Science

Science Courses

No major available. All science courses must be taken with their respective laboratories unless otherwise noted or waived by written permission from appropriate department chair.

Prerequisites:

SCI-L103 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

3

Description:

Case study approach to the fundamentals of science applied to environmental degradation, ecosystems, geological processes, population dynamics, deforestation and biodiversity, climate change, ozone depletion, air soil, and water resource management, pollution and risks to health, economics and the environment, politics and the environment, and ethics and the environment.

Prerequisites:

Must take SCI-103 concurrently

Credits:

1

Description:

Laboratory exercises to illustrate the topics covered in Science 103. Field-testing and analysis of environmental samples. Field trip required.

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers, as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes, detection, and prevention. Psychosocial aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, and bone marrow transplants.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors Students Only

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers, as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes, detection, and prevention. Psycho-social aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, and bone marrow transplants.

Credits:

4

Description:

Students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers, as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes, detection, and prevention. Psychosocial aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, and bone marrow transplants. Service-learning is a pedagogy integrating academically relevant service activities that address human and community needs into a course. Students connect knowledge and theory to practice by combining service with reflection in a structured learning environment. Students will engage in service-learning with an underserved community partner in regards to cancer by working directly with cancer patients or by assisting on a project that supports cancer patients.

Credits:

4

Description:

Students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers, as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes, detection, and prevention. Psychosocial aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, and bone marrow transplants. Service-learning is a pedagogy integrating academically relevant service activities that address human and community needs into a course. Students connect knowledge and theory to practice by combining service with reflection in a structured learning environment. Students will engage in service-learning with an underserved community partner in regards to cancer by working directly with cancer patients or by assisting on a project that supports cancer patients.

Prerequisites:

MATH-128 or higher and SCI-L111 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3

Description:

History of Astronomy from the ancients to Newton; light; telescopes; sun, earth, moon planets, comets, asteroids, meteors; space programs, science and technology in society. Course culminates with a visit to the Clay Center Observatory, where students will be able to make first hand observations. For non-science majors.

Prerequisites:

Take SCI-111 concurrently

Credits:

1

Description:

Laboratory experiments and exercises to illustrate the principles discussed in Science 111. Observational exercises using the Celestron telescope, astrophotography exercises, and computer simulations. Course culminates with a visit to the Clay Center Observatory, where students will be able to make first hand observations.

Prerequisites:

MATH-128 or higher and SCI-L112 concurrently

Credits:

3

Description:

Astronomy of the cosmos; sun, stars, interstellar materials, galaxies, pulsars, quasars, black holes; nature of time relativity, cosmology. Course culminates with a visit to the Clay Center Observatory, where students will be able to make first hand observations. For non-science majors.

Prerequisites:

Take SCI-112 concurrently

Credits:

1

Description:

Laboratory experiments and exercises to illustrate the principles discussed in Science 112. Observational exercises using the Celestron telescope, astrophotography exercises, and computer simulations. Course culminates with a visit to the Clay Center Observatory, where students will be able to make first hand observations.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course introduces non-science majors to concepts that are central to making our planet habitable. It presents Earth in context of the solar system with a broad view of global climate change and energy resources in a quest to better understand the workings our planet. This course on Earth and Planetary Science is suitable for students who may have taken their last science and math course several years ago, or are just curious about knowing facts on major issues that pertain to the future of our planet. Together with a reading component, this course aims to give students a flavor of how researchers think, investigate and develop conclusions that directly affect our political and economic future. Topics covered in this course range from the solar system to the study of search for other habitable Earth-like planets, search for extraterrestrial life, and evolution of life on Earth. Other characteristics of this course are heavy use of audio-visual materials often including computer animations and simulations, in-class experiment demonstration, and intensive use of INTERNET-based resources.

Credits:

4

Description:

About 15 billion years ago, (data indicate) the big bang occurred and the universe was born. With it came physical laws and a spectacular array of consequences that lead to the universe as we know it. This non-lab , 4 credit course explores the inner workings of the physical universe in terms of the scientific inquiry which lead to Newton's laws, an understanding of energy, waves, light, electricity, atomic structure, chemical reactions, nuclear physics, particle physics, relativity, and the big bang theory. During the course, students will learn to make use of modern resources to access scientific and technical literature to research a scientific topic. They will learn to distinguish between science and technology (e.g. quantum mechanics and nanotechnology, the discovery of the Higgs boson and the large hadron collider that made it possible, etc.) and to understand how the science, technology, and engineering disciplines play a crucial role in recognizing and solving problems of society and the world that we share.

Credits:

4

Description:

The most basic needs of humans have not changed - water, food, and shelter - but the means of meeting these needs has. In this course, we will examine how technology-driven societies operate by studying how cities are built and how they function. Topics will include water supply and distribution systems; transportation systems (including road and bridge design and construction); building design, construction, and operation (including skyscraper and sustainable building design), and waste removal systems (municipal and industrial wastewater removal and treatment, solid waste removal and treatment). This is not a course about little gadgets and widgets; this is a course about big engineering marvels; and it emphasizes applications of science - how things work - rather than scientific theory.

Prerequisites:

Honors students or at least a 3.3 GPA only

Credits:

4

Description:

The most basic needs of humans have not changed - water, food, and shelter - but the means of meeting these needs has. In this course, we will examine how technology-driven societies operate by studying how cities are built and how they function. Topics will include water supply and distribution systems; transportation systems (including road and bridge design and construction); building design, construction, and operation (including skyscraper and sustainable building design), and waste removal systems (municipal and industrial wastewater removal and treatment, solid waste removal and treatment). This is not a course about little gadgets and widgets; this is a course about big engineering marvels; and it emphasizes applications of science - how things work - rather than scientific theory.

Prerequisites:

SCI-L173 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3

Description:

Geographic Information Science (GIS) link information (number of fire hydrants on a block) to features on a map (e.g., a point representing street address) that has a designated geographic location (as designated by global coordinates). Unlike paper maps, GIS software allows the production of interactive maps that allows the user to layer data, to indicate spatial patterns, to analyze trends, and to combine different features of the mapped area in novel ways. For example, a business person may wish to use GIS to determine the optimum location of retail outlet (based on the mapped demographics of a neighborhood), while an environmental engineer may use GIS to describe the location of outfalls to see how they correlate to areas of stream pollution. In this course, students will be introduced to maps, map vocabulary and attributes, and GIS mapping through a series of mapping exercises. A knowledge of Windows-type applications is presumed.

Prerequisites:

SCI-173 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

1

Description:

This laboratory illustrates concepts and methods taught in SCI 173. In this lab students will be introduced to maps, map vocabulary and attributes, and GIS mapping through a series of mapping exercises. A knowledge of Windows-type applications is presumed.

Credits:

4

Description:

No longer offered on Boston campus This is a four credit, non-lab, science course that examines the central scientific problems confronting the 21st century. The course studies particular topics and teaches the necessary science around these topics to provide a good understanding of the issues. The topics currently are: Energy, Science and Economic Decisions, Sustainability of Life on Earth, Health and Science.

Credits:

4

Description:

This is a 4 credit, project based science course that examines the central scientific problems confronting the 21st century. The course consists of lectures, class discussions, field trips, and in-class hands-on activities designed to familiarize the student with different concepts of the lectures. The current focus is on sustainable energy production. A final team project related to the course topics will be given. This is the version of SCI 183 without a separate lab component. Students who have taken SCI 183, L183 are not allowed to take this course.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course presents a topical introduction to the key principles and concepts of physics in the context of the world events and natural phenomena that confront world leaders and that require informed decisions and responses. Energy, health, counter-terrorism, remote sensing, space programs, nuclear proliferation, and a host of other modern challenges have technological and scientific dimensions, the understanding of which is essential to avoiding disastrous policy decisions. This course considers the application of physics to these societal challenges. The material is covered at a level and pace that a future world leader should be able to handle; the emphasis is on the development of physical reasoning skills, and not on detailed, mathematical problem solving.

Prerequisites:

Take SCI-L210 concurrently

Credits:

3

Description:

This course will provide undergraduate students of various disciplines with an introduction to gems and crystals using interactive, evidence-based teaching approaches. Crystalline forms of matter are critical to our existence. Using innovative teaching strategies of in-class hands-on demonstration, supplemented with visuals of crystal details, the course provides students insights into the formation, alteration and unique properties that make crystals invaluable. Topics range from the study of proteins and nucleic acids to the interior of planets. The in-class lectures will provide a basic guide that will serve as a platform for individually catered in-depth study. Therefore, the course is open to advanced students as well, who can pick up higher level of information for discussion and class projects.

Prerequisites:

Take SCI-210 concurrently

Credits:

1

Description:

This course introduces concepts that are central to understanding crystals, gemstones and other natural materials abundant throughout the solar system. It includes an introduction to carbon-based crystals (diamonds, proteins, viruses and ices) in context with origins of life, geopolitical significance and their applications This laboratory-based course is an introduction to modern tools and techniques for crystal analysis with a historical context of some of the greatest discoveries in science (DNA, and other nanomaterials). It presents crystals and gems from their visually appealing point of view to their sometimes-dramatic physical characteristics, with a broad view of their formation, occurrence, physics, chemistry and resources perspective.

Prerequisites:

Intro Math

Credits:

4

Description:

Coastal environments will be analyzed with an emphasis on the important environmental characteristics of these areas. Management and environmental problems within the coastal and offshore areas such as beach erosion, beach access, and oil spills will be considered. One required field trip.

Prerequisites:

Take SCI-L360 concurrently.

Credits:

3

Description:

This course introduces concepts that are central to understanding of life on Earth, feasibility and the search for life in the universe. The approach of this course is multidisciplinary focus on the life's origins, habitability, and the possibility of life elsewhere through space exploration of possible habitable (Earth-like) environments in our solar system and beyond. The main theme of the course is to understand the habitability of Earth in context with alien environments. We will explore the scientific understanding of life in extreme environments and detection of life itself. With Mt. Teide volcano (Tenerife) as our laboratory, we will explore the evolution and emergence of life in new environments in context with astrophysical observations and biochemical principles that sustain life processes. The core theme of this Interdisciplinary Science focused course is suitable for students who may have taken their last science and math course several years ago, or are just curious about knowing facts on Life on Earth and the science behind the search for life in other planetary bodies. Together with a reading component, this course aims to give students a flavor of how researchers think, work in the field, make observations and build hypothesis. Topics covered in this course range from origins to life, life in extreme environments, search for habitable exoplanets and defining the habitable zone in the universe.

Prerequisites:

Take SCI-360 concurrently.

Credits:

1

Description:

This is the laboratory component of the course on Planetary Science and Astrobiology. in which we develop the scientific understanding of life in extreme environments and detection of life itself. With Mt. Teide volcano (Tenerife) as our laboratory, we will explore the evolution and emergence of life in new environments in context with astrophysical observations and biochemical principles that sustain life processes.

Prerequisites:

Take CHEM-111, CHEM-L111, CHEM-112, and CHEM-L112

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is designed to identify the ways that scientific knowledge can be used to resolve environmental problems, particularly the ocean's role in the biogeochemical cycling of selected elements and the impacts of humans on the cycling of these elements. Sample topics include the chemical composition of seawater from the perspectives of elemental speciation and the impacts of solutes on water's physical behavior; biogeochemical phenomena which control accumulation and preservation of marine sediments; marine chemistry of radioactive and stable isotopes; and how climate change and pollution impact the marine environment with mitigation strategies outlined.