As an honors student, you will join a select group of talented, highly motivated students. Part of your experience will include academic opportunities and advising specifically tailored to honors students.

Courses

  • Priority course registration. You can choose the best classes and professors before everyone else.
  • Take special courses and special sections of the Freshman Seminar open only to honors students

Advising

  • Each department has a designated faculty member who advises honors students in that major.
  • Comprising faculty and administrators, the Honors Advisory Committee reviews applicants to the Honors Program, develops honors programming, and works closely with the student Honors Council.

Senior Honors Project

In your senior year, you’ll delve into a topic of personal or professional interest through the honors senior project. You might write an original play, do fieldwork in a foreign country, or conduct research alongside a Suffolk professor. Current projects include:

  • Comedy in Crisis: Is the use of sensitive material in comedy acceptable? Erika is tracking how TV shows and online satirical publications use their jokes and storylines as a response to crisis.
  • Princess Problem: Kayleigh is conducting a study on how the Disney princess ideal affects young girls, comparing older Disney films to their latest box office success, Frozen.
  • Social Sharing: Inspired by the rapid sharing of information via social media in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing, Brian is investigating whether social media is a valid source of information in times of crisis.
  • Solving a Mystery: Charles Dickens’ final novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, was unfinished at the time of his death. Cory is deciphering clues in the text to predict an ending to the tale.
  • What’s Your IQ?: Valerie is exploring the history of intelligence testing and its implications for students and society.

External Fellowships & Scholarships

Are you interested in earning a prestigious fellowship or scholarship for summer study, a post-graduate project, or funding for graduate school? Learn more on the Undergraduate Academic Advising Center website.

Seminar for Freshmen

All CAS freshmen are required to take this seminar. Special honors sections allow you to start building community and cohesion with your honors peers right away. Options have included:

  • SF-H101 Fixing the World- Energy and Water: The Science of Solutions

    Prerequisites:

    CAS Honors students only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Two of the most daunting challenges the world faces (or will face) is how to provide for both its growing energy needs and potable drinking water. Regular news events include climate change, droughts, flooding, and petroleum struggles. Human nature often requires a severe crisis before it responds. This course will investigate the historical science driving the use of energy since the Industrial Revolution to convert energy resources into work, including the steam engine, the electric motor, and the internal combustion engine. It will also consider alternative energy options to fossil fuels, such as solar, wind, geothermal, and ocean power. Along the way we will consider the evidence for Global Warming and Climate Change. We will look into human nature, simple life styles, conspiracy theories, and the influence of those in power to shape human opinion. We will also consider how our water supply is provided and where it goes after being used. What options do developing countries or drought racked areas have to remedy their water needs? Although the course pursues a scientific understanding of these issues, the mathematics used will be gentle, and a larger emphasis will be placed on the intuitive appreciation of these concerns.

  • SF-H116 Enlightened Insanity

    Prerequisites:

    CAS Honors students only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Rain or shine, the great 18th century Enlightenment philosophers would meet at the famous cafes of Paris to discuss their ideas, and to observe and criticize society. From these informal debates emerged ideas that are at the core of our modern understanding of the nature of society, marginality, human nature, civil rights, the essence of creativity and genius. Come join us in the quest to understand, define, observe, and analyze the key ideas and concepts of these great thinkers, such as Rousseau, Diderot, and Voltaire, still so relevant in our time. We will read key works of these creative thinkers and philosophers. We will enrich our experience and understanding through the use of film, theatre performances, museum visits, as well as the occasional cafe debate.

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement,Honors

  • SF-H178 Sacred Hoops & Sneaker Pimps: Understanding the American Hoop Dream

    Prerequisites:

    CAS Honors students only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is about the basketball hoop dream played out at the high school and college levels. We will study a wide variety of materials - novels, films, websites, reference works - to understand both the construction, and destruction, of the hoop dream in such diverse places as New York City, Seattle, rural Indiana, suburban Georgia, and the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. Issues of race and culture will serve as guiding themes as we develop critical theory explaining why the hoop dream has persisted, and adapted, over time, to fit the needs of its believers and supporters.

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A

  • SF-H182 Heroes, Antiheroes and Outsiders: Reading the Graphic Novel

    Prerequisites:

    CAS Honors students only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    How is it that comics", a genre often viewed as entertainment for children and adolescents, has become one of the most exciting forms of narrative and visual art? To answer this question, this seminar will examine a range of graphic novels, from those that celebrate their origins in superhero comics, such as Alan Moore's Watchmen, to those that treat subjects not usually considered proper to the comics genre, such as Art Spiegelman's Maus, about the Holocaust, and Alison Bechdel's Fun Home, about the complexities of sexual identity. As we read these works, we will look at how the combination of words and still images makes the graphic novel a unique storytelling form, as well as how artists and writers push the envelope to create new styles and challenge our expectations. In addition to class discussions and writing assignments, we will take a field trip to the Museum of Fine Arts and create a collaborative group graphic novel step-by-step over the course of the semester (all abilities welcome).

  • SF-H197 Sustainability, Energy, and Technology At Suffolk University

    Prerequisites:

    CAS Honors students only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In this project and team-based course, students study a sustainability problem at Suffolk University and spend the semester developing proposals to address the problem. At the end of the course students will present their proposals to Suffolk University's sustainability committee, and will exhibit their websites and visual aids in the Donahue lobby to educate the Suffolk community about sustainability. If their proposals are well-researched and well-communicated, students can see their ideas actualized while they are still undergraduates.

  • SF-H1134 The Meaning of Life

    Prerequisites:

    CAS honors students only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    What do we live for? Which beliefs, values, and experiences sustain meaningful, fulfilling existence? Are we authors of our destinies or powerless pawns in an unfathomable cosmic game? Does death render all our efforts superfluous? This award-winning course offers a cross-cultural, interdisciplinary exploration of these questions through philosophical and religious texts, art, fiction, autobiography, and psychological studies. The course opens with the Old Testament's book of Ecclesiastes, followed by three units: 1) A Life Worth Living: Humanity's Ideals focuses on the ancient and modern visions of human flourishing; 2) Threats to Meaning: Humanity's Discontents, discusses the disillusionments leading to the loss of meaning; and 3) Recovery of Meaning: Crises and Hopes, explores the post-crisis possibilities of self-discovery and growth. Please visit http://meaningoflife.cherkasova.org/

    Type:

    Honors