Forensic Science

Forensic Science Minor

Learn more about this minor

Minor Requirements: 5 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 19-20 credits

Core Requirements (2 courses and corresponding laboratories, 8 credits)

Prerequisites:

FS-L103 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Application of the principles of forensic science in evaluating physical evidence with emphasis on its role in criminal investigation. Class experiences may include guest lectures and field trips. 3-hour lecture. Normally offered Fall

Prerequisites:

FS-103 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory experiences related to the collection and analysis of physical evidence as performed by forensic science professionals. Experiments may include forensic microscopy drug analysis forensic serology physical patterns fingerprint and firearm evidence analysis techniques. 3-hour laboratory. Normally offered Fall

Prerequisites:

CHEM-211 and CHEM-L314 (concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the basic techniques of collecting and analyzing data from different types of instrumentation including: ultraviolet visible fluorescence atomic and emission spectroscopy; chromatographic methods; electrochemical measurements. Students will apply these techniques to problems in chemistry forensics and environmental science.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-314 (concurrently) and CHEM-L211

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This hybrid laboratory will be offered with three mandatory face to face sessions to develop essential skills. The rest of the curriculum will be offered in an online format. Explores the basic techniques of collecting and analyzing data from different types of instrumentation including: ultraviolet visible fluorescence atomic and emission spectroscopy; chromatographic methods; electrochemical measurements. Students will apply these techniques to problems in chemistry forensics and environmental science.

Please note that CHEM-314 has the following prerequisites:

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH-104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH-104 must take MATH-104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-L111.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces atomic structure the periodic table the nature of chemical bonds chemical reactions and stoichiometry. This course is recommended for science majors or those considering careers in the health sciences.

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH-104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH-104 must take MATH-104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-111.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course introduces the basic principles of chemistry through hands-on laboratory experiments. Students learn safe laboratory practices and fundamental technical skills. These include the determination of mass and volume making solutions and synthesizing a product. Emphasis is also placed on understanding and writing scientific literature.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-L112 (concurrently), CHEM-111, CHEM-L111 and MATH-104 or higher

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I. Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces thermochemistry gases solution chemistry chemical kinetics chemical equilibrium acid-base systems and thermodynamics.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-112 (concurrently) and CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111 and MATH-104 placement or higher.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I Laboratory. Apply the basic principles of chemistry through discovery laboratory experiments with an emphasis on quantitative analysis. Apply Beer's Law and acid-base titrations. This laboratory is designed around the foundational laboratory skills practiced by science students in a wide variety of majors.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112. CHEM-L211 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces basic theories of structure bonding and chemical reactivity as specifically applied to modern organic chemistry. Includes functional groups acid/base chemistry nomenclature resonance spectroscopy and stereochemistry.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-211.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Introduces synthetic organic chemistry techniques. Includes melting point determination distillation crystallization extraction chromatographic separations and infrared spectroscopy. Discusses experimental design within the context of green organic chemistry.

Electives (3 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 11-12 credits)

Choose three of the following:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Study of the varieties of fraud including financial statement fraud fraud against organizations consumer fraud bankruptcy fraud tax fraud and e-commerce fraud. The causes prevention detection and investigation of fraud are explored. Examination of famous past frauds with hands-on cases are used to apply these concepts and to understand the resolution of fraud in the legal system.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L111 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explanation of key biological structures and reactions of the cell. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 (concurrently)

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Sessions are designed to familiarize the student with biological molecules and the techniques used in their study. The techniques covered include basic solution preparation separation and quantification of molecules enzyme catalysis and cell isolation.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L274 (concurrently), BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An examination of the basic principles of genetics in eukaryotes and prokaryotes at the level of molecules cells and multicellular organisms including humans. Topics include Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance structure and function of chromosomes and genomes biological variation resulting from recombination mutation and selection and population genetics.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114. Must be taken concurrently with BIO 274.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Experiments designed to demonstrate principles presented in lecture using a range of genetic model organisms that include E. coli B. subtilis S. cerevisiae D. melanogaster S. fimicola and C. elegans.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-331 or instructor's consent

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces basic principles of pharmacology (dose-response curves absorption distribution metabolism and excretion) and toxicology. The biochemical mechanisms of several intoxicants (pain-killers ethanol pesticides etc.) will be discussed.

Prerequisites:

Take CHEM-212 previously, CHEM-453 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory course where students learn to use biochemistry cheminformatics and bioinformatics tools to predict the effect that various xenobiotics will have on various receptors transporters and enzymes in the human body. Lab techniques may include: enzyme kinetics binding affinity and ELISA.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides students with a foundational understanding of how the American criminal justice system operates. Students will examine the types of behavior widely deemed appropriate for criminal justices responses while exploring the range of responses used today. Specific topics include policing the courts corrections and community supervision. Students will be challenged to situate the contemporary criminal justice system within a broader historical and institutional context. Inequalities on the basis of race class and gender will be explored. Upon completion students will have developed a criminal justice knowledge base necessary to succeed in more advanced coursework.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides an overview of youth gangs and their sociological underpinnings which are rooted in poverty and racism. Topical areas are discussed in relation to these key factors. Study topics include the history of gangs theories about gang formation and individual membership gangs and criminal behavior socio-cultural importance of gangs and strategies to control gang behavior. The course will utilize current gang issues in the US generally and in Massachusetts in particular as a basis to better understand the nuances of youth gangs.

Prerequisites:

PHIL-119, or PHIL-123, or PHIL-127.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of the moral problems facing health-care practitioners their patients and others involved with the practice of medicine in today's society. Issues include euthanasia the ethics of medical experimentation the use of reproductive technologies genetic counseling and genetic engineering truth-telling and confidentiality in doctor-patient relationships the cost and availability of medical care. Normally offered every third year.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH-114 and 54 credits or more

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the interface between psychology and the law by exploring the theoretical conceptual and applied facets of forensic psychology. Topics include: the assessment of competence civil commitment insanity defenses violence risk assessment the detection of deception expert testimony assessment of child abuse and neglect child custody/visitation and ethical issues in the practice of forensic psychology.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will look at the special opportunities and obligations of those in the health and legal professions to protect human rights. There will be an overview of human rights doctrine and key documents. Students will learn to apply human rights principles to particular occupations in the health and legal professions.

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major or double major combination to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

Forensic Science Courses

Prerequisites:

FS-L103 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Application of the principles of forensic science in evaluating physical evidence with emphasis on its role in criminal investigation. Class experiences may include guest lectures and field trips. 3-hour lecture. Normally offered Fall

Prerequisites:

FS-103 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory experiences related to the collection and analysis of physical evidence as performed by forensic science professionals. Experiments may include forensic microscopy drug analysis forensic serology physical patterns fingerprint and firearm evidence analysis techniques. 3-hour laboratory. Normally offered Fall

Prerequisites:

Instructor's permission is required for registration

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

The practicum involves participation in government crime laboratories private forensic laboratories private analytical chemical laboratories (including biomedical laboratories) a forensic science project at Suffolk University or other laboratories where the student can demonstrate that he or she can acquire skills applicable to forensic analysis. Students are encouraged to seek a practicum sponsor that suits his/her skills and interests; assistance may be provided by the Forensic Science Program Director. Participation at the laboratories is subject to requirements of the particular laboratory and will be open only to those students approved by the Forensic Science Director. Development of a research report and poster presentation to the department are required elements.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's permission is required for registration

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

The practicum involves participation in government crime laboratories private forensic laboratories private analytical chemical laboratories (including biomedical laboratories) a forensic science project at Suffolk University or other laboratories where the student can demonstrate that he or she can acquire skills applicable to forensic analysis. Students are encouraged to seek a practicum sponsor that suits his/her skills and interests; assistance may be provided by the Forensic Science Program Director. Participation at the laboratories is subject to requirements of the particular laboratory and will be open only to those students approved by the Forensic Science Director. Development of a final research report and oral presentation to the department and the SU community are required elements.