Philosophy

Philosophy Major

Learn more about this major

Major Requirements: 11 courses, 38 credits

Core Requirements (4 courses, 10 credits)

Prerequisites:

CAS 101. CAS students only. SBS students by special permission. Restricted to the following majors: Art History, Asian Studies, Biology, Economics, English, French, History, Humanities, International Economics, Music History, Philosophy, Physics, Radiation Science, Spanish, and Undeclared. Instructor consent required for all other majors.

Credits:

1

Description:

This course engages students in the early stages of career planning. Students will explore their interests, skills, values, and strengths, which will allow them to begin setting appropriate goals for professional development. Once students understand themselves in relation to the world of work, they will learn how to research careers and employment paths that fit with their goals.

Credits:

4

Description:

The study of philosophical thought from the period of the ancient Greek philosophers through the Medieval thinkers, including such philosophers as Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Zeno, Parmenides, Pythagoras, Protagoras, Augustine, Aquinas, Anselm, and Abelard. An introductory course designed to equip the student with a well grounded understanding and appreciation of Philosophy. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

A study of the prominent modern thinkers, such as Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. The course is an historical survey of the key concepts, problems and developments in modern philosophy including rationalism, empiricism, and skepticism. The following themes central to Modern philosophy will be addressed: the nature of reality; the limits of human knowledge; self and self-identity; mind and body; freedom in theory and practice; reason vs. sentiment in ethics. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: PHIL 210 and 211 and consent of instructor.

Credits:

1

Description:

This is a required course for all students in the major, to be taken in the Spring Semester of their senior year. Students will prepare a portfolio of their previous coursework, collaborate with the faculty symposium leader on a selection of texts to read in common with other seniors, and prepare one paper for delivery at the Senior Symposium, usually held in late April. Students seeking Honors in Philosophy must take this course to complete the senior thesis. PHIL 210 and 211 and consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered Spring Semester every year.

Core Electives (3 courses, 12 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

4

Description:

An introduction to non-formal methods of analyzing and formulating arguments, including treatment of such concepts/topics as: the nature of argument, induction, deduction, validity, soundness, aspects of language which tend to interfere with logical thought, definition, role of emotion, types of disagreement, and fallacies. The course also emphasizes the practical application of sound reasoning in both evaluating arguments and making arguments of one's own about matters of issues facing society. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

An introduction to formal (or semi-formal) study of the basic types of deductive arguments (propositional and syllogistic logic). 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

4

Description:

A systematic introduction to the major thinkers and their positions on the main issues of ethics, such as: What is morality? What are moral values? How should we live our lives? Are there objective, universal, absolute moral standards? If so, what are they, and what is their basis? 1 term - credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

In this class you will be introduced to the perspectives and methods of politics, philosophy, and economics and see how these three disciplines present distinct but interconnected dimensions of current social and political issues.

Credits:

4

Description:

An examination of contemporary Western society, particularly in the United States," in relation to philosophical attempts to define the ""good life."" Current books that exhibit a philosophical approach towards important contemporary social issues will be discussed\"

Credits:

4

Description:

A critical examination of a number of contemporary moral issues such as: abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, capital punishment, cloning, drug legalization, environmental ethics, euthanasia, genetic engineering, gun control, pornography, same-sex marriage, suicide, war and terrorism, etc. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Choose one Philosophy course at the 400-level

Electives (4 courses, 16 credits)

Students are required to take four additional Philosophy courses selected with the help of an advisor. At least one of these additional courses should be at the 200-level or higher and one should be at the 300-level or higher. A detailed program suited to the needs of the individual student will be developed for each Philosophy major.

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Philosophy Learning Goals & Objectives

Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.

Learning Goals Learning Objectives
Students will...
Students will be able to...
Gain philosophical insight
  • Sustain an ethic of inquiry
  • Formulate and pursue their own questions
  • Engage major thinkers and texts of the tradition to develop a response
Learn to write effectively
  • Develop a distinct style and voice
  • Master composition, grammar, and mechanics to produce clear, persuasive, and forceful prose
Conduct well-motivated research
  • Implement self-directed research and independent projects
  • Integrate primary and secondary sources fluidly
Engage in active and constructive discussion
  • Engage in all dimensions of classroom citizenship (group work, Q & A, class preparation, etc.)
  • Develop questions and conversations in a constructive manner with the professor and fellow students
  • Give effective presentations, both formal and informal
Understand critical reasoning and logical analysis
  • Conduct textual analysis
  • Analyze diverse arguments
  • Develop critical thinking and evaluation skills
  • Integrate textual analysis, argument analysis and evaluation
Learn a variety of reading styles
  • Master a variety of styles and genres, with the ability to understand the core concepts and arguments, as well as to raise substantive questions about both
Understand major authors, texts, and themes in philosophy
  • Acquire a solid foundation in the history of philosophy
  • Gain proficiency in ethics, theoretical and applied
  • Learn to apply philosophical methods of investigation
  • Appreciate the practical importance of a philosophical approach to life questions

Applied Ethics Concentration

Major Requirements with Applied Ethics Concentration: 11 courses, 38 credits

Requirements for the Applied Ethics concentration supersede all other requirements for the major.

Core Requirements (6 courses, 18 credits)

Prerequisites:

CAS 101. CAS students only. SBS students by special permission. Restricted to the following majors: Art History, Asian Studies, Biology, Economics, English, French, History, Humanities, International Economics, Music History, Philosophy, Physics, Radiation Science, Spanish, and Undeclared. Instructor consent required for all other majors.

Credits:

1

Description:

This course engages students in the early stages of career planning. Students will explore their interests, skills, values, and strengths, which will allow them to begin setting appropriate goals for professional development. Once students understand themselves in relation to the world of work, they will learn how to research careers and employment paths that fit with their goals.

Credits:

4

Description:

A systematic introduction to the major thinkers and their positions on the main issues of ethics, such as: What is morality? What are moral values? How should we live our lives? Are there objective, universal, absolute moral standards? If so, what are they, and what is their basis? 1 term - credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

The study of philosophical thought from the period of the ancient Greek philosophers through the Medieval thinkers, including such philosophers as Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Zeno, Parmenides, Pythagoras, Protagoras, Augustine, Aquinas, Anselm, and Abelard. An introductory course designed to equip the student with a well grounded understanding and appreciation of Philosophy. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

A study of the prominent modern thinkers, such as Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. The course is an historical survey of the key concepts, problems and developments in modern philosophy including rationalism, empiricism, and skepticism. The following themes central to Modern philosophy will be addressed: the nature of reality; the limits of human knowledge; self and self-identity; mind and body; freedom in theory and practice; reason vs. sentiment in ethics. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

An examination of persistent debates in political and social philosophy. Topics covered can include the meaning of property and welfare, the tensions between liberty and equality, censorship and freedom of expression, the relation of church and state, human rights and the common good, the possibility of political education and civic virtue, legitimacy of the state, revolution and counter-revolution, war and problems of ends and means, addressing historic injustices, such as racism, genocide, or sexism, among other topics. Students will read both classic and contemporary writings to address both the historical roots and the contemporary treatment of these questions. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: PHIL 210 and 211 and consent of instructor.

Credits:

1

Description:

This is a required course for all students in the major, to be taken in the Spring Semester of their senior year. Students will prepare a portfolio of their previous coursework, collaborate with the faculty symposium leader on a selection of texts to read in common with other seniors, and prepare one paper for delivery at the Senior Symposium, usually held in late April. Students seeking Honors in Philosophy must take this course to complete the senior thesis. PHIL 210 and 211 and consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered Spring Semester every year.

Core Elective (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

4

Description:

An introduction to non-formal methods of analyzing and formulating arguments, including treatment of such concepts/topics as: the nature of argument, induction, deduction, validity, soundness, aspects of language which tend to interfere with logical thought, definition, role of emotion, types of disagreement, and fallacies. The course also emphasizes the practical application of sound reasoning in both evaluating arguments and making arguments of one's own about matters of issues facing society. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

An introduction to formal (or semi-formal) study of the basic types of deductive arguments (propositional and syllogistic logic). 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Applied Ethics Requirements (4 courses, 16 credits)

Choose four courses in Applied Ethics, at least two of which must be at the 200-level or higher:

Credits:

4

Description:

In this class you will be introduced to the perspectives and methods of politics, philosophy, and economics and see how these three disciplines present distinct but interconnected dimensions of current social and political issues.

Credits:

4

Description:

An examination of contemporary Western society, particularly in the United States," in relation to philosophical attempts to define the ""good life."" Current books that exhibit a philosophical approach towards important contemporary social issues will be discussed\"

Credits:

4

Description:

A critical examination of a number of contemporary moral issues such as: abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, capital punishment, cloning, drug legalization, environmental ethics, euthanasia, genetic engineering, gun control, pornography, same-sex marriage, suicide, war and terrorism, etc. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

PHIL-119, PHIL-123, PHIL-127 or PHIL-120

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will address in depth one or more specific issues in applied ethics. Topics will vary and may range from applied issues in political thought, such as just war theory or transitional justice, to specific questions in professional ethics or social policy, such as end-of-life care, economic justice, or the role of technology in the human future. Prerequisite: PHIL 119, or 123, or 127. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every other year.

Prerequisites:

PHIL-119, PHIL-123, PHIL-127 or PHIL-120

Credits:

4

Description:

An examination of the moral issues involved in the interaction of humans with their natural environment. Topics include: the environmental crisis, human-centered vs. nature-centered ethics, intrinsic value in nature, obligations to future generations, the importance of preserving endangered species and wilderness, radical ecology, eco-feminism, and the role of social justice in environmental issues. Prerequisite: PHIL 119, or 123, or 127. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: Phil 119, or 123, or 127.

Credits:

4

Description:

An examination of the moral problems facing health-care practitioners, their patients, and others involved with the practice of medicine in today's society. Issues include euthanasia, the ethics of medical experimentation, the use of reproductive technologies, genetic counseling and genetic engineering, truth-telling and confidentiality in doctor-patient relationships, the cost and availability of medical care. Normally offered every third year.

Prerequisites:

PHIL-119, PHIL-123, PHIL-127 or PHIL-120 and consent of instructor

Credits:

4

Description:

Students in this course will serve as interns in a department-approved position with a service provider, professional organization, government agency, or non-governmental organization whose work is relevant to issues in applied ethics. A faculty mentor will meet with students regularly to develop individually designed programs of readings and to discuss this material and its relation to the internship experience. In addition to the substantial time commitment to the internship, course requirements will usually include a journal and a research project. PHIL 119 or 123 or 127 and consent of instructor. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Philosophy Minor

Learn more about this minor

Minor Requirements: 5 courses, 20 credits

Core Requirements (2 courses, 8 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

4

Description:

A systematic introduction to the major thinkers and their positions on the main issues of ethics, such as: What is morality? What are moral values? How should we live our lives? Are there objective, universal, absolute moral standards? If so, what are they, and what is their basis? 1 term - credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

An examination of contemporary Western society, particularly in the United States," in relation to philosophical attempts to define the ""good life."" Current books that exhibit a philosophical approach towards important contemporary social issues will be discussed\"

Credits:

4

Description:

A critical examination of a number of contemporary moral issues such as: abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, capital punishment, cloning, drug legalization, environmental ethics, euthanasia, genetic engineering, gun control, pornography, same-sex marriage, suicide, war and terrorism, etc. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

4

Description:

The study of philosophical thought from the period of the ancient Greek philosophers through the Medieval thinkers, including such philosophers as Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Zeno, Parmenides, Pythagoras, Protagoras, Augustine, Aquinas, Anselm, and Abelard. An introductory course designed to equip the student with a well grounded understanding and appreciation of Philosophy. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

A study of the prominent modern thinkers, such as Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. The course is an historical survey of the key concepts, problems and developments in modern philosophy including rationalism, empiricism, and skepticism. The following themes central to Modern philosophy will be addressed: the nature of reality; the limits of human knowledge; self and self-identity; mind and body; freedom in theory and practice; reason vs. sentiment in ethics. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Electives (3 courses, 12 credits)

Choose three additional philosophy courses, two of which should be at the 200-level or higher.

 

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major or double major combination to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

Honors

To complete requirements for honors in the major, a candidate must:

  1. Graduate with a major GPA of 3.5 or higher
  2. Graduate with an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher
  3. Complete either two years of language study by graduation or PHIL-212 and PHIL-423
  4. Complete a minimum of two 400-level Philosophy courses
  5. Complete PHIL-H515
  6. Complete a research paper/thesis in PHIL-H515 that is approved by the department
  7. CAS Honors Program students only: Present work from the senior honors experience at the Honors Symposium or Pecha Kucha event

To become a candidate for honors in the major, a student must:

  1. Have a major GPA of 3.4 or higher
  2. Have an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher
  3. Have completed a minimum of 8 credits in Philosophy courses at Suffolk University

CAS Honors Program students only: CAS Honors Program student who fulfill the above GPA requirement and the minimum credits of coursework are assumed candidates for departmental honors and should consult with the major advisor during junior year about registering for honors requirements as described above

All other students: Apply to the department chair or the advisor at the beginning of junior year

Credits:

4

Description:

An introduction to formal (or semi-formal) study of the basic types of deductive arguments (propositional and syllogistic logic). 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: PHIL 212 or consent of instructor.

Credits:

4

Description:

In this course, students will put to work the logical theory developed in Formal Logic (Phil 212). In particular, students will use First-Order Logic to investigate computability and computation theory. Goedel's First and Second Incompleteness Theorems are a particular focus in the course. Prerequisite: PHIL 212 or consent of instructor. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

Take PHIL-210 and PHIL-211; Instructor consent required; CAS Honors

Credits:

1

Description:

This is a required course for all Honors Program students in the major, to be taken in the Spring Semester of their senior year. Students will prepare a portfolio of their previous coursework, collaborate with the faculty symposium leader on a selection of texts to read in common with other seniors, and prepare one paper for delivery at the Senior Symposium, usually held in late April. Students seeking Honors in Philosophy must take this course to complete the senior thesis. Normally offered Spring Semester every year.

Societies

Phi Sigma Tau Philosophy Honor Society

Phi Sigma Tau, the National Honor Society for Philosophy, established its Massachusetts Beta Chapter at Suffolk in 1965. Active membership is open to students who have reached junior standing, and who have completed at least six courses in philosophy at Suffolk with an average of 3.3, plus a cumulative average of 3.0.

Philosophy Courses

Credits:

4

Description:

An introduction to non-formal methods of analyzing and formulating arguments, including treatment of such concepts/topics as: the nature of argument, induction, deduction, validity, soundness, aspects of language which tend to interfere with logical thought, definition, role of emotion, types of disagreement, and fallacies. The course also emphasizes the practical application of sound reasoning in both evaluating arguments and making arguments of one's own about matters of issues facing society. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

A general introduction to the nature of philosophical analysis. Lectures, readings, and discussions will focus on representative issues and thinkers from the main areas of philosophy (such the nature of truth, reality, morality, politics, and religion). 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

A systematic introduction to the major thinkers and their positions on the main issues of ethics, such as: What is morality? What are moral values? How should we live our lives? Are there objective, universal, absolute moral standards? If so, what are they, and what is their basis? 1 term - credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

PHIL-119 concurrently and Instructor consent

Credits:

0

Description:

Service Learning Component

Prerequisites:

PHIL Major and Minors, CAS Honors, or CAS GPA 3.3 or higher.

Credits:

4

Description:

A systematic introduction to the major thinkers and their positions on the main issues of ethics, such as: What is morality? What are moral values? How should we live our lives? Are there objective, universal, absolute moral standards? If so, what are they, and what is their basis? Prerequisite: Philosophy majors, minors, or honor students only. 1 term -4 credits.

Credits:

4

Description:

In this class you will be introduced to the perspectives and methods of politics, philosophy, and economics and see how these three disciplines present distinct but interconnected dimensions of current social and political issues.

Credits:

4

Description:

An examination of contemporary Western society, particularly in the United States," in relation to philosophical attempts to define the ""good life."" Current books that exhibit a philosophical approach towards important contemporary social issues will be discussed\"

Prerequisites:

PHIL-123 concurrently and Instructor consent

Credits:

0

Description:

Service Learning Component

Prerequisites:

Limited to PHIL majors, minors, and CAS Honors students.

Credits:

4

Description:

An examination of contemporary Western society, particularly in the United States," in relation to philosophical attempts to define the ""good life."" Current books that exhibit a philosophical approach towards important contemporary social issues will be discussed\"

Credits:

4

Description:

A critical examination of a number of contemporary moral issues such as: abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, capital punishment, cloning, drug legalization, environmental ethics, euthanasia, genetic engineering, gun control, pornography, same-sex marriage, suicide, war and terrorism, etc. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

PHIL-127 concurrently and Instructor consent

Credits:

0

Description:

Service Learning Component

Prerequisites:

PHIL Major and Minors, CAS Honors, or CAS GPA 3.3 or higher.

Credits:

4

Description:

A critical examination of a number of contemporary moral issues such as: abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, capital punishment, cloning, drug legalization, environmental ethics, euthanasia, genetic engineering, gun control, pornography, same-sex marriage, suicide, war and terrorism, etc. 1 term - 4 credits. Prerequisite: Philosophy majors, minors, or honor students only. 1 term -4 credits.

Credits:

4

Description:

The study of philosophical thought from the period of the ancient Greek philosophers through the Medieval thinkers, including such philosophers as Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Zeno, Parmenides, Pythagoras, Protagoras, Augustine, Aquinas, Anselm, and Abelard. An introductory course designed to equip the student with a well grounded understanding and appreciation of Philosophy. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors Students Only

Credits:

4

Description:

The study of philosophical thought from the period of the ancient Greek philosophers through the Medieval thinkers, including such philosophers as Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Zeno, Parmenides, Pythagoras, Protagoras, Augustine, Aquinas, Anselm, and Abelard. An introductory course designed to equip the student with a well grounded understanding and appreciation of Philosophy. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

A study of the prominent modern thinkers, such as Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. The course is an historical survey of the key concepts, problems and developments in modern philosophy including rationalism, empiricism, and skepticism. The following themes central to Modern philosophy will be addressed: the nature of reality; the limits of human knowledge; self and self-identity; mind and body; freedom in theory and practice; reason vs. sentiment in ethics. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

An introduction to formal (or semi-formal) study of the basic types of deductive arguments (propositional and syllogistic logic). 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

"What counts as art? ""What is beauty?"" ""Are there objective standards of beauty?"" This course examines the nature of aesthetic experience\"

Credits:

4

Description:

An inquiry into some philosophical themes in modern literature. Existential reality, immortality, faith and nature, morality and reason will be explored through the creative word of modern authors. Special emphasis will be placed on recurrent themes and their philosophical belief structure and meaning. 1 term - 4 credits.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is an introduction to the philosophy of feminist thought. Feminist theories of epistemology, metaphysics and morality will be examined as critiques of traditional philosophy,. Feminist perspectives and methodologies include radical, liberal, postmodern," as well as more recent trends in ecofeminism. Special emphasis will be placed on explicit and implicit practices of alienation and exclusion as they have unfolded in the ""gendering"" of thought\"

Prerequisites:

PHIL 119, or PHIL 123, or PHIL 127

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the political, social, and ecological problems facing us as a global community. Having its roots in feminist theory and deep-ecology, eco-feminism provides a critical framework for ecological responsibility and accountability. Writings from eco-feminist thinkers and environmental activists around the world will be used to highlight the philosophical and political conflicts and challenges, including globalization and loss of biodiversity, global warming, international human rights, the relationship of gender and nature, and modes of redress for eco-justice and sustainable development.

Prerequisites:

PHIL 119, or PHIL 123, or PHIL 127. Restricted to CAS Honors Students

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the political, social, and ecological problems facing us as a global community. Having its roots in feminist theory and deep-ecology, eco-feminism provides a critical framework for ecological responsibility and accountability. Writings from eco-feminist thinkers and environmental activists around the world will be used to highlight the philosophical and political conflicts and challenges, including globalization and loss of biodiversity, global warming, international human rights, the relationship of gender and nature, and modes of redress for eco-justice and sustainable development.

Credits:

4

Description:

An examination of persistent debates in political and social philosophy. Topics covered can include the meaning of property and welfare, the tensions between liberty and equality, censorship and freedom of expression, the relation of church and state, human rights and the common good, the possibility of political education and civic virtue, legitimacy of the state, revolution and counter-revolution, war and problems of ends and means, addressing historic injustices, such as racism, genocide, or sexism, among other topics. Students will read both classic and contemporary writings to address both the historical roots and the contemporary treatment of these questions. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

Both mythology and science arise from the human need to explain the world, to understand its laws, and give an account of its origin. This course focuses on the controversial relationship between myth and science and explores their historical roots, their social influence and their respective views of reality, human nature, and origin of the universe. Both historical controversies and contemporary debates, such as evolution vs. intelligent design, will be considered. Topics in the philosophy of science, such as the nature and scope of the scientific method, will also be addressed. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

4

Description:

The exposition and critical evaluation of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Islam. Special attention is given to foundation principles as well as to the similarities and differences of each of these philosophies to basic ideas in Western philosophy. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

Credits:

4

Description:

An historical survey of Buddhist philosophy. We will explore Buddhist origins, central teachings, devotional and meditational practices, ritual and institutions as developed from classical to modern times. Special attention given to the philosophical diversity of the Buddhist world view. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is an examination of Native American (Indian) religious experience," both the similarities and differences among the myths and rituals of the major tribes which comprise the background of our nation's history of Western migration and ""settlement."" The emphasis will be on understanding how life was experienced by these peoples through a close look at the philosophical meanings of their mythology and ethics. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C a"

Credits:

4

Description:

An exploration into the various dimensions and ideologies concerning the role of the feminine in relation to the Divine. Belief systems, myths and archetypes from ancient Goddess worship to 20th century feminist theology will be examined in terms of the philosophical content and psychological consequences. Special emphasis will be placed on feminist metaphysical structures for understanding consciousness and Reality. Classes will be conducted by means of lectures, primary and secondary texts and class discussions. Normally offered alternate years. Cultural Diversity A

Credits:

4

Description:

An introduction to both traditional and modern philosophy from the African continent. Topics include: the intellectual dimensions of oral-traditional cultures within Africa; the impact of colonialism on African belief systems; philosophical responses to colonization; contributions of modern and contemporary African thinkers to the fields of social, political, moral and aesthetic philosophy.

Credits:

4

Description:

A survey of the main developments in Chinese Philosophy. The course begins with the early dynastic concept of humanism and then turns to Confucius and Mencius. Having developed the central Confucian doctrines, students next examine the Taoist response to Confucianism in the writings of Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu. The course then considers Zen Buddhism, which is called Ch'an Buddhism in China, where it originated. In particular, students study the concept of sudden enlightenment before turning to the Neo-Confucian scholars.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: PHIL 211 or consent of instructor.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines one or more of the following major philosophical movements of the 20th century: Pragmatism, Phenomenology, Existentialism, Logical Positivism, Analytic (Linguistic) Philosophy, Postmodernism and Critical Theory (Post-Analytic Philosophy). Prerequisite: PHIL 211 or consent of instructor. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.

Credits:

4

Description:

An overview of the existentialist tradition. Primary focus on issues and problems arising from the existentialist reaction to classical philosophy. Topics include: paradoxes and contradictions of human nature and human condition; radical freedom, commitment, and responsibility; existential anxiety, meaninglessness and the rejection of God; authenticity and self-deception; individuality and community. Philosophers to be discussed will include Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, Camus, Dostoevsky, and Heidegger. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every other year.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or consent of instructor. Restricted to CAS Honors students

Credits:

4

Description:

An overview of the existentialist tradition. Primary focus on issues and problems arising from the existentialist reaction to classical philosophy. Topics include: paradoxes and contradictions of human nature and human condition; radical freedom, commitment, and responsibility; existential anxiety, meaninglessness and the rejection of God; authenticity and self-deception; individuality and community. Philosophers to be discussed will include Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, Camus, Dostoevsky, and Heidegger. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every other year.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

This class will focus on the general role that law plays in public life. Instead of studying what the current laws are, the class emphasizes the challenges in analyzing, interpreting, and constructing law. Among the most important questions will be how we should evaluate or reform existing legal systems. Readings may include formative cases, recent legal studies, and classic texts by figures such as Grotius, Bentham, Holmes, Hart, and Dworkin. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every other year.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Instructor's consent. CAS Honors students only

Credits:

4

Description:

This class will focus on the general role that law plays in public life. Instead of studying what the current laws are, the class emphasizes the challenges in analyzing, interpreting, and constructing law. Among the most important questions will be how we should evaluate or reform existing legal systems. Readings may include formative cases, recent legal studies, and classic texts by figures such as Grotius, Bentham, Holmes, Hart, and Dworkin. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every other year.

Prerequisites:

PHIL-119, PHIL-123, PHIL-127 or PHIL-120

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will address in depth one or more specific issues in applied ethics. Topics will vary and may range from applied issues in political thought, such as just war theory or transitional justice, to specific questions in professional ethics or social policy, such as end-of-life care, economic justice, or the role of technology in the human future. Prerequisite: PHIL 119, or 123, or 127. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every other year.

Prerequisites:

One course in Philosophy or consent of instructor.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course explores indigenous African systems of thought, modern academic African philosophy, African social and political theory, and contemporary debates centered on questions of identity, modernity, essentialism and historicity within the African context. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every third year. C b

Prerequisites:

PHIL-119, PHIL-123, PHIL-127 or PHIL-120

Credits:

4

Description:

An examination of the moral issues involved in the interaction of humans with their natural environment. Topics include: the environmental crisis, human-centered vs. nature-centered ethics, intrinsic value in nature, obligations to future generations, the importance of preserving endangered species and wilderness, radical ecology, eco-feminism, and the role of social justice in environmental issues. Prerequisite: PHIL 119, or 123, or 127. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: Phil 119, or 123, or 127.

Credits:

4

Description:

An examination of the moral problems facing health-care practitioners, their patients, and others involved with the practice of medicine in today's society. Issues include euthanasia, the ethics of medical experimentation, the use of reproductive technologies, genetic counseling and genetic engineering, truth-telling and confidentiality in doctor-patient relationships, the cost and availability of medical care. Normally offered every third year.

Prerequisites:

PHIL-120

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Students in this course will serve as interns in a program-approved position with a service provider, professional organization, government agency, or non-governmental organization whose work is relevant to the PPE major. A faculty mentor will meet with students regularly to develop individually designed programs of readings and to discuss this material and its relation to the internship experience. In addition to the substantial time commitment to the internship, course requirements will usually include a weekly journal and a research project.

Prerequisites:

Take 1 PHIL course level 200 or higher; or take GVT-275 or GVT-276; Instructor consent required.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines how classical works of ancient and medieval moral and political philosophy raise questions and themes that persist in challenges facing contemporary public policy and personal ethics. Topics covered will include the nature of moral duties, the connection between happiness and morality, citizenship and virtue, the meaning of a good life, the attractions and limitations of moral relativism, the foundations of legitimate government, arguments for and against democracy, realism and idealism in statecraft, and the relationship between law and ethics. Authors may include the Pre-Socratic thinkers, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, and Aquinas, among others.

Prerequisites:

PHIL-210, PHIL-211, 1 400-level PHIL course, and Instructor consent

Credits:

4

Description:

Continues the examination of themes addressed in PHIL 401/701, with a focus on how radical change, from the early modern era to the present, poses both challenges and opportunities for thought and action. In addition to issues from PHIL 401/701, themes may include revolution and reaction, the role of science and technology, the clash between universalism and particularism, distributive justice and the economy, liberty and equality, faith and secularism, and others. Authors may include Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche, as well as contemporary thinkers.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's Consent

Credits:

4

Description:

This seminar will analyze and explore the universal human rights concept -- the idea that all human beings, by virtue of their humanity alone, have human rights that should be recognized by all nations. It will explore the concept's meaning; its theoretical underpinnings, critiques and defenses; and the kinds of specific rights suggested by the concept. The course will also provide an introduction to existing human rights law. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits.

Credits:

4

Description:

A detailed exposition and evaluation of a specific topic or of the views of one major philosophical thinker or group of thinkers. Readings from both primary and secondary sources. Prerequisite: PHIL 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors student only

Credits:

4

Description:

A detailed exposition and evaluation of a specific topic or of the views of one major philosophical thinker or group of thinkers. Readings from both primary and secondary sources. Prerequisite: PHIL 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: PHIL 210 or consent of instructor.

Credits:

4

Description:

A detailed study of Platonic texts and issues. Works studied will vary but will often include dialogues such as the Apology, Euthyphro, Phaedo, Republic, and Symposium. Themes may include, among others: the nature of philosophy and its relation to society; the dialogue form and the character of Socrates; the difference between truth and opinion; the meaning of virtue; justice and the ideal regime; the theory of forms and the nature of reality; love, death, and transcendence. Prerequisite: PHIL 210 or consent of instructor. 1 term ? 4 credits. Normally offered every third year.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: PHIL 212 or consent of instructor.

Credits:

4

Description:

In this course, students will put to work the logical theory developed in Formal Logic (Phil 212). In particular, students will use First-Order Logic to investigate computability and computation theory. Goedel's First and Second Incompleteness Theorems are a particular focus in the course. Prerequisite: PHIL 212 or consent of instructor. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

4

Description:

A study of the nineteenth-century Russian novelist Feodor Dostoevsky and his contribution to world philosophy and literature. Dostoevsky's stories, which weave together philosophical reflections, unique personalities and gripping plots, earned the author numerous superlative titles. Dostoevsky has been praised as a literary genius, a prophetic political thinker, a keen psychologist and an expert on human condition. His work inspired generations of intellectuals, among them prominent European thinkers: Nietzsche, Freud, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus, Hesse and many others. In addition to a detailed study of Dostoevsky's writings the course explores the socio-political, literary, and intellectual contexts in which he developed as a thinker, introducing students to both his opponents and admirers.

Credits:

4

Description:

An interdisciplinary course examining the idea of law and its function in human society, with a special focus on issues of violence, war, peace, and justice. The course will examine law as it represented, enacted, and discussed in various literary and philosophical writings from the ancient world to the present, to include various Biblical texts, Sophocles's Antigone, Aeschylus's Oresteia, Plato's Apology, Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice, Melville's Billy Budd, Toni Morrison's Beloved, among many others.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: PHIL 210 and 211 and consent of instructor.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Students meet with a department member to pursue advanced studies in areas of particular interest to them.

Prerequisites:

PHIL-119, PHIL-123, PHIL-127 or PHIL-120 and consent of instructor

Credits:

4

Description:

Students in this course will serve as interns in a department-approved position with a service provider, professional organization, government agency, or non-governmental organization whose work is relevant to issues in applied ethics. A faculty mentor will meet with students regularly to develop individually designed programs of readings and to discuss this material and its relation to the internship experience. In addition to the substantial time commitment to the internship, course requirements will usually include a journal and a research project. PHIL 119 or 123 or 127 and consent of instructor. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: PHIL 210 or PHIL 211 and consent of instructor.

Credits:

4

Description:

Students with sufficient background in philosophy and a special interest in areas of philosophy which cannot be covered in regularly offered courses will be guided by senior members of the Department. Students working on Honors in Philosophy must take this course in the first semester of their senior year to prepare a thesis proposal. PHIL 210 or PHIL 211 and consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

Take PHIL-210 or PHIL-211; Instructor consent required; CAS Honors

Credits:

4

Description:

Students in the Honors Program with sufficient background in philosophy and a special interest in areas of philosophy which cannot be covered in regularly offered courses will be guided by senior members of the Department. Students working on Honors in Philosophy must take this course in the first semester of their senior year to prepare a thesis proposal. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: PHIL 210 and 211 and consent of instructor.

Credits:

1

Description:

This is a required course for all students in the major, to be taken in the Spring Semester of their senior year. Students will prepare a portfolio of their previous coursework, collaborate with the faculty symposium leader on a selection of texts to read in common with other seniors, and prepare one paper for delivery at the Senior Symposium, usually held in late April. Students seeking Honors in Philosophy must take this course to complete the senior thesis. PHIL 210 and 211 and consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered Spring Semester every year.

Prerequisites:

Take PHIL-210 and PHIL-211; Instructor consent required; CAS Honors

Credits:

1

Description:

This is a required course for all Honors Program students in the major, to be taken in the Spring Semester of their senior year. Students will prepare a portfolio of their previous coursework, collaborate with the faculty symposium leader on a selection of texts to read in common with other seniors, and prepare one paper for delivery at the Senior Symposium, usually held in late April. Students seeking Honors in Philosophy must take this course to complete the senior thesis. Normally offered Spring Semester every year.

Credits:

0

Description:

Service Learning Component

Credits:

0

Description:

Service Learning Component

Prerequisites:

PHIL-119, PHIL-120, PHIL-123, or PHIL-127 and 2 of the following courses: GVT-110, GVT-201, GVT-225, EC-101, EC-102, PHIL-212, PHIL-250, STATS-240, STATS-250. PPE students only. Senior status required.

Credits:

4

Description:

This interdisciplinary class brings together the fields of politics, philosophy, and economics at a high academic level. You will be confronted with hard questions about the sources, ends, and limits of government; the usefulness and troubles of free markets; the proper distribution of economic advantages in society; and what works best for building a just and efficient system of economic institutions.

Prerequisites:

Take PHIL-119 PHIL-120 PHIL-123 or PHIL-127; and 2 of the following courses: GVT-110, GVT-201, GVT-225, EC-101, EC-102, PHIL-212, PHIL-250, STATS-240, STATS-250. PPE Students Only. Senior Status and CAS Honors required.

Credits:

4

Description:

This interdisciplinary class for students in PPE and the Honors Program brings together the fields of politics, philosophy, and economics at a high academic level. You will be confronted with hard questions about the sources, ends, and limits of government; the usefulness and troubles of free markets; the proper distribution of economic advantages in society; and what works best for building a just and efficient system of economic institutions.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Independent Study

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will explore the comparative history and structure of Western religious traditions, broadly understood, and their impact on other world religions, while attempting to recognize the similarities and the differences among them. Traditions to be studied include Greek and Roman religion, the monotheistic faiths (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as Zoroastrianism, Sikhism and Bahaism). We will also explore the impact of the Western religions on indigenous traditions, such as African religion, Native American religion, and Pacific Island religion. Attention will be given to the reading of original texts when available. Requiring students to observe religious ceremonies will enhance practical understanding of many of the above traditions. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will examine a variety of Eastern religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shintoism. Possible connections to be explored will be the impact of these traditions on others, such as Pacific Islands and African religion, as well as the growing place of Eastern religion in the West. This course will explore the history and structure of each tradition, while attempting to recognize the similarities and the differences among them. Attention will be given to the reading of original texts when available. Requiring students to observe religious ceremonies will enhance practical understanding of many of the above traditions. Normally offered every year. Cultural Diversity B

Credits:

4

Description:

Traces the evolution of Judaism, Christianity and Islam to the High Middle Ages to explore the role of Neo-Platonism and Aristotelianism in clarifying and explaining dogma. Particular attention will be paid to ideas about the ways of knowing and rational proofs of God's existence in Philo of Alexandria, Augustine, Anselm, Ibn Rushd (Averroes), Aquinas and Maimonides. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered in alternate years.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Students meet with a department member to pursue advanced studies in areas of particular interest to them.