• GVT-010 Summer Campaign Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor Consent Required

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    This non-credit, two-week intensive certificate will combine in-depth training on building and running a successful campaign, with site visits to leading political strategy and non-profit agencies. Students will broaden their network meeting leaders in government, public policy, and non-profits by participating in evening speaker series and networking events. Evening teamwork will culminate in a final campaign plan to be presented on the final day of the program.

  • GVT-607 Globalization of Gender Politics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the interaction between gender and globalization. It discusses the centrality of gender in international development by focusing on gender as one of the most critical factors that affect the success or the failure of globalization. Critically reviewing general theories of globalization, the course presents a historical overview of gender and development. It then explores selected topics: global restructuring and feminization of the labor force, gender in multinational corporations, gender and international migration, sex-tourism, AIDS, and the impact of the state, religion, and culture in creating social dislocations and inequalities. Finally, we will consider strategies of change and diverse forms of resistance by women.

  • GVT-608 International Security

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the dynamic evolution of the debates on International Security as well as the transformations in the main global and regional security institutions such as UN and NATO. Based upon International Relations perspectives, it analyzes the traditional definitions of security at the national, regional and international levels of analysis since 1945. Likewise, it studies how states and international institutions have revisited the concepts, policies and strategies of security since the end of the Cold War and after the September 11 events, from realist perspectives to the Copenhagen School of security studies.

  • GVT-609 Transitional Justice

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces the concept and practices of transitional justice, which addresses current and past human rights violations. We review the various mechanisms of transitional justice, including: criminal prosecution; lustrations; truth and reconciliation commissions; reparations; and apologies. Our focus will be on understanding the nature of the political and moral dilemmas encountered by countries that consider and apply these mechanisms. We will consider broad theoretical questions as well as specific examples (e.g., Germany after the Holocaust; The South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission; The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda). The course will also emphasize the practical implications of transitional justice: how do we empirically measure the effects of transitional justice; what is the role of traditional mechanisms of justice; how does one balance between the global human rights regime and local realities; what is the relationship between gender and religion and transitional justice; and, what is the role of transitional justice mechanisms in conflict resolution.

  • GVT-610 Politics Korea

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Study of the government and politics of North and South Korea, including the political systems of the two countries and relations between them, including issues of reunification, nuclear weapons, and democratization. Normally offered alternate years

  • GVT-611 Politics of the Arab-Israeli Conflict

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An analysis of the origins and the local, regional, and international dimensions of the Palestinian-Israeli-Arab conflict, this course will examine the conflict through the eyes of the major protagonists and the roles played by them from the early twentieth century to the present: Zionists/Israelis, Palestinians and other Arabs, British, Americans, Soviets. We will also explore the questions of why this conflict has captured the world's attention and why it has gone unresolved since World War II. Finally, we will examine the possibilities and attempts for resolution of what appears to be an intractable human tragedy.

  • GVT-623 Political Survey Research

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Everything needed to design, carry out, and interpret a political survey. Topics covered include questionnaire design, sampling, interviewing, coding data, and univariate and bivariate analysis of the results. Multivariate analysis will be discussed but not studied in depth. An actual survey will be conducted as a class project. Prerequisites: Open to graduate students, seniors, and juniors; previous course in political science research methods, or comparable course in another discipline and consent of instructor.

  • GVT-638 Environmental Policy & Politics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    From Rio to the Boston Harbor Project, this course examines the polices and politics of the environment. It examines the origins of the environmental movement in the United States focusing on the development and present function of government and non-government organizations responsible for the development and implementation of global, national, state and local environmental policies.

  • GVT-641 Ready, Set, Run!

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Designed to introduce students to the nuts and bolts of preparing to run for office or guiding a candidate through the process. Students learn how to file nomination papers, develop a field team, and create a general branding strategy.

  • GVT-642 Candidate Definition

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Students learn the basics of how candidates successfully introduce their candidacy to the public. From announcing the campaign to conducting meet and greets to producing candidate photos, this course guides you through the process of effectively defining the candidate.

  • GVT-643 Candidate Media Strategy 101

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Students learn the fundamentals of how to maximize positive media coverage with attention paid to generating endorsements, developing non-paid media, and persuading voters.

  • GVT-644 Campaign Issues:Taking a Stand

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    In this highly interactive course, students learn how to develop position papers, conduct opposition research, and ultimately use their knowledge to convey information effectively in political speeches and debates. Attention paid to message development.

  • GVT-646 Getting Out the Vote

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Learn the cutting edge techniques to help register new voters, identify voters, and effectively manage election-day operations to increase turnout for your candidacy. Learn how to successfully recruit and retain volunteers.

  • GVT-647 Race, Gender and Sexual Orientation on Campaigns

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course will examine the role that race, gender, and sexual orientation play on political campaigns. We will explore the challenges and opportunities that women, people of color, and LGBT individuals face as candidates, the consequences of diversity (or lack thereof) on campaign teams, and how race, gender and sexual orientation are mobilized by campaigns to reinforce messages, target voters, and raise money.

  • GVT-650 Lobbying, the Media and Public Policy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This class will examine the role of lobbyists and the media in influencing state and national decision makers and public policy. Focusing primarily on current issues relating to energy and environmental policy, we will discuss and critically examine all sides of today's hot topics- renewable power, climate change, sustainability and others. The goal is not to determine who is right and who is wrong, but rather to get behind the headlines and separate fact from hype and discuss how and why certain policy decisions are made and how policy makers are influenced. You'll gain an appreciation as to how public opinion, lobbyists and the media (and even celebrities!) can actually change government priorities- and not always for the better, as rising public opinion and political pressure often collides with well established scientific evidence.

  • GVT-657 Urban Politics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the political process and problems characteristic of big cities in the United States today. Students are encouraged to do individual and group research on specific urban political topics.

  • GVT-659 Hockey, International Development & Politics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This class examines the way in which national identity, global and regional economics and international development intersect. It uses the professionalization of the sport of hockey and its subsequent spread around the globe as its case. It will look at the rise of the pro game, the way in which it shapes national identity in the Canadian case, the way in which the pro business model has changed in response to broad socio-economic changes in North America and geo-political shifts around the globe, especially in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union.

  • GVT-660 United Nations Seminar

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course provides an introduction to the study of the role of the United Nations System in the globalization era. The course is divided in two main sections. The first is based on a series of readings, lectures and discussion on the rules, principles and norms which govern the relationship among states and the UN system; it also covers traditional topics such as the sources and subjects of international law, the jurisdiction of states, the peaceful settlement of disputes, the use of force and the legal personality of international actors, human rights, humanitarian intervention, global environment, use of armed force, as well as economic relations. the second part of the course is based on a required study trip to the UN headquarters in order to experience a direct contact with policy-makers within the UN system in a diversity of areas such as security, aid and peacekeeping areas.

  • GVT-662 Debates on Conflicting Ideas U.S. Foreign Policy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In order to understand the change and continuity in U.S. foreign policy, it is crucial to examine the debate among those who inform the ideas put forward by U.S. foreign policy experts, policymakers, and the groups-whether political parties or NGOs- with which they are allied. This course will explore the importance of ideas in U.S. foreign policy from the early days of the republic with an emphasis on the post-World War II period.

  • GVT-663 International Legal Systems

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explains the main components of the international legal system. It begins by exploring the rules, principles and norms that govern the relationship among states, the different cultural and philosophical legal perspectives and the history of the international legal system. The second part of the course covers the study of the sources and subjects of international law, the jurisdiction of states, the peaceful settlement of disputes, the use of force, and the legal personality of international actors. The third part of the course addresses a number of significant topics derived from the process of globalization legal norms: human rights, humanitarian intervention, law of the sea, environmental law, and economic relations.

  • GVT-665 International and Transnational Organizations

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course explores the institutional structures, political processes, and impact of international governmental and nongovernmental organizations. It analyses their increasingly prominent role in efforts to resolve a wide range of global problems and contribution to strengthen the current system of global governance. While the course covers the problems of international security, global distribution of wealth, deterioration of the environmental system and threats to social welfare, it focuses on the interaction between the United Nations System and regional organizations, on the one hand, and the role of non-governmental organizations in cooperating or something to solve specific problems in the area of international relations.

  • GVT-666 Governance & Regional Political Economy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the intertwined nature of the globalization and regionalization processes from the perspective of global political economy. The first part of the course provides the basic elements and indicators to understand the main challenges the international economy is facing such as crisis, protectionism, and underdevelopment, inter alia. The second part presents the evolution of globalization and regionalism in the past decades. The third and final section compares how the distinct regions in the world are dealing with local and global problems; particularly attention is paid to the European Union, NAFTA, Mercosur and APEC.

  • GVT-667 Comparative Social Movements

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    How do we explain the appearance or absence of social movements? What social or individual factors explain their development and decline? Who joins social movements? Who does not? Why? What ideas or ideals animate those who do participate? What is it like to be part of a social movement? What effect do they or have they had on politics, power and efforts at social change? These are some of the questions that have traditionally shaped debates over social movements, both domestically and internationally. They will form the analytical core of the work in this course. By critically evaluating several competing schools of thought in social movement theory and history we will attempt to highlight the social forces that have, at varying points in times, facilitated, maintained, as well as blocked the development of social movements in the US and beyond.

  • GVT-669 International Human Rights

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An examination of human rights at the end of the 20th Century. Attention will be given to the origin and expansion of the concept of human rights, the place of human rights in different political systems, the link between culture and human rights, and the means and mechanisms for safeguarding rights with particular reference to the United Nations system.

  • GVT-671 Topics in Democracy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In this course, students will have an opportunity to examine the basic foundations of the democratic theory and practice. Specifically, the course focuses on the building blocks of a democratic relationship between people and government, including transparency, accountability, accessibility, and opportunities for effective advocacy and participation. Both classical and modern authors who weighed in on these issues will be discussed.

  • GVT-672 American Foreign Policy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A decision-making approach to understanding the domestic and institutional context of US foreign policy. Includes analysis of continuity and change since WWII using case studies of critical decisions, e.g., Korea, Cuba, Vietnam, etc.

  • GVT-682 Crisis and Integration in Europe

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Why did 17 European countries surrender the sovereign control of their currency and create the Euro? Will Turkey become a member of the European Union? Will Europeans continue free riding the security protection of the United States? Is the integration process another layer of bureaucracy or an institutional instrument to deal with the permanent crises in Europe? These are some of the questions guiding the discussions in this class.

  • GVT-685 Politics and International Relations of The Middle East

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Interlocking themes making the contemporary Middle East an area of chronic conflict: Big Power rivalries; social and political change within individual countries; unity and rivalry involved in Arab nationalism; the Palestinian-Israeli-Arab dispute.

  • GVT-687 Conflict & Reconciliation: Community Service Abroad

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Examines the social and economic conditions and current political trends in the Caribbean and in selected Central American nations. Emphasis will be placed on comparative analysis of public policies in the region, as well as on external factors which impact on politics in the Caribbean and central America. Students will use academic sources for the background of their analysis.

  • GVT-694 The U.S. and the International Relations of the Middle East

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will explore the role played by the United States in the Middle East in the twentieth century, with emphasis on the period since World War II. Our study will begin with a decision-making approach to understanding the domestic and institutional context of America's policy toward the region, followed by an examination of that policy as it confronted radical nationalist, socialist, and Islamic movements, Soviet influence, and specific contemporary problems - the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Lebanese civil war, the Iranian revolution, the Iran-Iraq War, and the Gulf War.

  • GVT-723 Graduate Internship

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This internship option is recommended for students seeking careers in professional politics or international relations. Typically, an internship will involve supervised work at a professional level in a political campaign, on a legislative staff, in an international non-governmental organization, or in a legislative relations for a governmental agency or private organization. Internship placement must be approved by the student's advisor, and will typically require at least 20 hours of work per week for the duration of a semester and the completion of a research paper based on the internship experience. The research paper must be approved by a departmental committee.

  • GVT-724 Politics of Public Policy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the politics of making public policy. How is policy made? Who is involved? What kinds of information do policy-makers rely on to make their decisions? How do political opportunities shape potential for policy change, shifts or stasis? We will examine how policy decisions are made and how policy makers cope and adapt to a diverse set of constraints. We will also focus on what political strategies can be used to improve policy-making processes and outcomes. Students will be required to interview policy makers about a specific policy and write a comprehensive policy analysis. The course is intended to have both theoretical and practical value.

  • GVT-747 Seminar in Legislation & Lobbying

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core course for the Professional Politics Concentration. Students will read and discuss current research on legislative politics and organization, including committees, interest groups and lobbying, legislative voting and decision making, and other topics. Students will conduct their own research and present it to the seminar. Prerequisites: Open to graduate students only; at least one previous course in legislatures or interest groups, or consent of the instructor.

  • GVT-755 Seminar Campaigns & Elections

    Prerequisites:

    At least one course in elections, voting behavior, or political parties.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core course for the Professional Politics Concentration. Students will read and discuss current research on campaigns and elections, voting behavior, and political parties, and will conduct their own research and present it to the seminar.

  • GVT-761 Seminar: International Relations Theory

    Prerequisites:

    OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core course for the concentration in North American Politics. This course will examine the key concepts of an approaches to world politics. Special attention will be given the application of these concepts and approaches to the relations among the nation-states of North America.

  • GVT-763 International Political Economy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to the study of international political economy (IPE). It addresses the interactive relationship between politics and economics in the historical and contemporary international system by exploring the effect of political factors on international economic relations as well as the impact of economic factors on domestic and international politics.

  • GVT-765 Global Public Policy

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    In this course, students are exposed to the policy dilemmas at various levels of government, from the local, to the state, to the international arena. The class examines concepts such as systems regulation, institutions, legitimacy and governance. The class will take a selection of themes (i.e. inequity, energy, climate) and investigate them from the perspective of policy challenges and solutions at each level of government.

  • GVT-772 Ethical Issues in Professional Politics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Core course for the Professional Politics Concentration. The purpose of campaigns is to win, while the purpose of elections is to maintain democracy. This course will focus on the tension between these two goals, on the assumption that a healthy democracy needs a well-developed ethical sense among political professionals. The course will combine consideration of fundamental ethical principles with class discussion of hard cases. Each student will be asked to study a case and present it to the class.

  • GVT-777 Writing for the Policy Professional

    Prerequisites:

    Open to graduate students only;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The aim of this course is to familiarize students with the major written formats of the policy-making process including background memos, literature reviews, white-papers, policy analyses, one-pagers, talking points memos, op-eds, and legislative histories. This writing-intensive course focuses on public policy writing techniques and methods, and helps students to develop writing skills applicable to the private, nonprofit, and government sectors.

  • GVT-778 Global Policy & Data Analysis International Relations

    Prerequisites:

    Open to graduate students only; previous course in political science research methods or comparable course in another discipline or instructor's consent.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The primary goal of this class is to review and analyze in a systematic way the design, implementation, and evaluation of global public policies. After exploring and discussing global policy debates and examine what kinds of values and ideas shape these debates, the student will develop the skills necessary to critically analyze policy issues and problems and learn about the constraints with which policy makers must cope in an environment of imperfect information. This course will also focus on dissecting indicators and databases often used by professional analysts to produce policy reports and recommendations from policy makers.

  • GVT-801 Political Marketing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This class will examine the techniques used to market political candidates, parties, issues, interest groups and think tanks in the modern American polity, as well as in Canada and the EU. The class will examine the causes and impact of the change that many observers have seen in the American polity from a civil to a consumptive political culture and question the extent to which this is a U.S. based versus more global phenomenon. At the same time, the class will aim to provide the student will a hands-on understanding of the way in which various marketing techniques are employed to sell politics. The techniques will include message development, branding, micro-targeting, and political marketing campaign strategy by looking at a series of cases from around the world. Cases examined will include the Barack Obama , Hillary Clinton and John McCain campaigns from 2008, the effort to brand the Conservative Party and New Labour in the United Kingdom.

  • GVT-803 Washington Academic Seminar I

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor permission required

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An intensive off-campus experience, normally of two-week's duration, arranged through a The Washington Center in Washington, D.C. Topics vary. Students will be graded by both an on-site evaluator and an assigned Government Department faculty member. In addition, students are normally required to meet three times during the semester of registration, keep a journal of the off-campus experience and to write a significant research paper based on the topic of the academic seminar.

  • GVT-804 International Political Marketing

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This class will examine the ways in which political marketing is conducted across the globe. It will look at a variety of political systems and cultures in an effort to discern which techniques work best with which political systems and political cultures. The cases will be drawn from all 7 continents and a wide diversity of socio-political cultures. Cases are likely to include Canada, New Zealand, India, Japan, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Argentina, Russia and many others. By the end of the class, students should have a strong sense of how political marketing is done globally and which techniques work best with which systems.

  • GVT-805 Washington Seminar on National Security

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A two-week intensive seminar in Washington DC; the first week will focus on a look inside the defense and intelligence community in the US government; the second week will examine issues, threats, and challenges in global society. The seminar, carried out in partnership with The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars, will include briefing sessions, with security officials, site visits, small group meetings, keeping a journal, and academic papers. There will also be some further academic work after you return to Suffolk. Prerequisites: Registration in this course requires advance application. The seminar is offered in Mar, and applications are due by March 1. Interested students should consult the instructor for further details.

  • GVT-811 Politics of North and Southeast Asia

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the cultural background and political systems mainly of China, Korea, and Japan, also touching upon the small tiger states in South-East Asia. It elucidates the historical origins, evolution, and current trajectory of these stated with a particular concentration on North Korea. One further concentration is the interplay of domestic and foreign policy in the relations of these states, regional stability and cooperation. Topics include history, social structure, the interplay of culture and ideology, political economy, humanitarian issues, security, and the politics of North Korean domestics and foreign policy. We will spend considerable time analyzing China's and North Korea's relationship with regional and world powers and examining the origins, history, and implications of the North Korean nuclear weapons program. Students will be expected to demonstrate the ability to apply theoretical and historical knowledge toward analyzing the rapidly evolving landscape of contemporary issues related to East Asia.

  • GVT-834 Immigration Policy and Politics

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines how American governmental institutions, political actors, and processes have both shaped and responded to one of the most significant and complex issues of public policy facing the nation: immigration to the United States. This class will explore a number of intriguing and difficult policy topics related to the almost unprecedented level of immigration that the U.S. has been experiencing. The focus of the class will include the following: admissions, citizenship, deportation and detention (including that of suspected terrorists), refugee/asylum law, and highly contested issues of today, such as definitions of citizenship, immigrant rights, and border enforcement. A major objective of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to conduct their own original research in American politics by delving into some aspect of immigration as a public policy issue.

  • GVT-889 Global Politics of Resistance

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Utilizing the theoretical frameworks of Comparative Politics and International Relations, this course will focus on a critical analysis of contemporary forms of resistance politics, such as those culminating in popular struggles for peace, democracy, human rights, economic justice, gender equality, environment, and the rights of indigenous peoples.

  • GVT-906 Summer Party Convention Program

    Prerequisites:

    Students must see the professor to get required Washington Center Application

    Credits:

    3.00- 6.00

    Description:

    An opportunity to do an internship through the Washington Center at either the Republican National Convention or the Democratic National convention. Graduate students will learn what goes on behind the scenes and interact with important public figures that are influential in setting public policy at various levels of government. They will spend a week prior to the convention studying the electoral process, familiarizing themselves with convention operations and preparing for their convention fieldwork assignments. In addition they will hear from a wide variety of speakers, including members of the media, party officials, and other political personalities. Students are then assigned as volunteers to assist with the work of the convention the second week. Normally offered every four years.

  • GVT-907 Pre-Thesis Reading Course

    Prerequisites:

    completion of all other course work for the MSPS/ thesis option, with a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or better, and permission of the department's Director of Graduate Studies.

    Credits:

    6.00

    Description:

    Intensive reading, under the guidance of a faculty member, of advanced scholarly literature in the subfield of the student's intended master's thesis.

  • GVT-910 Independent Study

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's consent and approval of the Director of Graduate studies required.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Individual program of reading, research and writing on an approved topic, under the supervision of a member of the department. Topic and assignments are to be determined by the faculty member and student.

  • GVT-920 International Internship - Brussels

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor consent required

    Credits:

    6.00

    Description:

    Students must also complete academic work designed to enhance experiential learning and professional development in their internship abroad that is supervised by a Suffolk instructor. Course work will include developing individualized learning goals and objectives for their internships, journaling, mid-term self-evaluation and a final research paper.

  • GVT-938 Summer Campaign Lab

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor Consent Required

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This two-week, intensive class will combine in-depth training on building and running a successful campaign, with site visits to leading political strategy and non-profit agencies. Students will broaden their network meeting leaders in government, public policy, and non-profits by participating in evening speaker series and networking events. Evening teamwork will culminate in a final campaign plan to be presented on the final day of the program.

  • GVT-957 Thesis Research & Writing

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 907

    Credits:

    6.00

    Description:

    Completion of a Master's thesis. Students interested in writing a thesis should consult the department about requirements of the thesis option Government 957 can only be taken on a pass/fail basis.

  • GVT-958 Thesis/Internship Continuation

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    0 credit course for graduate students who are writing a thesis or internship report that need to be considered full-time. They will be charged for 1 credit, but earn 0 and are not graded.