty member and student.

  • GVT-913 The Presidency, Congress & Media

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is fast-paced, highly interactive, multi-media and thought provoking. We apply the traditional academic requirements at The Washington Center, while adding the unique elements that allow you to connect with students at other universities. This course offers interesting guests, lively discussions, thoughtful debates, historic video from C-SPAN and the National Archives. As we examine and analyze the political, legislative and social issues facing our country, we will take an in-depth look at the issues and events shaping the agenda for next Congress & the next round of elections. Our focus will also include the historical process of public policy making, as well as an intense examination on the changing role of media, especially social media, in shaping public opinion.

  • GVT-958 Thesis/Internship Continuation

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    0 credit course for graduate students who are writing a thesis or internship report that need to be considered full-time. They will be charged for 1 credit, but earn 0 and are not graded.