Black Studies

Black Studies Minor

Learn more about this minor
There is no major available in Black Studies.

Minor Requirements: 5 courses, 20 credits

Core Requirements (2 courses, 8 credits)

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces students to the basic concepts, literature and interdisciplinary nature of Black Studies. Provides a conceptual framework for the investigation and analysis of black history and culture as well.

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces students to basic research techniques and methods in Black Studies including library use, identifying resources, project development, documenting sources, and writing research papers.

Electives (3 courses, 12 credits)

Choose three of the following; no more than two may be taken from any one department outside of Black Studies:

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the history and culture of West Africa through its portrayal in literature and film. The specific countries that will be focused on are Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana and Nigeria. This class will also recognize the fact that borders are a modern, man-made element of the West African landscape serving to both separate people who have historically and traditionally seen themselves as connected, and to bring together people into a nation who have historically and traditionally seen themselves as distinct from one another.

Credits:

4

Description:

Using literature and film to present aspects of the African American experience in the United States. By using film and literature it is possible to present the broad range of cultural styles, regional variations, class differences, gender issues, family structures and multiple viewpoints that make up the African American experience. Through lectures and in-class presentations a historical context will be provided for each of the films or texts that are used during the semester.

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces students to the Reconstruction era in American history, and uses Reconstruction as a bridge to look at enslavement, which preceded the era, and the issue of freedom during, and after the era. In the first half of the class students read from texts that will provide them with an understanding of slavery, emancipation and reconstruction. The second half of the class will utilize on-line collections of the Freedman's Bureau Papers to allow students to use documents to deepen their understanding of the Reconstruction era. The class will also provide a comparative approach by considering questions of citizenship in the 19th century for people of African descent in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean. This course is identical to HST 469.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

4

Description:

Independent study in Black Studies

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4

Description:

African-American writing from the beginning through the present. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

GVT 110 and GVT 120

Credits:

4

Description:

The political development of Africa in colonial and post-colonial periods. Analysis of the evolution of governmental institutions includes economic, social and personal factors; political forces at work in present day Africa.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the history of Africa from prehistoric times to the nineteenth century to give students an introduction to African Studies and a sense of Africa's place in world history. Topics include: the Nile Valley civilizations, West African empires, the trans-Saharan trade, the slave trade, the spread and impact of Islam.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the history of Africa from 1800 to the present and enable students to develop an understanding of issues that affect the relationship between modern Africa and the world. Topics include: the African tradition; the impact of Islam and Christianity, abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism and colonialism, African independence movements, African nationalism, Pan Africanism.

Credits:

4

Description:

Compares and analyzes the history of race and politics in South Africa and the United States from the 17th century to the present. Examines how race as a social and ideological construct influenced and informed political conflicts over land, labor, and social relations in the two countries including slavery, segregation, apartheid, and the struggle to create racial democracies.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the history of Africans in the United States from their arrival in the colonies to the Civil War and the end of legal slavery. Topics examined include: the development of the slave system, African-Americans, and the Declaration of Independence, and the abolition movement.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines African American history from the end of slavery to the twenty first century. Topics examined include: Emancipation and Reconstruction, Reconstruction and the Constitution, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, and African-Americans at the start of the twenty-first century.

Credits:

4

Description:

Using music as a window this class explores the history of Black America as well as the history of all America. Through a combination of texts, videos, and recordings this class examines the music of Black America, from it's African roots to hip hop in the 21st century. This will be done in the context and communities in which black music was created and performed, and also in relationship to the wider world.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the global dispersion of African people outside of the African continent. The history and culture of African descendant people and their communities in the Americas, Europe, and Asia will be included.

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major or double major combination to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

Black Studies Courses

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces students to the basic concepts, literature and interdisciplinary nature of Black Studies. Provides a conceptual framework for the investigation and analysis of black history and culture as well.

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces students to basic research techniques and methods in Black Studies including library use, identifying resources, project development, documenting sources, and writing research papers.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the history and culture of West Africa through its portrayal in literature and film. The specific countries that will be focused on are Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana and Nigeria. This class will also recognize the fact that borders are a modern, man-made element of the West African landscape serving to both separate people who have historically and traditionally seen themselves as connected, and to bring together people into a nation who have historically and traditionally seen themselves as distinct from one another.

Credits:

4

Description:

Using literature and film to present aspects of the African American experience in the United States. By using film and literature it is possible to present the broad range of cultural styles, regional variations, class differences, gender issues, family structures and multiple viewpoints that make up the African American experience. Through lectures and in-class presentations a historical context will be provided for each of the films or texts that are used during the semester.

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces participants to the sabar music and dance tradition of Senegal through a study of music, dance, language and history. Taught by professional practitioners of the sabar tradition, students will develop a sense of how music and dance are used in both traditional and popular contexts. This course will be directed by Prof. Robert A. Bellinger.

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces students to the Reconstruction era in American history, and uses Reconstruction as a bridge to look at enslavement, which preceded the era, and the issue of freedom during, and after the era. In the first half of the class students read from texts that will provide them with an understanding of slavery, emancipation and reconstruction. The second half of the class will utilize on-line collections of the Freedman's Bureau Papers to allow students to use documents to deepen their understanding of the Reconstruction era. The class will also provide a comparative approach by considering questions of citizenship in the 19th century for people of African descent in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean. This course is identical to HST 469.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

4

Description:

Independent study in Black Studies