Healthcare Administration (Archive 2018-2019)

Graduate Programs in Healthcare Administration

There are three healthcare administration programs: the Master of Healthcare Administration (MHA), the Master of Business Administration/Health (MBA/Health) specialized degree, and the Master of Public Administration (MPA) with a concentration in Community Health.

Objectives for our Healthcare Administration Programs

Building on the missions of Suffolk University and the Sawyer Business School for delivering excellence in education, scholarship and research, the Healthcare Administration Programs–MHA, MBA/Health and MPA with a concentration in Community Health–provide powerful, innovative and enduring learning experiences for students aspiring to lead and manage healthcare organizations of compassion, quality, and value in the 21st Century.

The Healthcare Administration Programs are designed to nurture each student’s potential as a healthcare leader and/or manager by engaging her or him in the key issues, challenges, opportunities and requirements for success in healthcare. Through cutting-edge academic and hands-on learning, students develop the analytic and strategic skills needed to transform organizations, build relationships, and strengthen organizational performance.

The curriculum is tailored to meet the unique needs of students who:

  • Work in healthcare and seek to strengthen their knowledge and skills and advance their careers, or
  • Have little or no training or experience in healthcare administration and seek education and opportunities that will enable them to enter and succeed in the healthcare field.

Mission for our Master of Healthcare Administration Program

The MHA Program educates and inspires current and future healthcare leaders and managers from our region, other parts of the United States and around the world. We enroll healthcare professionals who seek to strengthen their knowledge and skills and advance their careers, as well as individuals who have little or no training or experience in healthcare administration and seek education and opportunities that will enable them to enter and succeed in the healthcare field.

We prepare our students to skillfully and ethically lead healthcare organizations toward superior performance that yields better patient care, and improved population health and lower costs. The MHA is a broad-based degree: it prepares students for professional opportunities in not-for-profit, for-profit and public organizations representing a broad continuum of healthcare delivery, financing and regulation, from ambulatory and acute inpatient care to post-acute and long-term care, as well as in consulting and insurance organizations and public agencies. The MHA Program integrates theoretical and practical knowledge, taking advantage of our location amid Boston’s world-class healthcare organizations to bring together the highest quality teaching, scholarship, research, mentoring and engagement in the healthcare community.

Vision for the Master of Healthcare Administration Program

Suffolk University will have the pre-eminent MHA Program in the Northeastern United States, serving a diverse group of students who are committed to their professional development and success as well as to being change agents who are striving to improve the healthcare delivery system and the health of the population. Our MHA Program will take graduate education to new levels of performance and creativity by providing inspiring and innovative learning experiences in classrooms and in healthcare organizations, utilizing our talented faculty members as well as healthcare professionals serving as mentors and internship sponsors.

Master of Healthcare Administration (MHA) Archive 2018-2019

The Master of Healthcare Administration Program is offered by the Healthcare Administration Department. The MHA is a broad-based degree that focuses exclusively on many diverse aspects of healthcare administration. Students are prepared for professional opportunities in not-for profit, for-profit, and public organizations representing a broad continuum of healthcare delivery, financing and regulation, from ambulatory and acute inpatient care to post-acute and long-term care, as well as in consulting and insurance organizations and public agencies. The MHA Program integrates theoretical and practical knowledge, taking advantage of our location amid Boston’s world-class healthcare organizations to bring together the highest quality teaching, scholarship, research, mentoring, and engagement in the healthcare community.

MHA Curriculum

The MHA curriculum focuses on the key issues, opportunities, challenges and requirements for success in healthcare administration.

MHA Curriculum (Total credits required: 50)

Required Introductory Courses (2 credits)

Prerequisites:

MHA students only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course is required for all MHA students. Its primary goal is to focus students on their career development. The course provides an orientation to Suffolk's MHA Program and the University's resources, along with guidance for getting the most from the MHA Program and the student's time at Suffolk. It introduces students to the healthcare industry in Massachusetts and identifies opportunities for student involvement in selected healthcare organizations. The course highlights how to build essential skills in written and verbal communication, critical and strategic thinking, resume development, and professional networking. Finally, it enables each student to conduct in-depth planning for his or her career as a healthcare professional. After becoming familiar with the range of competencies put forth by the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE) and the National Center for Healthcare Leadership (NCHL), each student develops a Personal Roadmap for Professional Development that incorporates selected competencies. The roadmap is a guide for the student's learning and development as a healthcare manager in the years ahead.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

SBS 700 is the first required course in Suffolk's graduate programs. The course is based on the precepts of experiential learning. Based on the idea that people learn best by participating in meaningful activities, this course provides students with the opportunity to learn about and experience first-hand the many complexities of business and the role of top managers. To accomplish this, students will work in small groups as they take on the roles of top managers in a hands-on behavioral simulation.

Core Courses (15 courses, 36 credits)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course presents an overview of the origins, components, organization, and operation of the health system in the United States. It is an introduction to the major health issues and institutions, including the settings in which health services are delivered, providers of these services, and the public and private payers for services.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides a framework for understanding the economics of the U.S. healthcare industry. The industry is experiencing great pressure to reduce costs, even as it strives to do better at both improving the health of the population and engaging patients in their care. This course enables students to apply the perspectives and tools of health economics to the tasks of understanding and improving the business of healthcare. Students analyze and evaluate current and evolving healthcare markets, public policies, payment methods, mechanisms for bearing and sharing financial risk, and the economic impact of changes in technology and the health professions. Students participate in envisioning the future and designing better ways for healthcare leaders, managers and policy makers to meet the challenges facing the industry.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an overview of healthcare management. Students develop knowledge and skills required for effective management of organizations that deliver high quality, patient-centered, cost-effective care. The course examines forces that are shaping healthcare organizations and draws on management theory and practice to explore a wide range of topics, including: governance and control; strategy; organizational structure, tasks and positions; culture and ethics; leadership and motivation; communication: planning; decision making and problem solving; recruiting and retaining human resources; teamwork; cultural competence and diversity management; managing people and performance in clinical and support services; and organizational change.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers both qualitative and quantitative research methods, with a strong focus on applied healthcare management research. Course topics include scientific reasoning, research design, action research methods, qualitative research methods, fundamental statistical techniques, and display and presentation of quantitative and qualitative analyses. This course prepares students as both producers and consumers of healthcare related research. Students will: Learn fundamentals of scientific reasoning, research design, and action research methods. Gain basic skills in both qualitative and quantitative data collection, analysis and presentation. Understand the meaning and appropriate application of basic statistical techniques relevant to healthcare management. Become prepared to analyze and draw conclusions from surveys, program evaluations, and operations data. Be able to troubleshoot the work of consultants and be critical consumers of research performed by others.

Prerequisites:

TAKE HLTH 701

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The growing healthcare field is the most labor intensive employer in the United States. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the theories, requirements and practices associated with managing human resources in healthcare organizations. The course covers both strategic and operational aspects of human resources planning and management, and it devotes particular attention to the issues that make human resources management in healthcare so challenging. Perhaps most important, the course guides students in developing practical knowledge and skills to prepare them- as healthcare leaders and managers- to successfully address human resource issues. The course will draw from a range of theoretical material and practical situations, using a variety of learning approaches and featuring guest speakers from healthcare organizations who share their experiences and perspectives from the field of human resources. The course focuses on the following topics: The changing healthcare environment and its implications for human resources management, the use of strategic human resource management to gain a competitive edge in the healthcare industry, workforce design, legal and regulatory requirements, recruitment and retention, organizational development, performance management, compensation and benefits, managing with organized labor and creating customer-satisfying healthcare organizations.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

This course serves as an introduction to the financial accounting of healthcare organizations. Understanding the important principles of a healthcare organization's income statement and balance sheet is the essence of this course. Focused attention will be given to the interpretation and analysis of financial statements, including the implications of assuming risk in an era of managed care.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students investigate the structural and functional aspects of the legal, institutional, and political factors that condition the character of the US healthcare industry, the role of the healthcare manager, the legislative process, administrative policy-making, and national trends related to political parties and interest groups. Topics in healthcare law include medical malpractice, informed consent, confidentiality of patient information, healthcare liability, and administrative law.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701; MHA students are required to take HLTH 824. MBA/H students are required to take MBA 640. Non-MHA and MBA/H students need permission from the Health Department before registering;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

This course serves as an introduction to the financial management of healthcare organizations. Using financial information for decision making is the essence of this course. Students will gain a perspective on the critical factors related to managing a healthcare organization in a marketplace that is demanding cost effective services. Focused attention will be given to managerial accounting, cost allocation, budgeting, and variance analysis.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 701;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

Healthcare industry trends point toward increasing need for meaningful measurement of the health of populations- from the population of patients who use a particular health service to the populations of nations. Healthcare managers must measure the need and demand for health services as well as the quality, safety and effectiveness or services. This course provides the fundamental information and enables students to develop the skills to apply principles and techniques of epidemiology in planning, delivering and evaluating health services.

Prerequisites:

Take HLTH-701 and either HLTH-812 or SBS-604. MHA and MSBA students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to concepts and analytic tools and techniques in operations management, such as project management, process improvement, queuing theory, forecasting, capacity planning, and supply chain management. Students will be challenged to examine the distinctive characteristics of health services operations, understand process improvement and patient flow, and explore the means for making optimal managerial decisions. In-class exercises, applied concept assignments, guest speakers, and exams are used to help students understand ways to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare organizations.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

The 'production' of health care is a service of significant personal and social consequence and high on the agenda of every healthcare executive. Today's consumer actively seeks evidence about the quality of care they can anticipate while payers are offering financial incentives to providers who can demonstrate superior patient outcomes. This course will focus on the complexities and processes of assuring quality performance in healthcare organizations.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines health policy development and implementation as well as important and cutting-edge U.S. health issues, including their policy and ethical implications. Topics may change each year, but usually include state and federal healthcare reform, access and health disparities, medical errors, healthcare quality, evidence-based practice and shared decision making, chronic illness and disabilities, behavioral health, stem cells and genetics, the consumer paradigm, emergency response management, and end-of-life issues.

Prerequisites:

Take HLTH-701;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

As the healthcare industry continues to be highly competitive, and as health-related information becomes more available through television and the Internet, healthcare organizations are challenged to communicate their messages more aggressively and in new ways to their key audiences. This course enables students to learn about the nature of those audiences as well as healthcare marketing and communications, with emphasis on designing and conducting market research, identifying market segments and their unique characteristics, selecting promotional strategies and tactics for reaching target audiences, and developing marketing plans.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

This course covers health information and a range of healthcare IT applications as well as topics related to IT planning and management. Applications include medical records, order entry, decision support, and emerging applications. Planning and management topics include data security, IT cost, systems interoperability, project management, IT implementation, and governance.

Prerequisites:

Take HLTH-701;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces concepts and managerial views of business ethics, corporate social responsibility, and leadership practice as applied to organizational settings in healthcare.

Required Capstone Course

Prerequisites:

This course is the capstone of the MHA Program and should be taken in the last semester of coursework. MHA and MBA/HLTH students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The success of any healthcare organization depends on the ability of its leaders and managers to continuously identify, evaluate and address the key issues and challenges facing the organization. This capstone course for healthcare explores the essential elements of strategic management: the foundation (including Systems Thinking), strategic analysis, and strategy development and implementation. Using Futurescan and provocative case studies, students: conduct assessments of external trends, assumptions and implications; identify and assess organizational opportunities and threats/challenges as well as strengths and weaknesses; identify strategic and operational issues; and review and develop strategies and action steps to address the issues. For the final project, each student develops a strategic plan for a healthcare organization or conducts a research project on a healthcare organization or strategic issue of particular interest (e.g., mergers and acquisitions in healthcare). Fundamentally, this course focuses on applying strategic and systemic thinking in diagnosing organizational circumstances and developing strategies for "what to do next."

Required for Students without Professional Experience in the U.S. Healthcare System

Prerequisites:

Take HLTH-701;

Credits:

0.00- 3.00

Description:

The internship enables students to learn about important aspects of healthcare by working in a healthcare organization. It is intended for students who do not have professional experience in the U.S. healthcare system as well as students who already work in healthcare and seek to gain exposure to other areas of the system. For all students, the internship provides networking opportunities for future career development. The internship requires each student to: work with a healthcare faculty member to identify opportunities and secure an internship in a healthcare organization; complete 400 hours of supervised work in that healthcare organization; attend classes to examine relevant aspects of the internship; and report on the lessons learned from the internship and how they could be applied in the student's future professional endeavors.

Electives (9 credits)

MHA students must take a total of nine (9) credits in electives. This requirement may be fulfilled by either taking all nine (9) credits from the following list of Healthcare Administration Electives or by taking up to two (2) graduate-level courses, six (6) credits, from other programs in the Sawyer Business School, with the remaining credits from the Healthcare Administration Electives. Permission to take courses outside of the Healthcare Administration Electives must be obtained from the chairperson of the Healthcare Administration Department.

Healthcare Administration Electives

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to a wide range of current innovations as well as innovations that are expected in the future. The course builds students' skills to anticipate, adopt and manage innovation in healthcare. It covers innovation in the organization and delivery of healthcare services as well as in the pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices, and healthcare information technology. In particular, the course explores how innovation happens -- i.e., how players across the healthcare industry create, identify, pursue, and support or impede opportunities for innovation.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 701

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course prepares students to plan, lead, manage and improve primary care and other ambulatory patient care services ("APC") toward achieving the "Triple Aim" of better population health, better patient care and lower cost. The course covers a range of APC services including physician practices, community health centers, ambulatory surgery, retail clinics, behavioral health and dental care. Students who complete the course will be able to understand and analyze: key structures and processes of APC services and their effects on the Triple Aim; key APC contexts including regulatory, reimbursement, technological and professional; and important industry trends related to APC. Specific topics include organizational structure and governance; workforce and staffing; facilities and licensure; emerging business models; performance measurement; relationship between primary care and public health; and emerging practice models including the patient-centered medical home.

Prerequisites:

Take HLTH-701 HLTH-824 HLTH-826;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In our complex and ever-changing healthcare industry, leaders and managers must understand the financial drivers that are shaping the strategic planning and decision making at all levels of healthcare organizations. This advanced course builds on the healthcare financial management techniques introduced in HLTH 824 and HLTH 826 and is intended for students seeking to enhance their analytic and financial management skill set. Through in-depth research of a healthcare organization's financial statements, students will gain practical experience using the latest tools and analytic methodologies employed by healthcare managers. Our work will focus on financial statement analysis, benchmarking, forecasting, revenue cycle management (including the implications of capitation and pay-for-performance), and capital budgeting (including capital acquisition, lease/buy decisions, and access to capital markets). A group project, guest speakers and course readings aim to develop practical financial management skills that will enable students to make effective managerial decisions that lead to the financial success and long-term viability of their healthcare organizations.

Prerequisites:

Take HLTH-701 AND HLTH-831;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The imperative to improve and assure the quality and safety of services is of paramount importance to clinical providers, managers, and executive leadership. This course builds on the basic principles, concepts, tools, and analytic methods addressed in HLTH 831. Among the topics explored in this advanced course are: creating a culture of safety; establishing and sustaining organizational alignment; quality/safety implications for accreditation and regulatory compliance; measuring and improving the patient experience; mistake-proofing the design process; and principles and strategies to improve reliability. The course will provide a foundation for the learner to: 1.Compare and contrast definitions of quality from a variety of stakeholder perspectives. 2.Classify medical error and identify means to reduce risk and/or take effective corrective action. 3.Explore sense-making and its applicability to transformational change in healthcare quality. 4.Identify leadership strategies for establishing an organization-wide culture of safety. 5.Apply essential healthcare team concepts, especially collegiality and collaboration, in complex circumstances of quality improvement. 6.Define mistake-proofing and mistake-proofing approaches and design applied to patient safety. 7.Apply reliability principles to performance improvement in complex systems. 8.Complete an actual healthcare performance improvement project that involves the use of knowledge and skills acquired in the pre-requisite course HLTH 831: Performance Improvement and Patient Safety as well as this course.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The health and wellbeing of people throughout the world are challenged by many factors. To highlight those factors and what is being done to address them, this course focuses on global health problems and needs, including those related to infectious and chronic diseases, injuries, mental illness and substance abuse, and complex emergencies such as natural disasters and war, with particular attention to women, children and families. It also review critical global health-related policy issues such as poverty, population growth, the food and nutrition crisis, water wars, environmental degradation and climate change. Among the assignments, students write papers on specific global health problems and needs and identify healthcare and health-related organizations and financial resources in selected countries that are addressing the problems and needs. The course closes by examining the challenges of how to prioritize the deployment of scarce resources and mobilize citizens, governments and for-profit and non-profit organizations to enhance people's health and wellbeing and save civilization.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The American healthcare system is a paradox. It costs far more than any other country's system but often delivers less in terms of good health. Part of the problem is that its information infrastructure and use of data are not up to par with other industries or with the challenges it faces. The new science of analytics provides critical intelligence to produce innovative solutions through its use of data science, information technology, and deep knowledge of the sector. This course focuses on the three most promising areas of health analytics: business intelligence, community health, and behavior change. It draws upon the best analytics from within the health and healthcare sectors as well as from other sectors including banking, sports, politics, and retail. The classes, both in the classroom and online, include a mix of lectures, discussions, application labs, guest speakers, a field trip to a leading health technology firm, and a class project to work with a health organization to design an analytics solution. By the end of the course, students will have built competencies in obtaining information from multiple data sources, analyzing metrics, applying analytic tools, using systems thinking to frame and solve problems, evaluating the pros and cons of various analytics approaches, and creating solutions through the use of case narratives, use cases, and client presentations.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701; Restricted to MHA, MBA, or MPA students. Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

England, as part of the United Kingdom, has a nationalized healthcare system. Given that it leads the systems in other countries on many aspects of care delivery and health outcomes, there is an advantage for healthcare administrators and policymakers in the U.S. to have exposure to this system for what they might learn and apply to improve our own healthcare system. Therefore, the purpose of this global travel seminar is to enable students to explore and answer one overarching question: What can we learn from the healthcare system in England that will enable us to better understand and make needed improvements to the healthcare system in the U.S.? At the macro level, students will learn about and analyze such features of the healthcare system in England as government ownership of healthcare delivery organizations, near-universal insurance coverage, allocation of resources according to national and regional budgets, and reforms to address serious quality and safety deficiencies. At the micro level, students will visit healthcare delivery organizations and meet with healthcare providers, managers and policy makers to get a close look at the realities of the healthcare system, including quality improvement and cost containment initiatives. By the end of this course, students will also understand how the healthcare system in England compares on key dimensions with the healthcare system in the U.S.

Prerequisites:

Take HLTH-701;

Credits:

1.00- 3.00

Description:

This is a student-initiated directed study project. The student and faculty advisor must concur on a written proposal and final report, and the project must be approved by the Dean of Academic Affairs prior to registration.

Requirements to Earn the MHA Degree

All students must complete 50 credits as well as maintain a grade point average of 3.0 or better to earn the MHA degree, with the exception of students who are required to do an internship and therefore must complete 53 credits to earn the MHA degree.

MHA Learning Goals and Objectives

Learning Goals Learning Objectives
Develop and demonstrate broad-based understanding of the U.S. healthcare system, including its key components and their functions, as well as the forces and dynamics at play throughout the system.
(Systemic Understanding)
  1. Understand the various players and their roles and goals in the U.S. healthcare system, including consumers, providers of care, biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, insurers, policy makers, and government agencies.
  2. Understand the many forces and dynamics at play, including key stakeholders and their agendas, as well as innovation, social determinants of health, the insurance and payment system, and the availability and accessibility of healthcare services.
Develop and demonstrate understanding of the principles, theories, and practice of business leadership in healthcare administration.
(Leadership)
  1. Understand the principles and theories of business leadership and various leadership styles
  2. Apply business leadership principles and styles to personal experiences and specific healthcare contexts and leadership challenges.
  3. Assess one’s own leadership competencies and style, engage in reflective practice related to this, and incorporate this self-assessment and reflection into one’s own leadership development.
  4. Prepare and begin implementing a personal leadership development plan for professional growth, including the integration of ethics into practice.
Develop and demonstrate broad-based understanding of the operations and dynamics of healthcare organizations, as well as the skills to be effective leaders and managers.
(Management)
  1. Understand the core business areas of healthcare organizations, including care delivery, organizational behavior, planning, accounting and finance, legal, quality and patient safety, information systems, human resources, marketing, data analytics and project management.
  2. Understand key aspects of organizational design and function, including organizational structure, climate and culture, communication, and teamwork.
  3. Identify, and suggest useful approaches to address leadership opportunities and challenges in healthcare organizations.
Develop and apply analytical and critical thinking skills to a wide range of situations in order to understand those situations and, as a result, take steps to address problems and enhance the efficiency, effectiveness and responsiveness of healthcare organizations.
(Analytical and Critical Thinking)
  1. Understand different methods of analytical and critical thinking.
  2. Identify specific problems, challenges and issues, and apply analytical and critical thinking to describe, analyze and understand them.
  3. Generate alternatives to address the problems, challenges and issues, along with identify potential implications.
Develop and demonstrate understanding of and the ability to conduct internal and external assessments, identify key strategic and operational issues in a healthcare organization, and understand and develop strategies to address the issues.
(Strategic Orientation)
  1. Understand and apply the Trends, Assumptions, and Implications (TAI) methodology to the healthcare field.
  2. Understand how to assess and present key attributes of a healthcare organization’s internal and external environments – specifically, strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats/challenges.
  3. Understand how to identify and present key strategic and operational issues facing a healthcare organization and how to develop, evaluate, and select strategies (goals, objectives, and implementation steps) to address those issues.
Verbal Communication: Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively one on one, in small groups and in large groups, including delivering effective presentations.
  1. Be able to use both inquiry and advocacy in conversations.
  2. Develop a presentation with an appealing storyline and appropriate examples and supporting information.
  3. Organize a presentation effectively, with a clearly defined beginning, middle and ending
  4. Deliver a presentation with attention to volume, clarity, grammatical correctness and eye contact with the audience.
  5. Use communication aids effectively, such as slides and videos.
  6. Summarize the presentation.
Written Communication: Demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in various forms of writing, including short memos and longer thematic papers.
(Communication and Engagement)
  1. Develop a topic with appropriate supporting information.
  2. Organize written communication logically and effectively.
  3. Use correct word choice and effective sentence structure.
  4. Employ normal conventions of spelling, grammar and punctuation.
  5. Provide examples and supporting evidence.
  6. Communicate accurate quantitative information.
  7. Provide clear summary and conclusions.
Demonstrate the ability to identify the range of professional behaviors and behave in a professional manner in all situations, as well as demonstrate the ability to identify career goals and pursue suitable development activities to achieve the goals.
(Professional Behavior)
  1. Exhibit professionalism in appearance, demeanor, competence, reliability, accountability and ethics Ethical behavior includes:
    a. Identifying conflicts of interests and pressures that could lead to unethical conduct .
    b. Understanding what kinds of questions are helpful to ask oneself when confronting an ethical dilemma.
    c. Demonstrating the ability to identify and take into account the interests of different stakeholders.
    d. Understanding how business strategies that facilitate “doing good” can be made consistent with profitability.
    e. Understanding that what is legal may not always be ethical and that what is ethical may sometimes not be legal.
    f. Appreciating that ethical norms vary across different countries and cultures.
  2. Develop regularly updated plans for career development that include both knowledge and skills enhancement as well as professional networking.

Career Tracks

Healthcare is a growing industry with an expanding range of career paths, and the opportunities and challenges faced by healthcare organizations call for exceptional leaders and managers. Our graduates work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, academic medical centers, physician practices, ambulatory care centers, long-term care facilities, managed care and insurance companies, and healthcare consulting firms.

To learn more about careers in healthcare, please visit our Careers page.

Advising

Students in the MHA Program are assigned an academic advisor who is a professor in the Healthcare Administration Department, and students are encouraged to discuss their academic and professional interests, goals and program of study with their advisor.

In addition, students with questions related to course selection and registration can contact the Healthcare Administration Department by phone at 617-305-1769 or by email.

MBA with Healthcare Specialization Archive 2018-2019

The Master of Business Administration/Health (MBA/Health) is offered by the Sawyer Business School in collaboration with the Healthcare Administration Department. This specialized MBA degree prepares leaders and managers who want to focus on core aspects of business, such as finance, accounting, marketing, and strategic management. Roles in the healthcare industry include healthcare delivery, pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and medical devices companies. MBA/Health students enhance their business skills, while gaining specific insight into the requirements for success in the healthcare industry.

The specialized healthcare administration portion of this degree must be completed in Boston.

MBA/Health Curriculum

Total Credits Required: 54-60

 

Contextualize: from Boston to the World (5 credits)

Must be taken as early in the program as possible.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

SBS 700 is the first required course in Suffolk's graduate programs. The course is based on the precepts of experiential learning. Based on the idea that people learn best by participating in meaningful activities, this course provides students with the opportunity to learn about and experience first-hand the many complexities of business and the role of top managers. To accomplish this, students will work in small groups as they take on the roles of top managers in a hands-on behavioral simulation.

Prerequisites:

MBA students only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course teaches students ethical frameworks to lead and manage organizations that go beyond the standard legal compliance and risk management approaches, and that embrace the more inclusive principles of sustainability and corporate responsibility. This course will set forth the fundamentals of managerial ethics and will prepare students for the complex, multilevel managerial and leadership integrity challenges that corporations face today.

Prerequisites:

MBA students only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This first-semester MBA course introduces students to the topic of world-class clusters as a multi-level phenomenon. Beginning from the macro level of analysis and proceeding to the micro level, the course covers a panoply of concepts and frameworks for understanding why world-class clusters emerge at specific locations in the first place and then regularly succeed in transforming themselves to keep up with and even lead the pace of change in their respective industries. In the group projects that they conduct for this course, students are expected to emulate the characteristics of high-powered teams found in world-class clusters: the course thus begins with conceptual understanding of world-class clusters and then proceeds to have students emulate the behavior that can be observed in world-class clusters.

Core Courses (15 credits)

MBA Core courses may be waived.

Credits:

1.50

Description:

This course introduces the basic tools and concepts of microeconomics (2 classes) for supply and demand analysis; for consumer market behavior; and for production, cost, and pricing decisions in different market structures. Greater emphasis (4 to 5 classes) in the course is on the macroeconomic topics of national economic performance, the economic role of government and fiscal and monetary policy, and the banking and financial system in the current economic environment. The course is intended for MBA students who have no recent academic background in economics.

Credits:

1.50

Description:

This course emphasizes the importance of basic concepts in probability and statistics for managerial decision making with a strong emphasis on practical application. Students will learn basic data analysis, random variables and probability distributions, sampling distributions, interval estimation, hypothesis testing and regression. MS Excel will be used throughout the course. Numerous examples are chosen from quality control applications, finance, marketing and Management to illustrate the managerial value of applying sound statistical techniques to the analysis of operational data.

Prerequisites:

MBA-625 or SBS-604 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides students with Operations Management concepts, techniques, and tools to design, analyze, and improve operational capabilities in any organization. Students will understand and analyze common OM decisions on managing inputs (materials, information, finances, and human resources) and processes to deliver desirable outcomes to customers. Topics covered include operations strategy, process analysis, quality management and lean operations, capacity analysis, inventory management, product development, supply chain management, project management, revenue management and pricing, decision analysis, and forecasting. Software tools used may include MS Excel, Visio, and Project Management. This course will contain experiential learning components related to Boston's world-class industries, which may include guest lectures, simulation exercises, or visits to local organizations.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course deals with the structure and information content of the three principal financial statements of profit-directed companies, namely the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows. It develops skill in using accounting information to analyze the performance and financial condition of a company, and to facilitate decision making, planning and budgeting, and performance appraisal in a managerial context. This course also contains an experiential component by offering guided inquiry and real company cases.

Prerequisites:

1 course from each of the following groups: MBA-615 or SBS-603; MBA-625 or SBS-604; MBA-640 or ACCT-800; These courses may be taken prior to or concurrently with MBA-650.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces the basic principles of corporate finance. The main focus is on fundamental principles such as time value of money, asset valuation, and risk and return tradeoff. Topics to be covered also include cost of capital, capital budgeting, and capital structure.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

At its core, marketing is about providing consumer value. The practice of doing this is changing constantly-driven by rapid and far-reaching changes in technology; globalization; and the evolution of consumer values, practices, and lifestyles. This course will present themes, theories, and trends that are critical for: 1. understanding the business of creating, capturing and sustaining value; 2. introducing students to the global, consumer, and technological realities of marketing in the 21st Century; and 3. providing students with a sound foundation to explore marketing in further depth in upper-level elective courses. This course also contains an experiential component. .

Understand Business Fundamentals (9 credits)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course teaches students critical thinking and problem solving skills in the context of two essential ingredients of collaboration: leading people and teams, and managing projects. Students will learn concepts and processes that support building and launching high performing teams that can manage complex projects efficiently and effectively. Students will collaborate experientially to solve problems facing Boston's world-class industry clusters.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to three essential ingredients of innovation: Entrepreneurial Thinking, Information Technology in an Age of Disruption, and Law as Framework. Entrepreneurial thinking is a critical element in the creation, growth, and sustainability of an organization. In new ventures, entrepreneurs drive innovation with limited resources and within a flat organization. Information technology, strategically selected and implemented, can provide a significant, competitive advantage. Students will survey the increasingly complex, evolving, and highly competitive business environment in which ethical, legal, economic, and regulatory forces are continuously reshaping the global marketplace both to create and limit competitive opportunities. This course will contain experiential components, relating to Boston's world-class industries.

Prerequisites:

Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Immersion course provides an opportunity for students to link their program work to hands-on experience and visits to real-life global companies. The highly experiential, intensive course combines classroom learning with a direct business and cultural experience. Students will work in teams directly for a client or several clients, solving real challenges, using their analytical skills, knowledge, and experience to develop feasible solutions. Required for all MBA students, the course will be offered globally or nationally to accommodate a variety of student needs.

Healthcare Specialized Courses (15 credits)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course presents an overview of the origins, components, organization, and operation of the health system in the United States. It is an introduction to the major health issues and institutions, including the settings in which health services are delivered, providers of these services, and the public and private payers for services.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides a framework for understanding the economics of the U.S. healthcare industry. The industry is experiencing great pressure to reduce costs, even as it strives to do better at both improving the health of the population and engaging patients in their care. This course enables students to apply the perspectives and tools of health economics to the tasks of understanding and improving the business of healthcare. Students analyze and evaluate current and evolving healthcare markets, public policies, payment methods, mechanisms for bearing and sharing financial risk, and the economic impact of changes in technology and the health professions. Students participate in envisioning the future and designing better ways for healthcare leaders, managers and policy makers to meet the challenges facing the industry.

Prerequisites:

TAKE HLTH 701

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The growing healthcare field is the most labor intensive employer in the United States. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the theories, requirements and practices associated with managing human resources in healthcare organizations. The course covers both strategic and operational aspects of human resources planning and management, and it devotes particular attention to the issues that make human resources management in healthcare so challenging. Perhaps most important, the course guides students in developing practical knowledge and skills to prepare them- as healthcare leaders and managers- to successfully address human resource issues. The course will draw from a range of theoretical material and practical situations, using a variety of learning approaches and featuring guest speakers from healthcare organizations who share their experiences and perspectives from the field of human resources. The course focuses on the following topics: The changing healthcare environment and its implications for human resources management, the use of strategic human resource management to gain a competitive edge in the healthcare industry, workforce design, legal and regulatory requirements, recruitment and retention, organizational development, performance management, compensation and benefits, managing with organized labor and creating customer-satisfying healthcare organizations.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701; MHA students are required to take HLTH 824. MBA/H students are required to take MBA 640. Non-MHA and MBA/H students need permission from the Health Department before registering;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

This course serves as an introduction to the financial management of healthcare organizations. Using financial information for decision making is the essence of this course. Students will gain a perspective on the critical factors related to managing a healthcare organization in a marketplace that is demanding cost effective services. Focused attention will be given to managerial accounting, cost allocation, budgeting, and variance analysis.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

The 'production' of health care is a service of significant personal and social consequence and high on the agenda of every healthcare executive. Today's consumer actively seeks evidence about the quality of care they can anticipate while payers are offering financial incentives to providers who can demonstrate superior patient outcomes. This course will focus on the complexities and processes of assuring quality performance in healthcare organizations.

Prerequisites:

Take HLTH-701;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces concepts and managerial views of business ethics, corporate social responsibility, and leadership practice as applied to organizational settings in healthcare.

Healthcare Specialized Electives (6 credits)

Construct the Big Picture (7 credits)

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-701, MBA-710, MBA-721, MBA-730, and SBS-700

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course involves synthesizing and applying the content from Values Based Decision Making through two deliverables, both of which require reflection on the MBA experience. Students will consider the external clients they have worked with in their client oriented classes and the MBA curriculum through an ethical lens. They will focus on identifying organization-based ethical issues and values, applying ethical frameworks to analyze them, and making an argument as leaders or managers for an ethical solution. This course will offer application and synthesis, taught towards the end, allowing students to creatively apply ethical perspectives to what they learned in the MBA.

Prerequisites:

MBA students only. SBS-700, MBA-701, MBA-710, MBA-615(or SBS 603), MBA-625(or SBS 604), MBA-635, MBA-640(or ACCT 800,) MBA-650, MBA-660, MBA-720(or MBA-721), MBA-730, and MBA-745(may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the global business environment in a way specifically relevant to innovation in world-class clusters. The course has a three-part format: 1. global business fundamentals; 2. opportunity recognition, validation and planning; and 3. experiential term group project in the elaboration of a proposed innovation. Global business fundamentals include the complexities of operating in the international economic environment, the theory and practice of trade, the global integration and local responsiveness of the multinational firm, the internationalization decision of firms, as well as the different modes of entry.

Prerequisites:

SBS-700, MBA-701, MBA-710, MBA-615(or SBS 603), MBA-625(or SBS 604), MBA-635, MBA-640(or ACCT 800,) MBA-650, MBA-660, MBA-720(or MBA-721), MBA-730, and MBA-745(may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students engage in a variety of learning activities, such as case studies, computer simulations, examinations, project reports, and most especially, experiential exercises involving competition. Students will develop a multi-functional general management perspective. The course is designed to help students integrate and apply their knowledge and techniques learned in the core courses of the MBA program into an overall view of the firm, evaluate the environment, and speculate on the future direction of the organization. Students will also learn about the principal concepts, frameworks, and techniques of strategic management, they will develop the capacity for strategic thinking, and they will examine the organizational and environmental contexts in which strategic management unfolds. This course will make extensive use of experiential activities and projects designed to get students to experience the dynamics of competition right in the classroom.

Lead and Implement Change (3 credits)

Must be taken as late in the program as possible.

Prerequisites:

MBA students only. SBS-700 MBA-701 MBA-710 MBA-615 MBA-625 MBA-635 MBA-640 MBA-650 MBA-660 MBA-720(or MBA-721) MBA-730 MBA-745 MBA-750 MBA-760 (MBA 745, MBA-750 and MBA-760 may be taken concurrently with MBA 770)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The final course in the MBA curriculum ties together the integral components of the four industry clusters, strategy and business fundamentals to the experience of leading change. Students experience the change process personally through a simulation. Students then apply their learning to an applied project based in one of the four clusters that is team-based, client-focused, grounded in research, and integrates MBA concepts as required with a final presentation to a live client. As part of understanding change, students will also evaluate the wider societal impacts of the business change. Finally, students reflect on their MBA program in total, revisiting their career plan and vision. This course uses multiple approaches, defining, understanding and experiencing the strategic value of change at the organizational, team, and individual levels.

MPA Community Health Concentration Archive 2018-2019

This Concentration focuses on preparing nonprofit and public service managers for positions in community healthcare, community advocacy organizations, and government health agencies to manage and lead in a dynamic and changing healthcare environment.

Required Course

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course presents an overview of the origins, components, organization, and operation of the health system in the United States. It is an introduction to the major health issues and institutions, including the settings in which health services are delivered, providers of these services, and the public and private payers for services.

Choose nine (9) credits worth of courses from this list:

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides a framework for understanding the economics of the U.S. healthcare industry. The industry is experiencing great pressure to reduce costs, even as it strives to do better at both improving the health of the population and engaging patients in their care. This course enables students to apply the perspectives and tools of health economics to the tasks of understanding and improving the business of healthcare. Students analyze and evaluate current and evolving healthcare markets, public policies, payment methods, mechanisms for bearing and sharing financial risk, and the economic impact of changes in technology and the health professions. Students participate in envisioning the future and designing better ways for healthcare leaders, managers and policy makers to meet the challenges facing the industry.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to a wide range of current innovations as well as innovations that are expected in the future. The course builds students' skills to anticipate, adopt and manage innovation in healthcare. It covers innovation in the organization and delivery of healthcare services as well as in the pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices, and healthcare information technology. In particular, the course explores how innovation happens -- i.e., how players across the healthcare industry create, identify, pursue, and support or impede opportunities for innovation.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an overview of healthcare management. Students develop knowledge and skills required for effective management of organizations that deliver high quality, patient-centered, cost-effective care. The course examines forces that are shaping healthcare organizations and draws on management theory and practice to explore a wide range of topics, including: governance and control; strategy; organizational structure, tasks and positions; culture and ethics; leadership and motivation; communication: planning; decision making and problem solving; recruiting and retaining human resources; teamwork; cultural competence and diversity management; managing people and performance in clinical and support services; and organizational change.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

This course serves as an introduction to the financial accounting of healthcare organizations. Understanding the important principles of a healthcare organization's income statement and balance sheet is the essence of this course. Focused attention will be given to the interpretation and analysis of financial statements, including the implications of assuming risk in an era of managed care.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students investigate the structural and functional aspects of the legal, institutional, and political factors that condition the character of the US healthcare industry, the role of the healthcare manager, the legislative process, administrative policy-making, and national trends related to political parties and interest groups. Topics in healthcare law include medical malpractice, informed consent, confidentiality of patient information, healthcare liability, and administrative law.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701; MHA students are required to take HLTH 824. MBA/H students are required to take MBA 640. Non-MHA and MBA/H students need permission from the Health Department before registering;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

This course serves as an introduction to the financial management of healthcare organizations. Using financial information for decision making is the essence of this course. Students will gain a perspective on the critical factors related to managing a healthcare organization in a marketplace that is demanding cost effective services. Focused attention will be given to managerial accounting, cost allocation, budgeting, and variance analysis.

Prerequisites:

Take HLTH-701 HLTH-824 HLTH-826;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In our complex and ever-changing healthcare industry, leaders and managers must understand the financial drivers that are shaping the strategic planning and decision making at all levels of healthcare organizations. This advanced course builds on the healthcare financial management techniques introduced in HLTH 824 and HLTH 826 and is intended for students seeking to enhance their analytic and financial management skill set. Through in-depth research of a healthcare organization's financial statements, students will gain practical experience using the latest tools and analytic methodologies employed by healthcare managers. Our work will focus on financial statement analysis, benchmarking, forecasting, revenue cycle management (including the implications of capitation and pay-for-performance), and capital budgeting (including capital acquisition, lease/buy decisions, and access to capital markets). A group project, guest speakers and course readings aim to develop practical financial management skills that will enable students to make effective managerial decisions that lead to the financial success and long-term viability of their healthcare organizations.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 701;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

Healthcare industry trends point toward increasing need for meaningful measurement of the health of populations- from the population of patients who use a particular health service to the populations of nations. Healthcare managers must measure the need and demand for health services as well as the quality, safety and effectiveness or services. This course provides the fundamental information and enables students to develop the skills to apply principles and techniques of epidemiology in planning, delivering and evaluating health services.

Prerequisites:

Take HLTH-701 and either HLTH-812 or SBS-604. MHA and MSBA students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to concepts and analytic tools and techniques in operations management, such as project management, process improvement, queuing theory, forecasting, capacity planning, and supply chain management. Students will be challenged to examine the distinctive characteristics of health services operations, understand process improvement and patient flow, and explore the means for making optimal managerial decisions. In-class exercises, applied concept assignments, guest speakers, and exams are used to help students understand ways to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare organizations.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

The 'production' of health care is a service of significant personal and social consequence and high on the agenda of every healthcare executive. Today's consumer actively seeks evidence about the quality of care they can anticipate while payers are offering financial incentives to providers who can demonstrate superior patient outcomes. This course will focus on the complexities and processes of assuring quality performance in healthcare organizations.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines health policy development and implementation as well as important and cutting-edge U.S. health issues, including their policy and ethical implications. Topics may change each year, but usually include state and federal healthcare reform, access and health disparities, medical errors, healthcare quality, evidence-based practice and shared decision making, chronic illness and disabilities, behavioral health, stem cells and genetics, the consumer paradigm, emergency response management, and end-of-life issues.

Prerequisites:

Take HLTH-701 AND HLTH-831;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The imperative to improve and assure the quality and safety of services is of paramount importance to clinical providers, managers, and executive leadership. This course builds on the basic principles, concepts, tools, and analytic methods addressed in HLTH 831. Among the topics explored in this advanced course are: creating a culture of safety; establishing and sustaining organizational alignment; quality/safety implications for accreditation and regulatory compliance; measuring and improving the patient experience; mistake-proofing the design process; and principles and strategies to improve reliability. The course will provide a foundation for the learner to: 1.Compare and contrast definitions of quality from a variety of stakeholder perspectives. 2.Classify medical error and identify means to reduce risk and/or take effective corrective action. 3.Explore sense-making and its applicability to transformational change in healthcare quality. 4.Identify leadership strategies for establishing an organization-wide culture of safety. 5.Apply essential healthcare team concepts, especially collegiality and collaboration, in complex circumstances of quality improvement. 6.Define mistake-proofing and mistake-proofing approaches and design applied to patient safety. 7.Apply reliability principles to performance improvement in complex systems. 8.Complete an actual healthcare performance improvement project that involves the use of knowledge and skills acquired in the pre-requisite course HLTH 831: Performance Improvement and Patient Safety as well as this course.

Prerequisites:

Take HLTH-701;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

Healthcare is among the most complex and dynamic industries in the United States. It is characterized by: changing demographics, health conditions and consumer wants and needs; continuous innovation in programs, services, treatments, technology and delivery systems; increasing complexity of care; intense competition among some providers, and mergers and affiliations among others; increasing shortages of key personnel; rising costs; mounting pressure to deliver quality care and manage costs; changing laws, regulations and payment systems; 45+ million Americans without health insurance, resulting in disparate levels of service accessibility and quality; and a growing movement to make health insurance available and affordable for more Americans. In such an environment of challenge and change, healthcare leaders and managers must be able to understand current reality, anticipate the future, and continuously design and implement change. Healthcare organizations must be change-able: i.e., equipped with the orientation, skills and approaches to manage change across a wide range of leadership, management and service delivery dimensions). Accordingly, this course enables students to: 1. examine key external and internal forces for change that face healthcare organizations, and 2. begin to develop the orientation and skills to envision, design, lead, and implement change in healthcare organizations. Drawing on theory and case studies of organizational change, the course covers such topics as: the nature of organizational change; why the ability to create desired change is so important; key external and internal factors that require healthcare organizations to change; aspects of healthcare organizations that support and resist change; designing and implementing successful and lasting change; sources of greatest leverage for achieving desired change; and key requirements for success.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The success of any healthcare organization depends on the ability of its leaders and managers to continuously identify, evaluate and address the key issues facing the organization. Innovations in technology, products, practices, and organization, which are continuously reshaping healthcare, are among the most important issues. This course introduces students to these types of innovations, as part of the larger healthcare environment, and integrates them into the larger framework of strategic management of healthcare organizations. The course explores the essential elements of strategic management: systems thinking, strategic analysis, and strategy development and implementation. Using healthcare industry publications and provocative case studies, students conduct assessments of external trends, assumptions and implications; identify and assess organizational opportunities and challenges as well as strengths and weaknesses; identify strategic and operational issues; and review and develop strategies and actions to address the issues and achieve success.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

This course covers health information and a range of healthcare IT applications as well as topics related to IT planning and management. Applications include medical records, order entry, decision support, and emerging applications. Planning and management topics include data security, IT cost, systems interoperability, project management, IT implementation, and governance.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The primary focus will be on understanding the operational and strategic leadership aspects of managing mission driven, public service organizations. Specific emphasis will be placed on nonprofit corporations, including coursework that explores the legal, structural, and operational issues that are particular to such organizations.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

PAD 819 covers both Grant seeking and Grant writing. Students, individually, but most often in teams, work with a nonprofit or government organization to develop a project idea and prepare a Master Grant Proposal and a Grant Application to be submitted to a most-likely-to-fund Grand maker. Classes focus on step-by-step Grant writing & Grant seeking process, and the instructor also consults with student-Grant writers individually an via Blackboard.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to build financial management skills for students who wish to start or advance nonprofit management careers and for students who are likely to interact with nonprofits, through grants, contracts, or partnerships. The course focuses on the effective allocation of resources to programs which, in turn, have been designed to achieve the strategic goals of a nonprofit organization. From this point of view, financial management is not a disconnected management function, but an integral part of what managers do to fulfill as nonprofit organization's mission. Basic financial management knowledge and skills - including financial analysis, budgeting, full-cost accounting, pricing services, performance measurement, control of operations and financial reporting are taught within the context of the organization's strategic goals.

Many of the Healthcare electives are 1.5 credits for the course. You must complete nine (9) credits of electives from this list to graduate with a concentration in Community Health.

Graduate Certificate in Healthcare Management and Leadership Archive 2018-2019


Curriculum

6 Courses
15 Credits

Program Length
9-16 months of part-time study

This 6-course graduate certificate is for individuals with little or no experience in U.S. healthcare. It is designed to give them an understanding of the U.S. healthcare system and a foundation in healthcare administration, including leadership and ethics, human resources management, accounting and finance. This program can be completed in two or three semesters, part-time.

View the Federally Mandated Gainful Employment Disclosure for the Graduate Certificate in Healthcare Management and Leadership.

Required Courses (15 credits)

Prerequisites must be met for any courses taken.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course presents an overview of the origins, components, organization, and operation of the health system in the United States. It is an introduction to the major health issues and institutions, including the settings in which health services are delivered, providers of these services, and the public and private payers for services.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an overview of healthcare management. Students develop knowledge and skills required for effective management of organizations that deliver high quality, patient-centered, cost-effective care. The course examines forces that are shaping healthcare organizations and draws on management theory and practice to explore a wide range of topics, including: governance and control; strategy; organizational structure, tasks and positions; culture and ethics; leadership and motivation; communication: planning; decision making and problem solving; recruiting and retaining human resources; teamwork; cultural competence and diversity management; managing people and performance in clinical and support services; and organizational change.

Prerequisites:

TAKE HLTH 701

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The growing healthcare field is the most labor intensive employer in the United States. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the theories, requirements and practices associated with managing human resources in healthcare organizations. The course covers both strategic and operational aspects of human resources planning and management, and it devotes particular attention to the issues that make human resources management in healthcare so challenging. Perhaps most important, the course guides students in developing practical knowledge and skills to prepare them- as healthcare leaders and managers- to successfully address human resource issues. The course will draw from a range of theoretical material and practical situations, using a variety of learning approaches and featuring guest speakers from healthcare organizations who share their experiences and perspectives from the field of human resources. The course focuses on the following topics: The changing healthcare environment and its implications for human resources management, the use of strategic human resource management to gain a competitive edge in the healthcare industry, workforce design, legal and regulatory requirements, recruitment and retention, organizational development, performance management, compensation and benefits, managing with organized labor and creating customer-satisfying healthcare organizations.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

This course serves as an introduction to the financial accounting of healthcare organizations. Understanding the important principles of a healthcare organization's income statement and balance sheet is the essence of this course. Focused attention will be given to the interpretation and analysis of financial statements, including the implications of assuming risk in an era of managed care.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701; MHA students are required to take HLTH 824. MBA/H students are required to take MBA 640. Non-MHA and MBA/H students need permission from the Health Department before registering;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

This course serves as an introduction to the financial management of healthcare organizations. Using financial information for decision making is the essence of this course. Students will gain a perspective on the critical factors related to managing a healthcare organization in a marketplace that is demanding cost effective services. Focused attention will be given to managerial accounting, cost allocation, budgeting, and variance analysis.

Prerequisites:

Take HLTH-701;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces concepts and managerial views of business ethics, corporate social responsibility, and leadership practice as applied to organizational settings in healthcare.

Residency Requirement

To be awarded a graduate certificate from the Sawyer Business School, students must successfully complete a minimum of 15 credits, within the Sawyer Business School, as well as meet the individual requirements of a particular program.

Time for Completion

All graduate certificate programs must be completed within five (5) years after the start of graduate work unless otherwise noted by a particular program. All graduate courses must be satisfactorily completed and an overall average of 3.0, with a grade of "B" or better, achieved for the entire graduate certificate program. Students requesting an extension for the time of program completion must submit it in writing and it will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Advising

Students in the Graduate Certificates in Healthcare Management are assigned an advisor at the time of admission. Students are encouraged to discuss their academic and professional interests and goals with their academic advisor.

The Healthcare Administration Programs Office is also available to respond to any questions or concerns and may be reached by phone at 617-305-1769 or by email.

Waiver/Transfer Policy

Graduate certificate courses, if waived, need to be substituted with an approved elective. To substitute an approved elective for a required course, a student must have successfully completed equivalent academic coursework at the undergraduate/graduate level in the five (5) years prior to matriculation, with a grade of "B" or better, and provide official transcripts (with English translations, if applicable).

Candidates who apply within one year of completing their graduate certificate will have applicable courses applied to a Sawyer Business School (SBS) graduate degree program, in the same discipline as the certificate, as long as a grade of "B" or better was earned in that course.

Candidates who apply beyond one year from a certificate program outside their discipline will have coursework evaluated on a case-by-case basis for relevancy, current degree requirements and current Sawyer Business School waiver and transfer policies.

Transfer credits from their graduate certificate must have earned a grade of "B" or better and have been taken within five (5) years prior to entering a SBS graduate degree program. However, at the discretion of the program director, some courses may not be transferred if the subject material has changed significantly since completion.

Gainful Employment Disclosure

View the Federally Mandated Gainful Employment Disclosure for the Graduate Certificate in Healthcare Management and Leadership.

Graduate Certificate in Healthcare Management: Performance Improvement and Data Analytics Archive 2018-2019

6 Courses
15 Credits

Program Length
9-16 months of part time study

This 6-course graduate certificate is for professionals with some experience in U.S. healthcare and is designed to give them a strong quantitative, operations and data analytics foundation for managing healthcare organizations. This program can be completed in two or three semesters, part-time.

Required Courses (12 credits)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers both qualitative and quantitative research methods, with a strong focus on applied healthcare management research. Course topics include scientific reasoning, research design, action research methods, qualitative research methods, fundamental statistical techniques, and display and presentation of quantitative and qualitative analyses. This course prepares students as both producers and consumers of healthcare related research. Students will: Learn fundamentals of scientific reasoning, research design, and action research methods. Gain basic skills in both qualitative and quantitative data collection, analysis and presentation. Understand the meaning and appropriate application of basic statistical techniques relevant to healthcare management. Become prepared to analyze and draw conclusions from surveys, program evaluations, and operations data. Be able to troubleshoot the work of consultants and be critical consumers of research performed by others.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 701;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

Healthcare industry trends point toward increasing need for meaningful measurement of the health of populations- from the population of patients who use a particular health service to the populations of nations. Healthcare managers must measure the need and demand for health services as well as the quality, safety and effectiveness or services. This course provides the fundamental information and enables students to develop the skills to apply principles and techniques of epidemiology in planning, delivering and evaluating health services.

Prerequisites:

Take HLTH-701 and either HLTH-812 or SBS-604. MHA and MSBA students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to concepts and analytic tools and techniques in operations management, such as project management, process improvement, queuing theory, forecasting, capacity planning, and supply chain management. Students will be challenged to examine the distinctive characteristics of health services operations, understand process improvement and patient flow, and explore the means for making optimal managerial decisions. In-class exercises, applied concept assignments, guest speakers, and exams are used to help students understand ways to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare organizations.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701;

Credits:

1.50

Description:

The 'production' of health care is a service of significant personal and social consequence and high on the agenda of every healthcare executive. Today's consumer actively seeks evidence about the quality of care they can anticipate while payers are offering financial incentives to providers who can demonstrate superior patient outcomes. This course will focus on the complexities and processes of assuring quality performance in healthcare organizations.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The American healthcare system is a paradox. It costs far more than any other country's system but often delivers less in terms of good health. Part of the problem is that its information infrastructure and use of data are not up to par with other industries or with the challenges it faces. The new science of analytics provides critical intelligence to produce innovative solutions through its use of data science, information technology, and deep knowledge of the sector. This course focuses on the three most promising areas of health analytics: business intelligence, community health, and behavior change. It draws upon the best analytics from within the health and healthcare sectors as well as from other sectors including banking, sports, politics, and retail. The classes, both in the classroom and online, include a mix of lectures, discussions, application labs, guest speakers, a field trip to a leading health technology firm, and a class project to work with a health organization to design an analytics solution. By the end of the course, students will have built competencies in obtaining information from multiple data sources, analyzing metrics, applying analytic tools, using systems thinking to frame and solve problems, evaluating the pros and cons of various analytics approaches, and creating solutions through the use of case narratives, use cases, and client presentations.

Elective (3 credits)

Choose one from the following:

Prerequisites:

This course was formerly ISOM-815

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the importance of information as an organizational resource, role of big data in organizations, and the application of tools to provide high quality information. Students will be able to select the most appropriate data management tool (e.g., SQL vs. non-SQL databases) to business scenarios. Develops the skills needed to succeed in today's big data environment through the application of data management techniques, cases and exercises. Students will become proficient in designing databases using entity relationship modeling and normalization, in building and querying databases of various sizes with Access and SQL (an industry standard), preparing high quality data and applying data visualizing techniques. Students will complete a series of business-oriented hands-on exercises, prepare cases, and complete projects on database design and big data.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Predictive analytics make predictions about unknown future events. It is crucial for companies to ask the right questions, perform rigorous analysis, and take actions that will result in the most desirable outcomes. This course develops students' capability in applying the core concepts and techniques of predictive analytics to identify opportunity, recognize patterns, predict outcomes, and recommend optimal actions within the context of organizational decision-making. Topics include: business analytics life cycle, data pre- processing, linear and nonlinear regression, tree-based methods, model assessment and selection, and resampling methods.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces business intelligence and data analytics. Business intelligence and data analytics help organizations in strategic and operational decision making by improving performance management, optimizing customer relations, monitoring business activity, and improving decision support. On a macro-level, the class will discuss business cases for the adoption of business intelligence and data analytics. We will discuss technologies and processes for gathering, storing, accessing, and analyzing data to provide users with better insights and business decisions. On a micro-level, students will use a variety of tools to build their skills in analyzing data to solve business problems. In summary, this course provides a conceptual understanding of business data resources and the development of capabilities for data preparation, warehousing, selection, description, mining, interpretation, visualization, communication, and innovation.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the basic principles, tools and technique of the Project Management Life Cycle with practical real-life examples and scenarios. The basic concepts will be studied within the framework of the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK (R)Guide) guidelines set forth by the Project Management Institute (PMI). Other project management framework will be described though not in detail. The course will attempt to help students understand the relationship between good project management and successful software management, development and implementation, and the best practices at each stage of project planning, execution, control and closure. The course will also help build skills to research, analyze and report project management case studies that illustrate the topics covered in this course. PMP(R) and (PMBOK(R)Guide) are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.

Residency Requirement

To be awarded a graduate certificate from the Sawyer Business School, students must successfully complete a minimum of 15 credits, within the Sawyer Business School, as well as meet the individual requirements of a particular program.

Time for Completion

All graduate certificate programs must be completed within five (5) years after the start of graduate work unless otherwise noted by a particular program. All graduate courses must be satisfactorily completed and an overall average of 3.0, with a grade of "B" or better, achieved for the entire graduate certificate program. Students requesting an extension for the time of program completion must submit it in writing and it will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Advising

Students in Graduate Certificates in Healthcare Management are assigned an advisor at the time of admission. Students are encouraged to discuss their academic and professional interests and goals with their academic advisor.

The Healthcare Administration Programs Office is also available to respond to any questions or concerns and may be reached by phone at 617-305-1769 or by email.

Waiver/Transfer Policy

Graduate certificate courses, if waived, need to be substituted with an approved elective. To substitute an approved elective for a required course, a student must have successfully completed equivalent academic coursework at the undergraduate/graduate level in the five (5) years prior to matriculation, with a grade of "B" or better, and provide official transcripts (with English translations, if applicable).

Candidates who apply within one year of completing their graduate certificate will have applicable courses applied to a Sawyer Business School (SBS) graduate degree program, in the same discipline as the certificate, as long as a grade of "B" or better was earned in that course.

Candidates who apply beyond one year from a certificate program outside their discipline will have coursework evaluated on a case-by-case basis for relevancy, current degree requirements and current Sawyer Business School waiver and transfer policies.

Transfer credits from their graduate certificate must have earned a grade of "B" or better and have been taken within five (5) years prior to entering a SBS graduate degree program. However, at the discretion of the program director, some courses may not be transferred if the subject material has changed significantly since completion.

Gainful Employment Disclosure