Clinical Psychology

Suffolk University’s doctoral program in Clinical Psychology provides training in both psychological research and practice. The goal is to prepare students to be competent professionals in clinical psychology who may function in a variety of professional settings including academic, research, clinical, and community.

Students may opt to pursue additional learning and mentoring outside the classroom in a variety of areas such as acceptance and mindfulness, clinical child psychology, community psychology, cultural diversity, health psychology, life span development, neuropsychology, or teaching through research mentoring and clinical placements (when available).

Program Requirements

Learn more about this program

For research and professional training in the area of clinical psychology, the PhD in Clinical Psychology offers the following courses and requires students to complete 72 credit hours in order to participate in an internship. The Master’s degree is earned en route to the doctoral degree after a student has completed their presentation and manuscript for their Early Research Project manuscript. Students must maintain a 3.0 (B) average. All courses are consistent with the requirements of the American Psychological Association and the Massachusetts Licensing Board.

Required Courses:

Prerequisites:

Restricted to PhD students only.

Credits:

3

Description:

The goal of this course is to serve as a foundation for clinical practice and research activity in the important area of clinical neuropsychological assessment and psychological assessment. It serves to introduce the student to the techniques, methods and theories relevant to the practice of neuropsychological and psychological assessment. The course can roughly be divided into two halves. In the first half general technique, theory, and individual statistics will be covered. This will start with the procedures for the clinical neuropsychological examination, including the interview, preparation of the patient, and selection of instruments. The nature and structure of cognition, factor structure of the neuropsychological battery, and a theory of brain-behavior relationships will be covered. This will be followed by coverage of statistics as applied to assessment, that is, the difference between the inferential form of statistics students are used to (group statistics) and the probabilistic form (individual) of statistics useful in assessment. Subsequent focus will be on clinical decision-making, that is, the use of test data to respond to the diagnostic and descriptive questions that are the goals of the assessment process. The first half of the class will finish with a focus on individual differences, critical to the interpretation psychological test data. The second half of the course will focus on specific cognitive functions, assessment of personality and psychopathology, and on civil and forensic contexts relevant to assessment. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3

Description:

Provides intensive training in the process of psychology-orientated scientific writing. Topics include identifying knowledge gaps in the extant literature through a critical review of existing research, developing a strong rationale for future research, basic writing style and structure, disciplined writing practices, effective revision, and peer-review. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3

Description:

This graduate seminar requires students to examine and respond to current thinking and controversies in the conceptualization and categorization of mental disorders generally, and adult disorders in particular. Students will acquire foundational knowledge about the diagnostic characterization, etiology, and epidemiology of the major classes of adult behavior disorders; investigate mental disorders and our current diagnostic system from a variety of different perspectives (clinical, research, biological, sociocultural, etc.); gain significant practice critically evaluating scientific research and in articulating thoughtful responses to social and behavioral research on mental disorders. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3

Description:

Introduces students to the concept of empirically informed clinical practice. Topics covered include the history of the evidence-based movement in psychology, an overview of the methods used in scientifically-informed clinical practice (e.g., case conceptualization, treatment planning, ongoing assessment of progress), and an introduction to specific evidence-based principles that can be used in psychotherapy (e.g., exposure therapy, behavioral activation, etc.). Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Instructor Consent Required

Credits:

3

Description:

Doctoral students complete an academic year of placement service (9-10 months) at one of the selected practica sites during their second year of academic training. Students complete between 12 and 20 hours per week of placement service to include training in assessment, diagnostic interviewing and intakes, intervention, and applied research with diverse populations. Students will receive on-site supervision by licensed psychologists and other approved professionals. Students participate in a weekly practicum seminar. This didactic portion examines the legal, ethical, and professional issues currently facing psychologists in practice with diverse populations, including confidentiality/mandated reporting, informed consent, conflicts of interest, boundary issues, and limits of professional competence. Normally offered every fall semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH-738; Instructor Consent Required

Credits:

3

Description:

Continuation of Practicum & Ethics IA. Normally offered every spring semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH-738, PSYCH-739; Instructor Consent Required

Credits:

3

Description:

Doctoral students complete an academic year of placement service (9 to 10 months) at one of the selected practica sites during their third year of academic training. Students complete approximately 20 hours per week of placement service to include assessment, intervention, and consultation with diverse populations. Students receive on-site supervision by licensed psychologists and other approved professionals. All students will concurrently participate in practicum seminars taught by Suffolk University faculty. The didactic supplement provides a foundation in developing students' knowledge in the areas of consultation and supervision along with continued training in cultural and individual diversity. Normally offered every fall semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH-738, PSYCH-739, PSYCH-740; Instructor Consent Required

Credits:

3

Description:

Continuation of Practicum 2A. Normally offered every spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Doctoral Standing

Credits:

3

Description:

Examines theoretical foundations, empirical research, approaches, and ethics of clinical supervision and consultation in professional psychology. Emphasis will also be placed on the integration of theory and empirical findings into the application of skills necessary to work as effective clinical supervisors and psychological consultants. Offered yearly.

Credits:

0

Description:

Provides students enrolled in the Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology an extended introduction and orientation to the program and to the field of clinical psychology. Enrollment by invitation of the DCT only. The lab will be graded P/F. Offered yearly.

Credits:

0

Description:

Continues the orientation and early skill development of students enrolled in the Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology. Provides a lab experience within which to explore and develop initial skills preparatory for practicum experience in year 2. Enrollment by invitation of the DCT only. This lab will be graded P/F. Offered yearly.

The following courses should be completed to ensure acquisition of graduate-level knowledge in APA's discipline-specific knowledge (DSK) domains.

Take the following course to fulfill the History and Systems of Psychology content area:

Credits:

3

Description:

The purpose of this course is to trace the origin and development of psychology as a field of study from its philosophical and scientific roots to present day theories. The emphasis will be on critically examining the various systems of psychology, especially as they are translated into psychological practice, and their development in relation to sciences and societies. Normally offered yearly.

Take the following course to fulfill the Affective and Cognitive Aspects of Behavior content area as well as the Advanced Integrative Knowledge of Basic Discipline-Specific content area:

Credits:

3

Description:

Investigates theories regarding the function and experience of emotion. This course will survey the historical concepts of emotion in psychology and current theories of emotion, including motivational, cognitive and physiological aspects. The course will also describe research methods used in the study of emotion, including psychophysiology and neuroimaging, as well as clinical implications. Normally offered alternate years.

Take the following course to fulfill the Biological Bases of Behavior content area:

Credits:

3

Description:

Neuropsychology is the study of the affective, behavioral and cognitive consequences of brain injury, and clinical neuropsychology is the professional discipline that deals with the methods and techniques of assessing the consequences of brain insult. Clinical neuroscience is a branch of neuroscience that focuses on the scientific study of fundamental mechanisms that underlie diseases and disorders of the brain and central nervous system. It seeks to develop new ways of diagnosing such disorders and ultimately of developing novel treatments. This course will take the assumption that a good way to become a biologically informed practitioner of clinical psychology, is to participate in systematic instruction and learning in neuropsychology and the clinical neurosciences. In psychology graduate school, you are also becoming the culturally informed clinician, the developmentally informed clinician, and so forth. Toward that goal the reading and lecture materials for Psychology 792 will bring together the fields of neuroanatomy and functional neuroanatomy, neurobehavioral syndromes, cellular mechanisms of the central nervous system, behavior genetics including epigenetics, and psychopharmacology.

Take the following course to fulfill the Developmental Aspects of Behavior content area:

Prerequisites:

Doctoral Standing

Credits:

3

Description:

Examines development across the lifespan, including biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development, with attention to the role of culture and context. Reviews major theories of development and how such theories provide conceptual frameworks for understanding the development adaptive and maladaptive behaviors and trajectories. Also addresses implications for treatment and prevention. Normally offered yearly.

Take the following course to fulfill the Social Aspects of Behavior content area:

Credits:

3

Description:

Introduces students to the social bases of behavior and experience through examination of some traditional topics from the field of social psychology. These include: social cognition; self-knowledge; self-presentation; attitude formation and change; attraction and close relations; altruism; aggression; prejudice and stereotypes; and group dynamics. In addition, the course may include discussion of cross-cultural approaches to healing and the relationship between culture and mental health. Normally offered alternate years.

Take the following course to fulfill the Research Methods content area:

Credits:

3

Description:

Provides students with foundational skills needed to be both a consumer and producer of psychological research. Topics covered include hypothesis and proposal generation, experimental, correlational and qualitative designs, strategies to minimize bias, measurement issues, participant selection and recruitment, data management, grantsmanship and the dissemination of findings. Ethical issues in the conduct of research are emphasized. Normally offered yearly.

Take the following courses to fulfill the Statistical Analysis content area:

Credits:

3

Description:

Introduces basic statistical tests such as t tests, ANOVA, correlation, regression, Chi Square, and power analysis. Students are also required to demonstrate proficiency in computer data analysis using SPSS. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH-722

Credits:

3

Description:

Focuses on multivariate statistics and the interaction of research design and statistical analysis. Emphasis on MANOVA, multiple regression, principle components analysis/factor analysis, and logistic regression. Issues involving experimental and statistical control, multicollinearity, specification error, and nesting will be covered. Students learn basic principles of multivariate analysis, read journal articles using multivariate techniques, analyze data using each main type of analysis covered in the course, and write results and tables using APA style. Normally offered yearly.

Take the following course to fulfill the Psychometrics content area:

Prerequisites:

Restricted to PhD students only.

Credits:

3

Description:

The seminar aims to introduce you to the theory and practice of evidence-based social, emotional and behavioral assessment. To this end, specific issues we will cover include psychometric theory, cognitive abilities/intelligence testing, some classic assessment controversies, strengths and weaknesses of various assessment approaches, ethical and cultural issues, and the psychological assessment of children.

Choose one of the following courses to fulfill the Individual and Cultural Diversity content area:

Prerequisites:

Graduate course for Psychology Ph.D. program, approved by department.

Credits:

3

Description:

Introduces students to multicultural issues relevant to psychology. Covers a broad range of cultural diversity (sex, age, race, ethnicity, language, religion, sexual orientations, etc.) topics to highlight the role of culture in understanding human behavior and health-related issues. This course intends to strengthen students' multicultural knowledge, sensitivity, and competence in research/professional practice through their exposure to various theoretical/empirical perspectives, media, experiential exercises, etc. Students will acquire in-depth awareness of self and others' worldviews and a better insight into immigrants/minority groups, privilege/oppression, health care access/disparity issues, interpersonal relationship, community health and well being domains.

Credits:

3

Description:

Investigates race and ethnicity as ideological categories that both inform group identity and reproduce social inequalities. The course begins with an overview of the social and historical forces that developed these categories, with a focus on some of the major ethnic groups in the United States. Explores historical and contemporary roles played by psychologists around these issues. Students learn how to individually and collectively avoid perpetuating injustices in the science and practice of psychology. Course topics exemplify how race and ethnicity are inextricably linked to other identity categories, especially gender, class, and sexual identity. Normally offered alternate years.

Choose one of the following courses to fulfill the second Intervention requirement:

Credits:

3

Description:

This course focuses on the origins, maintenance, and treatment of anxiety and related disorders (e.g., depressive and trauma and stressor-related disorders). The class utilizes a cognitive-behavioral theoretical perspective to explore the development and treatment of anxiety and related disorders. Consistent with the introduction of unified cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) protocols for the treatment of emotional disorders, this course uses a transdiagnostic framework to highlight shared etiological and treatment mechanisms common across anxiety and related disorders. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of theory and empirical findings into the application of clinical skills for the treatment of adults with these disorders.

Credits:

3

Description:

In this psychotherapy seminar, students will learn about dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), an evidence-based treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Students will gain knowledge and experience (via role-plays) in behavioral assessment and in all modes of DBT, including individual therapy, group skills training, telephone coaching, and consultation team. Students will explore the theoretical bases of the treatment, as well as gain knowledge of the empirical basis for DBT's use with various patient populations, including BPD, opioid dependent, chronically suicidal/self-harming, and other populations (inpatients, bipolar disorder, friends and family of seriously mentally ill, etc.). Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

3

Description:

Examines the contemporary movement integrating acceptance (willingness to experience thoughts, emotions, physiological sensations and images) and mindfulness (intentional and non-judgmental awareness of the present moment) into traditional cognitive and behavioral approaches to case formulation and treatment. Topics include analysis and discussion of the theoretical underpinnings of this movement, examination of specific emerging therapies, and exploration of the application of these therapies to a variety of clinical problems. Normally offered alternate years.

Choose four additional electives from the following list:

Prerequisites:

PHD in Applied Developmental Psychology Students Only

Credits:

3

Description:

Explores socioemotional development from infancy to adolescence with an emphasis on early childhood. Using a bio-psycho-social lens, different theories of development (e.g., attachment; temperament; moral; gender-role) and current empirical research will be explored. Methodological techniques unique to this topic also will be considered. Finally, we will apply our knowledge of developmental research to current issues concerning children.

Prerequisites:

Applied Developmental PHD students only

Credits:

3

Description:

Methodology related to developmental systems will include longitudinal research, program evaluation and outcome research, panel study designs, and mixed-methods designs.

Prerequisites:

PHD in Applied Developmental Psychology Students Only

Credits:

3

Description:

With an eye toward incorporating mixed qualitative-qualitative methodologies, this course will provide students with a hands-on learning experience in qualitative study designs and coding approaches. A variety of coding techniques will be explored, along with popular computer-based coding systems.

Prerequisites:

PHD in Applied Developmental Psychology Students Only

Credits:

3

Description:

Advanced statistical platforms including SEM and HLM will be used and explored, particularly using large data sets with longitudinal and complex developmental designs. This is a hands-on course; students will leave with basic knowledge of statistical programs used for advanced statistical analyses in the developmental sciences.

Prerequisites:

Credits:

3

Description:

Examines child and adolescent psychopathology from an empirically-based developmental perspective. Reviews major developmental theories to elucidate the role of development in understanding the etiology and diagnosis of DSM-IV-TR disorders. Also focuses on theoretical and empirical literature in developmental psychopathology. Changes in the incidence rates of internalizing (e.g., depression, anxiety) and externalizing disorders (e.g., conduct disorder, attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder) are addressed. Disorders affecting both behavioral and mental functioning (e.g., autism) are included. Family, peer, and contextual/environmental influences are also covered. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3

Description:

Examines current theory and research on effective teaching of psychology. Surveys a variety of teaching techniques, tools, and methods for leading discussions, lecturing, assessment, and grading. Additional topics include: learning styles in the classroom, student diversity, development of critical thinking, and ethics in college teaching. Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

3.00- 9.00

Description:

Intended for students who are working on their Early Research Project. This course is graded P/F. Offered every semester.

Credits:

3

Description:

Intended for students who are preparing for their dissertation proposal. This course is graded P/F. Offered every semester.

Credits:

3.00- 6.00

Description:

Intended for students who are preparing for their dissertation proposal. This course is graded P/F. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

PHD in Applied Developmental Psychology Students Only

Credits:

3

Description:

Introduces students to the special issues that children growing up in poverty face. Theory and empirical research will be explored as well as specific contexts common to disadvantaged children (e.g., homelessness and abuse). In addition, we will examine individual resilience and the impact of environmental support in mitigating deleterious effects.

Prerequisites:

PHD in Applied Developmental Psychology Students Only

Credits:

3

Description:

This seminar explores the complex, multi-level ecological systems involved in migration and human adaptation to new cultural contexts. With a particular emphasis on children, adolescents, and families, we explore recent developmental topics related to immigration, documentation status(es), discrimination, as well as national integration policies and refugee experiences. Both risk and resilience frameworks will be emphasized.

Prerequisites:

PHD in Applied Developmental Psychology Students Only

Credits:

3

Description:

Human sexuality and gender operate at multiple layers of the developmental system: from historical political systems down to the most intimate aspects of biology and behavior. In this seminar, students will examine how applied developmental psychology has been used to frame questions and create knowledge about sex, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, sexuality, and romantic relationships. The course will take a trans-affirming queer feminist approach rooted in the inherent dignity of all people, as we grapple with how the process of scientific knowledge production can help and/or harm the struggle for human rights and freedom from oppression.

Prerequisites:

PHD in Applied Developmental Psychology Students Only

Credits:

3

Description:

This seminar presents a series of pressing topics, readings, and reflective writing activities focused on studying under-served and marginalized youth, and how systems of oppression continue to impact youth development.

Prerequisites:

PHD in Applied Developmental Psychology Students Only

Credits:

3

Description:

Systems at the local, regional, and national level- and the guiding policies that shape resources and access to services- will be explored. Students will learn to write policy briefs, and understand their potential role as experts in advocacy for social policy change.

Credits:

3.00- 6.00

Description:

Consists of the intensive study of one aspect of clinical psychology and/or human development in consultation with a faculty member.

Degree Requirements

The program in Clinical Psychology consists of a minimum of five years of full-time study. Please consult the Program Manual for more detailed information on all of these points. The requirements are as follows:
  1. Completion of 72 credits 
    There are 24 (3-credit) courses and two required labs to be completed within the first three years of the program for full-time students. A full-time course load is 12 credits, and students must maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 (B). To successfully complete required classes a minimum grade of B- or a pass for pass/fail is required. Students who transfer credit for previous coursework may need to complete up to 78 credits of coursework to maintain full-time status throughout the first three years of study.
  2. Completion of practicum experiences
    Two years of practicum experience are required of our doctoral students beginning in their second academic year; a third year is optional, but recommended. Students receive weekly supervision by professionals at their practicum sites and attend a weekly practicum seminar at Suffolk where they are able to integrate their practical experiences and educational training within the program. Students receive extensive individual supervision that is consistent with the student’s level of training, contact hours, and case load.
  3. Completion of teaching apprenticeships 
    The curriculum requires all students to participate as Teaching Apprentices (TAPS) for the first two semesters of their graduate study. TAPS are paired with advanced graduate student lecturers and professors to receive mentorship and experience in a broad-range of teaching-related skills. Students are not paid to serve as TAPS; the responsibilities associated with the position are designed to prepare students for potential careers as instructors/professors or other forms of scholarship. In addition, there are orientation and teacher training seminars offered during the first semester of graduate studies which all TAPS must attend. The seminars are designed to provide instrumental and interpersonal support for students as they build teaching, public speaking, and presentation skills.
  4. Early Research Project 
    Students are not admitted into the Clinical Psychology Program for a terminal master’s degree. A master’s degree is granted, however, usually after the second year, once the student has completed 48 credits of course work and the Early Research Project. This project provides students with an opportunity to apply the knowledge gained in their research and statistics courses by pursuing research under the supervision of a faculty member who serves as the research mentor; on the recommendation of this mentor, students will deliver an oral presentation to the department in the Spring and submit a written manuscript on their research project.
  5. Clinical Experiences Portfolio (CEP)
    Students’ attainment of clinical competencies are systematically evaluated through coursework and biannual student practicum evaluations. The systematic evaluation of clinical competencies occurs along with student completion of their CEP, which is designed to provide a repository within the department for some of each student's exemplar clinical work. Clinical competency evaluation and the CEP are intended to ensure that students clinical work is based on a sound foundation of 1) ethical reasoning, 2) judgment and understanding, and 3) skills, in relation to diagnostics, case conceptualization, therapy, and assessment. This CEP involves students completing a minimum number of assessment reports, case conceptualizations, treatment plans, oral case presentations, therapy write-ups, and peer consultations through planned, developmentally appropriate course assignments in their first three years of graduate training. The CEP also includes activities related to applying for the Pre-Doctoral Clinical Internship (i.e., submitting a mentor-approved draft of the Theoretical Orientation essay when submitting the Intent to Apply for Internship form and completing a mock-interview with a member of the Clinical Program Doctoral Faculty).
  6. Doctoral dissertation 
    The dissertation is conceptualized as an original empirical project that makes a substantive contribution to the knowledge base of clinical psychology. Dissertation committees, which must include at least three members, supervise the dissertation. Two committee members must be members of the Doctoral Program faculty, with one serving as the chair and primary mentor of the student. The third member of the dissertation committee will be either a member of the Doctoral Program faculty, a tenured or tenure-track member of the Psychology Department faculty who is not affiliated with the Doctoral Program, or someone external to the Psychology Department with demonstrated expertise in domains relevant to the proposed research. The committee is responsible for approving the proposal, overseeing data collection and analysis, and reviewing the final written draft. The doctoral committee must approve the formal dissertation and a departmental oral defense must also be completed. The oral proposal meeting must be successfully completed and the proposal document must be approved by the doctoral committee for students to receive permission to apply for internship.
  7. Pre-doctoral clinical internship 
    Doctoral students shall complete an APA (or CPA) accredited pre-doctoral internship. These are typically one year of full time training (at least 1600 hours). In order to apply for a pre-doctoral internship, students must have successfully completed the Early Research Project, submitted the dissertation literature review, completed the Clinical Experiences Portfolio, and successfully completed the dissertation proposal. Additionally, a minimum of 72 credits, including all required courses, must have been completed before the student may apply for a pre-doctoral internship, as well as the additional intervention and diversity requirements. The pre-doctoral internship may take place at an APA-approved site or at a site that has written approval of the director of clinical training and meets all of the requirements as defined in the Program Manual.
 

Psychology Graduate Courses

Credits:

0

Description:

Provides full-time enrollment status for students who have completed all content courses, and who are working on dissertations, but who are not on internship. At the discretion of the DCT, a practicum course may be taken concurrently with Psych 000. This course is NG (not graded).

Credits:

0

Description:

Provides full-time enrollment status for students whose ERPs are one or more semesters overdue. At the discretion of the DCT, a single practicum course may be taken concurrently with Psych 001.

Credits:

3

Description:

This course focuses on the origins, maintenance, and treatment of anxiety and related disorders (e.g., depressive and trauma and stressor-related disorders). The class utilizes a cognitive-behavioral theoretical perspective to explore the development and treatment of anxiety and related disorders. Consistent with the introduction of unified cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) protocols for the treatment of emotional disorders, this course uses a transdiagnostic framework to highlight shared etiological and treatment mechanisms common across anxiety and related disorders. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of theory and empirical findings into the application of clinical skills for the treatment of adults with these disorders.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to PhD students only.

Credits:

3

Description:

The seminar aims to introduce you to the theory and practice of evidence-based social, emotional and behavioral assessment. To this end, specific issues we will cover include psychometric theory, cognitive abilities/intelligence testing, some classic assessment controversies, strengths and weaknesses of various assessment approaches, ethical and cultural issues, and the psychological assessment of children.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to PhD students only.

Credits:

3

Description:

The goal of this course is to serve as a foundation for clinical practice and research activity in the important area of clinical neuropsychological assessment and psychological assessment. It serves to introduce the student to the techniques, methods and theories relevant to the practice of neuropsychological and psychological assessment. The course can roughly be divided into two halves. In the first half general technique, theory, and individual statistics will be covered. This will start with the procedures for the clinical neuropsychological examination, including the interview, preparation of the patient, and selection of instruments. The nature and structure of cognition, factor structure of the neuropsychological battery, and a theory of brain-behavior relationships will be covered. This will be followed by coverage of statistics as applied to assessment, that is, the difference between the inferential form of statistics students are used to (group statistics) and the probabilistic form (individual) of statistics useful in assessment. Subsequent focus will be on clinical decision-making, that is, the use of test data to respond to the diagnostic and descriptive questions that are the goals of the assessment process. The first half of the class will finish with a focus on individual differences, critical to the interpretation psychological test data. The second half of the course will focus on specific cognitive functions, assessment of personality and psychopathology, and on civil and forensic contexts relevant to assessment. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3

Description:

Provides intensive training in the process of psychology-orientated scientific writing. Topics include identifying knowledge gaps in the extant literature through a critical review of existing research, developing a strong rationale for future research, basic writing style and structure, disciplined writing practices, effective revision, and peer-review. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Graduate course for Psychology Ph.D. program, approved by department.

Credits:

3

Description:

Introduces students to multicultural issues relevant to psychology. Covers a broad range of cultural diversity (sex, age, race, ethnicity, language, religion, sexual orientations, etc.) topics to highlight the role of culture in understanding human behavior and health-related issues. This course intends to strengthen students' multicultural knowledge, sensitivity, and competence in research/professional practice through their exposure to various theoretical/empirical perspectives, media, experiential exercises, etc. Students will acquire in-depth awareness of self and others' worldviews and a better insight into immigrants/minority groups, privilege/oppression, health care access/disparity issues, interpersonal relationship, community health and well being domains.

Credits:

3

Description:

In this psychotherapy seminar, students will learn about dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), an evidence-based treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD). Students will gain knowledge and experience (via role-plays) in behavioral assessment and in all modes of DBT, including individual therapy, group skills training, telephone coaching, and consultation team. Students will explore the theoretical bases of the treatment, as well as gain knowledge of the empirical basis for DBT's use with various patient populations, including BPD, opioid dependent, chronically suicidal/self-harming, and other populations (inpatients, bipolar disorder, friends and family of seriously mentally ill, etc.). Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

3

Description:

This graduate seminar requires students to examine and respond to current thinking and controversies in the conceptualization and categorization of mental disorders generally, and adult disorders in particular. Students will acquire foundational knowledge about the diagnostic characterization, etiology, and epidemiology of the major classes of adult behavior disorders; investigate mental disorders and our current diagnostic system from a variety of different perspectives (clinical, research, biological, sociocultural, etc.); gain significant practice critically evaluating scientific research and in articulating thoughtful responses to social and behavioral research on mental disorders. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3

Description:

Provides students with foundational skills needed to be both a consumer and producer of psychological research. Topics covered include hypothesis and proposal generation, experimental, correlational and qualitative designs, strategies to minimize bias, measurement issues, participant selection and recruitment, data management, grantsmanship and the dissemination of findings. Ethical issues in the conduct of research are emphasized. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

0

Description:

Provides students enrolled in the Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology an extended introduction and orientation to the program and to the field of clinical psychology. Enrollment by invitation of the DCT only. The lab will be graded P/F. Offered yearly.

Credits:

3

Description:

The purpose of this course is to trace the origin and development of psychology as a field of study from its philosophical and scientific roots to present day theories. The emphasis will be on critically examining the various systems of psychology, especially as they are translated into psychological practice, and their development in relation to sciences and societies. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

0

Description:

Continues the orientation and early skill development of students enrolled in the Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology. Provides a lab experience within which to explore and develop initial skills preparatory for practicum experience in year 2. Enrollment by invitation of the DCT only. This lab will be graded P/F. Offered yearly.

Credits:

3

Description:

Introduces students to the concept of empirically informed clinical practice. Topics covered include the history of the evidence-based movement in psychology, an overview of the methods used in scientifically-informed clinical practice (e.g., case conceptualization, treatment planning, ongoing assessment of progress), and an introduction to specific evidence-based principles that can be used in psychotherapy (e.g., exposure therapy, behavioral activation, etc.). Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3

Description:

Introduces basic statistical tests such as t tests, ANOVA, correlation, regression, Chi Square, and power analysis. Students are also required to demonstrate proficiency in computer data analysis using SPSS. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH-722

Credits:

3

Description:

Focuses on multivariate statistics and the interaction of research design and statistical analysis. Emphasis on MANOVA, multiple regression, principle components analysis/factor analysis, and logistic regression. Issues involving experimental and statistical control, multicollinearity, specification error, and nesting will be covered. Students learn basic principles of multivariate analysis, read journal articles using multivariate techniques, analyze data using each main type of analysis covered in the course, and write results and tables using APA style. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3

Description:

Investigates race and ethnicity as ideological categories that both inform group identity and reproduce social inequalities. The course begins with an overview of the social and historical forces that developed these categories, with a focus on some of the major ethnic groups in the United States. Explores historical and contemporary roles played by psychologists around these issues. Students learn how to individually and collectively avoid perpetuating injustices in the science and practice of psychology. Course topics exemplify how race and ethnicity are inextricably linked to other identity categories, especially gender, class, and sexual identity. Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

3

Description:

Introduces students to the social bases of behavior and experience through examination of some traditional topics from the field of social psychology. These include: social cognition; self-knowledge; self-presentation; attitude formation and change; attraction and close relations; altruism; aggression; prejudice and stereotypes; and group dynamics. In addition, the course may include discussion of cross-cultural approaches to healing and the relationship between culture and mental health. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

Instructor Consent Required

Credits:

3

Description:

Doctoral students complete an academic year of placement service (9-10 months) at one of the selected practica sites during their second year of academic training. Students complete between 12 and 20 hours per week of placement service to include training in assessment, diagnostic interviewing and intakes, intervention, and applied research with diverse populations. Students will receive on-site supervision by licensed psychologists and other approved professionals. Students participate in a weekly practicum seminar. This didactic portion examines the legal, ethical, and professional issues currently facing psychologists in practice with diverse populations, including confidentiality/mandated reporting, informed consent, conflicts of interest, boundary issues, and limits of professional competence. Normally offered every fall semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH-738; Instructor Consent Required

Credits:

3

Description:

Continuation of Practicum & Ethics IA. Normally offered every spring semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH-738, PSYCH-739; Instructor Consent Required

Credits:

3

Description:

Doctoral students complete an academic year of placement service (9 to 10 months) at one of the selected practica sites during their third year of academic training. Students complete approximately 20 hours per week of placement service to include assessment, intervention, and consultation with diverse populations. Students receive on-site supervision by licensed psychologists and other approved professionals. All students will concurrently participate in practicum seminars taught by Suffolk University faculty. The didactic supplement provides a foundation in developing students' knowledge in the areas of consultation and supervision along with continued training in cultural and individual diversity. Normally offered every fall semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH-738, PSYCH-739, PSYCH-740; Instructor Consent Required

Credits:

3

Description:

Continuation of Practicum 2A. Normally offered every spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Doctoral Standing

Credits:

3

Description:

Examines theoretical foundations, empirical research, approaches, and ethics of clinical supervision and consultation in professional psychology. Emphasis will also be placed on the integration of theory and empirical findings into the application of skills necessary to work as effective clinical supervisors and psychological consultants. Offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Credits:

3

Description:

Examines child and adolescent psychopathology from an empirically-based developmental perspective. Reviews major developmental theories to elucidate the role of development in understanding the etiology and diagnosis of DSM-IV-TR disorders. Also focuses on theoretical and empirical literature in developmental psychopathology. Changes in the incidence rates of internalizing (e.g., depression, anxiety) and externalizing disorders (e.g., conduct disorder, attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder) are addressed. Disorders affecting both behavioral and mental functioning (e.g., autism) are included. Family, peer, and contextual/environmental influences are also covered. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Doctoral Standing

Credits:

3

Description:

Examines development across the lifespan, including biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development, with attention to the role of culture and context. Reviews major theories of development and how such theories provide conceptual frameworks for understanding the development adaptive and maladaptive behaviors and trajectories. Also addresses implications for treatment and prevention. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3

Description:

Presents students with an introduction to the field of psychopharmacology. Topics covered will include: the art of prescribing medication; the psychopharmacology of anxiety and psychotic mental disorders (including pediatric and geriatric psychopharmacology); pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy; biopsychosocial factors in drug abuse and addiction. Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

3

Description:

Investigates theories regarding the function and experience of emotion. This course will survey the historical concepts of emotion in psychology and current theories of emotion, including motivational, cognitive and physiological aspects. The course will also describe research methods used in the study of emotion, including psychophysiology and neuroimaging, as well as clinical implications. Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

3

Description:

Examines current theory and research on effective teaching of psychology. Surveys a variety of teaching techniques, tools, and methods for leading discussions, lecturing, assessment, and grading. Additional topics include: learning styles in the classroom, student diversity, development of critical thinking, and ethics in college teaching. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 741 and approval from Director of Clinical training.

Credits:

1

Description:

Consent of DCT is required to enroll. Concurrent enrollment in other content courses or Psych 000 is permitted. This course is graded P/F.

Credits:

3

Description:

Examines the contemporary movement integrating acceptance (willingness to experience thoughts, emotions, physiological sensations and images) and mindfulness (intentional and non-judgmental awareness of the present moment) into traditional cognitive and behavioral approaches to case formulation and treatment. Topics include analysis and discussion of the theoretical underpinnings of this movement, examination of specific emerging therapies, and exploration of the application of these therapies to a variety of clinical problems. Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

3.00- 9.00

Description:

Intended for students who are working on their Early Research Project. This course is graded P/F. Offered every semester.

Credits:

3

Description:

Intended for students who are preparing for comprehensive exams. This course is graded P/F. Offered every semester.

Credits:

3

Description:

Intended for students who are preparing for their dissertation proposal. This course is graded P/F. Offered every semester.

Credits:

3.00- 6.00

Description:

Intended for students who are preparing for their dissertation proposal. This course is graded P/F. Offered every semester.

Credits:

3

Description:

Neuropsychology is the study of the affective, behavioral and cognitive consequences of brain injury, and clinical neuropsychology is the professional discipline that deals with the methods and techniques of assessing the consequences of brain insult. Clinical neuroscience is a branch of neuroscience that focuses on the scientific study of fundamental mechanisms that underlie diseases and disorders of the brain and central nervous system. It seeks to develop new ways of diagnosing such disorders and ultimately of developing novel treatments. This course will take the assumption that a good way to become a biologically informed practitioner of clinical psychology, is to participate in systematic instruction and learning in neuropsychology and the clinical neurosciences. In psychology graduate school, you are also becoming the culturally informed clinician, the developmentally informed clinician, and so forth. Toward that goal the reading and lecture materials for Psychology 792 will bring together the fields of neuroanatomy and functional neuroanatomy, neurobehavioral syndromes, cellular mechanisms of the central nervous system, behavior genetics including epigenetics, and psychopharmacology.

Credits:

3

Description:

Researchers from the Boston Veterans Administration Hospital lecture on various topics including: neuropsychological assessment; plasticity in development; aphasia; apraxia; attention deficit disorder; aging; memory; dementia; bilingualism; epilepsy; and pain. Held at the Boston Veterans Administration Hospital in Jamaica Plain. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3

Description:

Continuation of PSYCH 795 at the Boston Veterans Administration Hospital in Jamaica Plain. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3

Description:

Provides students with a comprehensive overview of functional neuroanatomy, as well as an introduction to neuropathology, neuroepidemiology, and the neurobehavioral consequences of congenital and acquired neurological diseases and disorders. Teaching strategies will include lectures, human brain lab, directed readings, and neurosciences software programs. Held at Boston University School of Medicine. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Instructor Consent Required

Credits:

1

Description:

Provides full-time enrollment status for students who are on pre-doctoral internships. This course is graded P/F.

Credits:

1

Description:

Provides full-time enrollment status for Respecialization students who have completed all content courses and who are pursuing additional practicum training prior to predoctoral internship. Consent of DCT is required to enroll. Concurrent enrollment in other courses is not permitted. This course is graded P/F.

Credits:

3.00- 6.00

Description:

Consists of the intensive study of one aspect of clinical psychology and/or human development in consultation with a faculty member.