Master's Courses

  • COUNS-712 Life Span Development

    Prerequisites:

    Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the process of human development across the lifespan. While it will focus primarily on psychological processes, the intersection with biological and social processes will be explored as well. The major psychological theories of cognitive, social and emotional development will be covered as will the foundations for individual differences. Special emphasis will be placed on topics of interest to people entering the counseling professions. Normally offered yearly.

  • COUNS-713 Counseling: Theory & Practice

    Prerequisites:

    Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Analysis of selected counseling theories representative of the field of counseling psychology. Theories will be selected from the following areas: Psychoanalytic, Psychosocial, Rational, Cognitive Behavioral/Learning Theory, Person-Centered, and Existential Theory. Treatment goals and techniques will be explored.

  • COUNS-714 Psychology of Career Development

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A survey of various theories of vocational choice and development, and strategies for the implementation of vocational counseling in the school, agency, or business/industrial setting. Concepts of work, vocational concerns of women and minorities and other major issues also investigated.

  • COUNS-715 Methods of Research

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Principles, concepts and methods of research design and statistics associated with psychological and educational research. Practical applications of research studies to a diverse range of interests in education, psychology and counseling. Offered yearly.

  • COUNS-716 Psychological Diagnosis

    Prerequisites:

    TAKE COUNS-717

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The study of the nature of mental disorders; central concepts and processes. Psychogenesis, psychodynamics, role of anxiety, and clinical assessment using the DSM-IV.

  • COUNS-717 Introduction to Psychological Testing

    Prerequisites:

    COUNS-713(may be taken concurrently)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Evaluating, administering, scoring, interpreting, and reporting results of standardized tests of personality, academic performance, cognitive functioning, aptitude, and achievement. Self-study development and assessment of testing programs. Critical issues in testing. Normally offered yearly.

  • COUNS-720 School Counseling Practicum I

    Prerequisites:

    Take COUNS-710 COUNS-737 COUNS-746;

    Credits:

    3.00- 6.00

    Description:

    Application of skills in a school environment. Students will spend a minimum of fifteen hours per week in a school and participate in weekly group sessions at the University for the evaluation of progress and clinical supervision. Open only to degree candidates in the School Counseling Program who have formally applied for the Practicum and have completed at least 18 hours of coursework. Offered fall semester.

  • COUNS-721 School Counseling Practicum II

    Prerequisites:

    Take COUNS-720;

    Credits:

    3.00- 6.00

    Description:

    Continuation of COUNS 720 with an opportunity to assume increased responsibility for clients under supervision. Offered spring semester.

  • COUNS-722 Groups in Schools

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An overview of the various group counseling formats utilized in schools, and related theories. Issues related to the development and implementation of small counseling groups (e.g., group dynamics and processes for group member selection) and larger educational and prevention-based groups (e.g., fostering positive mental health, career-related programming, anti-bullying) will be explored and discussed.

  • COUNS-725 Forensic Psychological Assessment

    Prerequisites:

    COUNS-717;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The interface of psychology and the law will be examined in the context of forensic evaluations performed for courts, attorneys and related agencies or facilities. Topics ranging from Competency to Stand Trial and Criminal Responsibility to termination of parental rights and custody and visitation evaluations will be explored. Practical applications of the skills and knowledge domains needed to perform forensic evaluations will be emphasized, as will the study of relevant laws and regulations as applied to forensic assessment. Discussion will include specialized forensic topics such as the evaluation of juvenile sexual offenders and the forensic use of psychological testing.

  • COUNS-726 Family Therapy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Selected models of family therapy will be explored. Special emphasis will be placed on assessment and the acquisition of treatment strategies proven to be effective for counselors in helping families cope with developmental stresses. Normally offered alternate years.

  • COUNS-727 Substance Abuse & Treatment

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A study of the origin, contributing factors, and implications of drug and alcohol misuse. Various stages and manifestations of abuse/ dependence will be considered and current treatment modalities will be explored.

  • COUNS-728 Professional Orientation: Ethical/ Legal Issues

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An overview of the legal issues confronting counselors, human services providers and administrators. Study of regulatory and licensing matters, standards of care, confidentiality laws, mental health and disability laws and family law, constitutional issues, malpractice and legal/ethical dilemmas in human services.

  • COUNS-729 Human Sexuality Seminar

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The anatomy, physiology and psychology of human sexual functioning are reviewed. Etiology, interpersonal dynamics, and treatment of sexual dysfunctions are reviewed.

  • COUNS-730 Diagnosis & Treatment for Personality Disorders

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A theoretical exploration of the nature of personality, a review of the DSM-IV criteria for diagnosing personality disorders and an examination of current treatment approaches.

  • COUNS-731 Action Research

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Research designs, methods, and statistics for students in educator preparation programs (school counseling and teacher preparation). The focus of this course is on the practical methods of conducting practitioner-led research, and involves the execution and presentation of an original research project. Normally offered yearly.

  • COUNS-732 Psychological Disorders of Childhood & Adolescence

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the major psychological disorders of childhood and adolescence from biological, psychological, and sociocultural perspectives. Attention-deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders, Feeding and Eating Disorders, anxiety and depression are among the disorders explored. Student interest determines other topics. Assessment, treatment, and outcome studies are also discussed. Completion of EHS 701 or EHS 712 is recommended before taking this course. Normally offered alternate years.

  • COUNS-733 Counseling Diverse Populations

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A survey of problems and issues confronting cultural diversity. The study of ethnicity and sexual orientation as they influence the development of identity. Implications for counseling strategies. Normally offered yearly.

  • COUNS-735 Group Counseling

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A study of the practical and theoretical aspects of counseling small groups. There will be provision for a laboratory experience in which students participate in a group and study the dynamics of behavior as this group develops. Group stages of development and leadership skills will also be examined. Normally offered yearly.

  • COUNS-737 Counseling Skills Lab

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An introduction to the fundamental techniques and methods of interpersonal relationships, self-examination, and field visits in relation to the role of the professional counselor. The course will involve skill building through role playing, video and/or audio taping. Normally offered spring semester.

  • COUNS-738 Mental Health Counseling Practicum I

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Application of skills in an assigned field placement (school, agency or industry). Students will spend fifteen hours per week in field work and participate in weekly group sessions at the University for the evaluation of progress. Open only to degree candidates in Mental Health Counseling. Offered fall semester.

  • COUNS-739 Mental Health Counseling Practicum II

    Prerequisites:

    Take COUNS-738

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Continuation of COUNS 738 with an opportunity to assume increased responsibility for clients under supervision. Failure to successfully complete the practicum field experience for any reason following two attempts will result in termination from the program. Offered spring semester.

  • COUNS-740 Counseling Internship I

    Prerequisites:

    Take COUNS-738 COUNS-739;

    Credits:

    6.00

    Description:

    Application of skills in an approved field placement (school, clinic, hospital, agency, industry) totaling 300 clock hours. The opportunity to develop advanced skills and to integrate professional knowledge appropriate to the field experience. Failure to successfully complete the practicum field experience for any reason following two attempts will result in termination from the program. Offered fall semester.

  • COUNS-741 Counseling Internship II

    Prerequisites:

    Take COUNS-740;

    Credits:

    6.00

    Description:

    Continuation of Counseling Internship I with advanced responsibilities totaling 300 clock hours. Exploration of an area of individual specialization. Failure to successfully complete the practicum field experience for any reason following two attempts will result in termination from the program. Offered spring semester.

  • COUNS-746 Issues in School Counseling

    Prerequisites:

    Take COUNS-710;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An in-depth investigation of current major areas of concern for the secondary school counselor, including involvement in special needs, legal issues, working with diverse populations and developmental/psychological education. Normally offered yearly.

  • COUNS-747 College Admission Counseling Fundamentals

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will discuss issues surrounding admission testing and financial aid practices, admission policies and procedures, diverse students (e.g., first generation, students with learning disabilities, traditionally underrepresented populations in higher education), and the technology tools used to facilitate the college search and application process (e.g., Naviance, ConnectEDU, the Common Application). School-based programs to promote early college awareness will also be discussed, and the perspective of both the high school and undergraduate admissions counselor will be considered. Normally offered yearly

  • COUNS-748 Fieldwork: College Visits

    Prerequisites:

    COUNS-747;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will require students to visit a minimum of 8 public and private four-year and 2 two-year higher education institutions. Students will meet with admission, diversity services, and disability services personnel of each college to gain insight into how prospective students with diverse backgrounds and abilities would fit the campus resources and offerings. Normally offered yearly

  • COUNS-749 Access and Equity in Higher Education

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Historical and current problems regarding access and equity to higher education opportunities for traditionally underrepresented groups in the college classroom will be explored, with a focus on research describing the problems, and their solutions Course to be offered yearly by the Administration of Higher Education Program

  • COUNS-751 Domestic Violence, Abuse & Neglect

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An opportunity to learn the history of domestic violence including battering, child abuse and child neglect, and the legal response to it. Focus will be on Massachusetts Law and its response, especially the Abuse Prevention Act, its application and enforcement, and on laws protecting children from abuse and neglect. Filings, law office issues and special issues in dealing with battered women and abused and neglected children will be included with the psychological issues, cultural issues, and advocacy possibilities. Normally offered yearly.

  • COUNS-910 Independent Study

    Credits:

    1.00- 3.00

    Description:

    Members of the Department will meet with students to direct their research in areas of special interest to them. Projects will be authorized upon the recommendations of the Department Chairperson and with the approval of the Dean.

Doctoral Courses

  • PSYCH-000 Advanced Dissertation Residency

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    Provides full-time enrollment status for students who have completed all content courses, and who are working on dissertations, but who are not on internship. At the discretion of the DCT, a practicum course may be taken concurrently with Psych 000. This course is NG (not graded).

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • PSYCH-001 Early Research Project Continuation

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    Provides full-time enrollment status for students whose ERPs are one or more semesters overdue. At the discretion of the DCT, a single practicum course may be taken concurrently with Psych 001.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • PSYCH-703 Etiology and Treatment of Anxiety and Related Disorders

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on the origins, maintenance, and treatment of anxiety and related disorders (e.g., depressive and trauma and stressor-related disorders). The class utilizes a cognitive-behavioral theoretical perspective to explore the development and treatment of anxiety and related disorders. Consistent with the introduction of unified cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) protocols for the treatment of emotional disorders, this course uses a transdiagnostic framework to highlight shared etiological and treatment mechanisms common across anxiety and related disorders. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of theory and empirical findings into the application of clinical skills for the treatment of adults with these disorders.

  • PSYCH-705 Assessment I

    Prerequisites:

    Restricted to PhD students only.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The seminar aims to introduce you to the theory and practice of evidence-based social, emotional and behavioral assessment. To this end, specific issues we will cover include psychometric theory, cognitive abilities/intelligence testing, some classic assessment controversies, strengths and weaknesses of various assessment approaches, ethical and cultural issues, and the psychological assessment of children.

  • PSYCH-706 Assessment II

    Prerequisites:

    Restricted to PhD students only.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The goal of this course is to serve as a foundation for clinical practice and research activity in the important area of clinical neuropsychological assessment and psychological assessment. It serves to introduce the student to the techniques, methods and theories relevant to the practice of neuropsychological and psychological assessment. The course can roughly be divided into two halves. In the first half general technique, theory, and individual statistics will be covered. This will start with the procedures for the clinical neuropsychological examination, including the interview, preparation of the patient, and selection of instruments. The nature and structure of cognition, factor structure of the neuropsychological battery, and a theory of brain-behavior relationships will be covered. This will be followed by coverage of statistics as applied to assessment, that is, the difference between the inferential form of statistics students are used to (group statistics) and the probabilistic form (individual) of statistics useful in assessment. Subsequent focus will be on clinical decision-making, that is, the use of test data to respond to the diagnostic and descriptive questions that are the goals of the assessment process. The first half of the class will finish with a focus on individual differences, critical to the interpretation psychological test data. The second half of the course will focus on specific cognitive functions, assessment of personality and psychopathology, and on civil and forensic contexts relevant to assessment. Normally offered yearly.

  • PSYCH-711 Scientific Writing for the Psychological Sciences

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Provides intensive training in the process of psychology-orientated scientific writing. Topics include identifying knowledge gaps in the extant literature through a critical review of existing research, developing a strong rationale for future research, basic writing style and structure, disciplined writing practices, effective revision, and peer-review. Normally offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PSYCH-712 Multicultural Psychology

    Prerequisites:

    Graduate course for Psychology Ph.D. program, approved by department.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces students to multicultural issues relevant to psychology. Covers a broad range of cultural diversity (sex, age, race, ethnicity, language, religion, sexual orientations, etc.) topics to highlight the role of culture in understanding human behavior and health-related issues. This course intends to strengthen students' multicultural knowledge, sensitivity, and competence in research/professional practice through their exposure to various theoretical/empirical perspectives, media, experiential exercises, etc. Students will acquire in-depth awareness of self and others' worldviews and a better insight into immigrants/minority groups, privilege/oppression, health care access/disparity issues, interpersonal relationship, community health and well being domains.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PSYCH-714 Dialectical Behavior Therapy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In this psychotherapy seminar, students will learn about dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), an evidence-based treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Students will gain knowledge and experience (via role-plays) in behavioral assessment and in all modes of DBT, including individual therapy, group skills training, telephone coaching, and consultation team. Students will explore the theoretical bases of the treatment, as well as gain knowledge of the empirical basis for DBT's use with various patient populations, including BPD, opioid dependent, chronically suicidal/self-harming, and other populations (inpatients, bipolar disorder, friends and family of seriously mentally ill, etc.). Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PSYCH-716 Adult Psychopathology

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This graduate seminar requires students to examine and respond to current thinking and controversies in the conceptualization and categorization of mental disorders generally, and adult disorders in particular. Students will acquire foundational knowledge about the diagnostic characterization, etiology, and epidemiology of the major classes of adult behavior disorders; investigate mental disorders and our current diagnostic system from a variety of different perspectives (clinical, research, biological, sociocultural, etc.); gain significant practice critically evaluating scientific research and in articulating thoughtful responses to social and behavioral research on mental disorders. Normally offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PSYCH-718 Research Methods and Ethics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Provides students with foundational skills needed to be both a consumer and producer of psychological research. Topics covered include hypothesis and proposal generation, experimental, correlational and qualitative designs, strategies to minimize bias, measurement issues, participant selection and recruitment, data management, grantsmanship and the dissemination of findings. Ethical issues in the conduct of research are emphasized. Normally offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PSYCH-L718 Clinical Psychology Lab I

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    Provides students enrolled in the Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology an extended introduction and orientation to the program and to the field of clinical psychology. Enrollment by invitation of the DCT only. The lab will be graded P/F. Offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PSYCH-719 History & Systems of Psychology

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The purpose of this course is to trace the origin and development of psychology as a field of study from its philosophical and scientific roots to present day theories. The emphasis will be on critically examining the various systems of psychology, especially as they are translated into psychological practice, and their development in relation to sciences and societies. Normally offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PSYCH-L720 Clinical Psychology Lab II

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    Continues the orientation and early skill development of students enrolled in the Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology. Provides a lab experience within which to explore and develop initial skills preparatory for practicum experience in year 2. Enrollment by invitation of the DCT only. This lab will be graded P/F. Offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PSYCH-721 Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces students to the concept of empirically informed clinical practice. Topics covered include the history of the evidence-based movement in psychology, an overview of the methods used in scientifically-informed clinical practice (e.g., case conceptualization, treatment planning, ongoing assessment of progress), and an introduction to specific evidence-based principles that can be used in psychotherapy (e.g., exposure therapy, behavioral activation, etc.). Normally offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PSYCH-722 Graduate Statistics in Psychology I

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces basic statistical tests such as t tests, ANOVA, correlation, regression, Chi Square, and power analysis. Students are also required to demonstrate proficiency in computer data analysis using SPSS. Normally offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PSYCH-723 Graduate Statistics in Psychology II

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH-722

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Focuses on multivariate statistics and the interaction of research design and statistical analysis. Emphasis on MANOVA, multiple regression, principle components analysis/factor analysis, and logistic regression. Issues involving experimental and statistical control, multicollinearity, specification error, and nesting will be covered. Students learn basic principles of multivariate analysis, read journal articles using multivariate techniques, analyze data using each main type of analysis covered in the course, and write results and tables using APA style. Normally offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PSYCH-729 Social Justice, Race, & Ethnicity

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Investigates race and ethnicity as ideological categories that both inform group identity and reproduce social inequalities. The course begins with an overview of the social and historical forces that developed these categories, with a focus on some of the major ethnic groups in the United States. Explores historical and contemporary roles played by psychologists around these issues. Students learn how to individually and collectively avoid perpetuating injustices in the science and practice of psychology. Course topics exemplify how race and ethnicity are inextricably linked to other identity categories, especially gender, class, and sexual identity. Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PSYCH-732 Social Bases of Behavior and Experience

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces students to the social bases of behavior and experience through examination of some traditional topics from the field of social psychology. These include: social cognition; self-knowledge; self-presentation; attitude formation and change; attraction and close relations; altruism; aggression; prejudice and stereotypes; and group dynamics. In addition, the course may include discussion of cross-cultural approaches to healing and the relationship between culture and mental health. Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PSYCH-738 Clinical Practicum & Ethics IA

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Doctoral students complete an academic year of placement service (9-10 months) at one of the selected practica sites during their second year of academic training. Students complete between 12 and 20 hours per week of placement service to include training in assessment, diagnostic interviewing and intakes, intervention, and applied research with diverse populations. Students will receive on-site supervision by licensed psychologists and other approved professionals. Students participate in a weekly practicum seminar. This didactic portion examines the legal, ethical, and professional issues currently facing psychologists in practice with diverse populations, including confidentiality/mandated reporting, informed consent, conflicts of interest, boundary issues, and limits of professional competence. Normally offered every fall semester.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PSYCH-739 Clinical Practicum & Ethics IB

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 738

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Continuation of Practicum & Ethics IA. Normally offered every spring semester.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PSYCH-740 Clinical Practicum IIA

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 738, PSYCH 739.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Doctoral students complete an academic year of placement service (9 to 10 months) at one of the selected practica sites during their third year of academic training. Students complete approximately 20 hours per week of placement service to include assessment, intervention, and consultation with diverse populations. Students receive on-site supervision by licensed psychologists and other approved professionals. All students will concurrently participate in practicum seminars taught by Suffolk University faculty. The didactic supplement provides a foundation in developing students' knowledge in the areas of consultation and supervision along with continued training in cultural and individual diversity. Normally offered every fall semester.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PSYCH-741 Clincial Practicum IIb

    Prerequisites:

    Psych 738, 739 and 740

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Continuation of Practicum 2A. Normally offered every spring semester.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PSYCH-743 Clinical Supervision and Consultation in Psychology

    Prerequisites:

    Doctoral Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines theoretical foundations, empirical research, approaches, and ethics of clinical supervision and consultation in professional psychology. Emphasis will also be placed on the integration of theory and empirical findings into the application of skills necessary to work as effective clinical supervisors and psychological consultants. Offered yearly.

  • PSYCH-748 Developmental Psychopathology

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines child and adolescent psychopathology from an empirically-based developmental perspective. Reviews major developmental theories to elucidate the role of development in understanding the etiology and diagnosis of DSM-IV-TR disorders. Also focuses on theoretical and empirical literature in developmental psychopathology. Changes in the incidence rates of internalizing (e.g., depression, anxiety) and externalizing disorders (e.g., conduct disorder, attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder) are addressed. Disorders affecting both behavioral and mental functioning (e.g., autism) are included. Family, peer, and contextual/environmental influences are also covered. Normally offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PSYCH-749 Lifespan Development

    Prerequisites:

    Doctoral Standing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines development across the lifespan, including biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development, with attention to the role of culture and context. Reviews major theories of development and how such theories provide conceptual frameworks for understanding the development adaptive and maladaptive behaviors and trajectories. Also addresses implications for treatment and prevention. Normally offered yearly.

  • PSYCH-751 Psychopharmacology

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents students with an introduction to the field of psychopharmacology. Topics covered will include: the art of prescribing medication; the psychopharmacology of anxiety and psychotic mental disorders (including pediatric and geriatric psychopharmacology); pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy; biopsychosocial factors in drug abuse and addiction. Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PSYCH-764 Cognitive and Experimental Approaches to Emotion

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Investigates theories regarding the function and experience of emotion. This course will survey the historical concepts of emotion in psychology and current theories of emotion, including motivational, cognitive and physiological aspects. The course will also describe research methods used in the study of emotion, including psychophysiology and neuroimaging, as well as clinical implications. Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PSYCH-772 The Teaching of Psychology

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines current theory and research on effective teaching of psychology. Surveys a variety of teaching techniques, tools, and methods for leading discussions, lecturing, assessment, and grading. Additional topics include: learning styles in the classroom, student diversity, development of critical thinking, and ethics in college teaching. Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PSYCH-777 Advanced Clinical Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 741 and approval from Director of Clinical training.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Consent of DCT is required to enroll. Concurrent enrollment in other content courses or Psych 000 is permitted. This course is graded P/F.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • PSYCH-779 Acceptance-Based Behavioral Therapy Psychotherapy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the contemporary movement integrating acceptance (willingness to experience thoughts, emotions, physiological sensations and images) and mindfulness (intentional and non-judgmental awareness of the present moment) into traditional cognitive and behavioral approaches to case formulation and treatment. Topics include analysis and discussion of the theoretical underpinnings of this movement, examination of specific emerging therapies, and exploration of the application of these therapies to a variety of clinical problems. Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PSYCH-780 Early Research Project Preparation

    Credits:

    3.00- 9.00

    Description:

    Intended for students who are working on their Early Research Project. This course is graded P/F. Offered every semester.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • PSYCH-781 Comprehensive Exam Preparation

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Intended for students who are preparing for comprehensive exams. This course is graded P/F. Offered every semester.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • PSYCH-782 Dissertation Proposal Preparation

    Credits:

    3.00- 6.00

    Description:

    Intended for students who are preparing for their dissertation proposal. This course is graded P/F. Offered every semester.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • PSYCH-783 Dissertation Research

    Credits:

    3.00- 6.00

    Description:

    Intended for students who are preparing for their dissertation proposal. This course is graded P/F. Offered every semester.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • PSYCH-792 Introduction to Neuropsychology

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduces the specialty area of neuropsychology. Includes the scope of neuropsychology, the difference between neuropsychology and related difference and subspecialties, different historical and theoretical approaches to neuropsychology, as well as credentialing requirements for the practice of neuropsychology. Introduction to research techniques used to investigate brain-behavior relationships, ethical issues, and the role of the neuropsychologist in clinical and rehabilitation settings. Covers the nervous system, the role of neurotransmitters, brain structures and associated functions, how different instruments are used to assess those functions, and how neuropsychological interventions are formulated and implemented. Normally offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PSYCH-795 Human Neuropsychology I

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Researchers from the Boston Veterans Administration Hospital lecture on various topics including: neuropsychological assessment; plasticity in development; aphasia; apraxia; attention deficit disorder; aging; memory; dementia; bilingualism; epilepsy; and pain. Held at the Boston Veterans Administration Hospital in Jamaica Plain. Normally offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PSYCH-796 Human Neuropsychology II

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Continuation of PSYCH 795 at the Boston Veterans Administration Hospital in Jamaica Plain. Normally offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

  • PSYCH-797 Functional Neuroanatomy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Provides students with a comprehensive overview of functional neuroanatomy, as well as an introduction to neuropathology, neuroepidemiology, and the neurobehavioral consequences of congenital and acquired neurological diseases and disorders. Teaching strategies will include lectures, human brain lab, directed readings, and neurosciences software programs. Held at Boston University School of Medicine. Normally offered yearly.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

  • PSYCH-801 Internship

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Provides full-time enrollment status for students who are on pre-doctoral internships. This course is graded P/F.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • PSYCH-900 Advanced Respecialization Practicum

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Provides full-time enrollment status for Respecialization students who have completed all content courses and who are pursuing additional practicum training prior to predoctoral internship. Consent of DCT is required to enroll. Concurrent enrollment in other courses is not permitted. This course is graded P/F.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

  • PSYCH-910 Independent Study

    Credits:

    3.00- 6.00

    Description:

    Consists of the intensive study of one aspect of clinical psychology and/or human development in consultation with a faculty member.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring