Finance

Master of Science in Finance (MSF)

Learn more about this degree

STEM Classification

The MSF is a graduate degree program with a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) designation. Due to the demand of graduates with expertise in STEM fields, the Department of Homeland Security permits international students graduating from STEM programs to apply for a 24 month extension of their initial year of Optional Practical Training (OPT). For more detailed information, please visit the ISSO webpage.

MSF Curriculum

12-16 Courses
32-44 Credits

Program Length:

  • Full-time in as few as 9 months
  • Part-time in as few as 21 months

Required Introductory Courses (2 credits)

Must be taken on campus in first semester of program.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

SBS 700 is the first required course in Suffolk's graduate programs. The course is based on the precepts of experiential learning. Based on the idea that people learn best by participating in meaningful activities, this course provides students with the opportunity to learn about and experience first-hand the many complexities of business and the role of top managers. To accomplish this, students will work in small groups as they take on the roles of top managers in a hands-on behavioral simulation.

Prerequisites:

MSF and MSFSB students only;

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This is a boot camp-style course which introduces students to the basic concepts of math, statistics, accounting, and finance. Given the technical nature of modern finance, this course is designed to prepare students for the challenges of taking advanced finance courses. The course is based on lectures, problem solving, and discussion of concepts.

Required Prerequisite Courses (12 credits)

Must be taken or waived prior to enrolling in Finance Core Courses.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is required for MSA and MSF students and it is also a recommended elective for MBA students with a finance concentration. This course develops an understanding of the concepts, tools, and applications of economics at both the micro and macro level. The focus is on how economic analysis influences decision-making in the public and private sectors and how economic tools can enhance managerial effectiveness and organizational efficiency. The economic role of government and its impact on the business environment in a market economy, the factors that influence firm performance and competitiveness, and the role of financial institutions in the current economic environment are discussed throughout the course.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the concepts and applications of data analytics on large data sets for managerial decision making. Students will learn foundation skills needed to extract valuable information out of data, including various descriptive and predictive analytics techniques. Students develop knowledge of data visualization and interpretation coupled with conveying data, results and insights. Issues on data acquisition, storage and management will be discussed.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course deals with the structure and information content of the three principal financial statements of profit-directed companies, namely the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows. It develops skill in using accounting information to analyze the performance and financial condition of a company, and to facilitate decision making, planning and budgeting, and performance appraisal in a managerial context. This course also contains an experiential component by offering guided inquiry and real company cases.

Prerequisites:

1 course from each of the following groups: MBA-615 or SBS-603; MBA-625 or SBS-604; MBA-640 or ACCT-800; These courses may be taken prior to or concurrently with MBA-650.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces the basic principles of corporate finance. The main focus is on fundamental principles such as time value of money, asset valuation, and risk and return tradeoff. Topics to be covered also include cost of capital, capital budgeting, and capital structure.

Finance Core Courses (15 credits)

Must be taken on campus unless permission to take online granted by the Academic Program Director.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of financial statements, this course is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of business entity. This course also analyzes financial services industry: bank financial statement analysis with an emphasis on off- balance sheet lending and borrowing, capital structure issues, and innovations in mortgage-backed securities and asset-based financing techniques are covered. Additionally, the tax implications of various derivative securities is studied.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course extends the body of knowledge acquired in MBA 650. Students expand knowledge of dividend theory, capital structure theory, capital budgeting, long-term financing decisions, cash management and corporate restructuring, market efficiency, and risk and liability management.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine markets for investment procedures, valuation models, basic analytical techniques, and factors influencing risk/return tradeoffs. This course emphasizes the professional approach to managing investment assets. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, options, and futures.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students explore the pricing of options and futures contracts, the characteristics of the markets in which these contracts are traded, options and futures strategies, and the application of these contracts in the hedging of financial positions. In addition, students are exposed to swap markets and a variety of swaps.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to mathematical statistics and basic econometrics. They study fundamental econometric tools as well as hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, linear regressions, simultaneous equations, and models of qualitative choice.

Capstone Course (3 credits)

Should be taken as late in the program as possible. Must be taken on campus, unless permission to take online is granted by the Academic Program Director. 

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-808, FIN-810, and FIN-814. (FIN-814 can be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine financial theories, techniques, and models applied to the study of corporate financial decisions, aspects of corporate strategy, industry structure, and the functioning of capital markets.

Concentration Descriptions and Applicable Elective Courses (12 credits)

Choose four (4) elective courses from the approved MSF electives list. Courses must be taken on campus, within Sawyer Business School, 800-level or above (exception MBA 740), unless permission to take online is granted by the Academic Director.

Students may declare a concentration in Corporate Finance, FinTech, Investments or Risk Management. If a concentration in Corporate Finance, Investments or Risk Management is declared, three electives must be in one concentration area. If a concentration in FinTech is declared students must complete ISOM 730, FIN 830, one approved FIN elective and one approved ISOM elective. The schedule of when courses within a concentration are offered vary by semester.


Students who declare a concentration must submit an SBS Graduate Program Concentration Request Form. Students are encouraged to meet with their advisor before they declare a concentration

The concentration appears on the transcript, not the diploma.

Corporate Finance Concentration

Choose three courses from the following list:

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine techniques and decision-making rules for the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects by corporations and the interaction of investment and financing.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers corporate financial decisions in an international setting with a focus on foreign exchange management and capital budgeting.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the history, terminology, current developments, future challenges and opportunities related to the application of technology to financial discipline. With an emphasis of case studies and guest lecture, the class will discuss algorithmic trading, predictive behavioral analysis, data-driven decision making, mobile-only services, robo advisers, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, RegTech, InsureTech, innovations in lending, and cybersecurity. Students will be required to complete projects based on a statistical software package.

Prerequisites:

FIN-818

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The nature, techniques, and problems of business forecasting. Covers indicators of business activity, short-run econometrics forecasting models, and the construction of aggregate forecasts as well as forecasts of major economic sectors. Includes long-term predictions and the application of aggregate and sector forecasts for particular industries and firms. Prerequisite: FIN 818.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course addresses the financial needs of private businesses, focusing on the financial motives and needs of private company owners and their advisors. The course is an opportunity to present private finance as a complement to corporate finance/public finance so as to prepare students to better serve or participate in making better financing decisions in the marketplace of privately held businesses.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze the main functions of investment banks such as origination, syndication, and distribution of security issues. They examine pricing of new issues and secondary offerings by investment banks, mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, valuation of closely held companies, and restructuring of distressed companies. The role of investment bankers in restructuring industry and financing governments and ethical issues faced by investment bankers will be studied.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

MSF Thesis work

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of timely special issues in the field of finance. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's approval required

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A student-initiated directed study project, generally for three credit hours and completed within one quarter or semester. The student and faculty advisor must concur on a written proposal and final report, and the proposal must be approved by the Office of the Dean prior to registration.

Prerequisites:

SBS-700, MBA-615, MBA-625, MBA-635, MBA-640, MBA-650 MBA-660, and Instructor's approval. Limited to MBA students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides a hands-on, practical learning opportunity for a student-initiated experience at a domestic or international organization. Students work closely with the MBA advisor and faculty advisor regarding career-related learning outcomes. Over the course of a semester, students collaborate with their corporate internship supervisor and complete projects in either accounting, business law and ethics, entrepreneurship, finance, international business, strategy or tax. Offered every semester.

FInTech Concentration

Required Courses (2 courses, 6 credits)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is introductory to use Python for business analytics, intended for students with little or no programming experience. Students will learn how to program with Python and how to use it in conjunction with scientific computing modules and libraries to compute, analyze, and visualize data to make analytics-driven decisions in finance, operations, marketing, accounting, and management. By the end of this course, students will have confidence and understanding of how to program in Python, know how to create and manipulate arrays using numpy library, know how to use pandas library to create and analyze data sets, know how to use matplotlib and seaborn libraries to create beautiful data visualization, and have an understanding of scikit-learn for data analytics.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the history, terminology, current developments, future challenges and opportunities related to the application of technology to financial discipline. With an emphasis of case studies and guest lecture, the class will discuss algorithmic trading, predictive behavioral analysis, data-driven decision making, mobile-only services, robo advisers, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, RegTech, InsureTech, innovations in lending, and cybersecurity. Students will be required to complete projects based on a statistical software package.

Finance Elective Course (3 credits)

Take one from the following list of electives:

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course is designed to provide information on various types of fixed income securities and markets, theories and concepts of the term structure of interest rates and valuation of fixed income securities, measurement and management of risk for traditional bonds and bonds with embedded options, understanding of the role of derivatives such as mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, swaps and exotic options, credit analysis and bond rating, portfolio management and performance evaluation. This course is generally offered as an intensive elective.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine fundamental equity analysis as the convergence of a number of skills such as accounting, financial, and strategic analysis with detective work and experience. Students practice communicating and defending an argument, use a business analysis framework that helps tie together strategy and finance, practice model building and practical approach to profitability in the markets.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an integrated framework for analyzing and measuring risk with a computer simulation approach. A common set of computational tools will be applied across several different financial applications ranging from options pricing to portfolio design. Extensive time will be spent on estimating and simulating 'Value at Risk' which has been a standard for measuring risk in large financial institutions. We will also compare this with other traditional methods as well as other modern methods, such as extreme value theory at quantifying risk. Computationally intensive methods, such as bootstrapping, and Monte Carlo analysis will be used extensively throughout the course with MATLAB as the primary programming tool.

ISOM Elective (3 credits)

Take one from the following list of electives:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Analyzes various real world business problems and explores the full scope of MS Excel's formulas, functions and features to create data models and present solutions. Students analyze data, design custom charts, graphs, PivotTables and Pivot charts, create three-dimensional workbooks, build links between files and endow worksheets with decision-making capabilities. Students conduct What-If Analysis, utilizing Scenario Manager, Solver, Data Tables and Goal Seek. This course provides the skills necessary to pass the Microsoft Office Specialist Certification in Excel.

Prerequisites:

This course was formerly ISOM-815

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the importance of information as an organizational resource, role of big data in organizations, and the application of tools to provide high quality information. Students will be able to select the most appropriate data management tool (e.g., SQL vs. non-SQL databases) to business scenarios. Develops the skills needed to succeed in today's big data environment through the application of data management techniques, cases and exercises. Students will become proficient in designing databases using entity relationship modeling and normalization, in building and querying databases of various sizes with Access and SQL (an industry standard), preparing high quality data and applying data visualizing techniques. Students will complete a series of business-oriented hands-on exercises, prepare cases, and complete projects on database design and big data.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides students with an understanding of the nature of enterprise integration and enterprise software, business process reengineering, the implementation within organizations, and strategies for maximizing benefits from enterprise systems. To manage complex business processes in today's multi-national, wired and wireless world, firms need integrated software packages to manage their global business. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems are used to support a wide range of business functions for all companies across industries. With ERP systems, business managers are able to make decisions with accurate, consistent, and current data. Intensive lab projects on the SAP ERP System with real life business scenarios are utilized to reinforce understanding of enterprise systems functionality and business process concepts.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course teaches students how to build and maintain data warehouses, and how to analyze and use this data as a source for business intelligence and competitive advantage. Students study data mining concepts and the use of analytics tools and methods for producing business knowledge. Topics include extraction, transformation and loading; decision support systems; text, web and data mining models as well as data presentation/visualization including dashboards, scorecards and various charts. Students build a data warehouse and practice the extraction and filtering process used to produce high quality data warehouses. Students will use tools such as MS Excel, SAP Lumira, Tableau and SAP Business Warehouse.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Predictive analytics make predictions about unknown future events. It is crucial for companies to ask the right questions, perform rigorous analysis, and take actions that will result in the most desirable outcomes. This course develops students' capability in applying the core concepts and techniques of predictive analytics to identify opportunity, recognize patterns, predict outcomes, and recommend optimal actions within the context of organizational decision-making. Topics include: business analytics life cycle, data pre- processing, linear and nonlinear regression, tree-based methods, model assessment and selection, and resampling methods.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the fundamental principles of information and big data security. Security vulnerabilities, threats and risks will be analyzed. Common types of computer attacks and counter-attacks will be identified. Security technologies such as biometrics, firewalls, intrusion detection systems and cryptography systems will be applied in conjunction with human based safeguards. Business continuity and disaster recovery planning will be covered. Students will then learn how to design and build a layered security defense combining several of the above controls to address the different challenges to data security. The managerial concerns of security and privacy of information will be stressed including the legal and privacy issues. Best practices for planning and auditing security and privacy will then be covered.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces business intelligence and data analytics. Business intelligence and data analytics help organizations in strategic and operational decision making by improving performance management, optimizing customer relations, monitoring business activity, and improving decision support. On a macro-level, the class will discuss business cases for the adoption of business intelligence and data analytics. We will discuss technologies and processes for gathering, storing, accessing, and analyzing data to provide users with better insights and business decisions. On a micro-level, students will use a variety of tools to build their skills in analyzing data to solve business problems. In summary, this course provides a conceptual understanding of business data resources and the development of capabilities for data preparation, warehousing, selection, description, mining, interpretation, visualization, communication, and innovation.

Investments Concentration

Choose three courses from the following list:

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the history, terminology, current developments, future challenges and opportunities related to the application of technology to financial discipline. With an emphasis of case studies and guest lecture, the class will discuss algorithmic trading, predictive behavioral analysis, data-driven decision making, mobile-only services, robo advisers, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, RegTech, InsureTech, innovations in lending, and cybersecurity. Students will be required to complete projects based on a statistical software package.

Prerequisites:

FIN 810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The foundation of most of modern financial models and theories are based on neoclassical economists' assumption that most economic agents are rational decision makers. Behavioral finance recognizes that our cognitive biases and errors along with our individuality are not always consistent with the rationality assumption and utility maximization. This course will examine the implications of human psychology, emotions and biases on financial decision-making process as well as potential impact on the overall financial markets.

Prerequisites:

FIN-818

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The nature, techniques, and problems of business forecasting. Covers indicators of business activity, short-run econometrics forecasting models, and the construction of aggregate forecasts as well as forecasts of major economic sectors. Includes long-term predictions and the application of aggregate and sector forecasts for particular industries and firms. Prerequisite: FIN 818.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course addresses the financial needs of private businesses, focusing on the financial motives and needs of private company owners and their advisors. The course is an opportunity to present private finance as a complement to corporate finance/public finance so as to prepare students to better serve or participate in making better financing decisions in the marketplace of privately held businesses.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze the main functions of investment banks such as origination, syndication, and distribution of security issues. They examine pricing of new issues and secondary offerings by investment banks, mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, valuation of closely held companies, and restructuring of distressed companies. The role of investment bankers in restructuring industry and financing governments and ethical issues faced by investment bankers will be studied.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to the language and principles of real estate. Includes an overview of decision-making in the field, with particular emphasis on investment and asset management.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course is designed to provide information on various types of fixed income securities and markets, theories and concepts of the term structure of interest rates and valuation of fixed income securities, measurement and management of risk for traditional bonds and bonds with embedded options, understanding of the role of derivatives such as mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, swaps and exotic options, credit analysis and bond rating, portfolio management and performance evaluation. This course is generally offered as an intensive elective.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine fundamental equity analysis as the convergence of a number of skills such as accounting, financial, and strategic analysis with detective work and experience. Students practice communicating and defending an argument, use a business analysis framework that helps tie together strategy and finance, practice model building and practical approach to profitability in the markets.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an integrated framework for analyzing and measuring risk with a computer simulation approach. A common set of computational tools will be applied across several different financial applications ranging from options pricing to portfolio design. Extensive time will be spent on estimating and simulating 'Value at Risk' which has been a standard for measuring risk in large financial institutions. We will also compare this with other traditional methods as well as other modern methods, such as extreme value theory at quantifying risk. Computationally intensive methods, such as bootstrapping, and Monte Carlo analysis will be used extensively throughout the course with MATLAB as the primary programming tool.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

MSF Thesis work

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of timely special issues in the field of finance. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's approval required

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A student-initiated directed study project, generally for three credit hours and completed within one quarter or semester. The student and faculty advisor must concur on a written proposal and final report, and the proposal must be approved by the Office of the Dean prior to registration.

Prerequisites:

SBS-700, MBA-615, MBA-625, MBA-635, MBA-640, MBA-650 MBA-660, and Instructor's approval. Limited to MBA students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides a hands-on, practical learning opportunity for a student-initiated experience at a domestic or international organization. Students work closely with the MBA advisor and faculty advisor regarding career-related learning outcomes. Over the course of a semester, students collaborate with their corporate internship supervisor and complete projects in either accounting, business law and ethics, entrepreneurship, finance, international business, strategy or tax. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Immersion course provides an opportunity for students to link their program work to hands-on experience and visits to real-life global companies. The highly experiential, intensive course combines classroom learning with a direct business and cultural experience. Students will work in teams directly for a client or several clients, solving real challenges, using their analytical skills, knowledge, and experience to develop feasible solutions. Required for all MBA students, the course will be offered globally or nationally to accommodate a variety of student needs.

Risk Management Concentration

Choose three courses from the following list:

*Note: Students who choose the Risk Management Elective Concentration must take FIN 816 and FIN 882 as part of their program.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the structure and management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course discusses tools for identifying, measuring, evaluating, and managing risks, such as interest rate, credit, foreign exchange, liquidity, market, sovereign, and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and discusses important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the history, terminology, current developments, future challenges and opportunities related to the application of technology to financial discipline. With an emphasis of case studies and guest lecture, the class will discuss algorithmic trading, predictive behavioral analysis, data-driven decision making, mobile-only services, robo advisers, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, RegTech, InsureTech, innovations in lending, and cybersecurity. Students will be required to complete projects based on a statistical software package.

Prerequisites:

FIN 810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The foundation of most of modern financial models and theories are based on neoclassical economists' assumption that most economic agents are rational decision makers. Behavioral finance recognizes that our cognitive biases and errors along with our individuality are not always consistent with the rationality assumption and utility maximization. This course will examine the implications of human psychology, emotions and biases on financial decision-making process as well as potential impact on the overall financial markets.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course is designed to provide information on various types of fixed income securities and markets, theories and concepts of the term structure of interest rates and valuation of fixed income securities, measurement and management of risk for traditional bonds and bonds with embedded options, understanding of the role of derivatives such as mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, swaps and exotic options, credit analysis and bond rating, portfolio management and performance evaluation. This course is generally offered as an intensive elective.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an integrated framework for analyzing and measuring risk with a computer simulation approach. A common set of computational tools will be applied across several different financial applications ranging from options pricing to portfolio design. Extensive time will be spent on estimating and simulating 'Value at Risk' which has been a standard for measuring risk in large financial institutions. We will also compare this with other traditional methods as well as other modern methods, such as extreme value theory at quantifying risk. Computationally intensive methods, such as bootstrapping, and Monte Carlo analysis will be used extensively throughout the course with MATLAB as the primary programming tool.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

MSF Thesis work

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of timely special issues in the field of finance. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisites:

SBS-700, MBA-615, MBA-625, MBA-635, MBA-640, MBA-650 MBA-660, and Instructor's approval. Limited to MBA students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides a hands-on, practical learning opportunity for a student-initiated experience at a domestic or international organization. Students work closely with the MBA advisor and faculty advisor regarding career-related learning outcomes. Over the course of a semester, students collaborate with their corporate internship supervisor and complete projects in either accounting, business law and ethics, entrepreneurship, finance, international business, strategy or tax. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Immersion course provides an opportunity for students to link their program work to hands-on experience and visits to real-life global companies. The highly experiential, intensive course combines classroom learning with a direct business and cultural experience. Students will work in teams directly for a client or several clients, solving real challenges, using their analytical skills, knowledge, and experience to develop feasible solutions. Required for all MBA students, the course will be offered globally or nationally to accommodate a variety of student needs.

Approved Finance Electives

Note: Students wishing to take SBS 920 for an elective in the MSF Program must consult with the MSF Advisor for guidance on how to be considered for this option.

London Financial Services Travel Seminar is the only seminar approved as an MSF elective. Any other travel seminar requires MSF Academic Program Director approval.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine techniques and decision-making rules for the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects by corporations and the interaction of investment and financing.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the structure and management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course discusses tools for identifying, measuring, evaluating, and managing risks, such as interest rate, credit, foreign exchange, liquidity, market, sovereign, and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and discusses important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers corporate financial decisions in an international setting with a focus on foreign exchange management and capital budgeting.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the history, terminology, current developments, future challenges and opportunities related to the application of technology to financial discipline. With an emphasis of case studies and guest lecture, the class will discuss algorithmic trading, predictive behavioral analysis, data-driven decision making, mobile-only services, robo advisers, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, RegTech, InsureTech, innovations in lending, and cybersecurity. Students will be required to complete projects based on a statistical software package.

Prerequisites:

FIN 810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The foundation of most of modern financial models and theories are based on neoclassical economists' assumption that most economic agents are rational decision makers. Behavioral finance recognizes that our cognitive biases and errors along with our individuality are not always consistent with the rationality assumption and utility maximization. This course will examine the implications of human psychology, emotions and biases on financial decision-making process as well as potential impact on the overall financial markets.

Prerequisites:

FIN-818

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The nature, techniques, and problems of business forecasting. Covers indicators of business activity, short-run econometrics forecasting models, and the construction of aggregate forecasts as well as forecasts of major economic sectors. Includes long-term predictions and the application of aggregate and sector forecasts for particular industries and firms. Prerequisite: FIN 818.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course addresses the financial needs of private businesses, focusing on the financial motives and needs of private company owners and their advisors. The course is an opportunity to present private finance as a complement to corporate finance/public finance so as to prepare students to better serve or participate in making better financing decisions in the marketplace of privately held businesses.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze the main functions of investment banks such as origination, syndication, and distribution of security issues. They examine pricing of new issues and secondary offerings by investment banks, mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, valuation of closely held companies, and restructuring of distressed companies. The role of investment bankers in restructuring industry and financing governments and ethical issues faced by investment bankers will be studied.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to the language and principles of real estate. Includes an overview of decision-making in the field, with particular emphasis on investment and asset management.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course is designed to provide information on various types of fixed income securities and markets, theories and concepts of the term structure of interest rates and valuation of fixed income securities, measurement and management of risk for traditional bonds and bonds with embedded options, understanding of the role of derivatives such as mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, swaps and exotic options, credit analysis and bond rating, portfolio management and performance evaluation. This course is generally offered as an intensive elective.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine fundamental equity analysis as the convergence of a number of skills such as accounting, financial, and strategic analysis with detective work and experience. Students practice communicating and defending an argument, use a business analysis framework that helps tie together strategy and finance, practice model building and practical approach to profitability in the markets.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an integrated framework for analyzing and measuring risk with a computer simulation approach. A common set of computational tools will be applied across several different financial applications ranging from options pricing to portfolio design. Extensive time will be spent on estimating and simulating 'Value at Risk' which has been a standard for measuring risk in large financial institutions. We will also compare this with other traditional methods as well as other modern methods, such as extreme value theory at quantifying risk. Computationally intensive methods, such as bootstrapping, and Monte Carlo analysis will be used extensively throughout the course with MATLAB as the primary programming tool.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

MSF Thesis work

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of timely special issues in the field of finance. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's approval required

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A student-initiated directed study project, generally for three credit hours and completed within one quarter or semester. The student and faculty advisor must concur on a written proposal and final report, and the proposal must be approved by the Office of the Dean prior to registration.

Prerequisites:

SBS-700, MBA-615, MBA-625, MBA-635, MBA-640, MBA-650 MBA-660, and Instructor's approval. Limited to MBA students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides a hands-on, practical learning opportunity for a student-initiated experience at a domestic or international organization. Students work closely with the MBA advisor and faculty advisor regarding career-related learning outcomes. Over the course of a semester, students collaborate with their corporate internship supervisor and complete projects in either accounting, business law and ethics, entrepreneurship, finance, international business, strategy or tax. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

SBS 700 (Formerly SBS 600). International students must complete 2 academic semesters before approved. Approval of Program Director/Course Coordinator and SBS Dean of Graduate Programs required.

Credits:

0.00

Description:

This internship course is for students who are working in an approved graduate level internship in a company, non-profit organization, or public agency. The internship is described in a written proposal agreed upon by the company sponsor and intern. The internship must be approved by the International Student Services Office (international students only), Program Director/Course Coordinator and SBS Dean of Graduate Programs. The internship is intended for international students who wish to participate in a practical, degree related experience. This course does not count toward a degree. International students must receive Curricular Practical Training (CPT) approval with the International Student Services Office PRIOR to beginning an internship.

Prerequisites:

Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Immersion course provides an opportunity for students to link their program work to hands-on experience and visits to real-life global companies. The highly experiential, intensive course combines classroom learning with a direct business and cultural experience. Students will work in teams directly for a client or several clients, solving real challenges, using their analytical skills, knowledge, and experience to develop feasible solutions. Required for all MBA students, the course will be offered globally or nationally to accommodate a variety of student needs.

Finance Learning Goals & Objectives

Learning Goals Learning Objectives
Demonstrate ability to apply analytical reasoning skills to Finance problems (Analytical Reasoning)
  1. Identify the problem and related issues.
  2. Identify key assumptions.
  3. Generate salient alternatives.
  4. Examine the evidence and source of evidence.
  5. Identify conclusions, implications, and consequences.
Demonstrate application of finance knowledge even in new and unfamiliar circumstances through conceptual understanding (Knowledge Integration)
  1. Acknowledge that the project covers different key functional areas in finance.
  2. Display understanding across different key functional areas in finance.
  3. Identify the methodologies appropriate to solve the problem.
  4. Apply and coordinate the methodologies to get the best solution for the problem.
  5. Display understanding of the implications of the solution for each functional area.
  6. Demonstrate overall ability to integrate knowledge from the different functional areas.
Apply ethical principles to financial decision making (Ethics)
  1. Identify conflicts of interests and pressures that could lead to unethical conduct.
  2. Understand what kinds of questions are helpful to ask oneself when confronting an ethical dilemma.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to identify and take into account the interests of different stakeholders.
  4. Understand how business strategies that facilitate “doing good” can be made consistent with profitability.
  5. Understand that what is legal may not always be ethical and that what is ethical may sometimes not be legal.
  6. Appreciate that ethical norms vary across different countries and cultures.
Demonstrate effective oral communication about financial information (Oral Communication)
  1. Organize the presentation effectively.
  2. Deliver the presentation with attention to volume, clarity, grammatical correctness and precision.
  3. Develop the topic.
  4. Communicate with the audience.
  5. Use communication aids effectively.
  6. Summarize the presentation.
Demonstrate effective written communication about financial information (Written Communication):
  1. Develop a topic with supporting details.
  2. Organize written communication effectively and logically.
  3. Use correct word choice and effective sentence structure.
  4. Employ normal conventions of spelling and grammar.
  5. Provide examples and supporting evidence.
  6. Communicate accurate quantitative information.

Waiver Policy

To waive an MSF prerequisite course, a student must successfully complete equivalent coursework at the undergraduate/graduate level in the seven (7) years prior to MSF matriculation, with a grade of “B” or better, and provide official transcripts (with English translations, if applicable).

To substitute an approved elective for an MSF Core Course, a student must have successfully completed equivalent academic coursework at the undergraduate/graduate level in the seven (7) years prior to MSF matriculation, with a “B” or better, and provide official transcripts (with English translations, if applicable). 

All waiver requests are evaluated upon a student’s acceptance into the MSF program. Students may also elect to take a proficiency exam, for a fee, to gain a waiver for prerequisite coursework. Proficiency exams must be taken in the first semester and are administered on the Boston Campus.

All MSF students must complete a minimum of 32 graduate credits in the Sawyer Business School.

Transfer Policy 

Any candidate seeking transfer credits, taken at the graduate level from an AACSB-accredited graduate program in business, will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. These credits may be considered for transfer if the credits do not apply to a previously completed degree.

Transfer credits must have earned a grade of “B” or better and be taken within seven (7) years prior to entering the Suffolk MSF program. However, at the discretion of the MSF program director, MSF required core courses may not be transferred if the subject material has changed significantly since completion. A maximum of six (6) credits may be considered for transfer.

Students Who Leave Boston Before Their Degree is Complete

Occasionally, Suffolk MSF students must leave the Boston area having not yet completed their degree. You may be able to transfer in six (6) credits of elective courses from an AACSB-accredited MSF Program close to your new place of residence. Courses must be pre-approved by Suffolk's Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs and have a grade of "B" or better.

Students who leave the area may also complete their Suffolk MSF online.

Master of Science in Finance (MSF) Online

Learn more about this degree

STEM Classification

The MSF is a graduate degree program with a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) designation. Due to the demand of graduates with expertise in STEM fields, the Department of Homeland Security permits international students graduating from STEM programs to apply for a 24 month extension of their initial year of Optional Practical Training (OPT). For more detailed information, please visit the ISSO webpage.

MSF Curriculum

12-16 Courses
32-44 Credits

Program Length:

  • Part-time in as few as 20 months

Required Introductory Courses (2 credits)

 

Credits:

1.00

Description:

SBS 700 is the first required course in Suffolk's graduate programs. The course is based on the precepts of experiential learning. Based on the idea that people learn best by participating in meaningful activities, this course provides students with the opportunity to learn about and experience first-hand the many complexities of business and the role of top managers. To accomplish this, students will work in small groups as they take on the roles of top managers in a hands-on behavioral simulation.

Prerequisites:

MSF and MSFSB students only;

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This is a boot camp-style course which introduces students to the basic concepts of math, statistics, accounting, and finance. Given the technical nature of modern finance, this course is designed to prepare students for the challenges of taking advanced finance courses. The course is based on lectures, problem solving, and discussion of concepts.

Required Prerequisite Courses (12 credits)

Must be taken or waived prior to enrolling in Finance Core Courses.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is required for MSA and MSF students and it is also a recommended elective for MBA students with a finance concentration. This course develops an understanding of the concepts, tools, and applications of economics at both the micro and macro level. The focus is on how economic analysis influences decision-making in the public and private sectors and how economic tools can enhance managerial effectiveness and organizational efficiency. The economic role of government and its impact on the business environment in a market economy, the factors that influence firm performance and competitiveness, and the role of financial institutions in the current economic environment are discussed throughout the course.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the concepts and applications of data analytics on large data sets for managerial decision making. Students will learn foundation skills needed to extract valuable information out of data, including various descriptive and predictive analytics techniques. Students develop knowledge of data visualization and interpretation coupled with conveying data, results and insights. Issues on data acquisition, storage and management will be discussed.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course deals with the structure and information content of the three principal financial statements of profit-directed companies, namely the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows. It develops skill in using accounting information to analyze the performance and financial condition of a company, and to facilitate decision making, planning and budgeting, and performance appraisal in a managerial context. This course also contains an experiential component by offering guided inquiry and real company cases.

Prerequisites:

1 course from each of the following groups: MBA-615 or SBS-603; MBA-625 or SBS-604; MBA-640 or ACCT-800; These courses may be taken prior to or concurrently with MBA-650.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces the basic principles of corporate finance. The main focus is on fundamental principles such as time value of money, asset valuation, and risk and return tradeoff. Topics to be covered also include cost of capital, capital budgeting, and capital structure.

Finance Core Courses (15 credits)

 

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of financial statements, this course is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of business entity. This course also analyzes financial services industry: bank financial statement analysis with an emphasis on off- balance sheet lending and borrowing, capital structure issues, and innovations in mortgage-backed securities and asset-based financing techniques are covered. Additionally, the tax implications of various derivative securities is studied.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course extends the body of knowledge acquired in MBA 650. Students expand knowledge of dividend theory, capital structure theory, capital budgeting, long-term financing decisions, cash management and corporate restructuring, market efficiency, and risk and liability management.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine markets for investment procedures, valuation models, basic analytical techniques, and factors influencing risk/return tradeoffs. This course emphasizes the professional approach to managing investment assets. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, options, and futures.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students explore the pricing of options and futures contracts, the characteristics of the markets in which these contracts are traded, options and futures strategies, and the application of these contracts in the hedging of financial positions. In addition, students are exposed to swap markets and a variety of swaps.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to mathematical statistics and basic econometrics. They study fundamental econometric tools as well as hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, linear regressions, simultaneous equations, and models of qualitative choice.

Capstone Course (3 credits)

Should be taken as late in the program as possible.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-808, FIN-810, and FIN-814. (FIN-814 can be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine financial theories, techniques, and models applied to the study of corporate financial decisions, aspects of corporate strategy, industry structure, and the functioning of capital markets.

Concentration Descriptions and Applicable Elective Courses (12 credits)

Choose four (4) elective courses from the approved MSF electives list. Courses must be taken within the Sawyer Business School, 800-level or above (exception MBA 740).

If a concentration is declared, three electives must be in one concentration area. Concentrations include: Corporate Finance, Investments or Risk Management. The schedule of when courses within a concentration are offered vary by semester. 

Students who declare a concentration must submit an SBS Graduate Program Concentration Request Form. Students are encouraged to meet with their advisor before they declare a concentration

The concentration appears on the transcript, not the diploma.

 

Corporate Finance Concentration

Choose three courses from the following list:

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine techniques and decision-making rules for the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects by corporations and the interaction of investment and financing.

Prerequisites:

FIN-818

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The nature, techniques, and problems of business forecasting. Covers indicators of business activity, short-run econometrics forecasting models, and the construction of aggregate forecasts as well as forecasts of major economic sectors. Includes long-term predictions and the application of aggregate and sector forecasts for particular industries and firms. Prerequisite: FIN 818.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze the main functions of investment banks such as origination, syndication, and distribution of security issues. They examine pricing of new issues and secondary offerings by investment banks, mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, valuation of closely held companies, and restructuring of distressed companies. The role of investment bankers in restructuring industry and financing governments and ethical issues faced by investment bankers will be studied.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Investments Concentration

Choose three courses from the following list:

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

Prerequisites:

FIN 810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

Prerequisites:

FIN-818

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The nature, techniques, and problems of business forecasting. Covers indicators of business activity, short-run econometrics forecasting models, and the construction of aggregate forecasts as well as forecasts of major economic sectors. Includes long-term predictions and the application of aggregate and sector forecasts for particular industries and firms. Prerequisite: FIN 818.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze the main functions of investment banks such as origination, syndication, and distribution of security issues. They examine pricing of new issues and secondary offerings by investment banks, mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, valuation of closely held companies, and restructuring of distressed companies. The role of investment bankers in restructuring industry and financing governments and ethical issues faced by investment bankers will be studied.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Risk Management Concentration

Choose three courses from the following list:

*Note: Students who choose the Risk Management Elective Concentration must take FIN 816 and FIN 882 as part of their program.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the structure and management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course discusses tools for identifying, measuring, evaluating, and managing risks, such as interest rate, credit, foreign exchange, liquidity, market, sovereign, and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and discusses important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Prerequisites:

FIN 810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Prerequisites:

Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Immersion course provides an opportunity for students to link their program work to hands-on experience and visits to real-life global companies. The highly experiential, intensive course combines classroom learning with a direct business and cultural experience. Students will work in teams directly for a client or several clients, solving real challenges, using their analytical skills, knowledge, and experience to develop feasible solutions. Required for all MBA students, the course will be offered globally or nationally to accommodate a variety of student needs.

Approved Finance Electives

 

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine techniques and decision-making rules for the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects by corporations and the interaction of investment and financing.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the structure and management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course discusses tools for identifying, measuring, evaluating, and managing risks, such as interest rate, credit, foreign exchange, liquidity, market, sovereign, and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and discusses important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Prerequisites:

FIN 810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

Prerequisites:

FIN-818

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The nature, techniques, and problems of business forecasting. Covers indicators of business activity, short-run econometrics forecasting models, and the construction of aggregate forecasts as well as forecasts of major economic sectors. Includes long-term predictions and the application of aggregate and sector forecasts for particular industries and firms. Prerequisite: FIN 818.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze the main functions of investment banks such as origination, syndication, and distribution of security issues. They examine pricing of new issues and secondary offerings by investment banks, mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, valuation of closely held companies, and restructuring of distressed companies. The role of investment bankers in restructuring industry and financing governments and ethical issues faced by investment bankers will be studied.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Waiver Policy

To waive an MSF prerequisite course, a student must successfully complete equivalent coursework at the undergraduate/graduate level in the seven (7) years prior to MSF matriculation, with a grade of “B” or better, and provide official transcripts (with English translations, if applicable).

To substitute an approved elective for an MSF Core Course, a student must have successfully completed equivalent academic coursework at the undergraduate/graduate level in the seven (7) years prior to MSF matriculation, with a “B” or better, and provide official transcripts (with English translations, if applicable).

All waiver requests are evaluated upon a student’s acceptance into the MSF program. Students may also elect to take a proficiency exam, for a fee, to gain a waiver for prerequisite coursework. Proficiency exams must be taken in the first semester and are administered on the Boston Campus.

All MSF students must complete a minimum of 32 graduate credits in the Sawyer Business School.

Transfer Credit Policy

Any candidate seeking transfer credits, taken at the graduate level from an AACSB-accredited graduate program in business, will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. These credits may be considered for transfer if the credits do not apply to a previously completed degree.

Transfer credits must have earned a grade of “B” or better and be taken within seven (7) years prior to entering the Suffolk MSF program. However, at the discretion of the MSF program director, MSF required core courses may not be transferred if the subject material has changed significantly since completion. A maximum of six (6) credits may be considered for transfer.

Accelerated MSF for Attorneys

STEM Classification

The MSF is a graduate degree program with a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) designation. Due to the demand of graduates with expertise in STEM fields, the Department of Homeland Security permits international students graduating from STEM programs to apply for a 24 month extension of their initial year of Optional Practical Training (OPT). For more detailed information, please visit the ISSO webpage.


Curriculum

12-15 Courses
32-41 Credits

Program Length:

  • Full-time in as few as 9 months
  • Part-time in as few as 21 months

Required Introductory Courses (2 credits)

Must be taken on campus in first semester of program.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

SBS 700 is the first required course in Suffolk's graduate programs. The course is based on the precepts of experiential learning. Based on the idea that people learn best by participating in meaningful activities, this course provides students with the opportunity to learn about and experience first-hand the many complexities of business and the role of top managers. To accomplish this, students will work in small groups as they take on the roles of top managers in a hands-on behavioral simulation.

Prerequisites:

MSF and MSFSB students only;

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This is a boot camp-style course which introduces students to the basic concepts of math, statistics, accounting, and finance. Given the technical nature of modern finance, this course is designed to prepare students for the challenges of taking advanced finance courses. The course is based on lectures, problem solving, and discussion of concepts.

Required Prerequisite Courses (12 credits)

Must be taken or waived prior to enrolling in Finance Core Courses.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is required for MSA and MSF students and it is also a recommended elective for MBA students with a finance concentration. This course develops an understanding of the concepts, tools, and applications of economics at both the micro and macro level. The focus is on how economic analysis influences decision-making in the public and private sectors and how economic tools can enhance managerial effectiveness and organizational efficiency. The economic role of government and its impact on the business environment in a market economy, the factors that influence firm performance and competitiveness, and the role of financial institutions in the current economic environment are discussed throughout the course.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the concepts and applications of data analytics on large data sets for managerial decision making. Students will learn foundation skills needed to extract valuable information out of data, including various descriptive and predictive analytics techniques. Students develop knowledge of data visualization and interpretation coupled with conveying data, results and insights. Issues on data acquisition, storage and management will be discussed.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course deals with the structure and information content of the three principal financial statements of profit-directed companies, namely the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows. It develops skill in using accounting information to analyze the performance and financial condition of a company, and to facilitate decision making, planning and budgeting, and performance appraisal in a managerial context. This course also contains an experiential component by offering guided inquiry and real company cases.

Prerequisites:

1 course from each of the following groups: MBA-615 or SBS-603; MBA-625 or SBS-604; MBA-640 or ACCT-800; These courses may be taken prior to or concurrently with MBA-650.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces the basic principles of corporate finance. The main focus is on fundamental principles such as time value of money, asset valuation, and risk and return tradeoff. Topics to be covered also include cost of capital, capital budgeting, and capital structure.

Finance Core Courses (15 credits)

Must be taken on campus unless permission to take online granted by Academic Program Director.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of financial statements, this course is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of business entity. This course also analyzes financial services industry: bank financial statement analysis with an emphasis on off- balance sheet lending and borrowing, capital structure issues, and innovations in mortgage-backed securities and asset-based financing techniques are covered. Additionally, the tax implications of various derivative securities is studied.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course extends the body of knowledge acquired in MBA 650. Students expand knowledge of dividend theory, capital structure theory, capital budgeting, long-term financing decisions, cash management and corporate restructuring, market efficiency, and risk and liability management.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine markets for investment procedures, valuation models, basic analytical techniques, and factors influencing risk/return tradeoffs. This course emphasizes the professional approach to managing investment assets. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, options, and futures.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students explore the pricing of options and futures contracts, the characteristics of the markets in which these contracts are traded, options and futures strategies, and the application of these contracts in the hedging of financial positions. In addition, students are exposed to swap markets and a variety of swaps.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to mathematical statistics and basic econometrics. They study fundamental econometric tools as well as hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, linear regressions, simultaneous equations, and models of qualitative choice.

Capstone Course (3 credits)

Should be taken as late in the program as possible. Must be taken on campus, unless permission to take online is granted by the Academic Program Director.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-808, FIN-810, and FIN-814. (FIN-814 can be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine financial theories, techniques, and models applied to the study of corporate financial decisions, aspects of corporate strategy, industry structure, and the functioning of capital markets.

Concentration Descriptions and Applicable Elective Courses (9-12 credits)

Choose four (4) elective courses from the approved MSF electives list. Choose three (3) elective courses if some or none of the prerequisite requirements are waived. Courses must be taken on campus, within Sawyer Business School, 800-level or above (exception MBA 740), unless permission to take online is granted by the Academic Director.

If a concentration is declared, three or four electives must be in one concentration area. Concentrations include: Corporate Finance, FinTech, Investments or Risk Management.  The schedule of when courses within a concentration are offered vary by semester.

Students who declare a concentration must submit an SBS Graduate Program Concentration Request Form. Students are encouraged to meet with their advisor before they declare a concentration.

The concentration appears on the transcript, not the diploma.

 

Corporate Finance Concentration

Choose three courses from the following list:

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine techniques and decision-making rules for the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects by corporations and the interaction of investment and financing.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers corporate financial decisions in an international setting with a focus on foreign exchange management and capital budgeting.

Prerequisites:

FIN-818

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The nature, techniques, and problems of business forecasting. Covers indicators of business activity, short-run econometrics forecasting models, and the construction of aggregate forecasts as well as forecasts of major economic sectors. Includes long-term predictions and the application of aggregate and sector forecasts for particular industries and firms. Prerequisite: FIN 818.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course addresses the financial needs of private businesses, focusing on the financial motives and needs of private company owners and their advisors. The course is an opportunity to present private finance as a complement to corporate finance/public finance so as to prepare students to better serve or participate in making better financing decisions in the marketplace of privately held businesses.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze the main functions of investment banks such as origination, syndication, and distribution of security issues. They examine pricing of new issues and secondary offerings by investment banks, mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, valuation of closely held companies, and restructuring of distressed companies. The role of investment bankers in restructuring industry and financing governments and ethical issues faced by investment bankers will be studied.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

MSF Thesis work

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of timely special issues in the field of finance. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's approval required

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A student-initiated directed study project, generally for three credit hours and completed within one quarter or semester. The student and faculty advisor must concur on a written proposal and final report, and the proposal must be approved by the Office of the Dean prior to registration.

Prerequisites:

SBS-700, MBA-615, MBA-625, MBA-635, MBA-640, MBA-650 MBA-660, and Instructor's approval. Limited to MBA students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides a hands-on, practical learning opportunity for a student-initiated experience at a domestic or international organization. Students work closely with the MBA advisor and faculty advisor regarding career-related learning outcomes. Over the course of a semester, students collaborate with their corporate internship supervisor and complete projects in either accounting, business law and ethics, entrepreneurship, finance, international business, strategy or tax. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the history, terminology, current developments, future challenges and opportunities related to the application of technology to financial discipline. With an emphasis of case studies and guest lecture, the class will discuss algorithmic trading, predictive behavioral analysis, data-driven decision making, mobile-only services, robo advisers, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, RegTech, InsureTech, innovations in lending, and cybersecurity. Students will be required to complete projects based on a statistical software package.

FinTech Concentration

Required Courses (2 courses, 6 credits)

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the history, terminology, current developments, future challenges and opportunities related to the application of technology to financial discipline. With an emphasis of case studies and guest lecture, the class will discuss algorithmic trading, predictive behavioral analysis, data-driven decision making, mobile-only services, robo advisers, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, RegTech, InsureTech, innovations in lending, and cybersecurity. Students will be required to complete projects based on a statistical software package.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is introductory to use Python for business analytics, intended for students with little or no programming experience. Students will learn how to program with Python and how to use it in conjunction with scientific computing modules and libraries to compute, analyze, and visualize data to make analytics-driven decisions in finance, operations, marketing, accounting, and management. By the end of this course, students will have confidence and understanding of how to program in Python, know how to create and manipulate arrays using numpy library, know how to use pandas library to create and analyze data sets, know how to use matplotlib and seaborn libraries to create beautiful data visualization, and have an understanding of scikit-learn for data analytics.

Finance Elective Course (3 credits)

Take one from the following list of electives:

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course is designed to provide information on various types of fixed income securities and markets, theories and concepts of the term structure of interest rates and valuation of fixed income securities, measurement and management of risk for traditional bonds and bonds with embedded options, understanding of the role of derivatives such as mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, swaps and exotic options, credit analysis and bond rating, portfolio management and performance evaluation. This course is generally offered as an intensive elective.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine fundamental equity analysis as the convergence of a number of skills such as accounting, financial, and strategic analysis with detective work and experience. Students practice communicating and defending an argument, use a business analysis framework that helps tie together strategy and finance, practice model building and practical approach to profitability in the markets.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an integrated framework for analyzing and measuring risk with a computer simulation approach. A common set of computational tools will be applied across several different financial applications ranging from options pricing to portfolio design. Extensive time will be spent on estimating and simulating 'Value at Risk' which has been a standard for measuring risk in large financial institutions. We will also compare this with other traditional methods as well as other modern methods, such as extreme value theory at quantifying risk. Computationally intensive methods, such as bootstrapping, and Monte Carlo analysis will be used extensively throughout the course with MATLAB as the primary programming tool.

ISOM Elective (3 credits)

Take one from the following list of electives:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Analyzes various real world business problems and explores the full scope of MS Excel's formulas, functions and features to create data models and present solutions. Students analyze data, design custom charts, graphs, PivotTables and Pivot charts, create three-dimensional workbooks, build links between files and endow worksheets with decision-making capabilities. Students conduct What-If Analysis, utilizing Scenario Manager, Solver, Data Tables and Goal Seek. This course provides the skills necessary to pass the Microsoft Office Specialist Certification in Excel.

Prerequisites:

This course was formerly ISOM-815

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the importance of information as an organizational resource, role of big data in organizations, and the application of tools to provide high quality information. Students will be able to select the most appropriate data management tool (e.g., SQL vs. non-SQL databases) to business scenarios. Develops the skills needed to succeed in today's big data environment through the application of data management techniques, cases and exercises. Students will become proficient in designing databases using entity relationship modeling and normalization, in building and querying databases of various sizes with Access and SQL (an industry standard), preparing high quality data and applying data visualizing techniques. Students will complete a series of business-oriented hands-on exercises, prepare cases, and complete projects on database design and big data.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides students with an understanding of the nature of enterprise integration and enterprise software, business process reengineering, the implementation within organizations, and strategies for maximizing benefits from enterprise systems. To manage complex business processes in today's multi-national, wired and wireless world, firms need integrated software packages to manage their global business. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems are used to support a wide range of business functions for all companies across industries. With ERP systems, business managers are able to make decisions with accurate, consistent, and current data. Intensive lab projects on the SAP ERP System with real life business scenarios are utilized to reinforce understanding of enterprise systems functionality and business process concepts.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course teaches students how to build and maintain data warehouses, and how to analyze and use this data as a source for business intelligence and competitive advantage. Students study data mining concepts and the use of analytics tools and methods for producing business knowledge. Topics include extraction, transformation and loading; decision support systems; text, web and data mining models as well as data presentation/visualization including dashboards, scorecards and various charts. Students build a data warehouse and practice the extraction and filtering process used to produce high quality data warehouses. Students will use tools such as MS Excel, SAP Lumira, Tableau and SAP Business Warehouse.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Predictive analytics make predictions about unknown future events. It is crucial for companies to ask the right questions, perform rigorous analysis, and take actions that will result in the most desirable outcomes. This course develops students' capability in applying the core concepts and techniques of predictive analytics to identify opportunity, recognize patterns, predict outcomes, and recommend optimal actions within the context of organizational decision-making. Topics include: business analytics life cycle, data pre- processing, linear and nonlinear regression, tree-based methods, model assessment and selection, and resampling methods.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the fundamental principles of information and big data security. Security vulnerabilities, threats and risks will be analyzed. Common types of computer attacks and counter-attacks will be identified. Security technologies such as biometrics, firewalls, intrusion detection systems and cryptography systems will be applied in conjunction with human based safeguards. Business continuity and disaster recovery planning will be covered. Students will then learn how to design and build a layered security defense combining several of the above controls to address the different challenges to data security. The managerial concerns of security and privacy of information will be stressed including the legal and privacy issues. Best practices for planning and auditing security and privacy will then be covered.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces business intelligence and data analytics. Business intelligence and data analytics help organizations in strategic and operational decision making by improving performance management, optimizing customer relations, monitoring business activity, and improving decision support. On a macro-level, the class will discuss business cases for the adoption of business intelligence and data analytics. We will discuss technologies and processes for gathering, storing, accessing, and analyzing data to provide users with better insights and business decisions. On a micro-level, students will use a variety of tools to build their skills in analyzing data to solve business problems. In summary, this course provides a conceptual understanding of business data resources and the development of capabilities for data preparation, warehousing, selection, description, mining, interpretation, visualization, communication, and innovation.

Investments Concentration

Choose three courses from the following list:

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the history, terminology, current developments, future challenges and opportunities related to the application of technology to financial discipline. With an emphasis of case studies and guest lecture, the class will discuss algorithmic trading, predictive behavioral analysis, data-driven decision making, mobile-only services, robo advisers, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, RegTech, InsureTech, innovations in lending, and cybersecurity. Students will be required to complete projects based on a statistical software package.

Prerequisites:

FIN 810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

Prerequisites:

FIN-818

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The nature, techniques, and problems of business forecasting. Covers indicators of business activity, short-run econometrics forecasting models, and the construction of aggregate forecasts as well as forecasts of major economic sectors. Includes long-term predictions and the application of aggregate and sector forecasts for particular industries and firms. Prerequisite: FIN 818.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The foundation of most of modern financial models and theories are based on neoclassical economists' assumption that most economic agents are rational decision makers. Behavioral finance recognizes that our cognitive biases and errors along with our individuality are not always consistent with the rationality assumption and utility maximization. This course will examine the implications of human psychology, emotions and biases on financial decision-making process as well as potential impact on the overall financial markets.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course addresses the financial needs of private businesses, focusing on the financial motives and needs of private company owners and their advisors. The course is an opportunity to present private finance as a complement to corporate finance/public finance so as to prepare students to better serve or participate in making better financing decisions in the marketplace of privately held businesses.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze the main functions of investment banks such as origination, syndication, and distribution of security issues. They examine pricing of new issues and secondary offerings by investment banks, mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, valuation of closely held companies, and restructuring of distressed companies. The role of investment bankers in restructuring industry and financing governments and ethical issues faced by investment bankers will be studied.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to the language and principles of real estate. Includes an overview of decision-making in the field, with particular emphasis on investment and asset management.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course is designed to provide information on various types of fixed income securities and markets, theories and concepts of the term structure of interest rates and valuation of fixed income securities, measurement and management of risk for traditional bonds and bonds with embedded options, understanding of the role of derivatives such as mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, swaps and exotic options, credit analysis and bond rating, portfolio management and performance evaluation. This course is generally offered as an intensive elective.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine fundamental equity analysis as the convergence of a number of skills such as accounting, financial, and strategic analysis with detective work and experience. Students practice communicating and defending an argument, use a business analysis framework that helps tie together strategy and finance, practice model building and practical approach to profitability in the markets.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an integrated framework for analyzing and measuring risk with a computer simulation approach. A common set of computational tools will be applied across several different financial applications ranging from options pricing to portfolio design. Extensive time will be spent on estimating and simulating 'Value at Risk' which has been a standard for measuring risk in large financial institutions. We will also compare this with other traditional methods as well as other modern methods, such as extreme value theory at quantifying risk. Computationally intensive methods, such as bootstrapping, and Monte Carlo analysis will be used extensively throughout the course with MATLAB as the primary programming tool.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

MSF Thesis work

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of timely special issues in the field of finance. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's approval required

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A student-initiated directed study project, generally for three credit hours and completed within one quarter or semester. The student and faculty advisor must concur on a written proposal and final report, and the proposal must be approved by the Office of the Dean prior to registration.

Prerequisites:

SBS-700, MBA-615, MBA-625, MBA-635, MBA-640, MBA-650 MBA-660, and Instructor's approval. Limited to MBA students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides a hands-on, practical learning opportunity for a student-initiated experience at a domestic or international organization. Students work closely with the MBA advisor and faculty advisor regarding career-related learning outcomes. Over the course of a semester, students collaborate with their corporate internship supervisor and complete projects in either accounting, business law and ethics, entrepreneurship, finance, international business, strategy or tax. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Immersion course provides an opportunity for students to link their program work to hands-on experience and visits to real-life global companies. The highly experiential, intensive course combines classroom learning with a direct business and cultural experience. Students will work in teams directly for a client or several clients, solving real challenges, using their analytical skills, knowledge, and experience to develop feasible solutions. Required for all MBA students, the course will be offered globally or nationally to accommodate a variety of student needs.

Risk Management Concentration

Choose three courses from the following list:

*Note: Students who choose the Risk Management Elective Concentration must take FIN 816 and FIN 882 as part of their program.


Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the structure and management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course discusses tools for identifying, measuring, evaluating, and managing risks, such as interest rate, credit, foreign exchange, liquidity, market, sovereign, and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and discusses important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the history, terminology, current developments, future challenges and opportunities related to the application of technology to financial discipline. With an emphasis of case studies and guest lecture, the class will discuss algorithmic trading, predictive behavioral analysis, data-driven decision making, mobile-only services, robo advisers, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, RegTech, InsureTech, innovations in lending, and cybersecurity. Students will be required to complete projects based on a statistical software package.

Prerequisites:

FIN 810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The foundation of most of modern financial models and theories are based on neoclassical economists' assumption that most economic agents are rational decision makers. Behavioral finance recognizes that our cognitive biases and errors along with our individuality are not always consistent with the rationality assumption and utility maximization. This course will examine the implications of human psychology, emotions and biases on financial decision-making process as well as potential impact on the overall financial markets.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course is designed to provide information on various types of fixed income securities and markets, theories and concepts of the term structure of interest rates and valuation of fixed income securities, measurement and management of risk for traditional bonds and bonds with embedded options, understanding of the role of derivatives such as mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, swaps and exotic options, credit analysis and bond rating, portfolio management and performance evaluation. This course is generally offered as an intensive elective.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an integrated framework for analyzing and measuring risk with a computer simulation approach. A common set of computational tools will be applied across several different financial applications ranging from options pricing to portfolio design. Extensive time will be spent on estimating and simulating 'Value at Risk' which has been a standard for measuring risk in large financial institutions. We will also compare this with other traditional methods as well as other modern methods, such as extreme value theory at quantifying risk. Computationally intensive methods, such as bootstrapping, and Monte Carlo analysis will be used extensively throughout the course with MATLAB as the primary programming tool.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

MSF Thesis work

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of timely special issues in the field of finance. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's approval required

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A student-initiated directed study project, generally for three credit hours and completed within one quarter or semester. The student and faculty advisor must concur on a written proposal and final report, and the proposal must be approved by the Office of the Dean prior to registration.

Prerequisites:

SBS-700, MBA-615, MBA-625, MBA-635, MBA-640, MBA-650 MBA-660, and Instructor's approval. Limited to MBA students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides a hands-on, practical learning opportunity for a student-initiated experience at a domestic or international organization. Students work closely with the MBA advisor and faculty advisor regarding career-related learning outcomes. Over the course of a semester, students collaborate with their corporate internship supervisor and complete projects in either accounting, business law and ethics, entrepreneurship, finance, international business, strategy or tax. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Immersion course provides an opportunity for students to link their program work to hands-on experience and visits to real-life global companies. The highly experiential, intensive course combines classroom learning with a direct business and cultural experience. Students will work in teams directly for a client or several clients, solving real challenges, using their analytical skills, knowledge, and experience to develop feasible solutions. Required for all MBA students, the course will be offered globally or nationally to accommodate a variety of student needs.


Approved Finance Electives

Note: Students wishing to take SBS 920 for an elective in the MSF Program must consult with the MSF Advisor for guidance on how to be considered for this option.

London Financial Services Travel Seminar is the only seminar approved as an MSF elective. Any other travel seminar requires MSF Academic Program Director approval.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine techniques and decision-making rules for the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects by corporations and the interaction of investment and financing.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the structure and management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course discusses tools for identifying, measuring, evaluating, and managing risks, such as interest rate, credit, foreign exchange, liquidity, market, sovereign, and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and discusses important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers corporate financial decisions in an international setting with a focus on foreign exchange management and capital budgeting.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the history, terminology, current developments, future challenges and opportunities related to the application of technology to financial discipline. With an emphasis of case studies and guest lecture, the class will discuss algorithmic trading, predictive behavioral analysis, data-driven decision making, mobile-only services, robo advisers, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, RegTech, InsureTech, innovations in lending, and cybersecurity. Students will be required to complete projects based on a statistical software package.

Prerequisites:

FIN 810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The foundation of most of modern financial models and theories are based on neoclassical economists' assumption that most economic agents are rational decision makers. Behavioral finance recognizes that our cognitive biases and errors along with our individuality are not always consistent with the rationality assumption and utility maximization. This course will examine the implications of human psychology, emotions and biases on financial decision-making process as well as potential impact on the overall financial markets.

Prerequisites:

FIN-818

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The nature, techniques, and problems of business forecasting. Covers indicators of business activity, short-run econometrics forecasting models, and the construction of aggregate forecasts as well as forecasts of major economic sectors. Includes long-term predictions and the application of aggregate and sector forecasts for particular industries and firms. Prerequisite: FIN 818.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course addresses the financial needs of private businesses, focusing on the financial motives and needs of private company owners and their advisors. The course is an opportunity to present private finance as a complement to corporate finance/public finance so as to prepare students to better serve or participate in making better financing decisions in the marketplace of privately held businesses.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course is designed to provide information on various types of fixed income securities and markets, theories and concepts of the term structure of interest rates and valuation of fixed income securities, measurement and management of risk for traditional bonds and bonds with embedded options, understanding of the role of derivatives such as mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, swaps and exotic options, credit analysis and bond rating, portfolio management and performance evaluation. This course is generally offered as an intensive elective.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze the main functions of investment banks such as origination, syndication, and distribution of security issues. They examine pricing of new issues and secondary offerings by investment banks, mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, valuation of closely held companies, and restructuring of distressed companies. The role of investment bankers in restructuring industry and financing governments and ethical issues faced by investment bankers will be studied.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to the language and principles of real estate. Includes an overview of decision-making in the field, with particular emphasis on investment and asset management.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine fundamental equity analysis as the convergence of a number of skills such as accounting, financial, and strategic analysis with detective work and experience. Students practice communicating and defending an argument, use a business analysis framework that helps tie together strategy and finance, practice model building and practical approach to profitability in the markets.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an integrated framework for analyzing and measuring risk with a computer simulation approach. A common set of computational tools will be applied across several different financial applications ranging from options pricing to portfolio design. Extensive time will be spent on estimating and simulating 'Value at Risk' which has been a standard for measuring risk in large financial institutions. We will also compare this with other traditional methods as well as other modern methods, such as extreme value theory at quantifying risk. Computationally intensive methods, such as bootstrapping, and Monte Carlo analysis will be used extensively throughout the course with MATLAB as the primary programming tool.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

MSF Thesis work

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of timely special issues in the field of finance. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's approval required

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A student-initiated directed study project, generally for three credit hours and completed within one quarter or semester. The student and faculty advisor must concur on a written proposal and final report, and the proposal must be approved by the Office of the Dean prior to registration.

Prerequisites:

SBS-700, MBA-615, MBA-625, MBA-635, MBA-640, MBA-650 MBA-660, and Instructor's approval. Limited to MBA students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides a hands-on, practical learning opportunity for a student-initiated experience at a domestic or international organization. Students work closely with the MBA advisor and faculty advisor regarding career-related learning outcomes. Over the course of a semester, students collaborate with their corporate internship supervisor and complete projects in either accounting, business law and ethics, entrepreneurship, finance, international business, strategy or tax. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

SBS 700 (Formerly SBS 600). International students must complete 2 academic semesters before approved. Approval of Program Director/Course Coordinator and SBS Dean of Graduate Programs required.

Credits:

0.00

Description:

This internship course is for students who are working in an approved graduate level internship in a company, non-profit organization, or public agency. The internship is described in a written proposal agreed upon by the company sponsor and intern. The internship must be approved by the International Student Services Office (international students only), Program Director/Course Coordinator and SBS Dean of Graduate Programs. The internship is intended for international students who wish to participate in a practical, degree related experience. This course does not count toward a degree. International students must receive Curricular Practical Training (CPT) approval with the International Student Services Office PRIOR to beginning an internship.

Prerequisites:

Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Immersion course provides an opportunity for students to link their program work to hands-on experience and visits to real-life global companies. The highly experiential, intensive course combines classroom learning with a direct business and cultural experience. Students will work in teams directly for a client or several clients, solving real challenges, using their analytical skills, knowledge, and experience to develop feasible solutions. Required for all MBA students, the course will be offered globally or nationally to accommodate a variety of student needs.

Waiver Policy

To waive an MSF prerequisite course, a student must successfully complete equivalent coursework at the undergraduate/graduate level in the seven (7) years prior to MSF matriculation, with a grade of “B” or better, and provide official transcripts (with English translations, if applicable).

To substitute an approved elective for an MSF Core Course, a student must have successfully completed equivalent academic coursework at the undergraduate/graduate level in the seven (7) years prior to MSF matriculation, with a “B” or better, and provide official transcripts (with English translations, if applicable). 

All waiver requests are evaluated upon a student’s acceptance into the MSF program. Students may also elect to take a proficiency exam, for a fee, to gain a waiver for prerequisite coursework. Proficiency exams must be taken in the first semester and are administered on the Boston Campus.

All MSF students must complete a minimum of 32 graduate credits in the Sawyer Business School.

Transfer Policy 

Any candidate seeking transfer credits, taken at the graduate level from an AACSB-accredited graduate program in business, will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. These credits may be considered for transfer if the credits do not apply to a previously completed degree.

Transfer credits must have earned a grade of “B” or better and be taken within seven (7) years prior to entering the Suffolk MSF program. However, at the discretion of the MSF program director, MSF required core courses may not be transferred if the subject material has changed significantly since completion. A maximum of six (6) credits may be considered for transfer.

Students Who Leave Boston Before Their Degree is Complete

Occasionally, Suffolk MSF students must leave the Boston area having not yet completed their degree. You may be able to transfer in six (6) credits of elective courses from an AACSB-accredited MSF Program close to your new place of residence. Courses must be pre-approved by Suffolk's Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs and have a grade of "B" or better.

Students who leave the area may also complete their Suffolk MSF online.

Graduate Certificate in Corporate Finance

Learn more about this certificate


Curriculum

5 Courses
15 Credits

Program Length

Full-time in as few as 4 months
Part-time in as few as 9 months


Required Course (3 credits)

Prerequisites:

Take MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course extends the body of knowledge acquired in MBA 650. Students expand knowledge of dividend theory, capital structure theory, capital budgeting, long-term financing decisions, cash management and corporate restructuring, market efficiency, and risk and liability management.

Electives (12 credits)

Four (4) courses are electives. Three (3) of the electives must be from the approved elective list for Corporate Finance. One (1) elective can be any course from the approved MSF electives list. If your choice of elective has a prerequisite, then the prerequisite must be met prior to enrolling in the elective.
 

Approved Corporate Finance Elective List

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine techniques and decision-making rules for the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects by corporations and the interaction of investment and financing.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers corporate financial decisions in an international setting with a focus on foreign exchange management and capital budgeting.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the history, terminology, current developments, future challenges and opportunities related to the application of technology to financial discipline. With an emphasis of case studies and guest lecture, the class will discuss algorithmic trading, predictive behavioral analysis, data-driven decision making, mobile-only services, robo advisers, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, RegTech, InsureTech, innovations in lending, and cybersecurity. Students will be required to complete projects based on a statistical software package.

Prerequisites:

FIN-818

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The nature, techniques, and problems of business forecasting. Covers indicators of business activity, short-run econometrics forecasting models, and the construction of aggregate forecasts as well as forecasts of major economic sectors. Includes long-term predictions and the application of aggregate and sector forecasts for particular industries and firms. Prerequisite: FIN 818.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course addresses the financial needs of private businesses, focusing on the financial motives and needs of private company owners and their advisors. The course is an opportunity to present private finance as a complement to corporate finance/public finance so as to prepare students to better serve or participate in making better financing decisions in the marketplace of privately held businesses.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze the main functions of investment banks such as origination, syndication, and distribution of security issues. They examine pricing of new issues and secondary offerings by investment banks, mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, valuation of closely held companies, and restructuring of distressed companies. The role of investment bankers in restructuring industry and financing governments and ethical issues faced by investment bankers will be studied.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

MSF Thesis work

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of timely special issues in the field of finance. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled.

Approved Finance Electives

Note: Students wishing to take SBS 920 for an elective in the MSF Program must consult with the MSF Advisor for guidance on how to be considered for this option.

London Financial Services Travel Seminar is the only seminar approved as an MSF elective. Any other travel seminar requires MSF Academic Program Director approval.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine techniques and decision-making rules for the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects by corporations and the interaction of investment and financing.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the structure and management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course discusses tools for identifying, measuring, evaluating, and managing risks, such as interest rate, credit, foreign exchange, liquidity, market, sovereign, and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and discusses important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers corporate financial decisions in an international setting with a focus on foreign exchange management and capital budgeting.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the history, terminology, current developments, future challenges and opportunities related to the application of technology to financial discipline. With an emphasis of case studies and guest lecture, the class will discuss algorithmic trading, predictive behavioral analysis, data-driven decision making, mobile-only services, robo advisers, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, RegTech, InsureTech, innovations in lending, and cybersecurity. Students will be required to complete projects based on a statistical software package.

Prerequisites:

FIN 810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The foundation of most of modern financial models and theories are based on neoclassical economists' assumption that most economic agents are rational decision makers. Behavioral finance recognizes that our cognitive biases and errors along with our individuality are not always consistent with the rationality assumption and utility maximization. This course will examine the implications of human psychology, emotions and biases on financial decision-making process as well as potential impact on the overall financial markets.

Prerequisites:

FIN-818

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The nature, techniques, and problems of business forecasting. Covers indicators of business activity, short-run econometrics forecasting models, and the construction of aggregate forecasts as well as forecasts of major economic sectors. Includes long-term predictions and the application of aggregate and sector forecasts for particular industries and firms. Prerequisite: FIN 818.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course addresses the financial needs of private businesses, focusing on the financial motives and needs of private company owners and their advisors. The course is an opportunity to present private finance as a complement to corporate finance/public finance so as to prepare students to better serve or participate in making better financing decisions in the marketplace of privately held businesses.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze the main functions of investment banks such as origination, syndication, and distribution of security issues. They examine pricing of new issues and secondary offerings by investment banks, mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, valuation of closely held companies, and restructuring of distressed companies. The role of investment bankers in restructuring industry and financing governments and ethical issues faced by investment bankers will be studied.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to the language and principles of real estate. Includes an overview of decision-making in the field, with particular emphasis on investment and asset management.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course is designed to provide information on various types of fixed income securities and markets, theories and concepts of the term structure of interest rates and valuation of fixed income securities, measurement and management of risk for traditional bonds and bonds with embedded options, understanding of the role of derivatives such as mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, swaps and exotic options, credit analysis and bond rating, portfolio management and performance evaluation. This course is generally offered as an intensive elective.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine fundamental equity analysis as the convergence of a number of skills such as accounting, financial, and strategic analysis with detective work and experience. Students practice communicating and defending an argument, use a business analysis framework that helps tie together strategy and finance, practice model building and practical approach to profitability in the markets.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an integrated framework for analyzing and measuring risk with a computer simulation approach. A common set of computational tools will be applied across several different financial applications ranging from options pricing to portfolio design. Extensive time will be spent on estimating and simulating 'Value at Risk' which has been a standard for measuring risk in large financial institutions. We will also compare this with other traditional methods as well as other modern methods, such as extreme value theory at quantifying risk. Computationally intensive methods, such as bootstrapping, and Monte Carlo analysis will be used extensively throughout the course with MATLAB as the primary programming tool.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

MSF Thesis work

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of timely special issues in the field of finance. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's approval required

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A student-initiated directed study project, generally for three credit hours and completed within one quarter or semester. The student and faculty advisor must concur on a written proposal and final report, and the proposal must be approved by the Office of the Dean prior to registration.

Prerequisites:

SBS-700, MBA-615, MBA-625, MBA-635, MBA-640, MBA-650 MBA-660, and Instructor's approval. Limited to MBA students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides a hands-on, practical learning opportunity for a student-initiated experience at a domestic or international organization. Students work closely with the MBA advisor and faculty advisor regarding career-related learning outcomes. Over the course of a semester, students collaborate with their corporate internship supervisor and complete projects in either accounting, business law and ethics, entrepreneurship, finance, international business, strategy or tax. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

SBS 700 (Formerly SBS 600). International students must complete 2 academic semesters before approved. Approval of Program Director/Course Coordinator and SBS Dean of Graduate Programs required.

Credits:

0.00

Description:

This internship course is for students who are working in an approved graduate level internship in a company, non-profit organization, or public agency. The internship is described in a written proposal agreed upon by the company sponsor and intern. The internship must be approved by the International Student Services Office (international students only), Program Director/Course Coordinator and SBS Dean of Graduate Programs. The internship is intended for international students who wish to participate in a practical, degree related experience. This course does not count toward a degree. International students must receive Curricular Practical Training (CPT) approval with the International Student Services Office PRIOR to beginning an internship.

Prerequisites:

Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Immersion course provides an opportunity for students to link their program work to hands-on experience and visits to real-life global companies. The highly experiential, intensive course combines classroom learning with a direct business and cultural experience. Students will work in teams directly for a client or several clients, solving real challenges, using their analytical skills, knowledge, and experience to develop feasible solutions. Required for all MBA students, the course will be offered globally or nationally to accommodate a variety of student needs.

Course Substitution Policy

To substitute a corporate finance certificate course with an approved elective, a student must have successfully completed equivalent academic coursework at the undergraduate/graduate level in the seven years prior to matriculation ("B" or better). Official transcripts (with English translations, if applicable) must be provided. A maximum of 3 credits of coursework can be substituted.

Candidates who apply within one year of completing their graduate certificate will have applicable courses applied to a Sawyer Business School (SBS) graduate degree program, in the same discipline as the certificate, as long as a grade of "B" or better was earned in the course.

Candidates who apply to a degree program, different from their certificate program’s discipline area or beyond one year, will have coursework evaluated on a case by case basis for relevancy, current degree requirements and current Sawyer Business School waiver and transfer policies.

Graduate Certificate in Finance

Learn more about this certificate


Curriculum

5 Courses
15 Credits

Program Length
Part-time in as few as 9 months

Required Courses (15 credits)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is required for MSA and MSF students and it is also a recommended elective for MBA students with a finance concentration. This course develops an understanding of the concepts, tools, and applications of economics at both the micro and macro level. The focus is on how economic analysis influences decision-making in the public and private sectors and how economic tools can enhance managerial effectiveness and organizational efficiency. The economic role of government and its impact on the business environment in a market economy, the factors that influence firm performance and competitiveness, and the role of financial institutions in the current economic environment are discussed throughout the course.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the concepts and applications of data analytics on large data sets for managerial decision making. Students will learn foundation skills needed to extract valuable information out of data, including various descriptive and predictive analytics techniques. Students develop knowledge of data visualization and interpretation coupled with conveying data, results and insights. Issues on data acquisition, storage and management will be discussed.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course deals with the structure and information content of the three principal financial statements of profit-directed companies, namely the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows. It develops skill in using accounting information to analyze the performance and financial condition of a company, and to facilitate decision making, planning and budgeting, and performance appraisal in a managerial context. This course also contains an experiential component by offering guided inquiry and real company cases.

Prerequisites:

1 course from each of the following groups: MBA-615 or SBS-603; MBA-625 or SBS-604; MBA-640 or ACCT-800; These courses may be taken prior to or concurrently with MBA-650.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces the basic principles of corporate finance. The main focus is on fundamental principles such as time value of money, asset valuation, and risk and return tradeoff. Topics to be covered also include cost of capital, capital budgeting, and capital structure.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course extends the body of knowledge acquired in MBA 650. Students expand knowledge of dividend theory, capital structure theory, capital budgeting, long-term financing decisions, cash management and corporate restructuring, market efficiency, and risk and liability management.

Course Substitution Policy

To substitute a corporate finance certificate course with an approved elective, a student must have successfully completed equivalent academic coursework at the undergraduate/graduate level in the seven years prior to matriculation ("B" or better). Official transcripts (with English translations, if applicable) must be provided. A maximum of 3 credits of coursework can be substituted.

Candidates who apply within one year of completing their graduate certificate will have applicable courses applied to a Sawyer Business School (SBS) graduate degree program, in the same discipline as the certificate, as long as a grade of "B" or better was earned in the course.

Candidates who apply to a degree program, different from their certificate program’s discipline area or beyond one year, will have coursework evaluated on a case by case basis for relevancy, current degree requirements and current Sawyer Business School waiver and transfer policies.

Graduate Certificate in Investments

Learn more about this certificate


Curriculum

5 Courses
15 Credits

Program Length

Full-time in as few as 4 months
Part-time in as few as 9 months


Required Courses (6 credits)

Prerequisites:

Take MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course extends the body of knowledge acquired in MBA 650. Students expand knowledge of dividend theory, capital structure theory, capital budgeting, long-term financing decisions, cash management and corporate restructuring, market efficiency, and risk and liability management.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine markets for investment procedures, valuation models, basic analytical techniques, and factors influencing risk/return tradeoffs. This course emphasizes the professional approach to managing investment assets. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, options, and futures.

Electives (9 credits)

Three (3) courses are electives and must be selected from the approved elective list for Investments.

.

Approved Investments Elective List

Note: London Financial Services Travel Seminar is the only seminar approved as an MSF elective. Any other travel seminar requires MSF Academic Program Director approval

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the history, terminology, current developments, future challenges and opportunities related to the application of technology to financial discipline. With an emphasis of case studies and guest lecture, the class will discuss algorithmic trading, predictive behavioral analysis, data-driven decision making, mobile-only services, robo advisers, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, RegTech, InsureTech, innovations in lending, and cybersecurity. Students will be required to complete projects based on a statistical software package.

Prerequisites:

FIN 810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The foundation of most of modern financial models and theories are based on neoclassical economists' assumption that most economic agents are rational decision makers. Behavioral finance recognizes that our cognitive biases and errors along with our individuality are not always consistent with the rationality assumption and utility maximization. This course will examine the implications of human psychology, emotions and biases on financial decision-making process as well as potential impact on the overall financial markets.

Prerequisites:

FIN-818

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The nature, techniques, and problems of business forecasting. Covers indicators of business activity, short-run econometrics forecasting models, and the construction of aggregate forecasts as well as forecasts of major economic sectors. Includes long-term predictions and the application of aggregate and sector forecasts for particular industries and firms. Prerequisite: FIN 818.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course addresses the financial needs of private businesses, focusing on the financial motives and needs of private company owners and their advisors. The course is an opportunity to present private finance as a complement to corporate finance/public finance so as to prepare students to better serve or participate in making better financing decisions in the marketplace of privately held businesses.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze the main functions of investment banks such as origination, syndication, and distribution of security issues. They examine pricing of new issues and secondary offerings by investment banks, mergers and acquisitions, leveraged buyouts, valuation of closely held companies, and restructuring of distressed companies. The role of investment bankers in restructuring industry and financing governments and ethical issues faced by investment bankers will be studied.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to the language and principles of real estate. Includes an overview of decision-making in the field, with particular emphasis on investment and asset management.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course is designed to provide information on various types of fixed income securities and markets, theories and concepts of the term structure of interest rates and valuation of fixed income securities, measurement and management of risk for traditional bonds and bonds with embedded options, understanding of the role of derivatives such as mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, swaps and exotic options, credit analysis and bond rating, portfolio management and performance evaluation. This course is generally offered as an intensive elective.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine fundamental equity analysis as the convergence of a number of skills such as accounting, financial, and strategic analysis with detective work and experience. Students practice communicating and defending an argument, use a business analysis framework that helps tie together strategy and finance, practice model building and practical approach to profitability in the markets.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

MSF Thesis work

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an integrated framework for analyzing and measuring risk with a computer simulation approach. A common set of computational tools will be applied across several different financial applications ranging from options pricing to portfolio design. Extensive time will be spent on estimating and simulating 'Value at Risk' which has been a standard for measuring risk in large financial institutions. We will also compare this with other traditional methods as well as other modern methods, such as extreme value theory at quantifying risk. Computationally intensive methods, such as bootstrapping, and Monte Carlo analysis will be used extensively throughout the course with MATLAB as the primary programming tool.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of timely special issues in the field of finance. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisites:

Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Immersion course provides an opportunity for students to link their program work to hands-on experience and visits to real-life global companies. The highly experiential, intensive course combines classroom learning with a direct business and cultural experience. Students will work in teams directly for a client or several clients, solving real challenges, using their analytical skills, knowledge, and experience to develop feasible solutions. Required for all MBA students, the course will be offered globally or nationally to accommodate a variety of student needs.

Course Substitution Policy

To substitute a corporate finance certificate course with an approved elective, a student must have successfully completed equivalent academic coursework at the undergraduate/graduate level in the seven years prior to matriculation ("B" or better). Official transcripts (with English translations, if applicable) must be provided. A maximum of 3 credits of coursework can be substituted.

Candidates who apply within one year of completing their graduate certificate will have applicable courses applied to a Sawyer Business School (SBS) graduate degree program, in the same discipline as the certificate, as long as a grade of "B" or better was earned in the course.

Candidates who apply to a degree program, different from their certificate program’s discipline area or beyond one year, will have coursework evaluated on a case by case basis for relevancy, current degree requirements and current Sawyer Business School waiver and transfer policies.

Graduate Certificate in Risk Management

Learn more about this certificate


Curriculum

5 Courses
15 Credits

Program Length:

Full time in as few as 4 months
Part time in as few as 9 months


Required Courses (6 credits)

Prerequisites:

Take MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course extends the body of knowledge acquired in MBA 650. Students expand knowledge of dividend theory, capital structure theory, capital budgeting, long-term financing decisions, cash management and corporate restructuring, market efficiency, and risk and liability management.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine markets for investment procedures, valuation models, basic analytical techniques, and factors influencing risk/return tradeoffs. This course emphasizes the professional approach to managing investment assets. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, options, and futures.

Electives (9 credits)

Three (3) course are electives which must be selected from the approved elective list for Risk Management.


Approved Risk Management Elective List

Note: London Financial Services Travel Seminar is the only seminar approved as an MSF elective. Any other travel seminar requires MSF Academic Program Director approval

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the structure and management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course discusses tools for identifying, measuring, evaluating, and managing risks, such as interest rate, credit, foreign exchange, liquidity, market, sovereign, and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and discusses important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the history, terminology, current developments, future challenges and opportunities related to the application of technology to financial discipline. With an emphasis of case studies and guest lecture, the class will discuss algorithmic trading, predictive behavioral analysis, data-driven decision making, mobile-only services, robo advisers, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, RegTech, InsureTech, innovations in lending, and cybersecurity. Students will be required to complete projects based on a statistical software package.

Prerequisites:

FIN 810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The foundation of most of modern financial models and theories are based on neoclassical economists' assumption that most economic agents are rational decision makers. Behavioral finance recognizes that our cognitive biases and errors along with our individuality are not always consistent with the rationality assumption and utility maximization. This course will examine the implications of human psychology, emotions and biases on financial decision-making process as well as potential impact on the overall financial markets.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course is designed to provide information on various types of fixed income securities and markets, theories and concepts of the term structure of interest rates and valuation of fixed income securities, measurement and management of risk for traditional bonds and bonds with embedded options, understanding of the role of derivatives such as mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, swaps and exotic options, credit analysis and bond rating, portfolio management and performance evaluation. This course is generally offered as an intensive elective.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an integrated framework for analyzing and measuring risk with a computer simulation approach. A common set of computational tools will be applied across several different financial applications ranging from options pricing to portfolio design. Extensive time will be spent on estimating and simulating 'Value at Risk' which has been a standard for measuring risk in large financial institutions. We will also compare this with other traditional methods as well as other modern methods, such as extreme value theory at quantifying risk. Computationally intensive methods, such as bootstrapping, and Monte Carlo analysis will be used extensively throughout the course with MATLAB as the primary programming tool.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

MSF Thesis work

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of timely special issues in the field of finance. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled.

Prerequisites:

Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Immersion course provides an opportunity for students to link their program work to hands-on experience and visits to real-life global companies. The highly experiential, intensive course combines classroom learning with a direct business and cultural experience. Students will work in teams directly for a client or several clients, solving real challenges, using their analytical skills, knowledge, and experience to develop feasible solutions. Required for all MBA students, the course will be offered globally or nationally to accommodate a variety of student needs.

Course Substitution Policy

To substitute a corporate finance certificate course with an approved elective, a student must have successfully completed equivalent academic coursework at the undergraduate/graduate level in the seven years prior to matriculation ("B" or better). Official transcripts (with English translations, if applicable) must be provided. A maximum of 3 credits of coursework can be substituted.

Candidates who apply within one year of completing their graduate certificate will have applicable courses applied to a Sawyer Business School (SBS) graduate degree program, in the same discipline as the certificate, as long as a grade of "B" or better was earned in the course.

Candidates who apply to a degree program, different from their certificate program’s discipline area or beyond one year, will have coursework evaluated on a case by case basis for relevancy, current degree requirements and current Sawyer Business School waiver and transfer policies.