LAW-2170 Emerging Issues in Law, Information Technology and Transnational Business

Prof. Michael Rustad,

2 credits day; 2 credits evening.


This seminar will present an overview of how the cross-border world economy impacts intellectual property law, information technology, and e-business transactions. In today's global economy, business lawyers increasingly encounter transnational intellectual and information technology issues in their practice. Topics covered will include the globalization of intellectual property, global copyright and trademark law, transnational privacy, e-commerce issues, the licensing of software and content, the law of social networking sites, complex products liability & environmental law, cybertort torts, employment issues with e-mail, the Internet, and the social media consumer protection in an information society. Students must write a scholarly paper on a topic approved by the professor. Students will be required to write a minimum 25-30 page paper (without footnotes or bibliography).


Faculty comments: This proseminar is designed for LL.M students and J.D. students of advanced standing. Lectures and clear explanations of the way that information technology is protected in a globalized information-based economy.

Lectures and class discussions about globalization of intellectual property. This part of the course covers each branch of intellectual property, and is primarily U.S. law in its orientation. IP is a field subject to international treaties. Our focus will be on international norms evolving that situate IP in the United States and around the world.

You will learn to "speak the language" necessary to become a global technology lawyers and leader.

You will learn how information technology and intellectual property law works in a business context—and how to communicate more effectively with your clients.

Emerging Issues in Law, Information Technology and Transnational Business is a Perspective course, taught in a mixed lecture and problem solving format that emphasizes class participation and discussion. This proseminar is designed for LL.M students and J.D. students of advanced standing. Lectures and clear explanations of the way that information technology is protected in a globalized information-based economy.

The required texts include materials for each week’s topic on TWEN. Twenty-five percent of your grade will be based upon class participation, class exercises, and take home assignments. Seventy-five percent of your grade is based upon a scholarly paper. This is a required course for all International Exchange students and all LL.M students. It is an elective for upper division J.D. students.

Final Scholarly Paper Required as Well as Short Thought Papers and Class Exercises.


pointer    Elective Course

pointer    On List of Recommended Perspectives Courses

pointer    Meets Financial Services Concentration Requirements

pointer    Meets Intellectual Property Concentration Requirements

pointer    Meets International Law Concentration Requirements

pointer    Meets Legal Technology and Innovation Concentration Requirements

pointer    May Fulfill Legal Writing Requirement

pointer    Final Exam or Paper Required


<<Course Updated: March 11, 2016>>