Biology

Biology Major

Learn more about this major

Degree Requirements - 126 credits

Students can earn a bachelor of arts degree with this major.  See the requirements for the bachelor of arts degree.

Students can earn a bachelor of science degree with this major.  See the requirements for the bachelor of science degree.

Major Requirements: 19 courses and their corresponding laboratories, 66-70 credits

Concentrations in biotechnology, marine science, and health careers are also available. A Biology major must take courses in biology plus designated related science and math courses, in addition to the degree requirements.

Core Requirements (13 courses and their corresponding laboratories where applicable, 46 credits)

Biology Requirement (6 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 18 credits)

Prerequisites:

BIO-L111 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explanation of key biological structures and reactions of the cell. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 (concurrently)

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Sessions are designed to familiarize the student with biological molecules and the techniques used in their study. The techniques covered include basic solution preparation separation and quantification of molecules enzyme catalysis and cell isolation.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L114 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Rigorous introduction to organismal biology emphasizing evolution phylogenetics form and function. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A series of laboratory experiences in evolution diversity anatomy and physiology.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L274 (concurrently), BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An examination of the basic principles of genetics in eukaryotes and prokaryotes at the level of molecules cells and multicellular organisms including humans. Topics include Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance structure and function of chromosomes and genomes biological variation resulting from recombination mutation and selection and population genetics.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114. Must be taken concurrently with BIO 274.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Experiments designed to demonstrate principles presented in lecture using a range of genetic model organisms that include E. coli B. subtilis S. cerevisiae D. melanogaster S. fimicola and C. elegans.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114 and BIO-L333 (concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Areas of study include but are not limited to basic principles of population biology community ecology trophic dynamics ecosystem structure and function and evolutionary theory.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114, BIO-L114, and BIO-333 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Field and laboratory experiences in techniques and concepts relevant to ecological theory data collection statistical analysis visual representation and report preparation.

Prerequisites:

Senior standing

Credits:

1.00

Description:

The purpose of this class is to provide senior biology majors with the skills to land a job in the biological sciences including locating open positions preparing an application and performing well in an interview. Students will be guided through the preparation of application materials participate in mock interviews and develop skills to navigate a professional workplace environment. Students will also participate in a mandatory senior assessment exam to assist departmental curricular development.

Prerequisites:

CAS-101. CAS students only. SBS students by special permission. Restricted to the following majors: Art History, Asian Studies, Biology, Criminal Justice, Economics, English, French, Global Cultural Studies, History, Humanities, International Economics, Music History, Philosophy, Physics, Radiation Science, Socioloug, Spanish, and Undeclared. Instructor consent required for all other majors.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course engages students in the early stages of career planning. Students will explore their interests skills values and strengths which will allow them to begin setting appropriate goals for professional development. Once students understand themselves in relation to the world of work they will learn how to research careers and employment paths that fit with their goals.

Chemistry Requirement (4 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 16 credits)

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH-104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH-104 must take MATH-104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-L111.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces atomic structure the periodic table the nature of chemical bonds chemical reactions and stoichiometry. This course is recommended for science majors or those considering careers in the health sciences.

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH-104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH-104 must take MATH-104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-111.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course introduces the basic principles of chemistry through hands-on laboratory experiments. Students learn safe laboratory practices and fundamental technical skills. These include the determination of mass and volume making solutions and synthesizing a product. Emphasis is also placed on understanding and writing scientific literature.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-L112 (concurrently), CHEM-111, CHEM-L111 and MATH-104 or higher

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I. Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces thermochemistry gases solution chemistry chemical kinetics chemical equilibrium acid-base systems and thermodynamics.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-112 (concurrently) and CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111 and MATH-104 placement or higher.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I Laboratory. Apply the basic principles of chemistry through discovery laboratory experiments with an emphasis on quantitative analysis. Apply Beer's Law and acid-base titrations. This laboratory is designed around the foundational laboratory skills practiced by science students in a wide variety of majors.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112. CHEM-L211 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces basic theories of structure bonding and chemical reactivity as specifically applied to modern organic chemistry. Includes functional groups acid/base chemistry nomenclature resonance spectroscopy and stereochemistry.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-211.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Introduces synthetic organic chemistry techniques. Includes melting point determination distillation crystallization extraction chromatographic separations and infrared spectroscopy. Discusses experimental design within the context of green organic chemistry.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211. Must take CHEM-L212 concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Builds on the core competencies acquired in Organic Chemistry I. Includes detailed mechanistic discussions of substitution elimination and addition reactions. Emphasizes organic synthesis structure determination and spectroscopy.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211. Must be take CHEM-212 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This hybrid laboratory course builds on the core competencies acquired in Organic Chemistry Laboratory I and has two mandatory face to face laboratory sessions to develop essential laboratory skill. The remaining lab sessions use a variety of virtual tools including simulations videos class discussions and data analysis. Emphasizes the characterization of organic molecules via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Discusses experimental design within the context of green organic chemistry.

Math Requirement (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one Mathematics course:

Prerequisites:

MATH-104, MATH-121 or MATH level 4

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A one-semester introduction to differential and integral calculus. Theory is presented informally and topics and techniques are limited to polynomials rational functions logarithmic and exponential functions. Topics include a review of precalculus limits and continuity derivatives differentiation rules applications of derivatives to graphing minima/maxima applications of the derivative marginal analysis differential equations of growth and decay anti-derivatives the definite integral the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and area measurements. This course cannot be used to satisfy core or complementary requirements by students majoring in chemistry computer science engineering mathematics or physics. Several sections offered each semester.

or any higher level Mathematics course

Physics Requirement (2 courses and corresponding laboratories, 8 credits)

Choose one of the following sequences:

Prerequisites:

Take MATH-121 or MATH-134 or MATH-165 or permission of Physics department chair; PHYS-L111 taken concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics. Study of kinematics vectors Newton's laws rotations rigid body statics and dynamics energy and work momentum heat and thermodynamics kinetic theory.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-111 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This laboratory course consists of experiments and exercises to illustrate the basic concepts studied in PHYS 111. Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics. Study of kinematics vectors Newton's laws rotations rigid body statics and dynamics energy and work momentum heat and thermodynamics kinetic theory. Error propagation use of Excel laboratory notebooks and formal reports required.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-111 and PHYS-L11. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS-L112.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Continuation of the fundamental principles of physics. Study of simple harmonic motion waves fluids electric forces and fields electric potential DC circuits electromagnetic induction magnetic fields AC circuits introduction to optics introduction to atomic nuclear and particle physics.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-112(concurrently) and PHYS-111 and PHYS-L111

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This laboratory course consists of experiments and exercises to illustrate the basic concepts studied in PHYS 112. Continuation of the fundamental principles of physics. Study of simple harmonic motion waves fluids electric forces and fields electric potential DC circuits electromagnetic induction magnetic fields AC circuits introduction to optics introduction to atomic nuclear and particle physics. Error propagation use of Excel laboratory notebooks and formal reports required.

Or

Prerequisites:

MATH-121 or MATH-134 with a grade of C or better. MATH-165 can replace these prerequisites if taken concurrently with PHYS-151.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

PHYS 151 is the first of three courses (PHYS 151 152 153) that comprise the calculus-based introductory physics sequence intended for students majoring in the physical sciences engineering and mathematics. This course covers basic techniques in physics that fall under the topic of classical mechanics and their application in understanding the natural world. Specific topics include the study of vectors Newton's laws rotations kinetic and potential energy momentum and collisions rigid body statics and dynamics fluid mechanics gravitation simple harmonic motion mechanical waves sound and hearing. The student will learn how to analyze physical situations by using simple models and also how to solve those models and derive useful conclusions from them. This course will show students how experimental results and mathematical representations are combined to create testable scientific theories.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121, MATH-165, MATH-166 or MATH-134(with a minimum grade of C). PHYS-151 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This laboratory course consists of experiments and exercises to illustrate the basic concepts studied in PHYS 151: measurements propagation of errors vectors Newton's laws work and energy momentum rotations oscillations simple harmonic motion fluid. Knowledge of algebra trigonometry differentiation and integration required.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-151 and PHYS-L151. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS-L152.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This calculus-based course continues the topics in physics covered in Physics 151 and begins with temperature and heat the thermal properties of matter and the lasw of thermodynamics. It then switches to electromagnetism and covers electric charge and field Gauss' law electrical potential and capacitance electric currents and DC circuits. Next magnetism electromagnetic induction Faraday's law and AC circuits are discussed. This is followed by Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-152 (concurrently) and PHYS-151 and PHYS-L151

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This laboratory course consists of experiments and exercises to illustrate the basic concepts studied in PHYS 152: heat gas laws electric forces field and potential DC and AC circuits magnetic field electromagnetic induction Faraday's law optics. Calculus algebra trigonometry are required. Error propagation use of Excel laboratory notebooks and formal reports required.

Divisional Requirements (3 courses, 11-12 credits)

Molecular/Cellular Biology Requirement (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one of the following and its corresponding laboratory where applicable from the Molecular/Cellular division:

Prerequisites:

BIO 111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, BIO-L114, CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The course is designed as an application base educational experience that will allow students to learn the standard techniques associated with successful cell culture. As such students are responsible for the maintenance propagation isolation and preservation of their cells. A number of cell types and experimental manipulations of the cultures are investigated throughout the semester.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L285 (concurrently), BIO-111 and BIO-L111

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Viruses and bacteria are surveyed in terms of their ecology biochemistry taxonomy molecular biology and control.

Prerequisites:

BIO-285 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Introduction to microbiological techniques and their applications to health research and industry.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, BIO-L114, BIO-274, and BIO-L274

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to the development of cancer. Factors contributing to tumorgenesis angiogenesis and metastasis will be discussed; these factors oncogenes tumor suppressor genes and signal transduction networks. In addition an investigation of current strategies for cancer prevention and treatment will be considered.

Prerequisites:

BIO-274

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The concept of immunity response to infection structure of the immune system biochemistry of immunoglobins antigen-antibody interactions allergy immunological injury lymphocyte subpopulations and cellular immunity tolerance suppression and enhancement. Taught alternate/even years.

Prerequisites:

BIO-274 and BIO-L274 or BIO-285 and BIO-L285;

Credits:

4

Description:

The molecular mechanisms of host-microbe interactions and the epidemiology and public health aspects of microorganisms are stressed. Also covered are current topics in microbiology including antimicrobial therapy and resistance, emerging pathogens and novel applications of microbiology. Experimental design and troubleshooting skills are developed, using contemporary microbiology and molecular biology laboratory techniques. Taught alternate/odd years.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, CHEM-211, CHEM-L211 and BIO-L403 (concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The study of cells approached through examinations of biochemical mechanisms the relation between the structure and function of biological molecules and organelles and the regulation of normal and diseased cells.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L11 and CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211. Must take BIO-403 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Examination of biological molecules and their role in cell function. Techniques used in these examinations will include enzymatic analyses gel electrophoresis immunologic identification chromatography and spectroscopy. Students are expected to develop their proficiency in the laboratory techniques used to analyze their results in a quantitative manner and to present their findings.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-311 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274 and BIO-L474 (concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An examination of concepts and techniques of modern molecular biology. Topics include the structure and function of DNA RNA and proteins the regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels genetic modification of organisms and genome analysis. This course will incorporate readings and discussions of primary scientific literature. Spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Take CHEM-331 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274. BIO-474 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This upper level laboratory course will consist of a semester-long project in the form of a series of consecutive experiments involving the generation of a genetically modified organism and its subsequent molecular analysis. Techniques employed will include genetic screens DNA isolation restriction endonuclease analysis transformation of bacteria gel electrophoresis gene reported assays RNA isolation reverse transcription and quantitative PCR.

Organismic Structure & Function Requirement (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one of the following and its corresponding laboratory where applicable from the Organismic Structure and Function division:

Prerequisites:

BIO-L203 (concurrently), BIO-111 and BIO-L11

Credits:

3.00

Description:

First part of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course emphasizes histology and physiology in the understanding of the integumentary skeletal muscular and nervous systems. Medical terminology will be used.

Prerequisites:

BIO-203 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A study of the human skeletal system and a comparative look at other organ systems involving observation of anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes microscopy and computer simulations of physiological processes.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L204 (concurrently), BIO-203, and BIO-L203

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Conclusion of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course investigates the endocrine circulatory respiratory digestive urinary and reproductive systems as well as the physiology of immune responses nutrition and acid-base balance. Medical terminology will be used.

Prerequisites:

BIO-204 (concurrently) and BIO-203 and BIO-L203

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A study of the human viscera using anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes microscopy of tissues and physiological experiments.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L225 (concurrently) and BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Course introduces students to the anatomy physiology systematics ecology and economic uses of all major groups of plants. Aspects of the biology of nonvascular non-seed gymnosperm and angiosperm plants are explored. An overview of Kingdom Fungi is also covered. Each student is required to do a 10-15 minute presentation to the class highlighting the economic use of a group of plants assigned by the instructor. Normally offered Spring semester.

Prerequisites:

BIO-225 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111 and BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Lab exercises focus on plant anatomy physiology and systematics. Instruction in the identification of major plant families and fungal types is covered. Trips to a Boston area herbarium and botanical garden are required.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This interactive introduction to nutrition explores the science of human nutrition and further reviews concepts of how nutrition can promote health and well being. The course will review specific nutrient needs and functions nutrient digestion and the role of diet in well being and in the presence of chronic disease. Weekly course work encourages scientific literacy and fosters critical evaluation of nutrition in the news and in social media.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114. Must take BIO-L304 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Mechanisms of physiological adaptations to environmental challenges are studied. Examples of gas exchange osmoregulation fluid transport temperature regulation nervous control and movement are examined in various animal forms through class lecture and discussion required readings and external lectures. Spring semester.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114. Must take BIO-304 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Selected physiological processes and mechanisms or adaptation in invertebrate and vertebrate animals are examined by observation and controlled experiments.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on embryonic development in vertebrates. The conceptual focus on evolutionary developmental biology includes comparative developmental mechanisms and Epigenetic processes.

Diversity, Environment, and Conservation Requirement (1 course, 3-4 credits)

Choose one of the following and its corresponding laboratory where applicable from the Diversity, Environment, and Conservation division:

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will examine major trends issues and policy that are impacting the world's coastal and ocean resources. Scientific economic social and political aspects of each issue will be discussed and case studies will be used to illustrate the challenge of linking good scientific data with regulatory and management decisions. Topics include (but are not limited to) relevant coastal and ocean processes international and national governance coastal and marine spatial planning marine protected areas fishery management zones coastal development climate change and marine mammals.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111 or UES-111 and UES-L111

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This seminar course is designed to stimulate students' interests in the field of water resources from an environmentally sustainable perspective. Five water resource areas will be highlighted: (1) rivers and watersheds (2) groundwater and aquifers (3) estuaries (4) coastal floodplains and (5) marine resources. The focus will be on the resources themselves and their functions values and impacts from human uses as well as policy issues and management techniques.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course explores the biology and natural history of marine mammals including cetaceans pinnipeds and sirenians with a particular focus on species endemic to the North Atlantic. Topics include evolution anatomy physiology behavior ecology field identification the history of whaling and sealing and contemporary management and conservation issues. Hands-on activities may include the dissection of a small marine mammal and a whale watch in Massachusetts Bay.

Prerequisites:

BIO-254 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111 or BIO-114 and BIO-L114 or Instructor's consent

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduction to the marine environment its organisms and their specific adaptations. Emphasis on marine and estuarine ecology intertidal habits trophic relations and physiology. Human impacts on the sea: fisheries mariculture pollution introduced species climate change and seawater acidification and law of the sea. Taught yearly each fall.

Prerequisites:

BIO-254 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111 or BIO-114 and BIO-L114 or Instructor's consent

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Field trips to local marine environments museums and aquaria; field and laboratory study and observations of live preserved and models of marine organisms.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114 or UES-111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces geological processes leading to fossilization and sedimentary analysis of past environments. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of extinct lifeforms and their interaction with the environment starting with the formation of the planet through the present day.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114. BIO-274 (recommended).

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A survey of evolutionary theory exploring processes such as the genetic sources of variation natural and sexual selection and evolutionary developmental biology. Using phylogenetic systematics and other tools we will demonstrate how these mechanisms result in the visible patterns of evolution. This is a reading-and-writing intensive course centered on close reading of Origin of the Species and discussion of recent peer-reviewed literature about evolution.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course covers a broad spectrum of aspects of biodiversity and conservation by examining key elements ranging from global patterns in the distribution of life on our planet to the effects our human population is causing on those patterns. Examples from marine and terrestrial animals and plants are used to convey current ideas with a focus on the importance of global biodiversity and the design of management programs for the conservation of species and ecosystems. 4-credit

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A survey of the occurrence life history and pathogenicity of the most important arthropod-borne human diseases both internationally (malaria dengue plague trypanosomiasis yellow fever etc.) and within the United States (Lyme disease EEE West Nile Virus and others). Demographic and environmental factors leading to the re-emergence and spread of these diseases will be considered.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The evolution systematics anatomy physiology and behavior of freshwater marine and anadromous fishes from temperate to tropical environments. The interactions of fish in their environments including predator-prey relationships host-symbiont interactions and fish as herbivores. Taken with permission from the Marine Science Consortium Coordinator. [This is a Marine Science Consortium Course and enrollment is limited] Evenings only: off campus

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides a comprehensive review of the biology ecology and management of cetaceans. A thorough grounding in cetacean mammalogy and population biology will prepare students to understand conservation problems presented as case histories. Students will also complete an independent research paper on a topic related to cetacean biology. Hands-on activities may include the dissection of a small cetacean and a shore-based whale watch in Cape Cod Bay. This course is part of the Marine Studies Consortium and will be held at the New England Aquarium.[This is a Marine Science Consortium Course and enrollment is limited]

Electives (3 courses, 10-12 credits)

Choose three Biology course electives and their corresponding laboratories where applicable. Any of the courses listed above may be taken as an elective if another course is taken to fulfill the division requirement. If a student chooses one of the concentrations, the concentration requirements will fulfill these elective courses.

Additional elective options are:

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduction to the statistical methods used to evaluate biological problems. Sampling probability confidence intervals hypothesis tests experimental design analysis of variance regression and correlation are some of the topics offered. Software for data handling graphics and analysis will be used.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111, BIO-114 and BIO-L114, and BIO-274 and BIO-L274 (may be taken conccurently)

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Biology Internship: This course provides students with credit for an unpaid internship completed during the semester when credit is earned. Students must secure an approved internship and provide documentation from the internship's overseer to a full time faculty member sponsor in order to register for the course. The internship must involve participation in research and / or patient care. Students or their overseers will be required to submit monthly records of internship hours and provide the faculty sponsor with a written summary of internship experiences and accomplishments by the last week of classes. Only one internship may be used as a biology elective. This course is available for variable credit. Prerequisites: An Internship for Credit form must be submitted to the department chair Credits: 1-4

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111, and BIO-114 and BIO-L114, and BIO-274 and BIO-L274 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Biology Internship: This course provides students with credit for an unpaid internship completed during the semester when credit is earned. Students must secure an approved internship and provide documentation from the internship's overseer to a full time faculty member sponsor in order to register for the course. The internship must involve participation in research and / or patient care. Students or their overseers will be required to submit monthly records of internship hours and provide the faculty sponsor with a written summary of internship experiences and accomplishments by the last week of classes. Only one internship may be used as a biology elective. This course is available for variable credit. Prerequisites: An Internship for Credit form must be submitted to the department chair Credits: 1-4

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00- 5.00

Description:

Student projects may be initiated by a student or faculty member with the approval of the Chairperson. A paper and oral report are required. Only ONE independent study may be used toward biology electives.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Student projects may be initiated by a student or faculty member with the approval of the Chairperson. A paper and oral report are required. Thesis work is required to involve original research or an in-depth analysis.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-L331 (concurrently) CHEM-212 and CHEM-L212 or permission of instructor

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the foundations of biochemistry including the structure organization and behavior of proteins carbohydrates lipids and nucleic acids. Topics include enzyme catalysis kinetics and inhibition as well as protein regulation and membrane structure. Introduces the use of biochemical literature and bioinformatics techniques.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-331 (concurrently) and CHEM-212 and CHEM-L212 or permission of instructor

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory course introducing biochemical techniques. Includes buffer preparation PCR purification of DNA and proteins agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein quantitation and detection and enzyme kinetic assays.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111 and CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112 and BIO-114 and BIO-L114 (or UES-111 and UES-L111)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is designed to identify the ways that scientific knowledge can be used to resolve environmental problems particularly the ocean's role in the biogeochemical cycling of selected elements and the impacts of humans on the cycling of these elements. Sample topics include the chemical composition of seawater from the perspectives of elemental speciation and the impacts of solutes on water's physical behavior; biogeochemical phenomena which control accumulation and preservation of marine sediments; marine chemistry of dioactive and stable isotopes; and how climate change and pollution impact the marine environment with mitigation strategies outlined.

Notes:

  • BIO-503, BIO-H503, BIO-510, and BIO-H510 must be taken for a minimum of 3 credits to count as a major elective
  • Transfer students wishing to major in Biology must meet the residency requirement plus complete senior seminar in Biology at Suffolk University with a minimum grade point average of 2.0.

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Biology Concentrations

Biotechnology Concentration Requirements: 19 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 66-70 credits

This concentration requires the completion of all Biology major core requirements (listed in the Major Requirements section), as well as the following:

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, CHEM-211, CHEM-L211 and BIO-L403 (concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The study of cells approached through examinations of biochemical mechanisms the relation between the structure and function of biological molecules and organelles and the regulation of normal and diseased cells.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L11 and CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211. Must take BIO-403 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Examination of biological molecules and their role in cell function. Techniques used in these examinations will include enzymatic analyses gel electrophoresis immunologic identification chromatography and spectroscopy. Students are expected to develop their proficiency in the laboratory techniques used to analyze their results in a quantitative manner and to present their findings.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-311 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274 and BIO-L474 (concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An examination of concepts and techniques of modern molecular biology. Topics include the structure and function of DNA RNA and proteins the regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels genetic modification of organisms and genome analysis. This course will incorporate readings and discussions of primary scientific literature. Spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Take CHEM-331 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274. BIO-474 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This upper level laboratory course will consist of a semester-long project in the form of a series of consecutive experiments involving the generation of a genetically modified organism and its subsequent molecular analysis. Techniques employed will include genetic screens DNA isolation restriction endonuclease analysis transformation of bacteria gel electrophoresis gene reported assays RNA isolation reverse transcription and quantitative PCR.

Choose one Organismic Structure and Function Division course and its corresponding laboratory where applicable (options listed in the Major Requirements section)

Choose one Diversity, Environment, and Conservation Division course and its corresponding laboratory where applicable (options listed in the Major Requirements section)

Choose two of the following Biology electives and their corresponding laboratory where applicable (at least one of these two electives must have a laboratory component):

Prerequisites:

BIO 111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, BIO-L114, CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The course is designed as an application base educational experience that will allow students to learn the standard techniques associated with successful cell culture. As such students are responsible for the maintenance propagation isolation and preservation of their cells. A number of cell types and experimental manipulations of the cultures are investigated throughout the semester.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduction to the statistical methods used to evaluate biological problems. Sampling probability confidence intervals hypothesis tests experimental design analysis of variance regression and correlation are some of the topics offered. Software for data handling graphics and analysis will be used.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L285 (concurrently), BIO-111 and BIO-L111

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Viruses and bacteria are surveyed in terms of their ecology biochemistry taxonomy molecular biology and control.

Prerequisites:

BIO-285 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Introduction to microbiological techniques and their applications to health research and industry.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, BIO-L114, BIO-274, and BIO-L274

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to the development of cancer. Factors contributing to tumorgenesis angiogenesis and metastasis will be discussed; these factors oncogenes tumor suppressor genes and signal transduction networks. In addition an investigation of current strategies for cancer prevention and treatment will be considered.

Prerequisites:

BIO-274

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The concept of immunity response to infection structure of the immune system biochemistry of immunoglobins antigen-antibody interactions allergy immunological injury lymphocyte subpopulations and cellular immunity tolerance suppression and enhancement. Taught alternate/even years.

Prerequisites:

BIO-274 and BIO-L274 or BIO-285 and BIO-L285;

Credits:

4

Description:

The molecular mechanisms of host-microbe interactions and the epidemiology and public health aspects of microorganisms are stressed. Also covered are current topics in microbiology including antimicrobial therapy and resistance, emerging pathogens and novel applications of microbiology. Experimental design and troubleshooting skills are developed, using contemporary microbiology and molecular biology laboratory techniques. Taught alternate/odd years.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111, BIO-114 and BIO-L114, and BIO-274 and BIO-L274 (may be taken conccurently)

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Biology Internship: This course provides students with credit for an unpaid internship completed during the semester when credit is earned. Students must secure an approved internship and provide documentation from the internship's overseer to a full time faculty member sponsor in order to register for the course. The internship must involve participation in research and / or patient care. Students or their overseers will be required to submit monthly records of internship hours and provide the faculty sponsor with a written summary of internship experiences and accomplishments by the last week of classes. Only one internship may be used as a biology elective. This course is available for variable credit. Prerequisites: An Internship for Credit form must be submitted to the department chair Credits: 1-4

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111, and BIO-114 and BIO-L114, and BIO-274 and BIO-L274 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Biology Internship: This course provides students with credit for an unpaid internship completed during the semester when credit is earned. Students must secure an approved internship and provide documentation from the internship's overseer to a full time faculty member sponsor in order to register for the course. The internship must involve participation in research and / or patient care. Students or their overseers will be required to submit monthly records of internship hours and provide the faculty sponsor with a written summary of internship experiences and accomplishments by the last week of classes. Only one internship may be used as a biology elective. This course is available for variable credit. Prerequisites: An Internship for Credit form must be submitted to the department chair Credits: 1-4

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00- 5.00

Description:

Student projects may be initiated by a student or faculty member with the approval of the Chairperson. A paper and oral report are required. Only ONE independent study may be used toward biology electives.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Student projects may be initiated by a student or faculty member with the approval of the Chairperson. A paper and oral report are required. Thesis work is required to involve original research or an in-depth analysis.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-L331 (concurrently) CHEM-212 and CHEM-L212 or permission of instructor

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the foundations of biochemistry including the structure organization and behavior of proteins carbohydrates lipids and nucleic acids. Topics include enzyme catalysis kinetics and inhibition as well as protein regulation and membrane structure. Introduces the use of biochemical literature and bioinformatics techniques.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-331 (concurrently) and CHEM-212 and CHEM-L212 or permission of instructor

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory course introducing biochemical techniques. Includes buffer preparation PCR purification of DNA and proteins agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein quantitation and detection and enzyme kinetic assays.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-L332 (concurrently) and CHEM-331

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the principles of bioenergetics and metabolism of biomolecules. Includes intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates lipids amino acids and oxidative phosphorylation. Additional topics include signal transduction and the regulation and integration of metabolism.

Notes:

  • All courses must be taken with the corresponding laboratory class where applicable.
  • BIO-503, BIO-H503, BIO-510, and BIO-H510 must be taken for a minimum of 3 credits to count as a major elective.

    Marine Science Concentration Requirements: 19 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 66-70 credits

    This concentration requires the completion of all Biology major core requirements (listed in the Major Requirements section) as well as the following:

    • Choose one Molecular/Cellular Division course and its corresponding laboratory where applicable (options listed in the Major Requirements section)
    • Choose one Organismic Structure and Function Division course and its corresponding laboratory where applicable (options listed in the Major Requirements section)

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-254 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111 or BIO-114 and BIO-L114 or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduction to the marine environment its organisms and their specific adaptations. Emphasis on marine and estuarine ecology intertidal habits trophic relations and physiology. Human impacts on the sea: fisheries mariculture pollution introduced species climate change and seawater acidification and law of the sea. Taught yearly each fall.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-254 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111 or BIO-114 and BIO-L114 or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Field trips to local marine environments museums and aquaria; field and laboratory study and observations of live preserved and models of marine organisms.

    Choose three of the following courses:

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will examine major trends issues and policy that are impacting the world's coastal and ocean resources. Scientific economic social and political aspects of each issue will be discussed and case studies will be used to illustrate the challenge of linking good scientific data with regulatory and management decisions. Topics include (but are not limited to) relevant coastal and ocean processes international and national governance coastal and marine spatial planning marine protected areas fishery management zones coastal development climate change and marine mammals.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 and BIO-L111 or UES-111 and UES-L111

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This seminar course is designed to stimulate students' interests in the field of water resources from an environmentally sustainable perspective. Five water resource areas will be highlighted: (1) rivers and watersheds (2) groundwater and aquifers (3) estuaries (4) coastal floodplains and (5) marine resources. The focus will be on the resources themselves and their functions values and impacts from human uses as well as policy issues and management techniques.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores the biology and natural history of marine mammals including cetaceans pinnipeds and sirenians with a particular focus on species endemic to the North Atlantic. Topics include evolution anatomy physiology behavior ecology field identification the history of whaling and sealing and contemporary management and conservation issues. Hands-on activities may include the dissection of a small marine mammal and a whale watch in Massachusetts Bay.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course covers a broad spectrum of aspects of biodiversity and conservation by examining key elements ranging from global patterns in the distribution of life on our planet to the effects our human population is causing on those patterns. Examples from marine and terrestrial animals and plants are used to convey current ideas with a focus on the importance of global biodiversity and the design of management programs for the conservation of species and ecosystems. 4-credit

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The evolution systematics anatomy physiology and behavior of freshwater marine and anadromous fishes from temperate to tropical environments. The interactions of fish in their environments including predator-prey relationships host-symbiont interactions and fish as herbivores. Taken with permission from the Marine Science Consortium Coordinator. [This is a Marine Science Consortium Course and enrollment is limited] Evenings only: off campus

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course provides a comprehensive review of the biology ecology and management of cetaceans. A thorough grounding in cetacean mammalogy and population biology will prepare students to understand conservation problems presented as case histories. Students will also complete an independent research paper on a topic related to cetacean biology. Hands-on activities may include the dissection of a small cetacean and a shore-based whale watch in Cape Cod Bay. This course is part of the Marine Studies Consortium and will be held at the New England Aquarium.[This is a Marine Science Consortium Course and enrollment is limited]

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 and BIO-L111, BIO-114 and BIO-L114, and BIO-274 and BIO-L274 (may be taken conccurently)

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Biology Internship: This course provides students with credit for an unpaid internship completed during the semester when credit is earned. Students must secure an approved internship and provide documentation from the internship's overseer to a full time faculty member sponsor in order to register for the course. The internship must involve participation in research and / or patient care. Students or their overseers will be required to submit monthly records of internship hours and provide the faculty sponsor with a written summary of internship experiences and accomplishments by the last week of classes. Only one internship may be used as a biology elective. This course is available for variable credit. Prerequisites: An Internship for Credit form must be submitted to the department chair Credits: 1-4

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 and BIO-L111, and BIO-114 and BIO-L114, and BIO-274 and BIO-L274 (may be taken concurrently)

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Biology Internship: This course provides students with credit for an unpaid internship completed during the semester when credit is earned. Students must secure an approved internship and provide documentation from the internship's overseer to a full time faculty member sponsor in order to register for the course. The internship must involve participation in research and / or patient care. Students or their overseers will be required to submit monthly records of internship hours and provide the faculty sponsor with a written summary of internship experiences and accomplishments by the last week of classes. Only one internship may be used as a biology elective. This course is available for variable credit. Prerequisites: An Internship for Credit form must be submitted to the department chair Credits: 1-4

    Prerequisites:

    An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

    Credits:

    1.00- 5.00

    Description:

    Student projects may be initiated by a student or faculty member with the approval of the Chairperson. A paper and oral report are required. Only ONE independent study may be used toward biology electives.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Student projects may be initiated by a student or faculty member with the approval of the Chairperson. A paper and oral report are required. Thesis work is required to involve original research or an in-depth analysis.

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111 and CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112 and BIO-114 and BIO-L114 (or UES-111 and UES-L111)

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is designed to identify the ways that scientific knowledge can be used to resolve environmental problems particularly the ocean's role in the biogeochemical cycling of selected elements and the impacts of humans on the cycling of these elements. Sample topics include the chemical composition of seawater from the perspectives of elemental speciation and the impacts of solutes on water's physical behavior; biogeochemical phenomena which control accumulation and preservation of marine sediments; marine chemistry of dioactive and stable isotopes; and how climate change and pollution impact the marine environment with mitigation strategies outlined.

    Prerequisites:

    UES-111 and UES-L111 or permission of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the marine and coastal realms and the problems that arise from the human-marine relationship via topics such as: ocean and estuarine circulation climate change and ocean response and plant/animal adaptations in these varying ecosystems.

    Note: BIO-503, BIO-H503, BIO-510, and BIO-H510 must be taken for a minimum of 3 credits to count as a major elective.

    Health Careers Concentration Requirements: 19 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 67-70 credits

    The Health Careers concentration is focused on assisting students in gaining acceptance to graduate clinical training but it is not intended to be bachelor’s-level preparation for a specific clinical field.

    The concentration requires the completion of all Biology major core requirements (listed in the Major Requirements section), as well as the following:

    Choose one of the following courses from the Molecular/Cellular Division and its corresponding laboratory where applicable:

    Prerequisites:

    BIO 111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, BIO-L114, CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The course is designed as an application base educational experience that will allow students to learn the standard techniques associated with successful cell culture. As such students are responsible for the maintenance propagation isolation and preservation of their cells. A number of cell types and experimental manipulations of the cultures are investigated throughout the semester.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-L285 (concurrently), BIO-111 and BIO-L111

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Viruses and bacteria are surveyed in terms of their ecology biochemistry taxonomy molecular biology and control.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-285 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Introduction to microbiological techniques and their applications to health research and industry.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111, BIO-L111, CHEM-211, CHEM-L211 and BIO-L403 (concurrently)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The study of cells approached through examinations of biochemical mechanisms the relation between the structure and function of biological molecules and organelles and the regulation of normal and diseased cells.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 and BIO-L11 and CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211. Must take BIO-403 concurrently.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Examination of biological molecules and their role in cell function. Techniques used in these examinations will include enzymatic analyses gel electrophoresis immunologic identification chromatography and spectroscopy. Students are expected to develop their proficiency in the laboratory techniques used to analyze their results in a quantitative manner and to present their findings.

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM-311 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274 and BIO-L474 (concurrently)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An examination of concepts and techniques of modern molecular biology. Topics include the structure and function of DNA RNA and proteins the regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels genetic modification of organisms and genome analysis. This course will incorporate readings and discussions of primary scientific literature. Spring semester.

    Prerequisites:

    Take CHEM-331 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274. BIO-474 must be taken concurrently.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This upper level laboratory course will consist of a semester-long project in the form of a series of consecutive experiments involving the generation of a genetically modified organism and its subsequent molecular analysis. Techniques employed will include genetic screens DNA isolation restriction endonuclease analysis transformation of bacteria gel electrophoresis gene reported assays RNA isolation reverse transcription and quantitative PCR.

    Choose one of the following courses from the Organismic Structure and Function Division and its corresponding laboratory where applicable:

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-L203 (concurrently), BIO-111 and BIO-L11

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    First part of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course emphasizes histology and physiology in the understanding of the integumentary skeletal muscular and nervous systems. Medical terminology will be used.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-203 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    A study of the human skeletal system and a comparative look at other organ systems involving observation of anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes microscopy and computer simulations of physiological processes.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114. Must take BIO-L304 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Mechanisms of physiological adaptations to environmental challenges are studied. Examples of gas exchange osmoregulation fluid transport temperature regulation nervous control and movement are examined in various animal forms through class lecture and discussion required readings and external lectures. Spring semester.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114. Must take BIO-304 concurrently.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Selected physiological processes and mechanisms or adaptation in invertebrate and vertebrate animals are examined by observation and controlled experiments.

    Choose one Diversity, Environment, and Conservation Division course and its corresponding laboratory where applicable (options listed in the Major Requirements section)

    Choose three of the following Biology elective courses and their corresponding laboratories where applicable. Courses listed above not used to fulfill the division requirement may be taken as an elective.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-L203 (concurrently), BIO-111 and BIO-L11

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    First part of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course emphasizes histology and physiology in the understanding of the integumentary skeletal muscular and nervous systems. Medical terminology will be used.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-203 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    A study of the human skeletal system and a comparative look at other organ systems involving observation of anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes microscopy and computer simulations of physiological processes.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-L204 (concurrently), BIO-203, and BIO-L203

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Conclusion of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course investigates the endocrine circulatory respiratory digestive urinary and reproductive systems as well as the physiology of immune responses nutrition and acid-base balance. Medical terminology will be used.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-204 (concurrently) and BIO-203 and BIO-L203

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    A study of the human viscera using anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes microscopy of tissues and physiological experiments.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This interactive introduction to nutrition explores the science of human nutrition and further reviews concepts of how nutrition can promote health and well being. The course will review specific nutrient needs and functions nutrient digestion and the role of diet in well being and in the presence of chronic disease. Weekly course work encourages scientific literacy and fosters critical evaluation of nutrition in the news and in social media.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 and BIO-L111

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduction to the statistical methods used to evaluate biological problems. Sampling probability confidence intervals hypothesis tests experimental design analysis of variance regression and correlation are some of the topics offered. Software for data handling graphics and analysis will be used.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114. Must take BIO-L304 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Mechanisms of physiological adaptations to environmental challenges are studied. Examples of gas exchange osmoregulation fluid transport temperature regulation nervous control and movement are examined in various animal forms through class lecture and discussion required readings and external lectures. Spring semester.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114. Must take BIO-304 concurrently.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Selected physiological processes and mechanisms or adaptation in invertebrate and vertebrate animals are examined by observation and controlled experiments.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, BIO-L114, BIO-274, and BIO-L274

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to the development of cancer. Factors contributing to tumorgenesis angiogenesis and metastasis will be discussed; these factors oncogenes tumor suppressor genes and signal transduction networks. In addition an investigation of current strategies for cancer prevention and treatment will be considered.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-274

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The concept of immunity response to infection structure of the immune system biochemistry of immunoglobins antigen-antibody interactions allergy immunological injury lymphocyte subpopulations and cellular immunity tolerance suppression and enhancement. Taught alternate/even years.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on embryonic development in vertebrates. The conceptual focus on evolutionary developmental biology includes comparative developmental mechanisms and Epigenetic processes.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 and BIO-L111, BIO-114 and BIO-L114, and BIO-274 and BIO-L274 (may be taken conccurently)

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Biology Internship: This course provides students with credit for an unpaid internship completed during the semester when credit is earned. Students must secure an approved internship and provide documentation from the internship's overseer to a full time faculty member sponsor in order to register for the course. The internship must involve participation in research and / or patient care. Students or their overseers will be required to submit monthly records of internship hours and provide the faculty sponsor with a written summary of internship experiences and accomplishments by the last week of classes. Only one internship may be used as a biology elective. This course is available for variable credit. Prerequisites: An Internship for Credit form must be submitted to the department chair Credits: 1-4

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 and BIO-L111, and BIO-114 and BIO-L114, and BIO-274 and BIO-L274 (may be taken concurrently)

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Biology Internship: This course provides students with credit for an unpaid internship completed during the semester when credit is earned. Students must secure an approved internship and provide documentation from the internship's overseer to a full time faculty member sponsor in order to register for the course. The internship must involve participation in research and / or patient care. Students or their overseers will be required to submit monthly records of internship hours and provide the faculty sponsor with a written summary of internship experiences and accomplishments by the last week of classes. Only one internship may be used as a biology elective. This course is available for variable credit. Prerequisites: An Internship for Credit form must be submitted to the department chair Credits: 1-4

    Prerequisites:

    An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

    Credits:

    1.00- 5.00

    Description:

    Student projects may be initiated by a student or faculty member with the approval of the Chairperson. A paper and oral report are required. Only ONE independent study may be used toward biology electives.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Student projects may be initiated by a student or faculty member with the approval of the Chairperson. A paper and oral report are required. Thesis work is required to involve original research or an in-depth analysis.

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM-L331 (concurrently) CHEM-212 and CHEM-L212 or permission of instructor

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Explores the foundations of biochemistry including the structure organization and behavior of proteins carbohydrates lipids and nucleic acids. Topics include enzyme catalysis kinetics and inhibition as well as protein regulation and membrane structure. Introduces the use of biochemical literature and bioinformatics techniques.

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM-331 (concurrently) and CHEM-212 and CHEM-L212 or permission of instructor

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Laboratory course introducing biochemical techniques. Includes buffer preparation PCR purification of DNA and proteins agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein quantitation and detection and enzyme kinetic assays.

    Note: BIO-503, BIO-H503, BIO-510, BIO-H510 must be taken for a minimum of 4 credits to count as a major elective

    Biology Major Learning Goals & Objectives

    Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.

    Learning Goals Learning Objectives
    Students will...
    Students will be able to...
    Understand the process of science
  • Design a scientific experiment with statistical foresight
  • Assess the ethics of a proposed study
  • Conduct an experiment following standard protocols
  • Recognize the importance of safety protocols
  • Culture, grow, or prepare specimens for study
  • Collect data via quantitative and qualitative observations and measurements
  • Interpret the results of an experiment
  • Know how science is communicated
  • Evaluate primary literature in biology
  • Interpret visual representations of data
  • Summarize the discoveries of scientific research
  • Know how to communicate scientific findings
  • Orally present findings to others in formal and informal settings
  • Construct a written document in a scientific style including proper citation of sources
  • Prepare visual representations of data
  • Access and utilize scientific databases
  • Know how to work collaboratively
  • Conduct an experiment or gather data from the field as part of a group
  • Participate in group discussions
  • Formulate hypotheses in conjunction with others
  • Record protocols and observations
  • Provide constructive feedback to group members
  • Accept feedback from group members
  • Understand how genetic information is transmitted and regulated
  • Describe how information is transferred from DNA to RNA, and from RNA to protein
  • Explain some of the exceptions to the ‘central dogma’ described above
  • Describe how information in DNA is transmitted during cell division
  • Describe how cells maintain the integrity of their genetic information
  • Explain how information is passed from parent to offspring, by both Mendelian and non-Mendelian mechanisms
  • Explain how phenotypes and genotypes are related, including how this relationship is influenced by environmental factors
  • Identify the levels at which gene expression can be regulated
  • Explain how transcription of genes is regulated
  • Explain how protein activity is regulated by intracellular and extra-cellular signaling molecules
  • Understand that a structure’s physical and chemical characteristics influence its interactions with other structures and therefore its function
  • Identify the chemical structures and physical characteristics of the molecules of life, including carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids and amino acids
  • Explain how the structure of DNA is important for its information storage and transmission functions
  • Explain how protein structure is influenced by the chemical characteristics of amino acids and the cellular environment
  • Explain how protein function is related to structure, and how function can be regulated through reversible alterations of structure e. g. phosphorylation
  • Explain how membrane structure allows for compartmentalization in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and how this compartmentalization contributes to cellular functions
  • Explain how the structure of a cell – its shape, and polarity—relates to its function
  • Understand that energy can be changed from one form to another, and that chemical energy can be used by cells to drive energetically demanding activities necessary for life
  • Compare and contrast biologically relevant forms of energy (e. g. kinetic energy vs. potential energy, energy stored in bonds vs. potential energy of concentration gradients)
  • Identify biomolecules that are commonly used to store and transfer energy in cells
  • Explain how enzymes alter the energetics of biochemical reactions
  • Differentiate between catabolic pathways that break down molecules in cells, and anabolic pathways that form biological molecules
  • Describe the basic mechanisms of cellular metabolic function, including cellular respiration and photosynthesis
  • Understand the process of, and evidence for, evolution
  • Distinguish between the mechanisms of evolutionary change
  • Evaluate how mechanisms of evolution lead to speciation and the diversity of life
  • Examine how the classification of organisms reflects their evolutionary history
  • Assess how stochastic events and abiotic factors have influenced the history of life on Earth
  • Explain the connection between genetic inheritance and evolution
  • Understand the basic principles of ecology
  • Evaluate the importance of species interactions and trophic relationships for shaping population growth and community structure
  • Identify and assess through field exercises several measures that describe an ecosystem (e.g., biodiversity, productivity, trophic dynamics)
  • Explain how plant and animal communities change through time (e.g., succession) following natural environmental disturbances
  • Assess how human activities affect the distribution and abundance of species and how ecosystems function
  • Understand organismal structure and function
  • Assess the environmental challenges faced by organisms and the adaptations they have to address them
  • Evaluate the structural, physiological, and/or biochemical adaptations of organisms
  • Appraise how the structure of an adaption and/or molecule reflects its function
  • Understand how to pursue a career in the biological sciences
  • Appraise their technical and interpersonal skills and qualities
  • Effectively search for and locate pertinent internships and jobs
  • Assess their qualifications in relation to an internship and/or job description
  • Prepare job application materials including a resume and cover letter
  • Conduct a mock interview
  • Biology Minor

    Learn more about this minor

    Minor Requirements: 6 courses, 22-24 credits

    Core Requirements (2 courses with corresponding laboratories, 8 credits)

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-L111 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Explanation of key biological structures and reactions of the cell. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 (concurrently)

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Sessions are designed to familiarize the student with biological molecules and the techniques used in their study. The techniques covered include basic solution preparation separation and quantification of molecules enzyme catalysis and cell isolation.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-L114 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Rigorous introduction to organismal biology emphasizing evolution phylogenetics form and function. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    A series of laboratory experiences in evolution diversity anatomy and physiology.

    Electives (4 courses with corresponding laboratories where applicable, 14-16 credits)

    The following courses will NOT count toward a minor in Biology because they are non-major's courses. Choose any Biology course except:

    Prerequisites:

    Non Science Majors Only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Major topics include the scientific basis of evolution the fossil history of vertebrates evidence of evolution in the human body and applying an evolutionary perspective to the social interactions and possible futures of humanity. Meets one of the non laboratory science requirements for the non-science major. This reading and writing intensive course is a non-laboratory science option for non-science majors. This course will not fulfill requirement for a major or a minor in Biology.

    Prerequisites:

    Non Science Majors Only

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course explores the evolution, ecology, behavior, genetics, and adaptations of cats (Felis silvestris catus) and dogs (Canis lupus familiaris). We will discuss what is known about these species, current research, and what is still unknown. The course will focus on comparing and contrasting the biology of cats and dogs and how biological differences have led to the way they are perceived as companion animals. We will also discuss how these species can be used as model organisms for exploring patterns of human heredity and disease transmission.

    Prerequisites:

    Non Science Majors Only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course seeks to answer five current questions from all levels of biology from the subcellular to the ecosystem level. Topics will be discussed in the context of genetics evolution and ecology. We will focus on the process of doing science including how scientists evaluate ideas and communicate their findings. Emphasis will be placed on topics in biology that impact daily life.

    Note: BIO-503, BIO-H503, BIO-510, BIO-H510 must be taken for a minimum of 3 credits to count as a major elective

    Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

    Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major or double major combination to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

    Honors

    To complete requirements for honors in the major, a candidate must:

    1. Graduate with an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher
    2. Complete an independent project in BIO-H503 or BIO-H510 or an equivalent summer research experience that has been pre-approved by the departmental honors committee. Students must submit an application to the committee and their faculty research advisor or BIO-H503 faculty supervisor for pre-approval
    3. Students have the option to write a thesis in BIO-H555 that is approved by the thesis advisor and the departmental honors committee and give an oral presentation on completed research in BIO-H555. Thesis work is required to involve original research or an in-depth analysis based on work completed in BIO-H503 or BIO-H510
    4. Thesis students will present research at the Eastern New England Biology Conference, the Chemistry Talks, or as a guest speaker in an upper level course focused on the area of their research
    5. CAS Honors Program students only: Also present work from the senior honors experience at the Honors Symposium or Pecha Kucha event

    To become a candidate for honors in the major, a student must:

    1. Have a major GPA of 3.5 or higher
    2. Have an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher
    3. Apply to the honors coordinator by submitting an application form no later than May 15th of junior year. Notification of tentative acceptance will be sent to students on May 31st
    4. Submit a detailed outline (August 25th for summer research or December 10th for fall research) in order to receive acceptance into the program by January 10th

    Organizations and Societies

    Student Organizations

    The Biology Department supports four student organizations: the Health Careers Club, the American Society of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry (ASBMB), the Public Health and Nutrition Club, and the Chi Kappa Chapter of the Beta Beta Beta National Biological Honor Society. These four organizations give biology students opportunities to work closely with faculty while engaging in research that benefits the department and the greater Suffolk community.

    Beta Beta Beta Biological Honor Society

    Beta Beta Beta is an honor and professional society primarily for students of the biological sciences. Its goals include promoting student research, publication, and exposure to current biological scholarship and career possibilities. Regular membership is offered to majors in the biological sciences who have completed at least one term of the sophomore year (including three Biology courses) with a 3.0 average in Biology and an overall average of 2.75. Associate membership is open to any interested undergraduate.

    Biology Courses

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-101 and BIO-L101, can also be taken concurrently BIO-L104 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An introduction to basic evolutionary behavioral and ecological principles. Readings and discussions emphasize the ways that humans are affected by ecological processes and principles as well as how humans and their technology affect ecosystems. May not be taken by Biology majors or minors. This course will not fulfill requirements for a major or a minor in Biology. It is intended for non-biology majors as a follow-up to Biology 101. 3 hours lecture. Days Only. Madrid Campus only.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-104 must be taken concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Exercises and field trips designed to complement and demonstrate the ecological principles developed in the lecture section. The lab emphasizes the scientific method and employs long term group projects. Madrid Campus only.

    Prerequisites:

    Non Science Majors Only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Major topics include the scientific basis of evolution the fossil history of vertebrates evidence of evolution in the human body and applying an evolutionary perspective to the social interactions and possible futures of humanity. Meets one of the non laboratory science requirements for the non-science major. This reading and writing intensive course is a non-laboratory science option for non-science majors. This course will not fulfill requirement for a major or a minor in Biology.

    Prerequisites:

    CAS Honors students only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Major topics include the scientific basis of evolution the fossil history of vertebrates evidence of evolution in the human body and applying an evolutionary perspective to the social interactions and possible futures of humanity. Meets one of the non laboratory science requirements for the non-science major. This reading and writing intensive course is a non-laboratory science option for non-science majors. This course will not fulfill requirement for a major or a minor in Biology.

    Prerequisites:

    Non Science Majors Only

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course explores the evolution, ecology, behavior, genetics, and adaptations of cats (Felis silvestris catus) and dogs (Canis lupus familiaris). We will discuss what is known about these species, current research, and what is still unknown. The course will focus on comparing and contrasting the biology of cats and dogs and how biological differences have led to the way they are perceived as companion animals. We will also discuss how these species can be used as model organisms for exploring patterns of human heredity and disease transmission.

    Prerequisites:

    CAS and SBS Honors Students Only or 3.3 GPA. Non science majors only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores the evolution ecology behavior genetics and adaptations of cats (Felis silvestris catus) and dogs (Canis lupus familiaris). We will discuss what is known about these species current research and what is still unknown. The course will focus on comparing and contrasting the biology of cats and dogs and how biological differences have led to the way they are perceived as companion animals. We will also discuss how these species can be used as model organisms for exploring patterns of human heredity and disease transmission.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-L111 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Explanation of key biological structures and reactions of the cell. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-L111 concurrently. Restricted to Honors Biology Majors.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Explanation of key biological structures and reactions of the cell. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 (concurrently)

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Sessions are designed to familiarize the student with biological molecules and the techniques used in their study. The techniques covered include basic solution preparation separation and quantification of molecules enzyme catalysis and cell isolation.

    Prerequisites:

    Honor student status or GPA of 3.3 required. Must take concurrently with BIO-111.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Sessions are designed to familiarize the student with biological molecules and the techniques used in their study. The techniques covered include basic solution preparation separation and quantification of molecules enzyme catalysis and cell isolation.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Online lab sessions designed to familiarize the student with biological molecules their importance and the techniques used in their study through online lab simulations and virtual illustrations of scientific experiments. The techniques covered include solution preparation separation and quantification of molecules enzyme kinetics cell isolation and data analysis.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-L114 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Rigorous introduction to organismal biology emphasizing evolution phylogenetics form and function. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    A series of laboratory experiences in evolution diversity anatomy and physiology.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 (concurrently) and Honor student status or GPA of 3.3

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    A series of laboratory experiences in evolution diversity anatomy and physiology.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    A series of online interactive laboratory experiences in evolution diversity anatomy and physiology which complement the lecture.

    Prerequisites:

    Non Science Majors Only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course seeks to answer five current questions from all levels of biology from the subcellular to the ecosystem level. Topics will be discussed in the context of genetics evolution and ecology. We will focus on the process of doing science including how scientists evaluate ideas and communicate their findings. Emphasis will be placed on topics in biology that impact daily life.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-L203 (concurrently), BIO-111 and BIO-L11

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    First part of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course emphasizes histology and physiology in the understanding of the integumentary skeletal muscular and nervous systems. Medical terminology will be used.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-203 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    A study of the human skeletal system and a comparative look at other organ systems involving observation of anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes microscopy and computer simulations of physiological processes.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-203 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    A study of the human integumentary skeletal muscular and nervous systems using observation of gross anatomical simulation software. Includes videos of interpretation of histological samples and computer simulations of physiological processes.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-L204 (concurrently), BIO-203, and BIO-L203

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Conclusion of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course investigates the endocrine circulatory respiratory digestive urinary and reproductive systems as well as the physiology of immune responses nutrition and acid-base balance. Medical terminology will be used.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-203 and BIO-L203. BIO-L204 must be taken concurrently. Restricted to CAS Honors students only.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Conclusion of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course investigates the endocrine circulatory respiratory digestive urinary and reproductive systems as well as the physiology of immune responses nutrition and acid-base balance. Medical terminology will be used.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-204 (concurrently) and BIO-203 and BIO-L203

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    A study of the human viscera using anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes microscopy of tissues and physiological experiments.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course will examine major trends issues and policy that are impacting the world's coastal and ocean resources. Scientific economic social and political aspects of each issue will be discussed and case studies will be used to illustrate the challenge of linking good scientific data with regulatory and management decisions. Topics include (but are not limited to) relevant coastal and ocean processes international and national governance coastal and marine spatial planning marine protected areas fishery management zones coastal development climate change and marine mammals.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 and BIO-L111 or UES-111 and UES-L111

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This seminar course is designed to stimulate students' interests in the field of water resources from an environmentally sustainable perspective. Five water resource areas will be highlighted: (1) rivers and watersheds (2) groundwater and aquifers (3) estuaries (4) coastal floodplains and (5) marine resources. The focus will be on the resources themselves and their functions values and impacts from human uses as well as policy issues and management techniques.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-L225 (concurrently) and BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Course introduces students to the anatomy physiology systematics ecology and economic uses of all major groups of plants. Aspects of the biology of nonvascular non-seed gymnosperm and angiosperm plants are explored. An overview of Kingdom Fungi is also covered. Each student is required to do a 10-15 minute presentation to the class highlighting the economic use of a group of plants assigned by the instructor. Normally offered Spring semester.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-225 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111 and BIO-114 and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Lab exercises focus on plant anatomy physiology and systematics. Instruction in the identification of major plant families and fungal types is covered. Trips to a Boston area herbarium and botanical garden are required.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This interactive introduction to nutrition explores the science of human nutrition and further reviews concepts of how nutrition can promote health and well being. The course will review specific nutrient needs and functions nutrient digestion and the role of diet in well being and in the presence of chronic disease. Weekly course work encourages scientific literacy and fosters critical evaluation of nutrition in the news and in social media.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course explores the biology and natural history of marine mammals including cetaceans pinnipeds and sirenians with a particular focus on species endemic to the North Atlantic. Topics include evolution anatomy physiology behavior ecology field identification the history of whaling and sealing and contemporary management and conservation issues. Hands-on activities may include the dissection of a small marine mammal and a whale watch in Massachusetts Bay.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-254 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111 or BIO-114 and BIO-L114 or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Introduction to the marine environment its organisms and their specific adaptations. Emphasis on marine and estuarine ecology intertidal habits trophic relations and physiology. Human impacts on the sea: fisheries mariculture pollution introduced species climate change and seawater acidification and law of the sea. Taught yearly each fall.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-254 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111 or BIO-114 and BIO-L114 or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Field trips to local marine environments museums and aquaria; field and laboratory study and observations of live preserved and models of marine organisms.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-254 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111 or BIO-114 and BIO-L114 or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Guided virtual field trips to marine habitats including saltmarshes clam flats rocky intertidal and shallow subtidal; and study/discussions based on video of marine organisms and digital lab exercises involving virtual dissections observations data collection and reporting. There is no final exam for this lab course.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO 111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, BIO-L114, CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The course is designed as an application base educational experience that will allow students to learn the standard techniques associated with successful cell culture. As such students are responsible for the maintenance propagation isolation and preservation of their cells. A number of cell types and experimental manipulations of the cultures are investigated throughout the semester.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 and BIO-L111

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduction to the statistical methods used to evaluate biological problems. Sampling probability confidence intervals hypothesis tests experimental design analysis of variance regression and correlation are some of the topics offered. Software for data handling graphics and analysis will be used.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 and BIO-L111. Restricted to CAS Honor Students.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduction to the statistical methods used to evaluate biological problems. Sampling probability confidence intervals hypothesis tests experimental design analysis of variance regression and correlation are some of the topics offered. Software for data handling graphics and analysis will be used.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-L274 (concurrently), BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114 and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An examination of the basic principles of genetics in eukaryotes and prokaryotes at the level of molecules cells and multicellular organisms including humans. Topics include Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance structure and function of chromosomes and genomes biological variation resulting from recombination mutation and selection and population genetics.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 and BIO-L111 and BIO-114 and BIO-L114. BIO-L274 concurrently. CAS Honors students only.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An examination of the basic principles of genetics in eukaryotes and prokaryotes at the level of molecules cells and multicellular organisms including humans. Topics include Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance structure and function of chromosomes and genomes biological variation resulting from recombination mutation and selection and population genetics.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114. Must be taken concurrently with BIO 274.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Experiments designed to demonstrate principles presented in lecture using a range of genetic model organisms that include E. coli B. subtilis S. cerevisiae D. melanogaster S. fimicola and C. elegans.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114. Must be taken concurrently with BIO-274.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Online laboratory course that reinforces concepts presented in lecture and teaches basic principles associated with genetics research. Students will learn about lab practices and techniques using simulations videos and group activities. There will also be a focus on learning how to extract meaningful information from scientific papers and becoming proficient in scientific writing.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-L285 (concurrently), BIO-111 and BIO-L111

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Viruses and bacteria are surveyed in terms of their ecology biochemistry taxonomy molecular biology and control.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-285 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Introduction to microbiological techniques and their applications to health research and industry.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111, BIO-L111 and WRI-101, WRI-102, or WRI-H103. BIO and Radiation Therapy majors with junior standing only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Development of skills for writing clearly concisely and creatively in the style of scientific journals. This course emphasizes the formulation of a research project of the student's choice and leads to a formal manuscript on the topic. Instruction includes literature search methods and software for the graphical presentation of data. Professional development including the preparation of job application materials and in-person interview skills is also an integral part of this course. Required of all biology and radiation science majors. Junior standing required.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114. Must take BIO-L304 concurrently

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Mechanisms of physiological adaptations to environmental challenges are studied. Examples of gas exchange osmoregulation fluid transport temperature regulation nervous control and movement are examined in various animal forms through class lecture and discussion required readings and external lectures. Spring semester.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114. Must take BIO-304 concurrently.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Selected physiological processes and mechanisms or adaptation in invertebrate and vertebrate animals are examined by observation and controlled experiments.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114 or UES-111

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces geological processes leading to fossilization and sedimentary analysis of past environments. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of extinct lifeforms and their interaction with the environment starting with the formation of the planet through the present day.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114 and BIO-L333 (concurrently)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Areas of study include but are not limited to basic principles of population biology community ecology trophic dynamics ecosystem structure and function and evolutionary theory.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114 and BIO-L333 (concurrently)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Areas of study include but are not limited to basic principles of population biology community ecology trophic dynamics ecosystem structure and function and evolutionary theory.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114, BIO-L114, and BIO-333 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Field and laboratory experiences in techniques and concepts relevant to ecological theory data collection statistical analysis visual representation and report preparation.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114, BIO-L114, and BIO-333 concurrently

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    A virtual exploration of field methods and laboratory techniques relevant to ecological theory data collection statistical analysis visual representation synthesis and science writing.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114. BIO-274 (recommended).

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A survey of evolutionary theory exploring processes such as the genetic sources of variation natural and sexual selection and evolutionary developmental biology. Using phylogenetic systematics and other tools we will demonstrate how these mechanisms result in the visible patterns of evolution. This is a reading-and-writing intensive course centered on close reading of Origin of the Species and discussion of recent peer-reviewed literature about evolution.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course covers a broad spectrum of aspects of biodiversity and conservation by examining key elements ranging from global patterns in the distribution of life on our planet to the effects our human population is causing on those patterns. Examples from marine and terrestrial animals and plants are used to convey current ideas with a focus on the importance of global biodiversity and the design of management programs for the conservation of species and ecosystems. 4-credit

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    A survey of the occurrence life history and pathogenicity of the most important arthropod-borne human diseases both internationally (malaria dengue plague trypanosomiasis yellow fever etc.) and within the United States (Lyme disease EEE West Nile Virus and others). Demographic and environmental factors leading to the re-emergence and spread of these diseases will be considered.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The evolution systematics anatomy physiology and behavior of freshwater marine and anadromous fishes from temperate to tropical environments. The interactions of fish in their environments including predator-prey relationships host-symbiont interactions and fish as herbivores. Taken with permission from the Marine Science Consortium Coordinator. [This is a Marine Science Consortium Course and enrollment is limited] Evenings only: off campus

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course provides a comprehensive review of the biology ecology and management of cetaceans. A thorough grounding in cetacean mammalogy and population biology will prepare students to understand conservation problems presented as case histories. Students will also complete an independent research paper on a topic related to cetacean biology. Hands-on activities may include the dissection of a small cetacean and a shore-based whale watch in Cape Cod Bay. This course is part of the Marine Studies Consortium and will be held at the New England Aquarium.[This is a Marine Science Consortium Course and enrollment is limited]

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, BIO-L114, BIO-274, and BIO-L274

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An examination of molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to the development of cancer. Factors contributing to tumorgenesis angiogenesis and metastasis will be discussed; these factors oncogenes tumor suppressor genes and signal transduction networks. In addition an investigation of current strategies for cancer prevention and treatment will be considered.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-274

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The concept of immunity response to infection structure of the immune system biochemistry of immunoglobins antigen-antibody interactions allergy immunological injury lymphocyte subpopulations and cellular immunity tolerance suppression and enhancement. Taught alternate/even years.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-274 and BIO-L274 or BIO-285 and BIO-L285;

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The molecular mechanisms of host-microbe interactions and the epidemiology and public health aspects of microorganisms are stressed. Also covered are current topics in microbiology including antimicrobial therapy and resistance, emerging pathogens and novel applications of microbiology. Experimental design and troubleshooting skills are developed, using contemporary microbiology and molecular biology laboratory techniques. Taught alternate/odd years.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111, BIO-L111, CHEM-211, CHEM-L211 and BIO-L403 (concurrently)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    The study of cells approached through examinations of biochemical mechanisms the relation between the structure and function of biological molecules and organelles and the regulation of normal and diseased cells.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 and BIO-L11 and CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211. Must take BIO-403 concurrently.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Examination of biological molecules and their role in cell function. Techniques used in these examinations will include enzymatic analyses gel electrophoresis immunologic identification chromatography and spectroscopy. Students are expected to develop their proficiency in the laboratory techniques used to analyze their results in a quantitative manner and to present their findings.

    Prerequisites:

    Senior standing

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The purpose of this class is to provide senior biology majors with the skills to land a job in the biological sciences including locating open positions preparing an application and performing well in an interview. Students will be guided through the preparation of application materials participate in mock interviews and develop skills to navigate a professional workplace environment. Students will also participate in a mandatory senior assessment exam to assist departmental curricular development.

    Prerequisites:

    Senior standing. CAS Honors students only

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    The purpose of this class is to provide senior biology majors with the skills to land a job in the biological sciences including locating open positions preparing an application and performing well in an interview. Students will be guided through the preparation of application materials participate in mock interviews and develop skills to navigate a professional workplace environment. Students will also participate in a mandatory senior assessment exam to assist departmental curricular development.

    Prerequisites:

    CHEM-311 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274 and BIO-L474 (concurrently)

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    An examination of concepts and techniques of modern molecular biology. Topics include the structure and function of DNA RNA and proteins the regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels genetic modification of organisms and genome analysis. This course will incorporate readings and discussions of primary scientific literature. Spring semester.

    Prerequisites:

    Take CHEM-331 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274. BIO-474 must be taken concurrently.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This upper level laboratory course will consist of a semester-long project in the form of a series of consecutive experiments involving the generation of a genetically modified organism and its subsequent molecular analysis. Techniques employed will include genetic screens DNA isolation restriction endonuclease analysis transformation of bacteria gel electrophoresis gene reported assays RNA isolation reverse transcription and quantitative PCR.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-114 and BIO-L114

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course focuses on embryonic development in vertebrates. The conceptual focus on evolutionary developmental biology includes comparative developmental mechanisms and Epigenetic processes.

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    This course requires students to complete a minimum of 15 engagement hours per semester. Students gain exposure to a variety of activities related to biology course preparation and/or research in a laboratory or field setting with faculty oversight. Permission of instructor required. May be taken more than once.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 and BIO-L111 and BIO-114 BIO-L114. Instructor consent required.

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    This course requires that students complete at least 40 engagement hours a semester at an off campus internship. The internship must involve participation in research and/or patient care. Students will receive a Pass/Fail grade for the course. Permission of instructor required. May be taken more than once.

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 and BIO-L111, BIO-114 and BIO-L114, and BIO-274 and BIO-L274 (may be taken conccurently)

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Biology Internship: This course provides students with credit for an unpaid internship completed during the semester when credit is earned. Students must secure an approved internship and provide documentation from the internship's overseer to a full time faculty member sponsor in order to register for the course. The internship must involve participation in research and / or patient care. Students or their overseers will be required to submit monthly records of internship hours and provide the faculty sponsor with a written summary of internship experiences and accomplishments by the last week of classes. Only one internship may be used as a biology elective. This course is available for variable credit. Prerequisites: An Internship for Credit form must be submitted to the department chair Credits: 1-4

    Prerequisites:

    BIO-111 and BIO-L111, and BIO-114 and BIO-L114, and BIO-274 and BIO-L274 (may be taken concurrently)

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Biology Internship: This course provides students with credit for an unpaid internship completed during the semester when credit is earned. Students must secure an approved internship and provide documentation from the internship's overseer to a full time faculty member sponsor in order to register for the course. The internship must involve participation in research and / or patient care. Students or their overseers will be required to submit monthly records of internship hours and provide the faculty sponsor with a written summary of internship experiences and accomplishments by the last week of classes. Only one internship may be used as a biology elective. This course is available for variable credit. Prerequisites: An Internship for Credit form must be submitted to the department chair Credits: 1-4

    Prerequisites:

    An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

    Credits:

    1.00- 5.00

    Description:

    Student projects may be initiated by a student or faculty member with the approval of the Chairperson. A paper and oral report are required. Only ONE independent study may be used toward biology electives.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Student projects may be initiated by a student or faculty member with the approval of the Chairperson. A paper and oral report are required. Thesis work is required to involve original research or an in-depth analysis.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Student projects may be initiated by a student or faculty member with the approval of the Chairperson. A paper and oral report are required. Thesis work is required to involve original research or an in-depth analysis.

    Prerequisites:

    Biology Majors Only; GPA 3.5 or Higher; Instructor Permission Required

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Students will write an honors thesis based on their own discovery research or experience at an internship. Students will learn to write the sections of a scientific paper and review the writing of others. A public presentation is required.

    Prerequisites:

    Biology Majors Only; GPA 3.5 or Higher; Instructor Permission Required

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Students will complete a senior capstone project. This project may include an honors thesis based on their own discovery research or experience at an internship or a poster based upon a previously completed literature review. A public presentation is required.