The Expanded Classroom Requirement (ECR) asks students to combine theory with practice, to combine experiences inside and outside the classroom. All students who entered the College of Arts & Sciences with 45 or fewer credits between fall 2007 and spring 2015 must complete one Expanded Classroom course or program. All courses and programs that satisfy this requirement must be approved by the ECR Oversight Committee.

ECR courses and programs are credit-bearing experiences that contain one of the following elements:

Study Away

Study abroad opportunities include a range of programs approved by the ECR Oversight Committee.

Study Tours

On study tours, a Suffolk University professor leads students in the study of a subject matter that involves substantial travel away from the campus in the context of a course.

Field Work

Field work involved the practical application of methods and theories being studied in a course.

Internships and Cooperative Learning

Internships and cooperative learning include a wide variety of educational experiences in the context of a course in which the student works in a professional, educational, or service context.

Service Learning

Service learning involves working with a community service provider in the context of a course.

Linked Learning

This category includes all activities that satisfy the expanded classroom learning goals of the ECR but which do not fall into any of the other categories listed above. The ECR can be fulfilled by a linked learning activity for which the student finds a faculty sponsor for an Independent Study course or similar faculty mentored course. Once the student finds a faculty mentor, then the mentor must submit the proposal for approval to the ECR Oversight Committee during the semester prior to completing the requirement.

Expanded Classroom Requirement Course List:

  • ADFA-304 Art and Architecture of the Italian Renaissance

    Prerequisites:

    ADF-182 and the Fine Art Program Director's consent.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course introduces the students to Italian Renaissance art, artists and culture from the first evidence in the Italian Gothic (around the 1260's) to the Early and High Renaissance, predominantly in Florence and Venice, up to the 1600's. The course will survey the history of painting, sculpture and architecture as we study the works individually, for their formal elements and visual importance, but also within their aesthetic, historic, political and cultural context. Class discussion and a visual analysis of works of art will encourage personal interpretation and critical thinking. A list of terms related to the Renaissances introduces the language of art. Normally offered during the summer. Offered in Italy only.

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ADFA-306 Art & Culture of Asia, Africa, South America and Oceania

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The coursework introduces students to the artistic and visual traditions from South and East Asia, Africa, Oceania and the Americas. In addition to the material culture of the particular region under study, the coursework will consider socio-political ideals, religious belief systems, and cultural principles that 'shaped' or informed the work and the ideology of civilizations beyond the Western hemisphere. Comparative analysis among non-western and western traditions will be used to critically analyze the salient points of influence, rejection and modifications of aesthetic affinities. Class lectures will be supplemented with museum seminars specifically the rich non-western collections at the MFA, Boston. Guided field trips to the museum will allow students to formally analyze the works of art discussed in lecture and text material.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Cultural Diversity BFA,Asian Studies,Humanities & History,Expanded Classroo

  • ADFA-400 Fine Arts Internship

    Prerequisites:

    Restricted to Juniors and Seniors

    Credits:

    3.00- 6.00

    Description:

    An elective course for those who wish to pursue issues of artistic development to a further degree, this internship may involve assisting an established member of the local art community (in his or her own studio) in the preparation, marketing and exhibition of his work. Internships in area galleries or museums are also an option. The purpose of the internship will be to give students experience in real world aspects of the artistic life for which he or she has so far prepared only in the classroom setting. Participating students will earn credit based on the number of hours devoted to the internship. One credit will be given for every 45 hours of internship time, and all hours must be verified in writing for credit given.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ADG-S302 Italian Journal: Painting and Drawing On Paper

    Prerequisites:

    Instructors Consent

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This faculty-led study abroad course introduces the skills necessary for meeting clients' illustration needs in a variety of media appropriate to context. Florence, Italy and its environs will serve as the subject matter and catalyst in developing the ability to draw objects, i.e. Architecture, people and landscape while advancing a personal style. Study will begin with a pre-departure journal/book binding workshop at Suffolk University and then to the outdoors in and around Florence, Italy, Tuscan hill towns and the Veneto, where students will explore basic illustration styles, methods and techniques.

    Term:

    Summer

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ADG-400 Graphic Design Internship

    Prerequisites:

    Senior BFA status.

    Credits:

    3.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Seniors are required to pursue an internship with a local graphic design firm, whose work is directly related to that students intended area of professional concentration. Interns will observe and participate in all office procedures permitted by their place of internship and will be required to maintain a notebook of their observations. Required classroom seminars will reinforce new skills, share learning experiences and answer questions or concerns.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ADI-400 Interior Design Internship

    Prerequisites:

    ADI S202 and ADI S303; senior BFA standing required. This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    With the assistance of the faculty advisor, each student will identify an appropriate internship site with a local interior design firm. All interns are required to complete 120 hours of work/study within the semester, working a minimum of 8 hours per week under the direction of a qualified Interior Designer. Interns are expected to contribute to the host firm at a high level of design interaction. All interns will meet bi-weekly with the faculty advisor. The classroom seminars will reinforce new skills, share learning experiences, and answer questions or concerns. A firm site visit, production of firm profile, and participation in a professional organization are required within the seminar.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ALS-381 Paralegal Internship

    Prerequisites:

    Senior standing and at least 15 hours of paralegal courses, or instructor's permission.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A one-semester internship in either a law office, a governmental agency, insurance company, or a for-profit or non-profit corporation, depending on the positions available during each semester. Once a week seminars will discuss such topics as ethical considerations in a law office, experiences gained as a paralegal interns, and seeking paralegal employment. For specific placements/information, students must contact the Director of Paralegal Studies prior to the start of each semester. Prerequisites: Senior status and at least 15 hours of Paralegal Studies or permission of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered spring and summer. ECR

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ARH-318 Art and Museums Today

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the art world of the past few decades with special attention to the roles and exhibition practices of contemporary art museums and galleries. Considers the major artists and trends in today's art world, the history of museums, and the effect of museums on art produced today. Students will visit local museums, including the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) individually and in groups. This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement,Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • AS-500 Asian American Community Experience

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course facilitates students' exposure to Asian American communities and enhances their knowledge of diverse Asian cultures through research projects and service activities or an internship. Students will study under the guidance of the Director of the Major program and/or a faculty member as well as work with a community organization or service agency for a semester. They will engage in specific projects or an internship in collaboration with the assigned organization or agency to understand the cultural values and current issues relating to Asian populations. They will complete required hours as per the arrangement with the site and submit a comprehensive service/research report on their learning process and critical reflection of their experience at the end of the semester.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • BIO-222 Field Botany

    Prerequisites:

    BIO 111. This course will fulfill the Expanded Classroom Requirement.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A three-week camping excursion, during which common tracheotypes, bryophytes, algae, and other photosynthetic organisms characteristic of various habits in Maine will be identified. Emphasis will be on plant ecology including species interactions and habitat requirements. Vertical zonation in mountains, lakes and intertidal areas will be a point of focus. Participants will camp for one week at each of three sites: Baxter State Park, Central Maine (near Augusta),and the Friedman Field Station. Travel will be by van(s) and hiking (up to ten miles a day) over difficult terrain. Sleeping bags and tents required. Additional fees: Camping and food est. $475.00. ECR. The three-week camping excursion typically runs from late May (after tradition Spring course finals are over) into June. Taught alternate years.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • BIO-254 Marine Biology

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111/L111 or BIO-114/L114 or Instructor's consent; BIO-L254 concurrently;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduction to the marine environment, its organisms and their specific adaptations. Emphasis on marine and estuarine ecology, intertidal habits, trophic relations, and physiology. Human impacts on the sea; fisheries, mariculture, pollution, law of the sea. Taught only at the R. S. Friedman Field Station Campus, Edmunds, ME. ECR. This course typically meets for three weeks from early to mid-August to early September (before typical Fall courses begin). Taught alternate years.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • BIO-L254 Marine Biology Lab

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111/L111 or BIO-114/L114 or Instructor's consent; BIO-254 concurrently;

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Field trips to local marine environments; field and laboratory observations of marine organisms. Independent student projects. Taught only at the R.S. Friedman Field Station Campus, Edmunds, ME. ECR

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • BIO-333 Ecology

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114/L114; BIO-L333 concurrently;

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Areas of study include but are not limited to basic principles of population biology, community ecology, trophic dynamics, ecosystem structure and function and evolutionary theory.(note: some aspects of the course may differ depending on if it is a Boston or a FFS offering) ECR. Offered even years at both the Boston campus (Fall semester) and the R.S. Friedman Field Station Campus (FFS),Edmunds, ME (Early Fall offering for three weeks). There is a $475 camping fee associated with the FFS BIO 333 offering.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • CHEM-428 Research & Seminar I

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 212; CHEM L212; Instructor's Consent required

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Independent study under the direct supervision of the chemistry faculty. Students are required to attend departmental seminars, write a professional research report, and give an oral presentation on their project for review by the chemistry faculty. Depending on the project undertaken, students may obtain ECR credit. Prerequisites: CHEM 212 and CHEM L212 and by permission of the instructor. 1 terms - 1 to 4 credits. Normally offered every Fall.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • CHEM-429 Research & Seminar II

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM 212 and CHEM L212 and by permission of the instructor.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Independent study under the direct supervision of the chemistry faculty. Students are required to attend departmental seminars, write a professional research report, and give an oral presentation for review by the chemistry faculty. Depending on the project undertaken, students may obtain ECR credit. Prerequisites: CHEM 212 and CHEM L212 and permission of the instructor. 1 term - 1 to 4 credits. Normally offered every Spring.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • CHEM-L432 Advanced Biochemistry Research Laboratory

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM-331; CHEM-L331

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Laboratory course where students apply the use of biochemical techniques acquired in Biochemical Techniques I (CHEM L331) to conduct novel research. Projects vary from year to year, but may include recombinant DNA techniques, purification and characterization of DNA and proteins, and bioinformatics. Emphasis on experimental design, data interpretation, analysis of the scientific literature, and writing. Includes field trip to local research university or biotechnology/pharmaceutical laboratory.

    Term:

    Alternates Fall & Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • CJN-245 Forensics

    Credits:

    1.00- 8.00

    Description:

    Intensive research on topics in debate and active participation in the University forensics program. ECR

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • CJN-355 Media Production

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Practical exposure to methods of production and production equipment of the media. Students are introduced to basic theoretical concepts, such as three-point lighting and white balancing, and apply those to their productions. Students create a variety of non-fiction videos in teams and/or by themselves.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • CJN-385 Globalization of Media and Telecommunications

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the development of global media and telecommunication corporations and technologies and the influence these transnational organizations and technologies bear on regional and nation-state communication policy, global and local culture, and the world economy. Cultural Diversity B ECR

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,BSBA SOCIAL CHANGE,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • CJN-477 Public Relations IV: Campaigns

    Prerequisites:

    CJN-277 and CJN-377 and Senior Standing.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines case studies and typical public relations problems experienced by profit and not-for-profit organizations. The course provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of the skills, techniques, and knowledge of public relations by creating a comprehensive campaign for an actual client. Fulfills ECR requirement.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • CJN-483 Suffolk TV News

    Prerequisites:

    Take CJN 253 CJN 355 and either CJN 353 or CJN 361 or instructor's consent.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Students write, direct, crew, edit and serve as talent in producing the CJN Department's weekly news program aired on Boston Cable Access. Cannot be taken concurrently with CJN 361 or CJN 353.

    Term:

    Offered Spring Term

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • CJN-503 Experiential Learning in Communication

    Prerequisites:

    16 Hrs of CJN coursework or CJN Advisor consent

    Credits:

    1.00-12.00

    Description:

    Internships, practicum, and independent study experiences in Communication are available prior to the start of each semester. Normally offered every semester. ECR

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • CJN-505 Journalism Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    12 hours of CJN coursework and CJN advisor consent

    Credits:

    1.00-12.00

    Description:

    Practicum and Internship projects are available prior to the start of each semester. Prerequisites: Journalism majors with a minimum of 12 credits of coursework or permission of the Department Chairperson. 1-3 terms : 1-12 credits. Normally offered every semester. ECR

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • CMPSC-501 Software Development Internship

    Prerequisites:

    CMPSC-F131, CMPSC-F132, and 1 CMPSC course at 200, 300 or 400 level. Prior to registration, student must submit credit approval form and gain faculty approval.

    Credits:

    2.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Student works in a qualified software development setting to gain practical experience in modern industrial software development. Student will apply lessons learned in the classroom within a supervised, professional development while developing a greater understanding of the job expectations and organizational culture. Internship may be taken for 2-4 academic credit hours, at 4 hours of company work per week per each credit. Additional academic reports with be required. Students may take more than one internship, but the total number of credits applied toward graduation cannot exceed 12.

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • EC-504 Economic Competitiveness: Theory and Practice

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's consent required

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course examines the concept of economic competitiveness among nations and states and its usefulness to policymakers seeking to improve economic conditions. The emphasis will be on state-based economic competitiveness. We will read the current literature on economic growth and competitiveness and explore the current controversy surrounding the shortcomings of business climate indices. Special attention will be given to Beacon Hill Institute's index which attempts to identify the states with the sets of policies that sustain long-term economic growth and sustainable high incomes for citizens. The student will apply a stress test to the BHI index identifying its strengths and weaknesses. To learn how the index is used by professionals, the student will also compare the index against similar measures and interview at least two practitioners on how their states apply the index. The student will meet regularly with her advisor and submit a research paper and a professional memorandum advising BHI on how best to improve the index.

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ECE-411 Senior Project I

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 205, ECE 306, ECE 225, MATH 265; permission of the instructor may be required.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The Senior Project provides a significant opportunity for students to direct all of their previous training and learning towards one major endeavor. It has been modified from previous years to extend over two semesters (instead of one) to facilitate a more comprehensive effort in both the planning and execution of the project. Although resources and guidance are provided for each student, this course still requires them to take full responsibility to plan their time, manage, and implement their project. In Part I the student creates their project proposal. Over a fourteen-week period the student is subjected to the practical stress of completing and delivering in professional fashion a project of their own choosing (with endorsement from an appropriate faculty advisor or industrial mentor). This period includes the following objectives: selection and careful definition of a project; a review of background information; a selection of the desired approach with justification; identification of resources needed; an outline of the project implementation timetable with desired milestones; a delineation of how the completed project performance might be evaluated. Weekly progress reports and meeting with their advisor are required. A formal proposal document is reviewed by department members (and possibly Industrial constituents) and may go through numerous iterations to be deemed 'acceptable'. Along the way informal oral presentations of both the 'general' and 'technical' aspects of their project will be presented to the rest of their peer group. A formal presentation of the project proposal is made to an audience of peers, faculty, and outside advisors. Prerequisites: ECE 205, ECE 306, ECE 225, MA265; permission of the instructor may be required. ECR

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ECE-412 Senior Project II

    Prerequisites:

    ECE 411

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In Part II the student implements, documents, and presents their completed project. Having defined their project, students gather the resources necessary and proceed to execute their designs. This period will include the construction, testing, troubleshooting, refinement, and evaluation of their project. A formal presentation of the project is made. A professional caliber documentation of the project is also required, and may go through numerous iterations of review. The final project report must consider most of the following: environmental impact, sustainability, manufacturability, ethics, health and safety issues, and political concerns. Time management, prioritization of process, formal communication, overcoming obstacles and meeting deadlines are monitored by the project advisor. Weekly reports and meetings are expected. The advisor also serves as a resource for the student. However, full responsibility for the success of the project rests on the student. Cross-disciplinary projects are encouraged. ECR

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • EDUC-203 Service Learning: Pre-K Outreach and Tutoring

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Students complete a minimum of 35 hours of tutoring in an educational setting, or community organization, in conjunction with a weekly seminar on campus. Open to all majors. No previous experience required.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement,Social Science

  • EDUC-205 Service Learning: Community Tutoring Project

    Prerequisites:

    This class fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

    Credits:

    4.00- 8.00

    Description:

    Students complete 35 hours per semester of educational tutoring in a local school (K-5), in conjunction with a weekly seminar on campus. Open to all majors. No previous experience required.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement,Social Science

  • EDUC-312 Curriculum and Pedagogy: Middle and Secondary School

    Prerequisites:

    This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces students to the basic competencies of Middle and Secondary school teaching. Topics include: behavioral problems, classroom management,grouping for instruction, motivation and reward systems, individualized instruction, IEP's, requirements for licensure in Massachusetts, and discipline specific curriculum development using the curriculum frameworks developed by the Massachusetts Department of Education. Field observations and experiences are grounded in theoretical discussion as students begin to develop their personal philosophies of education. Field observations (40 hours) required. Required prior to student teaching.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement,Social Science

  • ENG-320 Writing and Tutoring: Theory and Practice I

    Prerequisites:

    By invitation only.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course serves as the vehicle for training students who have been hired as writing tutors at CLAS. Students will be trained a one-on-one basis and will discuss a tutoring experience they have had in CLAS the previous week each class.

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ENG-321 Writing and Tutoring: Theory and Practice II

    Prerequisites:

    ENG-320. By invitation only. Students must be hired as tutors for CLAS.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course is a continuation of ENG 320. This course serves as the vehicle for training students who have been hired as writing tutors at CLAS. Students will be trained a one-on-one basis and will discuss a tutoring experience they have had in CLAS the previous week each class.

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ENG-391 Research and Writing

    Prerequisites:

    Any 200-level English course

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores research and writing in the context of qualitative research, field work and bibliography. This course requires a lengthy report and project based on extended field work of at least 25 hours at an off-campus research site chosen by the student, approved by the instructor, and validated by a field site representative. This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement for CAS students. Normally offered alternate years.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ENG-514 Internship in English

    Prerequisites:

    ENG 213, ENG 214, ENG 215, ENG 216, ENG 217, or ENG 218

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Individualized guidance in a career-related activity. Upper-class English majors may gain academic credit for work preparing them for an English-related career, provided that the work is monitored by a member of the English faculty. Department approval is required.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ENST-403 Environmental Studies Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    This class fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement. Junior standing or above required or consent of the instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    One course to be taken as a practicum or internship. The choice of internship or practicum is to be determined in consultation with the program director.

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • ENVS-436 Environmental Science Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    This class fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Application of the principles and techniques of environmental science to a specific environmental problem in a faculty directed independent study. Typically, this experience will include literature research and field work in an off-campus environmental agency. 1 term- 4 credits. Normally offered fall and spring. Requires instructor's consent.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • FR-421 Sejour Linguistique en France

    Prerequisites:

    FR 201-202 or permission of instructor

    Credits:

    4.00- 8.00

    Description:

    Provides an immersion program in Vichy, France through a partnership with CAVILAM. Students are housed with families, participate in excursions and take classes that are conducted entirely in French.

    Term:

    Summer

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement,BA FOREIGN

  • FR-422 Sejour Linguistique au CCFS-Sorbonne

    Prerequisites:

    FR 201 and FR 202 or Instructor's Consent. Can take course for 1 term for 16 credits or 2 terms for 32 credits.

    Credits:

    4.00-16.00

    Description:

    Provides an immersion program in Vichy, France through a partnership with CCFS-Sorbonne, l'Universite de Paris IV. Students are housed with families, participate in excursions and take classes that are conducted entirely in French.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement,BA FOREIGN

  • GVT-503 Washington Academic Seminar I

    Prerequisites:

    This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement. Instructor's consent is required.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An intensive off-campus experience, normally of two-weeks duration, arranged through a qualified agency in Washington, D.C. Topics vary. Students will be graded by both an on-site evaluator and an assigned Government Department faculty member. Students are normally required to keep a journal of the off-campus experience and to write a significant research paper based on the topic of the academic seminar upon their return.

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-509 United Nations Seminar

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course provides an introduction to the study of the role of the United Nations System in the globalization era. The course is divided in two main sections. The first is based on a series of readings, lectures and discussion on the rules, principles and norms which govern the relationship among states and the UN system; it also covers traditional topics such as the sources and subjects of international law, the jurisdiction of states, the peaceful settlement of disputes, the use of force and the legal personality of international actors, human rights, humanitarian intervention, global environment, used of armed forces, as well as economic relations. The second part of the course is based on a required study trip to the UN headquarters in order to experience a direct contact with policy-makers within the UN system in a diversity of areas such as security, aid and peacekeeping areas.

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-521 Internship in Government

    Prerequisites:

    Junior standing

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Approximately 12 hours a week working in a position that offers the student significant opportunity to learn about politics and/or government. Interested students should consult instructor in advance. ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-523 Washington Internship

    Prerequisites:

    Sophomore standing and instructor's permission required

    Credits:

    12.00

    Description:

    A full-time, one-semester internship in Washington, D.C. Consult the Department office for more details. ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-524 Washington Internship

    Prerequisites:

    This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

    Credits:

    8.00

    Description:

    A full-time summer internship in Washington D.C. Consult the Department for more details. ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-525 Washington Internship Seminar

    Prerequisites:

    Concurrent enrollment in GVT 523 or GVT 524; Sophomore standing;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-526 International Internship-London

    Prerequisites:

    Juniors standing; GVT 528 & GVT 529 Concurrent

    Credits:

    8.00

    Description:

    A full-time, one-semester International Internship in London.

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-527 International Internship-Brussels

    Prerequisites:

    Juniors standing; GVT 528 & GVT 529 Concurrent

    Credits:

    8.00

    Description:

    A full-time, one-semester International Internship in London.

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-528 International Seminar I

    Prerequisites:

    Concurrently with GVT 526 or GVT 530 and GVT 529

    Credits:

    4.00- 8.00

    Description:

    One of two required seminars to be taken by International interns and service learning participation. ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-529 International Seminar II

    Prerequisites:

    Concurrently with GVT 526 or GVT 530 and GVT 528

    Credits:

    4.00- 8.00

    Description:

    One of two required seminars to be taken by International interns and service learning participation ECR

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • GVT-533 International Internship-Edinburgh

    Prerequisites:

    Juniors standing; GVT 528 & GVT 529 Concurrent

    Credits:

    8.00

    Description:

    A full-time, one-semester International Internship in London.

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • HST-365 Presenting History: Media & Methods of Public History

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Considers the history, theory, and techniques of public history presentation. Learn what visitors want for themselves and their families when they choose to spend their time at a historic site, historic house or history museum. Modes of presentation covered include film documentary, Web site exhibition, popular historical writing, and reenactment. Students produce a project using survey data and information learned throughout the course about preserving history through media and method to demonstrate what the future of historic preservation might resemble. Note: There will be travel involved to visit various historic sites. Please allow time before and after scheduled class time.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • HST-368 Boston's Historic Houses

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Working with historic houses in Boston, students will learn that art of interpreting history. Using collections, archives, and other repositories, students will research the houses and the people who lived in them. Many of these houses have existed from colonial times and had various uses. Formerly:HST 368 Introduction to Historical Interpretation.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Expanded Classroom Requirement,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-383 Boston: Heritage of a City

    Prerequisites:

    One History course

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Boston from its foundation in 1630 to its development as a 21st century metropolis. From the Massachusetts Bay Colony, to cradle of the American Revolution, to a Yankee merchant capital, Brahmin cultural center,and immigrant melting pot. When offered in the hybrid format, this course will meet at the regularly-scheduled time, but lectures and other course materials will be available on the course Blackboard site in case you cannot attend.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Expanded Classroom Requirement,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • HST-508 Study Trip to El Salvador

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will examine the history of El Salvador through readings, discussion, film, and most importantly, a fortnight in the Central American nation. Our goal is to explore how events ranging from the Spanish conquest of the sixteenth-century, the nineteenth century indigenous uprisings against land concentration, and the bloody and divisive civil war of the 1980s shaped today's El Salvadorans. ECR

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement,Humanities & History,Cultural Diversity Opt B,Humanities Literature R

  • HST-522 History Internship

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of instructor required.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Require approximately 12 hours of work per week in a history-related position, at a museum, historical society, or archive. Designed to introduce the student to the professional opportunities and responsibilities in the fields of public history or historic preservation. Interested students should consult the instructor in advance. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor is required.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Humanities & History,Humanities Literature Requirement,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • MATH-290 Financial Mathematics I

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-166 with a grade of C or better

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is mainly designed for students who are interested in financial mathematics and/or actuarial sciences, especially if they plan to take the second actuarial exam, and/or if they plan to study more in financial mathematics. The materials covered include time value of money, annuities, loans, bonds, cash flows and portfolios, general derivatives, options, hedging and investment strategies, forwards and futures, and swaps.

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • MATH-503 Internship in Mathematics

    Prerequisites:

    MATH 165 MATH 166 MATH 265 and at least one MATH courses 200 or above. Student must submit credit approval form and gain faculty approval.

    Credits:

    2.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Student works in a qualified mathematical corporation, industrial or educational setting gain practical experience in math related areas such as actuarial sciences, finance, math education. Student will apply lessons learned in the classroom within a supervised, professional development while developing a greater understanding of the job expectations and organizational culture. Internship may be taken for 2-4 academic credit hours, at 4 hours of company work per week per each credit. Additional academic reports with be required. Students may take more than one internship, but the total number of credits applied toward graduation cannot exceed 12.

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • MS-310 Clinical Practicum I

    Prerequisites:

    MS 301 and MS L301

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Student radiation therapists and student dosimetrists will spend fourteen weeks (full-time, 40 hrs/wk) gaining hands-on patient care experience in the Department of Radiation Oncology at our clinical affiliates. Under constant supervision by licensed therapists and certified medical dosimetrists, the student will be guided toward the application of theory in the real world of cancer treatment and planning.

    Term:

    Summer

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • MS-L304 Clinical Practicum for Radiation Therapy

    Prerequisites:

    Take MS-301 MS-L301;

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Student radiation therapists will spend 12 weeks (full-time, 40 hrs/wk) gaining hands on patient care experience in the department of radiation oncology at our clinical affiliates. Under constant supervision by licensed therapists, the student will be guided toward the application of theory in the real world of cancer treatment.

    Term:

    Summer

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • MS-L314 Clinical Practicum for Dosimetry

    Prerequisites:

    Take MS-301 and MS-L311;

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Student dosimetrists will spend 12 weeks (full-time, 40 hrs/wk) gaining hands on treatment planning experience in the department of radiation oncology at our clinical affiliates. Under constant supervision of certified medical dosimetrists, the student will be guided toward the application of theory in the real world of cancer treatment planning.

    Term:

    Summer

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • PHIL-262 Buddhism

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An historical survey of Buddhist philosophy. We will explore Buddhist origins, central teachings, devotional and meditational practices, ritual and institutions as developed from classical to modern times. Special attention given to the philosophical diversity of the Buddhist world view. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt B,Cultural Diversity BFA,Asian Studies,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • PHIL-513 Internship in Applied Ethics

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: PHIL 119 or 123 or 127 and consent of instructor

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Students in this course will serve as interns in a department-approved position with a service provider, professional organization, government agency, or non-governmental organization whose work is relevant to issues in applied ethics. A faculty mentor will meet with students regularly to develop individually designed programs of readings and to discuss this material and its relation to the internship experience. In addition to the substantial time commitment to the internship, course requirements will usually include a journal and a research project. PHIL 119 or 123 or 127 and consent of instructor. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered every year.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • PHYS-L304 Radiation Therapy Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    Take PHYS-301 PHYS-L301;*Course fulfills the following: Expanded Classroom Requirement.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Student radiation therapists will spend 12 weeks (full-time, 40 hrs/wk) gaining hands on patient care experience in the department of radiation oncology at our clinical affiliates. Under constant supervision by licensed therapists, the student will be guided toward the application of theory in the real world of cancer treatment.

    Term:

    Summer

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • PHYS-L314 Medical Dosimetry Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    Take PHYS-301 and PHYS-L311; *Course fulfills the following: Expanded Classroom Requirement.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Student dosimetrists will spend 12 weeks (full-time, 40 hrs/wk) gaining hands on treatment planning experience in the department of radiation oncology at our clinical affiliates. Under constant supervision of certified medical dosimetrists, the student will be guided toward the application of theory in the real world of cancer treatment planning.

    Term:

    Summer

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • PHYS-L315 Radiation Physics I Lab

    Prerequisites:

    PHYS 315 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This lab will cover a broad range of experiments associated with the Department of Radiation Oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital. Topics include: Quality assurance measurements for radiation therapy, calibration of radiation teletherapy unit using ionization chambers, measurements of dose distribution via film, measurements of dose in a phantom via TLDs, radiation protection survey of therapy installation and brachytherapy sources, and radiation biology.

    Term:

    Offered Fall Term

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • PSYCH-346 Community Psychology

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH-114 and Junior standing

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the efforts of psychologists to enhance the well-being of groups and communities. Complementing clinical approaches, community approaches have implications for both theory (e.g., environmental and/or person-environment theories) and practice (e.g., prevention-oriented paradigms targeted to groups and social systems). Students will be expected to attend weekly two-hour lectures to examine key concepts within the field (e.g., competence building, empowerment) as well as to engage in weekly community service activity. Normally offered every semester. This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • PSYCH-350 Psychology Internship

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Standing. Restricted to majors only unless permission of instructor. This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Provides majors the opportunity to gain a meaningful field experience in a professional setting that is consistent with their academic background and career goals. Students are on site a minimum of 6 hours a week and must accrue at least 60 hours of field experience. Seminar discussions focus on career exploration, the integration of academic knowledge with the demands of the workplace, and professional issues, including ethics, self-reflection, and cultural sensitivity. Students are required to secure an internship before the course begins. Normally offered every semester.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Social Science,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • SF-105 Voices in Conflict

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Why are conflicts so hard to resolve? How do myths about conflict affect communication? What is the role of power in conflicts? How can we use language and listening skills to engage in healthy conflict resolution? Course examines conflict within and across issues of gender, sexuality, race, class, religion, and ethnicity. Explores attempts to negotiate meaning and power within and across socio-cultural conflicts and how this is revealed through language.

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • SF-1107 Vertebrate Fossils and Evolution

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to vertebrate history using the fossil record. The pattern of vertebrate evolution shows great changes in anatomical structure that reflect natural selection toward new ecological opportunities. After an introduction to paleontological methods, the course develops a foundation of anatomical knowledge and phylogenetic relationships among the groups of living and extinct vertebrates. This foundational knowledge is then applied to the discussion of changes in locomotion, defense, and feeding adaptations in vertebrates, as well as an understanding of the way of life of the various groups, especially early tetrapods, dinosaurs, and mammals. The class will also be able to critique scientific arguments about areas of active debate in vertebrate paleontology. Early in the semester, the group makes a required weekend trip to study the evidence of prehistoric life and geologic change in Western Massachusetts.

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • SF-116 Enlightened Insanity

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Rain or shine, the great 18th century Enlightenment philosophers would meet at the famous cafes of Paris to discuss their ideas, and to observe and criticize society. From these informal debates emerged ideas that are at the core of our modern understanding of the nature of society, marginality, human nature, civil rights, the essence of creativity and genius. Come join us in the quest to understand, define, observe, and analyze the key ideas and concepts of these great thinkers, such as Rousseau, Diderot, and Voltaire, still so relevant in our time. We will read key works of these creative thinkers and philosophers. We will enrich our experience and understanding through the use of film, theatre performances, museum visits, as well as the occasional cafe debate.

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • SF-168 Women in Art: Eastern and Western Perspectives and Issues of Identity

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course will survey issues of female identities and how they were 'shaped' or informed as functions of social, political and religious dynamics in the Eastern and Western hemispheres and within various historical periods. The students will 'objectify' their study with the rich and highly representative collection at the Museum of Fine Arts as they critically interpret female portrayals 'under the brush' of the male artists and the purse of the male patron. The evolution of female identities and shifting perceptions of women will also serve as a key objective in weaving a more comprehensive understanding of this phenomenon

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • SF-190 Asia in America Fiction and Fact

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Through selected readings, movies, and a field trip to Chinatown, we will study important socio-cultural events related to Asian immigrants throughout American history. This seminar will help students gain a better understanding of racial and cultural relations and appreciate the dynamics of cultural interactions in the twenty-first century.

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A

  • SOC-226 Religion in Contemporary Society

    Prerequisites:

    This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of the fundamental purpose and functions of religion in society. Major religious systems in America are analyzed in terms of basic values and structure. The impact of changes in religious organizations upon clergy, laity and society are discussed. This class fulfills the ECR requirement.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • SOC-254 U.S. Health Care Landscapes

    Prerequisites:

    This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    In this course, students will learn about how the U.S. health care system works. We will study the politics and economics of the health care system and discuss the key health care policy issues of this decade. Using the theoretical perspectives provided by sociology, we will look at issues of power, hierarchy, race, and gender vis-a-vis the health care system. Reading for this course centers on first person narratives by people working in the health care system. This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • SOC-380 Special Topics in Sociology: Peer Tutoring

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's consent; ECR

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Specialized topics based on peer tutoring research and development. Content, prerequisites and hours to be announced.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • SOC-406 The Immigrant Experience

    Prerequisites:

    SOC-113 or SOC-116 and 4 credits of a SOC course at the 200 level or above

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The United States of America: A land of immigrants; The Great Melting Pot. This country has indeed attracted immigrants from all over the world. However, not all have been welcomed or treated equally. This course will investigate the reasons various immigrant groups (past and present) have come to the United States. We will also examine their experiences and the impact race, ethnicity, gender, class and social structures have had on them. During Spring Break the class will visit Ellis Island and the Tenement Museum in New York and the Lowell National Historical Park in Lowell. The class will also visit various sites in Boston throughout the semester.

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • SOC-483 Internship in Sociology I

    Prerequisites:

    Students must be Sociology majors with at least a 3.0 GPA; must have at least sophomore status at the time of application; must have one full day free each week to work an internship. Applications for the Internship in Sociology I course must be approved by the Instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Students are provided with the opportunity to apply academic learning in a supervised internship consistent with their personal career goals or academic interest. The course covers such topics as career exploration and development, resume and cover letter writing, job fairs, and networking, and graduate school applications. In addition to the course assignments, students are required to complete a minimum full day internship each per week during the entire semester.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • SOC-484 Internship in Sociology II

    Prerequisites:

    SOC 483. Students must be Sociology majors with at least a 3.0 GPA; must have at least sophomore status at the time of application; must have one full day free each week to work an internship. Applications for the Internship in Sociology I course must be approved by the Instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Students are provided an opportunity to intensify or extend their internship experience. The course covers such topics as mock interviewing, informational interviewing, and job fairs.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • SPAN-416 Border Crossings the Latino Experience in the USA

    Prerequisites:

    ENG-102 or ENG-103 or Instructor's consent. Span 302 is strongly recommended for Spanish and Latin American & Caribbean Studies majors and minors.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the myth of a singular Latino experience in the United States through a variety of genres and authors. Issues relating to culture, language, family, and religion are among some of the topics explored. Authors include Sandra Cisneros, House on Mango Street, Junot Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Julia Alvarez, How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents, Tato Laviera, and American.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Cultural Diversity Opt A,Humanities Literature Requirement

  • THETR-200 Theatre Practicum: Performance

    Prerequisites:

    Theatre majors or minors or instructor's consent

    Credits:

    1.00- 8.00

    Description:

    This course offers flexible credit for a wide range of production work in the Theatre Department determined by the challenge and time commitment of the assignment. Students should register for this course when participating in Theatre Department performance activities such as acting, directing, playwriting, dramaturgy, choreography, or stage management may. Written work includes a production log signed by the supervisor and a narrative journal. This course also satisfies the Theatre requirement for Theatre majors and minors. May be taken more than once. ECR

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • THETR-202 Theatre Practicum: Production

    Prerequisites:

    Theatre majors or minors or instructor's consent

    Credits:

    1.00- 8.00

    Description:

    This course offers flexible credit for a wide range of production work in the Theatre Department determined by the challenge and time commitment of the assignment. Students should register for this course when participating in Theatre Department production activities such as design or assistant design, load-in or run crews, board operators, carpenters, electricians, stitchers and painters. Written work includes a production log signed by the supervisor and a narrative journal. This course also satisfies the Theatre requirement for Theatre majors and minors. May be taken more than once. ECR

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • THETR-220 Theatre Practicum

    Prerequisites:

    Theatre majors or minors or instructor's consent

    Credits:

    1.00- 8.00

    Description:

    This course offers flexible credit for a wide range of production work in the Theatre Department determined by the challenge and time commitment of the assignment. Written work includes a production log signed by the supervisor and a narrative journal. Credits may be used to satisfy the Theatre practicum requirement for Theatre majors and minors. Students should register for section A for performance activities such as acting, directing, and writing, and section B for production related activities such as tech crew, design, and running shows. Stage management may fulfill either category. May be taken more than once.

    Term:

    Offered Both Fall and Spring

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement

  • THETR-319 Study Abroad: Flamenco in Madrid

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of Instructor

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is a three week, four credit, faculty led intensive course in Flamenco dance. The study of Flamenco immerses students in the rich cultural heritage of Spain's most popular and passionate art form. This unique program blends studio classes in the heart of Madrid with a study of the vibrant history and culture of Spain. Students interested in study abroad are encouraged to take language courses in the Humanities Department.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement,Cultural Diversity Opt B

  • THETR-509 Study Abroad: Flamenco in Madrid

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of Instructor

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This is a three week, four credit, faculty led intensive course in Flamenco dance. The study of Flamenco immerses students in the rich cultural heritage of Spain's most popular and passionate art form. This unique program blends studio classes in the heart of Madrid with a study of the vibrant history and culture of Spain. Students interested in study abroad are encouraged to take language courses in the Humanities Department.

    Term:

    Occasional

    Type:

    Expanded Classroom Requirement,Cultural Diversity Opt B