As an honors student, you will join a select group of talented, highly motivated students. Part of your experience will include academic opportunities and advising specifically tailored to honors students.

Courses

  • Priority course registration. You can choose the best classes and professors before everyone else.
  • Take special courses and special sections of the Freshman Seminar open only to honors students

Advising

  • Each department has a designated faculty member who advises honors students in that major.
  • Comprising faculty and administrators, the Honors Advisory Committee reviews applicants to the Honors Program, develops honors programming, and works closely with the student Honors Council.

Senior Honors Project

In your senior year, you’ll delve into a topic of personal or professional interest through the honors senior project. You might write an original play, do fieldwork in a foreign country, or conduct research alongside a Suffolk professor. Current projects include:

  • Comedy in Crisis: Is the use of sensitive material in comedy acceptable? Erika is tracking how TV shows and online satirical publications use their jokes and storylines as a response to crisis.
  • Princess Problem: Kayleigh is conducting a study on how the Disney princess ideal affects young girls, comparing older Disney films to their latest box office success, Frozen.
  • Social Sharing: Inspired by the rapid sharing of information via social media in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing, Brian is investigating whether social media is a valid source of information in times of crisis.
  • Solving a Mystery: Charles Dickens’ final novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, was unfinished at the time of his death. Cory is deciphering clues in the text to predict an ending to the tale.
  • What’s Your IQ?: Valerie is exploring the history of intelligence testing and its implications for students and society.

External Fellowships & Scholarships

Are you interested in earning a prestigious fellowship or scholarship for summer study, a post-graduate project, or funding for graduate school? Learn more on the Undergraduate Academic Advising Center website.

Seminar for Freshmen

All CAS freshmen are required to take this seminar. Special honors sections allow you to start building community and cohesion with your honors peers right away. Options have included:

  • SF-H116 Enlightened Insanity

    Prerequisites:

    CAS Honors students only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Rain or shine, the great 18th century Enlightenment philosophers would meet at the famous cafes of Paris to discuss their ideas, and to observe and criticize society. From these informal debates emerged ideas that are at the core of our modern understanding of the nature of society, marginality, human nature, civil rights, the essence of creativity and genius. Come join us in the quest to understand, define, observe, and analyze the key ideas and concepts of these great thinkers, such as Rousseau, Diderot, and Voltaire, still so relevant in our time. We will read key works of these creative thinkers and philosophers. We will enrich our experience and understanding through the use of film, theatre performances, museum visits, as well as the occasional cafe debate.

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • SF-H126 The Boston Theatre Scene: The Inside Experience

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Using the current Boston theatre season as its syllabus, this writing- and analysis-intensive course will explore several plays in production at some of Boston's many professional theatres. We will study the script of four to five plays before attending performances of those works. Students will gain insights on the world of theatre through backstage tours and conversations with theatre professionals such as producers, directors, actors, designers, playwrights, and critics. Students must be available for evening (usually Wednesday) performances. A fee for student-rate tickets will be assessed.

  • SF-H1134 The Meaning of Life

    Prerequisites:

    CAS honors students only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    What do we live for? Which beliefs, values, and experiences sustain meaningful, fulfilling existence? Are we authors of our destinies or powerless pawns in an unfathomable cosmic game? Does death render all our efforts superfluous? This award-winning course offers a cross-cultural, interdisciplinary exploration of these questions through philosophical and religious texts, art, fiction, autobiography, and psychological studies. The course opens with the Old Testament's book of Ecclesiastes, followed by three units: 1) A Life Worth Living: Humanity's Ideals focuses on the ancient and modern visions of human flourishing; 2) Threats to Meaning: Humanity's Discontents, discusses the disillusionments leading to the loss of meaning; and 3) Recovery of Meaning: Crises and Hopes, explores the post-crisis possibilities of self-discovery and growth. Please visit http://meaningoflife.cherkasova.org/

  • SF-H1135 Women Warriors: Stories of Captivity, Conversion, and Confession

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Since the beginning of time, women have been doing battle to themselves, while men have gone to battle against others. Whether it is through converting to Christ, yielding to captors in order to survive, or carrying a baby, this course introduces students to the many ways in which, whatever battles they face, women are warriors; they survive. Utilizing an array of captivity, conversion, and confession narratives by women, and pairing them across the centuries, students will make connections and draw conclusions between early-and mid-19th-century-American and contemporary women. Students will connect, for example, the trials of the 17th-century Puritan captive, Mary Rowlandson, and contemporary hostage, Elizabeth Smart, to explore how women (no matter how different they seem) draw upon unique inner resources to survive.

  • SF-H1152 The Idea of America: Past, Present, Future

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A systematic exploration of thinking of and about America, from the founding of the republic to American issues and traditions of thought that reflect upon the founding principles and the unfolding American experiment. The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution will be studied with an eye to their philosophical content and sources. The course will also examine works of philosophers and other thinkers who address conflicts over the meaning of founding principles in the course of the nation's history, from the struggle over slavery to America's contemporary role in the world. Because this course intends to apply theoretical understanding to real life, students will be expected to read contemporary journalism on a regular basis and assess the controversies of today in the light of the nation's philosophical and historical currents.