Administration of Higher Education

Master of Education in Administration of Higher Education

Learn more about this degree

Degree Requirements: 12 courses, 36 credits

Core Requirements (7 courses, 21 credits)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides a broad overview of the American higher education landscape and serves as the primary vehicle for introducing students to the complex nature of college and university administration. The interplay between organizational characteristics, structures, and modes of governance will be explored as a means of elucidating the practical application of administrative theories in higher education.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides students with a practical, working understanding of the legal foundations that govern institutions of higher educations. Using the case study method, it examines legal problems facing college and university administrators including tort liability, rights of teachers and students, free speech issues, contracts, tenure, confidentiality of records, and legal aspects of hiring and discrimination. Students will learn the current state of the law and acquire appropriate skills and resources necessary to make sound decisions in their professional practice, utilizing their knowledge of student development theories and the practical application of law and policy in higher education. Some emphasis will be placed on those areas of significance to the student affairs professional.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines financial management and fiduciary practices internal to institutions of higher education. It provides an introduction to the sources of higher education funding, budgeting and disbursement, control mechanisms, and the role of finance in strategic planning. It also provides students with information they need to better understand and participate more effectively in the funding, budgeting, and revenue/expenditure processes in higher education. Students examine the role of strategic planning and resource allocation in public and private colleges/universities. Various topics, issues, and trends in the financial arena of higher education are also explored.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary for locating sources of information and doing effective descriptive research in higher education. Students will design and execute field research on structures and problems of specific post-secondary institutions.

Choose three of the following:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides students with the opportunity to examine theoretical scholarship and empirical research on race, class, and gender in American higher education. The overall goal of this course is to assist future practitioners in the field in developing an ability to critically evaluate institutional and departmental approaches to diversity in higher education. Students will explore such issues as affirmative action, sexual harassment, access and financial aid practices, and the relationship of diversity to learning outcomes.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will explore theories, rationales, and methods of student development in higher education, as well as the organization and administration of student personnel services. Students will explore the history of student affairs and develop an understanding of the various functional areas and competencies associated with student affairs work. In addition, students will become familiar with a variety of theorists who have shaped the profession and incorporate relevant theories into program planning and assessment.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course is an in-depth examination of post-secondary students at all levels utilizing available statistics and other resources to describe various campus cultures and explore student attitudes toward society in general and the post-secondary experience in particular. Focus is given to exploring trends and changes in the enrollment characteristics of college students and addressing the attitudes and values of campus sub groups and cultures. Consideration is given to methods of locating resources on students and to measuring the effect of post-secondary education.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to leadership characteristics and theories in higher education. The course examines various leadership styles endemic to the college and university environment, focusing on those relevant to the president, vice presidents, department chairs, deans, faculty, and students. Trait-factor, group, transformational, situational, and other theories of leadership are explored in the context of team-building, participatory decision-making, staff development, resource allocation, and future planning.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In-depth research into and discussion of a range of pressing issues and problems such as affirmative action, executive compensation, international higher education and globalization, online/distance learning, for-profit higher education, and Internet issues. The goal of this course is to help students gain a general knowledge of some of the most salient higher education issues in the United States and develop skills to analyze and manage emerging issues they may encounter as professionals in the field.

Electives (3 courses, 9 credit)

Choose three of the following:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of college and university cultures in American higher education. Students will gain an understanding of the properties of campus culture, including norms of behavior, values, stories, physical artifacts, sagas, myths,symbols, and architecture, all of which guide and shape institutional behavior. In addition, students will examine the cultural norms of behavior of various institutional stakeholders - faculty, staff, students, and administrators - and develop an understanding of how campus culture affects each of these groups. In order to become more familiar with the ethos of institutional functioning and behavior, students will conduct a small-scale independent research project, employing qualitative research techniques, to investigate and analyze a particular campus subculture.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines the development of institutions and practices of higher education from their medieval origins to the present, concentrating on the American experience and identifying key trends in theory, organizations curriculum, and sociology. Not offered on a regular basis.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A study of the origin, contributing factors, and implications of drug and alcohol misuse. Various stages and manifestations of abuse/ dependence will be considered and current treatment modalities will be explored.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The anatomy, physiology and psychology of human sexual functioning are reviewed. Etiology, interpersonal dynamics, and treatment of sexual dysfunctions are reviewed.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A survey of problems and issues confronting cultural diversity. The study of ethnicity and sexual orientation as they influence the development of identity. Implications for counseling strategies. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A study of the practical and theoretical aspects of counseling small groups. There will be provision for a laboratory experience in which students participate in a group and study the dynamics of behavior as this group develops. Group stages of development and leadership skills will also be examined. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides a historical perspective and legal foundation of disability services as a functional area within the field of administration of higher education. Examines the various organizational structures, scope of programs and services, ethical responsibilities of institutions and administrators, roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders, legal guidelines and compliance concerns, and best practices associated with the provision of equal access to all academic and non-academic opportunities for diversely-abled students.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores disability profiles, documentation standards, and accommodation protocol for students with neurological, cognitive, physical, sensory, mental health, and chronic health related disabilities. Additional topics covered include lifespan and identity development of students with disabilities, social pragmatics and case management skills, disability as diversity, grievance procedures, and threat assessment.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Covers the legal framework for providing auxiliary aids and services as matters of access and accommodation for students with disabilities, as well as web accessibility standards, best practices for accessibility testing, and the administration of accessibility policy.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the laws, regulations, and accommodation practices in K-12, higher education, and employment settings with a focus on developing transition plans and identifying resources for students with disabilities. Additional topics covered include identity development for persons with disabilities, strategies for individual career development, transition to independent living, engaging outside resources, collaborative efforts with key stakeholders, and the development of leadership skills centered on community education.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines the politics of making public policy. How is policy made? Who is involved? What kinds of information do policy-makers rely on to make their decisions? How do political opportunities shape potential for policy change, shifts or stasis? We will examine how policy decisions are made and how policy makers cope and adapt to a diverse set of constraints. We will also focus on what political strategies can be used to improve policy-making processes and outcomes. Students will be required to interview policy makers about a specific policy and write a comprehensive policy analysis. The course is intended to have both theoretical and practical value.

Prerequisites:

Open to graduate students only;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The aim of this course is to familiarize students with the major written formats of the policy-making process including background memos, literature reviews, white-papers, policy analyses, one-pagers, talking points memos, op-eds, and legislative histories. This writing-intensive course focuses on public policy writing techniques and methods, and helps students to develop writing skills applicable to the private, nonprofit, and government sectors.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an in-depth look at today's philanthropic trends, patterns, and best practices in fundraising techniques.

Notes:

  • AHE core course options not used to fulfill requirements may be completed as electives.
  • Students completing the MEd in Administration of Higher Education and the Disability Services in Higher Education Graduate Certificate may double count no more than one DSHE course.

 

Supervised Field Experience: 2 courses, 6 credits

Students enrolled in the Administration of Higher Education program are required to complete a practicum experience, which is designed to link theoretical issues in practice and in the classroom to problems and concerns encountered by students in a field setting. Students will select a field setting and gain practical, hands-on work experience under the guidance of a master's level or higher site supervisor. The practicum experience consists of two 3-credit Practicum courses taken over an academic year (one course per semester) combined with 300 total work hours in the field (150 per semester). Students typically spend 10 hours per week working at a local college or university in an academic or student affairs setting. Students formally apply for the practicum experience and consult with their advisor regarding field placement.

Prerequisites:

Instructor consent required

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The practicum experience provides for the practical application of administrative skills in an appropriate field placement under the guidance of a site supervisor at an institution of higher education. The experience helps students gain exposure to various fields of work, and it provides an opportunity for students to observe, experience, and understand employer/employee relationships within the higher education environment. Students will apply theories learned in the classroom to a wide array of professional projects. Students enrolled in the course will meet as a class to discuss practicum-related issues.

Learning Goals and Objectives

Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program.

Learning Goals Learning Objectives
 Students will...  Students will be able to...
Learn broad-based knowledge of administrative, leadership, and management practices and structures found in institutions of higher education
  • Demonstrate a proficiency in oral communication skills, which are vital to their success as future leaders in the profession
Demonstrate the ability to connect theory to practice and apply what they learn in the classroom to professional work experiences in the field
  • Formulate and pursue their own questions
  • Engage intellectual thought leaders to develop a response
Conduct independent research and projects relevant to higher education administration issues
  • Implement self-directed research and independent projects
  • Integrate refereed and peer-reviewed sources
Gain proficiency in writing skills related to constructing scholarly papers, critical essays, issue papers, and other classroom-based projects
  • Master a variety of different writing styles. Write well developed arguments for and against issues in higher education
Develop a proficiency in oral communication skills, which are vital to their success as future leaders in the profession
  • Engage in all dimension of classroom citizenship (class preparation, group work, Q & A, class preparation, debates, etc.). Give effective formal and informal presentations

Administration of Higher Education Courses

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides a broad overview of the American higher education landscape and serves as the primary vehicle for introducing students to the complex nature of college and university administration. The interplay between organizational characteristics, structures, and modes of governance will be explored as a means of elucidating the practical application of administrative theories in higher education.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides students with a practical, working understanding of the legal foundations that govern institutions of higher educations. Using the case study method, it examines legal problems facing college and university administrators including tort liability, rights of teachers and students, free speech issues, contracts, tenure, confidentiality of records, and legal aspects of hiring and discrimination. Students will learn the current state of the law and acquire appropriate skills and resources necessary to make sound decisions in their professional practice, utilizing their knowledge of student development theories and the practical application of law and policy in higher education. Some emphasis will be placed on those areas of significance to the student affairs professional.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines financial management and fiduciary practices internal to institutions of higher education. It provides an introduction to the sources of higher education funding, budgeting and disbursement, control mechanisms, and the role of finance in strategic planning. It also provides students with information they need to better understand and participate more effectively in the funding, budgeting, and revenue/expenditure processes in higher education. Students examine the role of strategic planning and resource allocation in public and private colleges/universities. Various topics, issues, and trends in the financial arena of higher education are also explored.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides students with the opportunity to examine theoretical scholarship and empirical research on race, class, and gender in American higher education. The overall goal of this course is to assist future practitioners in the field in developing an ability to critically evaluate institutional and departmental approaches to diversity in higher education. Students will explore such issues as affirmative action, sexual harassment, access and financial aid practices, and the relationship of diversity to learning outcomes.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will explore theories, rationales, and methods of student development in higher education, as well as the organization and administration of student personnel services. Students will explore the history of student affairs and develop an understanding of the various functional areas and competencies associated with student affairs work. In addition, students will become familiar with a variety of theorists who have shaped the profession and incorporate relevant theories into program planning and assessment.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course is an in-depth examination of post-secondary students at all levels utilizing available statistics and other resources to describe various campus cultures and explore student attitudes toward society in general and the post-secondary experience in particular. Focus is given to exploring trends and changes in the enrollment characteristics of college students and addressing the attitudes and values of campus sub groups and cultures. Consideration is given to methods of locating resources on students and to measuring the effect of post-secondary education.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of college and university cultures in American higher education. Students will gain an understanding of the properties of campus culture, including norms of behavior, values, stories, physical artifacts, sagas, myths,symbols, and architecture, all of which guide and shape institutional behavior. In addition, students will examine the cultural norms of behavior of various institutional stakeholders - faculty, staff, students, and administrators - and develop an understanding of how campus culture affects each of these groups. In order to become more familiar with the ethos of institutional functioning and behavior, students will conduct a small-scale independent research project, employing qualitative research techniques, to investigate and analyze a particular campus subculture.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to leadership characteristics and theories in higher education. The course examines various leadership styles endemic to the college and university environment, focusing on those relevant to the president, vice presidents, department chairs, deans, faculty, and students. Trait-factor, group, transformational, situational, and other theories of leadership are explored in the context of team-building, participatory decision-making, staff development, resource allocation, and future planning.

Prerequisites:

Instructor consent required

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The practicum experience provides for the practical application of administrative skills in an appropriate field placement under the guidance of a site supervisor at an institution of higher education. The experience helps students gain exposure to various fields of work, and it provides an opportunity for students to observe, experience, and understand employer/employee relationships within the higher education environment. Students will apply theories learned in the classroom to a wide array of professional projects. Students enrolled in the course will meet as a class to discuss practicum-related issues.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In-depth research into and discussion of a range of pressing issues and problems such as affirmative action, executive compensation, international higher education and globalization, online/distance learning, for-profit higher education, and Internet issues. The goal of this course is to help students gain a general knowledge of some of the most salient higher education issues in the United States and develop skills to analyze and manage emerging issues they may encounter as professionals in the field.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary for locating sources of information and doing effective descriptive research in higher education. Students will design and execute field research on structures and problems of specific post-secondary institutions.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines the development of institutions and practices of higher education from their medieval origins to the present, concentrating on the American experience and identifying key trends in theory, organizations curriculum, and sociology. Not offered on a regular basis.