Applied Developmental Psychology

Program Requirements

Learn more about this program

Required Courses: 24 courses, 72 credits

Core Requirements (4 courses, 12 credits)

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Doctoral students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines development across the lifespan, including biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development, with attention to the role of culture and context. Reviews major theories of development and how such theories provide conceptual frameworks for understanding the development of behavior as well as implications for treatment and prevention. Introduces students to the social bases of behavior and experience through examination of topics from social psychology, including: social cognition; self-knowledge; self-presentation; attitude formation and change; attraction and close relations; altruism; aggression; prejudice and stereotypes; and group dynamics. The course also covers advanced integration of key concepts from developmental and social aspects of behavior. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Doctoral Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines development across the lifespan, including biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development, with attention to the role of culture and context. Reviews major theories of development and how such theories provide conceptual frameworks for understanding the development adaptive and maladaptive behaviors and trajectories. Also addresses implications for treatment and prevention. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

PhD students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Investigates theories regarding the function and experience of emotion. This course will survey the historical concepts of emotion in psychology and current theories of emotion, including motivational, cognitive and physiological aspects. The course will also describe research methods used in the study of emotion, including psychophysiology and neuroimaging, as well as clinical implications. Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Neuropsychology is the study of the affective, behavioral and cognitive consequences of brain injury, and clinical neuropsychology is the professional discipline that deals with the methods and techniques of assessing the consequences of brain insult. Clinical neuroscience is a branch of neuroscience that focuses on the scientific study of fundamental mechanisms that underlie diseases and disorders of the brain and central nervous system. It seeks to develop new ways of diagnosing such disorders and ultimately of developing novel treatments. This course will take the assumption that a good way to become a biologically informed practitioner of clinical psychology, is to participate in systematic instruction and learning in neuropsychology and the clinical neurosciences. In psychology graduate school, you are also becoming the culturally informed clinician, the developmentally informed clinician, and so forth. Toward that goal the reading and lecture materials for Psychology 792 will bring together the fields of neuroanatomy and functional neuroanatomy, neurobehavioral syndromes, cellular mechanisms of the central nervous system, behavior genetics including epigenetics, and psychopharmacology.

Methodology Requirements (6 courses, 18 credits)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides students with foundational skills needed to be both a consumer and producer of psychological research. Topics covered include hypothesis and proposal generation, experimental, correlational and qualitative designs, strategies to minimize bias, measurement issues, participant selection and recruitment, data management, grantsmanship and the dissemination of findings. Ethical issues in the conduct of research are emphasized. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces basic statistical tests such as t tests, ANOVA, correlation, regression, Chi Square, and power analysis. Students are also required to demonstrate proficiency in computer data analysis using SPSS. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH-722

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Focuses on multivariate statistics and the interaction of research design and statistical analysis. Emphasis on MANOVA, multiple regression, principle components analysis/factor analysis, and logistic regression. Issues involving experimental and statistical control, multicollinearity, specification error, and nesting will be covered. Students learn basic principles of multivariate analysis, read journal articles using multivariate techniques, analyze data using each main type of analysis covered in the course, and write results and tables using APA style. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Methodology related to developmental systems will include longitudinal research, program evaluation and outcome research, panel study designs, and mixed-methods designs.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

With an eye toward incorporating mixed qualitative-qualitative methodologies, this course will provide students with a hands-on learning experience in qualitative study designs and coding approaches. A variety of coding techniques will be explored, along with popular computer-based coding systems.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Advanced statistical platforms including SEM and HLM will be used and explored particularly using large data sets with longitudinal and complex developmental designs. This is a hands-on course; students will leave with basic knowledge of statistical programs used for advanced statistical analyses in the developmental sciences.

Writing Requirements (2 courses, 6 credits)

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Part 1 in a year-long sequence of student writing development, including grant-writing, professional psychological journal writing, and writing for lay/online/journalism print audiences. Students will complete the year with a draft of a grant proposal and at least 1 other writing product in-hand.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Part 2 in a year-long sequence of student writing development, including grant-writing, professional psychological journal writing, and writing for lay/online/journalism print audiences. Students will complete the year with a draft of a grant proposal and at least 1 other writing product in-hand.

Cultural and Social Context Requirements (4 courses, 12 credits)

Choose four of the following:

Prerequisites:

PHD Applied Developmental students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines biases, prejudice, and discrimination from a developmental psychological perspective. Applies theoretical and empirical research to examining causes, forms, consequences, and ways of reducing prejudice and discrimination. Addresses how systems of power and oppression impact the construction of individual and group identities.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to the special issues that children growing up in poverty face. Theory and empirical research will be explored as well as specific contexts common to disadvantaged children (e.g., homelessness and abuse). In addition, we will examine individual resilience and the impact of environmental support in mitigating deleterious effects.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This seminar explores the complex, multi-level ecological systems involved in migration and human adaptation to new cultural contexts. With a particular emphasis on children, adolescents, and families, we explore recent developmental topics related to immigration, documentation status(es), discrimination, as well as national integration policies and refugee experiences. Both risk and resilience frameworks will be emphasized.

Prerequisites:

ADP or Clinical Students only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This seminar addresses youth development in contexts of structural oppression through the lens of resistance. The goals of this seminar are to honor the individual agency and collective action of systematically marginalized communities in creating historical changes throughout society. Students will focus on the use of applied developmental psychology to describe, explain, and promote social justice activism in solidarity with youth targeted by intersecting systems of oppression such as heteropatriarchy and white supremacy.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Human sexuality and gender operate at multiple layers of the developmental system: from historical political systems down to the most intimate aspects of biology and behavior. In this seminar, students will examine how applied developmental psychology has been used to frame questions and create knowledge about sex, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, sexuality, and romantic relationships. The course will take a trans-affirming queer feminist approach rooted in the inherent dignity of all people, as we grapple with how the process of scientific knowledge production can help and/or harm the struggle for human rights and freedom from oppression.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This seminar presents a series of pressing topics, readings, and reflective writing activities focused on studying under-served and marginalized youth, and how systems of oppression continue to impact youth development.

Internships Requirement (2 courses, 6 credits)

Prerequisites:

PHD in Applied Developmental Psychology Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Semester 1 of a year-long internship in an applied developmental psychology setting. Students will engage in a variety of tasks related to community-based research, and receive weekly supervision and engage in scholarship on the processes and ethics of community-based participatory research. Readings will emphasize understanding the role of diversity in creating inclusive spaces/contexts to promote optimal youth development.

Prerequisites:

PHD in Applied Developmental Psychology Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Semester 2 in a year-long internship in an applied developmental psychology setting. Students continue engaging in community-based work, culminating in a written community report. Weekly supervision and scholarly discussion focuses on policy and systems in applied settings, and their implications for youth development. Readings continue to emphasize understanding the role of diversity in creating inclusive spaces/contexts to promote optimal youth development.

Public Policy Requirement (1 course, 3 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines the politics of making public policy. How is policy made? Who is involved? What kinds of information do policy-makers rely on to make their decisions? How do political opportunities shape potential for policy change, shifts or stasis? We will examine how policy decisions are made and how policy makers cope and adapt to a diverse set of constraints. We will also focus on what political strategies can be used to improve policy-making processes and outcomes. Students will be required to interview policy makers about a specific policy and write a comprehensive policy analysis. The course is intended to have both theoretical and practical value.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Systems at the local, regional, and national level- and the guiding policies that shape resources and access to services- will be explored. Students will learn to write policy briefs, and understand their potential role as experts in advocacy for social policy change.

Developmental Histories and Theories Requirement (1 course, 3 credits)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The purpose of this course is to trace the origin and development of psychology as a field of study from its philosophical and scientific roots to present day theories. The emphasis will be on critically examining the various systems of psychology, especially as they are translated into psychological practice, and their development in relation to sciences and societies. Normally offered yearly.

Electives (4 Courses, 12 credits)

Electives may include any doctoral-level course offered by the ADP program that is not already counted towards a requirement. Electives may also be taken in the Clinical program from the following list:

Prerequisites:

Graduate course for Psychology Ph.D. program, approved by department.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to multicultural issues relevant to psychology. Covers a broad range of cultural diversity (sex, age, race, ethnicity, language, religion, sexual orientations, etc.) topics to highlight the role of culture in understanding human behavior and health-related issues. This course intends to strengthen students' multicultural knowledge, sensitivity, and competence in research/professional practice through their exposure to various theoretical/empirical perspectives, media, experiential exercises, etc. Students will acquire in-depth awareness of self and others' worldviews and a better insight into immigrants/minority groups, privilege/oppression, health care access/disparity issues, interpersonal relationship, community health and well being domains.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This graduate seminar requires students to examine and respond to current thinking and controversies in the conceptualization and categorization of mental disorders generally, and adult disorders in particular. Students will acquire foundational knowledge about the diagnostic characterization, etiology, and epidemiology of the major classes of adult behavior disorders; investigate mental disorders and our current diagnostic system from a variety of different perspectives (clinical, research, biological, sociocultural, etc.); gain significant practice critically evaluating scientific research and in articulating thoughtful responses to social and behavioral research on mental disorders. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Investigates race and ethnicity as ideological categories that both inform group identity and reproduce social inequalities. The course begins with an overview of the social and historical forces that developed these categories, with a focus on some of the major ethnic groups in the United States. Explores historical and contemporary roles played by psychologists around these issues. Students learn how to individually and collectively avoid perpetuating injustices in the science and practice of psychology. Course topics exemplify how race and ethnicity are inextricably linked to other identity categories, especially gender, class, and sexual identity. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines child and adolescent psychopathology from an empirically-based developmental perspective. Reviews major developmental theories to elucidate the role of development in understanding the etiology and diagnosis of DSM-IV-TR disorders. Also focuses on theoretical and empirical literature in developmental psychopathology. Changes in the incidence rates of internalizing (e.g., depression, anxiety) and externalizing disorders (e.g., conduct disorder, attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder) are addressed. Disorders affecting both behavioral and mental functioning (e.g., autism) are included. Family, peer, and contextual/environmental influences are also covered. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines current theory and research on effective teaching of psychology. Surveys a variety of teaching techniques, tools, and methods for leading discussions, lecturing, assessment, and grading. Additional topics include: learning styles in the classroom, student diversity, development of critical thinking, and ethics in college teaching. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

PhD students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Intended for students who are preparing for their dissertation proposal. This course is graded P/F. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This seminar presents a series of pressing topics, readings, and reflective writing activities focused on studying under-served and marginalized youth, and how systems of oppression continue to impact youth development.

Degree Requirements

The program in Applied Developmental Psychology consists of a minimum of four years of full-time study. Please consult the Program Manual for more detailed information on all of these points. The requirements are as follows:

1. Completion of 72 Credits of Coursework

There are 24 (3-credit) courses that must be successfully completed within the first three years of the program for full-time students. To successfully complete a class, a minimum grade of B- or a pass for a pass/fail course is required. A full-time course load is 12 credits, and students must maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 (B) to remain in good standing.

2. Completion of Applied Internship

One year of internship is required of our doctoral students in their second academic year. Students receive weekly supervision by professionals at their internship site and attend a weekly internship seminar at Suffolk where they are able to integrate their practical experiences and educational training within the program.

3. Completion of Teaching Apprenticeships

The curriculum requires all students to participate as Teaching Apprentices (TAPS) for the first two semesters of their graduate study. TAPS are paired with advanced graduate student lecturers and professors to receive mentorship and experience in a broad-range of teaching-related skills. Students are not paid to serve as TAPS; the responsibilities associated with the position are designed to prepare students for potential careers as instructors/professors or other forms of scholarship. In addition, there are orientation and teacher training seminars offered during the first semester of graduate studies which all TAPS must attend. The seminars are designed to provide instrumental and interpersonal support for students as they build teaching, public speaking, and presentation skills.

4. Early Research Project

This project provides students with an opportunity to apply the knowledge gained in their research and statistics courses by pursuing research under the supervision of a faculty member who serves as the research mentor; on the recommendation of this mentor, students will deliver an oral presentation to the department and submit a written manuscript on their research project. The Master’s degree is conferred when students successfully complete 48 credits of required coursework and the oral and written portions of the Early Research Project.

5. Completion of the Comprehensive Theoretical Paper and Qualifying Portfolio

The theoretical paper is designed to demonstrate the student’s general theoretical knowledge and ability to apply this knowledge to the research process. It should review the important theories (historical and current) and ideas in the field of developmental psychology that are relevant to the student’s research interests, as well as demonstrate the student’s ability to use theory in the service of their program objectives. Students also must submit and present a Qualifying Portfolio that will allow faculty to evaluate their progress toward the dissertation and appropriateness for moving forward. The Qualifying Portfolio should include:

a. An updated curriculum vita
b. A transcript of completed course work
c. Evidence of having met teaching goals
d. Evidence of a successfully completed internship (e.g., a copy of the learning goals for the internship and how they were met)
e. Any publications, presentations, sample term papers or reports that demonstrate research competency
f. A plan for completion of the Ph.D. that should include:
g. A timeline for further plans to complete coursework, develop competencies, and write a dissertation proposal
h. A dissertation proposal outline and timeline for completion of the dissertation
i. If students have had research experiences outside of Suffolk, they are encouraged to submit letters of recommendation from their collaborators

6. Doctoral Dissertation

The dissertation is the capstone research-training milestone and its successful completion demonstrates that the student has the substantially independent ability to formulate research or other scholarly activities (e.g., critical literature reviews, dissertation, efficacy studies, clinical case studies, theoretical papers, program evaluation projects, program development projects) that are of sufficient quality and rigor to have the potential to contribute to the scientific, psychological, or professional knowledge base, to conduct research or other scholarly activities, and to critically evaluate and disseminate research or other scholarly activity via professional publication and presentation at the local, regional, or national level.

Dissertation committees, which consist of at least three members evaluate students’ oral and written presentation of a dissertation proposal and the oral and written defense.

Applied Developmental Psychology Learning Goals & Objectives

Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program

Learning Goals
Learning Objectives
Students will...
Students will be able to...
Acquire and demonstrate substantial understanding of, and competence in, research
  • Demonstrate the substantially independent ability to formulate research or other scholarly activities (e.g., critical literature reviews, dissertation, efficacy studies, theoretical papers, program evaluation projects, program development projects) that are of sufficient quality and rigor to have the potential to contribute to the scientific, psychological, or professional knowledge base
  • Conduct research or other scholarly activities
  • Critically evaluate and disseminate research or other scholarly activity via professional publication and presentation at the local, regional, or national level
Apply the science of psychology in the service of social justice and supporting marginalized youth and families
  • Demonstrate effective collaborations with community-based organizations pursuing social justice missions
  • Produce written material such as position papers or policy briefs designed to influence institutional/structural changes to promote justice and equity
  • Demonstrate how the student’s research comprehensively addresses its applied aims as part of the conceptualization and proposal processes for the ERP and dissertation
  • Integrate the expertise of people doing applied work in their issue areas who are outside of academia, at multiple steps of their research projects, including but not limited to conceptualization, project design, data collection, data analysis, and interpretation
  • Demonstrate a critical evaluation of their own multi-dimensional positionality in relation to power and privilege, and what this means for their relationship with the people who are or will be directly impacted by their work in both the ERP and dissertation
Acquire and demonstrate the ability to convey knowledge about the field of psychology through teaching
  • Demonstrate effective independent teaching skills
  • Create and maintain an inclusive and safe learning environment for all students
  • Foster active learning in students by using a variety of teaching techniques
  • Design and show effective use of student learning assessments in the course context
Manage themselves as colleagues responsible for their own behavioral conduct and treatment of others
  • Follow all program, department, and university policies and procedures
  • Adhere to the ethical and legal standards of psychology research and application, including APA
  • Demonstrate honesty, personal responsibility, professional integrity, and accountability in on-campus, off-campus, and online settings
  • Practice proactive, direct, respectful communication on all program-related matters
  • Engage in conflict navigation, negotiation, and resolution as needed, demonstrating humility and flexibility in pursuit of the best possible outcome
  • Pursue anti-oppression practices, goals, and values in collaboration with other students and faculty, understanding that such a process will be at times imperfect, uncomfortable, and difficult
  • Develop a diverse set of tools through which to advocate for social justice

Applied Developmental Psychology Courses

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Doctoral students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines development across the lifespan, including biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development, with attention to the role of culture and context. Reviews major theories of development and how such theories provide conceptual frameworks for understanding the development of behavior as well as implications for treatment and prevention. Introduces students to the social bases of behavior and experience through examination of topics from social psychology, including: social cognition; self-knowledge; self-presentation; attitude formation and change; attraction and close relations; altruism; aggression; prejudice and stereotypes; and group dynamics. The course also covers advanced integration of key concepts from developmental and social aspects of behavior. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

PHD Applied Developmental students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines biases, prejudice, and discrimination from a developmental psychological perspective. Applies theoretical and empirical research to examining causes, forms, consequences, and ways of reducing prejudice and discrimination. Addresses how systems of power and oppression impact the construction of individual and group identities.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides students with foundational skills needed to be both a consumer and producer of psychological research. Topics covered include hypothesis and proposal generation, experimental, correlational and qualitative designs, strategies to minimize bias, measurement issues, participant selection and recruitment, data management, grantsmanship and the dissemination of findings. Ethical issues in the conduct of research are emphasized. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The purpose of this course is to trace the origin and development of psychology as a field of study from its philosophical and scientific roots to present day theories. The emphasis will be on critically examining the various systems of psychology, especially as they are translated into psychological practice, and their development in relation to sciences and societies. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces basic statistical tests such as t tests, ANOVA, correlation, regression, Chi Square, and power analysis. Students are also required to demonstrate proficiency in computer data analysis using SPSS. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH-722

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Focuses on multivariate statistics and the interaction of research design and statistical analysis. Emphasis on MANOVA, multiple regression, principle components analysis/factor analysis, and logistic regression. Issues involving experimental and statistical control, multicollinearity, specification error, and nesting will be covered. Students learn basic principles of multivariate analysis, read journal articles using multivariate techniques, analyze data using each main type of analysis covered in the course, and write results and tables using APA style. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Methodology related to developmental systems will include longitudinal research, program evaluation and outcome research, panel study designs, and mixed-methods designs.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

With an eye toward incorporating mixed qualitative-qualitative methodologies, this course will provide students with a hands-on learning experience in qualitative study designs and coding approaches. A variety of coding techniques will be explored, along with popular computer-based coding systems.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Advanced statistical platforms including SEM and HLM will be used and explored particularly using large data sets with longitudinal and complex developmental designs. This is a hands-on course; students will leave with basic knowledge of statistical programs used for advanced statistical analyses in the developmental sciences.

Prerequisites:

Doctoral Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines development across the lifespan, including biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development, with attention to the role of culture and context. Reviews major theories of development and how such theories provide conceptual frameworks for understanding the development adaptive and maladaptive behaviors and trajectories. Also addresses implications for treatment and prevention. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

PhD students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Investigates theories regarding the function and experience of emotion. This course will survey the historical concepts of emotion in psychology and current theories of emotion, including motivational, cognitive and physiological aspects. The course will also describe research methods used in the study of emotion, including psychophysiology and neuroimaging, as well as clinical implications. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Part 1 in a year-long sequence of student writing development, including grant-writing, professional psychological journal writing, and writing for lay/online/journalism print audiences. Students will complete the year with a draft of a grant proposal and at least 1 other writing product in-hand.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines current theory and research on effective teaching of psychology. Surveys a variety of teaching techniques, tools, and methods for leading discussions, lecturing, assessment, and grading. Additional topics include: learning styles in the classroom, student diversity, development of critical thinking, and ethics in college teaching. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Part 2 in a year-long sequence of student writing development, including grant-writing, professional psychological journal writing, and writing for lay/online/journalism print audiences. Students will complete the year with a draft of a grant proposal and at least 1 other writing product in-hand.

Prerequisites:

PhD students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Intended for students who are preparing for their dissertation proposal. This course is graded P/F. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to the special issues that children growing up in poverty face. Theory and empirical research will be explored as well as specific contexts common to disadvantaged children (e.g., homelessness and abuse). In addition, we will examine individual resilience and the impact of environmental support in mitigating deleterious effects.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This seminar explores the complex, multi-level ecological systems involved in migration and human adaptation to new cultural contexts. With a particular emphasis on children, adolescents, and families, we explore recent developmental topics related to immigration, documentation status(es), discrimination, as well as national integration policies and refugee experiences. Both risk and resilience frameworks will be emphasized.

Prerequisites:

ADP or Clinical Students only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This seminar addresses youth development in contexts of structural oppression through the lens of resistance. The goals of this seminar are to honor the individual agency and collective action of systematically marginalized communities in creating historical changes throughout society. Students will focus on the use of applied developmental psychology to describe, explain, and promote social justice activism in solidarity with youth targeted by intersecting systems of oppression such as heteropatriarchy and white supremacy.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Human sexuality and gender operate at multiple layers of the developmental system: from historical political systems down to the most intimate aspects of biology and behavior. In this seminar, students will examine how applied developmental psychology has been used to frame questions and create knowledge about sex, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, sexuality, and romantic relationships. The course will take a trans-affirming queer feminist approach rooted in the inherent dignity of all people, as we grapple with how the process of scientific knowledge production can help and/or harm the struggle for human rights and freedom from oppression.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This seminar presents a series of pressing topics, readings, and reflective writing activities focused on studying under-served and marginalized youth, and how systems of oppression continue to impact youth development.

Prerequisites:

ADP and Clinical Psychology Doctoral Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Systems at the local, regional, and national level- and the guiding policies that shape resources and access to services- will be explored. Students will learn to write policy briefs, and understand their potential role as experts in advocacy for social policy change.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Neuropsychology is the study of the affective, behavioral and cognitive consequences of brain injury, and clinical neuropsychology is the professional discipline that deals with the methods and techniques of assessing the consequences of brain insult. Clinical neuroscience is a branch of neuroscience that focuses on the scientific study of fundamental mechanisms that underlie diseases and disorders of the brain and central nervous system. It seeks to develop new ways of diagnosing such disorders and ultimately of developing novel treatments. This course will take the assumption that a good way to become a biologically informed practitioner of clinical psychology, is to participate in systematic instruction and learning in neuropsychology and the clinical neurosciences. In psychology graduate school, you are also becoming the culturally informed clinician, the developmentally informed clinician, and so forth. Toward that goal the reading and lecture materials for Psychology 792 will bring together the fields of neuroanatomy and functional neuroanatomy, neurobehavioral syndromes, cellular mechanisms of the central nervous system, behavior genetics including epigenetics, and psychopharmacology.

Prerequisites:

PHD in Applied Developmental Psychology Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Semester 1 of a year-long internship in an applied developmental psychology setting. Students will engage in a variety of tasks related to community-based research, and receive weekly supervision and engage in scholarship on the processes and ethics of community-based participatory research. Readings will emphasize understanding the role of diversity in creating inclusive spaces/contexts to promote optimal youth development.

Prerequisites:

PHD in Applied Developmental Psychology Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Semester 2 in a year-long internship in an applied developmental psychology setting. Students continue engaging in community-based work, culminating in a written community report. Weekly supervision and scholarly discussion focuses on policy and systems in applied settings, and their implications for youth development. Readings continue to emphasize understanding the role of diversity in creating inclusive spaces/contexts to promote optimal youth development.