• AHE-625 Organization & Administration of Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides a broad overview of the American higher education landscape and serves as the primary vehicle for introducing students to the complex nature of college and university administration. The interplay between organizational characteristics, structures, and modes of governance will be explored as a means of elucidating the practical application of administrative theories in higher education.

  • AHE-626 Legal Aspects Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides students with a practical, working understanding of the legal foundations that govern institutions of higher educations. Using the case study method, it examines legal problems facing college and university administrators including tort liability, rights of teachers and students, free speech issues, contracts, tenure, confidentiality of records, and legal aspects of hiring and discrimination. Students will learn the current state of the law and acquire appropriate skills and resources necessary to make sound decisions in their professional practice, utilizing their knowledge of student development theories and the practical application of law and policy in higher education. Some emphasis will be placed on those areas of significance to the student affairs professional.

  • AHE-628 Financial Aspects Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines financial management and fiduciary practices internal to institutions of higher education. It provides an introduction to the sources of higher education funding, budgeting and disbursement, control mechanisms, and the role of finance in strategic planning. It also provides students with information they need to better understand and participate more effectively in the funding, budgeting, and revenue/expenditure processes in higher education. Students examine the role of strategic planning and resource allocation in public and private colleges/universities. Various topics, issues, and trends in the financial arena of higher education are also explored.

  • AHE-632 Diversity Issues in Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides students with the opportunity to examine theoretical scholarship and empirical research on race, class, and gender in American higher education. The overall goal of this course is to assist future practitioners in the field in developing an ability to critically evaluate institutional and departmental approaches to diversity in higher education. Students will explore such issues as affirmative action, sexual harassment, access and financial aid practices, and the relationship of diversity to learning outcomes.

  • AHE-634 Student Development: Theory and Practice

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will explore theories, rationales, and methods of student development in higher education, as well as the organization and administration of student personnel services. Students will explore the history of student affairs and develop an understanding of the various functional areas and competencies associated with student affairs work. In addition, students will become familiar with a variety of theorists who have shaped the profession and incorporate relevant theories into program planning and assessment.

  • AHE-635 The American College/University Student

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The course is an in-depth examination of post-secondary students at all levels utilizing available statistics and other resources to describe various campus cultures and explore student attitudes toward society in general and the post-secondary experience in particular. Focus is given to exploring trends and changes in the enrollment characteristics of college students and addressing the attitudes and values of campus sub groups and cultures. Consideration is given to methods of locating resources on students and to measuring the effect of post-secondary education.

  • AHE-640 Reading & Research

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides an opportunity for students to research a topic of special interest in higher education and write a related comprehensive research paper that integrates scholarly resources on the topic. The course enables students to gain research competence in a selected area of interest relative to the field of higher education.

  • AHE-642 College and University Culture

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of college and university cultures in American higher education. Students will gain an understanding of the properties of campus culture, including norms of behavior, values, stories, physical artifacts, sagas, myths,symbols, and architecture, all of which guide and shape institutional behavior. In addition, students will examine the cultural norms of behavior of various institutional stakeholders - faculty, staff, students, and administrators - and develop an understanding of how campus culture affects each of these groups. In order to become more familiar with the ethos of institutional functioning and behavior, students will conduct a small-scale independent research project, employing qualitative research techniques, to investigate and analyze a particular campus subculture.

  • AHE-643 Leadership in Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to leadership characteristics and theories in higher education. The course examines various leadership styles endemic to the college and university environment, focusing on those relevant to the president, vice presidents, department chairs, deans, faculty, and students. Trait-factor, group, transformational, situational, and other theories of leadership are explored in the context of team-building, participatory decision-making, staff development, resource allocation, and future planning.

  • AHE-645 Practicum in Administration

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The practicum experience provides for the practical application of administrative skills in an appropriate field placement under the guidance of a site supervisor at an institution of higher education. The experience helps students gain exposure to various fields of work, and it provides an opportunity for students to observe, experience, and understand employer/employee relationships within the higher education environment. Students will apply theories learned in the classroom to a wide array of professional projects. Students enrolled in the course will meet as a class to discuss practicum-related issues.

  • AHE-647 Critical Issues in Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In-depth research into and discussion of a range of pressing issues and problems such as affirmative action, executive compensation, international higher education and globalization, online/distance learning, for-profit higher education, and Internet issues. The goal of this course is to help students gain a general knowledge of some of the most salient higher education issues in the United States and develop skills to analyze and manage emerging issues they may encounter as professionals in the field.

  • AHE-648 Research in Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary for locating sources of information and doing effective descriptive research in higher education. Students will design and execute field research on structures and problems of specific post-secondary institutions.

  • AHE-649 History of Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the development of institutions and practices of higher education from their medieval origins to the present, concentrating on the American experience and identifying key trends in theory, organizations curriculum, and sociology. Not offered on a regular basis.

  • DSHE-710 Introduction to Disability Services in Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Provides a historical perspective and legal foundation of disability services as a functional area within the field of administration of higher education. Examines the various organizational structures, scope of programs and services, ethical responsibilities of institutions and administrators, roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders, legal guidelines and compliance concerns, and best practices associated with the provision of equal access to all academic and non-academic opportunities for diversely-abled students.

  • DSHE-720 Disability, Documentation, and Reasonable Accommodations

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Explores disability profiles, documentation standards, and accommodation protocol for students with neurological, cognitive, physical, sensory, mental health, and chronic health related disabilities. Additional topics covered include lifespan and identity development of students with disabilities, social pragmatics and case management skills, disability as diversity, grievance procedures, and threat assessment.

  • DSHE-730 Assistive Tech, Emerging Tech, and Web Access for Disability

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Covers the legal framework for providing auxiliary aids and services as matters of access and accommodation for students with disabilities, as well as web accessibility standards, best practices for accessibility testing, and the administration of accessibility policy.

  • DSHE-740 High School and Career Transition Planning for Students With Disabilities

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Explores the laws, regulations, and accommodation practices in K-12, higher education, and employment settings with a focus on developing transition plans and identifying resources for students with disabilities. Additional topics covered include identity development for persons with disabilities, strategies for individual career development, transition to independent living, engaging outside resources, collaborative efforts with key stakeholders, and the development of leadership skills centered on community education.

  • DSHE-745 Practicum in Disability Services Administration

    Prerequisites:

    Take DSHE-710

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The practicum experience provides for the practical application of administrative skills in the field of disability services under the guidance of a site supervisor at an institution of higher education. The experience helps students gain exposure to various fields of work, and it provides an opportunity for students to observe, experience, and understand employer/employee relationships within the disability services in higher education environment.

  • PHIL-603 The Idea of Human Rights

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's Consent

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This seminar will analyze and explore the universal human rights concept -- the idea that all human beings, by virtue of their humanity alone, have human rights that should be recognized by all nations. It will explore the concept's meaning; its theoretical underpinnings, critiques and defenses; and the kinds of specific rights suggested by the concept. The course will also provide an introduction to existing human rights law. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

  • PHIL-604 20th- Century Philosophy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines one or more of the following major philosophical movements of this century: Pragmatism, Phenomenology, Existentialism, Logical Positivism, Analytic (Linguistic) Philosophy, Postmodernism and Critical Theory (Post-Analytic Philosophy).

  • PHIL-609 Philosophy of Freedom

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Focuses on the paradoxical relationship between freedom and responsibility and how that affects our thinking about freedom in the individual, social and political spheres. Both classical and contemporary thinkers will be considered. Normally offered every other year.

  • PHIL-614 Topics in Philosophy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A detailed exposition and evaluation of a specific topic or of the views of one major philosophical thinker or group of thinkers. Readings from both primary and secondary sources. Normally offered every year.

  • PHIL-616 Plato: Profiles in Philosophy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is an in-depth examination of the philosophy of Plato, starting with a focus on the Philosopher's identity as discovered by sympathetically understanding Socrates' dialogic role in opposition to the Sophists of the day. Recent Platonic scholarship will be introduced to the student, and a detailed explanation of how Plato is no longer understood as an Idealist will be offered after a close look at the text The Republic, The Statesman, and the Symposium. Emphasis will be on student journals and role playing with regard to Socrates' verbal behavior.

  • PHIL-617 Kant: Profiles in Philosophy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An examination of Kant's ethics and theory of knowledge, including the following topics: structures of our knowledge of nature and the empirical world; the limits of rationality; the possibility of any knowledge of God, the soul and other metaphysical entities; the antinomies (paradoxes) of pure reason; Kant's theory of unconditional morality based on duty; the idea of the categorical imperative; autonomy and universal moral law; the problem of evil. Selections from Kant's political writings will also be introduced. Normally offered every third year.

  • PHIL-618 Philosophy of Law

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Readings may include a range of classical authors, such as Plato and Aquinas, as well as the works of such 20th century legal philosophers as H.L.A. Hart, Dworkin and Rawls. Also included may be leading jurists such as Oliver Wendell Holmes and Learned Hand. Issues discussed may include the nature of law, its relation to justice, and how the legal system should operate to arrive at just decisions. Normally offered every third year.

  • PHIL-619 Topics in Applied Ethics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will address in depth one or more specific issues in applied ethics. Topics will vary and may range from applied issues in political thought, such as just war theory or transitional justice, to specific questions in professional ethics or social policy, such as end-of-life care, economic justice, or the role of technology in the human future. Normally offered every other year.

  • PHIL-622 Existentialism

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An overview of the existentialist tradition. Primary focus on issues and problems arising from the existentialist reaction to classical philosophy. Topics include: individuality and freedom, humans in society, death, morality, immortality, and the rejection of God. Philosophers to be discussed will include Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre and Heidegger. Normally offered every other year.

  • PHIL-623 Advanced Formal Logic

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In this course students will put to work the logical theory developed in Formal Logic (Phil 212). In particular students will use First-Order Logic to investigate computability and computation theory. Goedel's First and Second Incompleteness Theorems are a particular focus in the course. Normally offered alternate years.

  • PHIL-630 African Philosophy and Religion

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores indigenous African systems of thought, modern academic African philosophy, African social and political theory, and contemporary debates centered on questions of identity, modernity, essentialism and historicity within the African context. Normally offered every third year.

  • PHIL-662 Environmental Ethics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An examination of the moral issues involved in the interaction of humans with their natural environment. Topics include: the environmental crises, human-centered vs. nature-centered ethics, intrinsic value in nature, obligations to future generations, the importance of preserving endangered species and wilderness, radical ecology, ecofeminism, and the role of social justice in environmental issues. Normally offered every year.

  • PHIL-663 Bio and Medical Ethics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An examination of the nature of life and the moral problems facing researchers, health-care practitioners and their patients, and others involved with the practice of medicine in today's society. Issues include euthanasia, the ethics of medical experimentation, the use of reproductive technologies, genetic counseling and genetic engineering, truth-telling and confidentiality in doctor-patient relationships, the cost and availability of medical care, and the possibilities for engineering life and a trans-human nature. Normally offered every third year.

  • PHIL-664 Business Ethics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An examination of the ethical questions in the working life and policies of the business and professional sectors of society. The focus will vary, but common themes will include: the role of commerce in civil society; the relation of business to conceptions of economic and social justice; the meaning and application of codes of ethics; obligations of corporations and professional organizations to shareholders and stakeholders; responsibilities to clients and colleagues; workplace conduct; the nature of success and conflicts between legal and moral obligations; the impact of globalization. The course will employ a variety of readings, including ethical theory and specific case studies. Normally offered every other year.

  • PHIL-701 Ethics in Action 1: Persistence of the Classics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines how classical works of ancient and medieval moral and political philosophy raise questions and themes that persist in challenges facing contemporary public policy and personal ethics. Topics covered will include the nature of moral duties, the connection between happiness and morality, citizenship and virtue, the meaning of a good life, the attractions and limitations of moral relativism, the foundations of legitimate government, arguments for and against democracy, realism and idealism in statecraft, and the relationship between law and ethics. Authors may include the Pre-Socratic thinkers, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, and Aquinas, among others.

  • PHIL-702 Ethics in Action 2: the Crisis of the Modern

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: PHIL 701

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Continues the examination of themes addressed in PHIL 401/701, with a focus on how radical change, from the early modern era to the present, poses both challenges and opportunities for thought and action. In addition to issues from PHIL 401/701, themes may include revolution and reaction, the role of science and technology, the clash between universalism and particularism, distributive justice and the economy, liberty and equality, faith and secularism, and others. Authors may include Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche, as well as contemporary thinkers.

  • PHIL-703 The Idea of Human Rights

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This seminar will analyze and explore the universal human rights concept -- the idea that all human beings, by virtue of their humanity alone, have human rights that should be recognized by all nations. It will explore the concept's meaning; its theoretical underpinnings, critiques and defenses; and the kinds of specific rights suggested by the concept. The course will also provide an introduction to existing human rights law.

  • PHIL-713 Internship in Applied Ethics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Students in this course will serve as interns in a department-approved position with a service provider, professional organization, government agency, or non-governmental organization whose work is relevant to issues in applied ethics. A faculty mentor will meet with students regularly to develop individually designed programs of readings and to discuss this material and its relation to the internship experience. In addition to the substantial time commitment to the internship, course requirements will usually include a journal and a research project. Normally offered every year.

  • PHIL-714 Masters' Thesis Supervision

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is intended for graduate students in the Ethics and Public Policy Masters' Program who have elected to write a formal thesis (instead of taking part in an internship). Students will prepare a thesis proposal in consultation with an assigned faculty advisor before they register for this course. The proposal will be approved by an ad -hoc faculty committee. Students will use this course to write the thesis in regular consultation with the faculty advisor, and usually during the summer following their first year of study. The final draft must be approved at a formal defense by the ad hoc committee.

  • PHIL-717 Independent Research

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on philosophical research and writing. It is designed as an independent research course to allow students the opportunity to focus on a topic of their choice and develop critical skills in writing and research methods. Students will be required to produce a research paper of a length commensurate with the number of credits in the course, complete with abstract, thesis, outline, bibliography, and primary and secondary sources. Students will be expected to follow MLA guidelines. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1-3 credits (variable). Normally offered on an as-needed basis.

  • PHIL-720 Practicum in Teaching Ethics

    Prerequisites:

    PHIL 701 and Instructor's Consent

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course is intended for graduate students in programs associated with the Philosophy Department as an introduction to methods in teaching ethics. The student will take an undergraduate ethics course, with the permission of the course's instructor, doing the course readings and attending classes. The course instructor will devise a mentoring program in consultation with the student, which may include some or all of the following, under the instructor's supervision: workshops with students; office hours with students; sample lectures, facilitating classroom discussion; review (but not grading) of student papers. Written work may include assignments on the pedagogical questions arising from both the materials themselves and the work with students, as well as other projects. Prerequisites: PHIL 701 and consent of the instructor. 3 credits. Offered every semester.

  • PHIL-910 Independent Study in Philosophy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Independent study in philosophy

  • PPE-701 Political Economy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This interdisciplinary class brings together the fields of politics, philosophy, and economics at a high academic level. You will be confronted with hard questions about the sources, ends, and limits of government; the usefulness and troubles of free markets; the proper distribution of economic advantages in society; and what works best for building a just and efficient system of economic institutions.

  • RS-601 Reason and Revelation

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Traces the evolution of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam to the High Middle Ages to explore the role of Neo-Platonism and Aristotelianism in clarifying and explaining dogma. Particular attention will be paid to ideas about the ways of knowing and rational proofs of God's existence in Philo of Alexandria, Augustine, Anselm, Ibn Rushd (Averroes), Aquinas and Maimonides. Normally offered in alternate years.