Arts Administration

As a complement to their undergraduate major, students who complete a minor in Arts Administration will have basic knowledge in the following areas:

  • Arts administration, including the managerial, financial, and legal needs of arts organizations
  • Marketing strategies and outreach programming for the arts
  • Resource development for the arts, with an emphasis on grant and proposal writing

Arts Administration Minor

Learn more about this minor

Minor Requirements: 5 courses, 17-19 credits

Core Requirements (3 courses, 11 credits)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Hands-on course that explores the process of writing and submitting grants to foundations, associations, the government, and other grantors on behalf of nonprofit organizations. Students learn how to identify grant resources through research, compile an effective submission, and write supporting material such as cover letters and appendices. Also covers how grants are reviewed and tips for successful grant submissions.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The primary focus will be on understanding the operational and strategic leadership aspects of managing mission driven, public service organizations. Specific emphasis will be placed on nonprofit corporations, including coursework that explores the legal, structural, and operational issues that are particular to such organizations.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The expansive world of arts administration provides a wealth of rewarding career opportunities. This course will provide a fundamental overview of the managing, marketing, fundraising, and financial management functions of the performing and visual arts organizations. Using Suffolk's Modern Theatre as a laboratory, as well as site visits to some of Boston's greatest arts and culture institutions, we will investigate real world successes and challenges and discover what special talents each individual student can bring to the management mix. This course is a core requirement for Suffolk's new interdisciplinary Arts Administration minor.

Electives (2 courses, 6-8 credits)

Choose two of the following:

Advertising, Public Relations, & Social Media

 

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The development and delivery of oral presentations. Students acquire skills in oral and physical delivery, organization, persuasion, critical thinking, and use of support media.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A survey course that introduces students to advertising concepts and practices from the perspective of agencies, clients, the media, and consumers. Students learn to think critically about advertising messages and learn practical techniques for developing effective advertising in various media.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Social media sites such as Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter are examined from a cultural and critical perspective. Students use of social media for community formation, social presence, identity building, and social activism. The roles of advertising, public relations, and branding are examined.

Prerequisites:

CJN-2277(formerly CJN-277)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines how events are built, promoted, managed, and assessed, with an emphasis on conventions, trade shows, and nonprofit events. Issues analyzed include facilities planning and contracts, legal issues, volunteer management, budgeting, marketing, and planner/staff communication.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Effective public relations involve an understanding of the history, theory, and practice of public relations including public relations concepts, the role of the practitioner, and the foundations of public relations. This course seeks to provide that foundation as an introduction to the field of public relations. Issues surrounding the history, legality, process, and principles of public relations are explored.

Art & Design/Art History

Prerequisites:

Non-majors interesting in taking art and design courses for elective credit should refer to offerings under the ART course listings

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Observational drawing is a fundamental way of understanding and communicating visual experience. This course stresses the development and mastery of traditional drawing skills, concepts, and vocabulary, and employs a variety of techniques and materials. Fundamental principles are introduced in structured lessons and exercises, which are supplemented by related outside assignments. Subject matter may include still life, portraiture, and the clothed and unclothed human figure.

Prerequisites:

Non-majors interesting in taking art and design courses for elective credit should refer to offerings under the ART course listings.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The study of color and design is supportive of every studio discipline and is vital to the understanding of all visual media. This course emphasizes the basic concepts and practices of two-dimensional design and color theory. Students employ an intensive, hands-on approach as they explore and master the elements of design (including line, shape, and value) and the three fundamental properties of color (hue, value, and strength). These skills are used in the construction of formally cohesive compositions, the development of arresting images, and the communication of visual ideas.

Prerequisites:

Non-majors interesting in taking art and design courses for elective credit should refer to offerings under the ART course listings.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This cross-disciplinary course will integrate the ideas and practices of two-dimensional design, color and drawing emphasis will be placed on understanding the creative process, exploring concepts and developing research skills. Students will undertake individual and collaborative projects in three spaces; the studio classroom, the digital world and the city at large.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores European and American art since WWII, including Abstract Expressionism, Colorfield Painting, Pop Art, Minimalism, Neo-Dada, Performance Art, Feminism, Neo-Expressionism and Post-Modernism. Artists include Bacon, Giacometti, Pollock, De Kooning, Frankenthaler, Rothko, Stella, Judd, Calder, David Smith, Serra, Johns, Rauschenberg, Warhol, Lichtenstein, Smithson, Christo, Nevelson, Kosuth, Kruger, Sherman, Basquiat, Kiefer, and Haring.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the art world of the past few decades with special attention to the roles and exhibition practices of contemporary art museums and galleries. Considers the major artists and trends in today's art world, the history of museums, and the effect of museums on art produced today. Students will visit local museums, including the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) individually and in groups. This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

Prerequisites:

Permission of instructor required

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the art of Caravaggio within the historical context of the Early Baroque period in Italy. The course emphasizes research skills and the methodology of art history. Designed as a foundation for students intending to pursue a career in the world of art and/or museums.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's consent required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the art of Gian Lorenzo Bernini, arguably the most important and influential figure in the world of 17th-century art. Designed for art history majors & minors, the seminar explores Bernini's career within the context of the religious, political, and artistic upheavals of his time; it also helps students develop research skills and provides a foundation that will be valuable for anyone pursuing a career in the world of art and museums.

Prerequisites:

Permission of instructor required

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the Impressionist movement of the late nineteenth-century, including Monet, Renoir, and Pissaro, within its historical context. The course emphasizes research skills and the methodology of art history. Designed as a foundation for students intending to pursue a career in the world of art and/or museums.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of drawing using both traditional and experimental techniques. Media includes pencil, charcoal, white chalk, ink and collage. Subject matter includes still-lives, landscapes/cityscapes, portraiture and live clothed models. This course is appropriate for beginners as well as more advanced students. Individual attention is given to students at various levels of ability, allowing students to progress at their own pace.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This introductory course is designed to encourage students with little or no knowledge of the use of various painting processes. The basic elements of painting are introduced in exercises enhanced by demonstrations. Students work with acrylic paint and various painting mediums. Creative work is encouraged in a relaxed atmosphere where individual attention is given to students at various levels of ability.

Business

 

Prerequisites:

MATH-128 or higher and WRI-102 or WRI-H103 or SBS-220

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to the accounting cycle, the financial statements, and the theory underlying accounting as information. Provides users of accounting information with a basic understanding of how to appraise and manage a business. Addresses current accounting topics, including relevant ethical and international issues found in the financial press.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the field of business law. Provides an overview of the organization and operation of the American legal system, court system and legal procedure. Examines selected business law topics such as contracts, torts, criminal law,agency, and business organizations. Attention is given to the ways in which business law manifests important social and ethical precepts.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to foundational concepts in business, including functional areas, the life cycle, competition, stakeholders and ethical considerations. Students develop critical thinking by learning and using a problem solving process through a business situation analysis model to analyze various situations that confront managers and founders of small, medium, and large organizations. Students will also develop tools for analysis, allowing them to critically view business in a new and thoughtful way. The class culminates with student- teams presenting a detailed analysis and recommendations to a panel of executives and persuading them that the recommended strategy is not only feasible, but also practical for the stakeholders involved.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you manage the day-to-day challenges of starting a new venture or working on a small business? This course is designed around problem-solving techniques that help you research the facts of a given situation, identify the problem, develop alternative solutions and defending the best solution. This course utilizes case analysis, role-plays, simulations, and other experiential lessons to help provide you with the knowledge and skills necessary to build and lead a new or innovative organization.

Prerequisites:

MGT 217 (formerly MGT 317); Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is premised on the fact that whereas a manager needs analytical skills to discover optimal solutions to business problems, a broad array of negotiation skills is needed to implement these solutions. This experiential course is designed to improve your skills in all phases of negotiation: understanding prescriptive and descriptive negotiation theory as it applies to dyadic and multiparty negotiations, to buyer-seller transactions and the resolution of disputes, to the development of negotiation strategy, and to the management of integrative and distributive aspects of the negotiation process. The course is based on a series of simulated negotiations in a variety of contexts including one-on-one, multi-party, cross-cultural, third-party and team negotiations. Please note that given the experiential nature of the course, attendance is mandatory and will be strictly enforced beginning from the first class session.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

As part of the core curriculum for the BSBA, this course provides a comprehensive, innovative, managerial, and practical introduction to marketing. Students will learn and apply basic concepts and practices of modern marketing as used in a wide variety of settings. Technological advances, rapid globalization, economic shifts and cultural and environmental developments are causing profound changes in the marketplace. As the marketplace changes, so must the marketers who serve it. These new developments signify a brand new world of opportunities for forward thinking marketers. In response to these new developments, the focus of this course is on four major themes that go to the heart of modern marketing theory and practice: 1. Building and managing profitable customer relationships; 2. Building and managing strong brands; 3. Harnessing new marketing technologies in this digital age; and 4. Marketing in a socially responsible way around the globe.

Prerequisites:

MKT 210 or MKT-H210

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Social media has altered the landscape of business, communications, marketing, and society as a whole. While some social media like Wikipedia and Facebook have become part of the fabric of many consumers' lives, new media like Snapchat and Tumblr are emerging. This constantly evolving landscape offers businesses innovative ways for generating awareness, demand and revenue. In this course students will take away a social media vocabulary, a set of social media skills and tools, and analytical frameworks for analyzing effective social media business practices. Naturally, student projects, assignments, and other activities will use social media tools.

Prerequisites:

MKT 210 or MKT-H210

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course explores how we can use the principles of web marketing as effective marketing tools. The course will have the following learning components: lectures, guest lectures, web site analyses, and student project presentations.

Note: BSBA students cannot count the following BSBA core requirements (ACCT-201, BLE-214, or ENT-101) as Arts Administration minor electives and should instead choose other courses from the full list of options provided.

Government and Law

 

Prerequisites:

GPA at least 3.3

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This friendly, interactive introduction to intellectual property covers the fundamental pillars of copyrights,patents, trademarks, and trade secret, and more far-reaching topics like international and internet intellectual property, and indigenous people and IP. The course is open to all majors,because it is relevant to anyone who deals with creative works, inventions, discoveries, or business. This undergraduate course will be taught at the Suffolk Law School by a member of its faculty.

Prerequisites:

Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The existence and validity of a contract is determined by specific rules. Students will learn about formation through offer and acceptance, contract enforceability, the necessity of consideration, and breach of contract and will draft contract provisions as a paralegal might in a law office. Normally offered each semester. Sophomore status required.

Prerequisites:

Take LAWU-101

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A survey of the law of the protection of ideas, trade secrets, inventions, artistic creations, and reputation. The course will briefly review the bases for patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret protection, the distinction among the various forms of intellectual property, and the statutory and common law methods of enforcing rights.

Theatre

 

Prerequisites:

This is a no credit course.

Credits:

0.00

Description:

A non-credit course to satisfy the Theatre practicum requirement for theatre majors and minors. Students should register for this course when participating in Theatre Department performance activities such as acting, directing, playwriting, dramaturgy, choreography, or stage management may. May be taken more than once.

Prerequisites:

This is a no credit course.

Credits:

0.00

Description:

A non-credit course to satisfy the Theatre practicum requirement for theatre majors and minors. Students should register for this course when participating in Theatre Department production activities such as design or assistant design, load-in or run crews, board operators, carpenters, electricians, stitchers and painters. May be taken more than once.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This introduction to acting prepares students for work in production and develops skills in all forms of communication. The first part of the course uses improvisational exercises based on the Stanislavski method to teach fundamental acting techniques. The second half of the course applies those techniques to scene work from major 20th century plays. This course is a core requirement for all Theatre Majors.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This rigorous class will give students the fundamental concepts, vocabulary and skills used to design for the stage such as: color, line, composition, research and script analysis. The class has a written component and is intended to prepare students to design workshop productions in the Studio Theatre. Students will be expected to complete a minimum of ten hours of production work for Theatre Department productions.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will teach both the methods and principles behind stage management demonstrating how to support a production while facilitating the work of directors, designers, and actors. In addition to teaching the specific technical skills necessary to each part of the production process, this course will also address the more subtle intellectual and managerial skills that make stage management an art. Satisfies a core requirement for Theatre majors.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This conservatory-style course provides students with fundamental directing skills through lectures, readings, and weekly projects that explore composition, staging, text analysis, and directorial communication skills. Students in this course become eligible to propose their own projects to the Theatre Department for production consideration. Directing students are also encouraged to stage manage and assistant direct faculty productions both in and outside of the Department.

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.