Education Studies

Education Studies Minor

Learn more about this minor

Minor Requirements: 5 courses, 20 credits

Core Requirements (2 courses, 8 credits)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Working with children and adolescents is a facet of many professions. This course will introduce students to the study of education occurring in formal and informal settings. This course focuses on the relationships among, and between, teachers, discourse, and community. Students will glean insight into the relationship of school and society as well as power and control in American Education. Required of all education minors. Five hours of field work required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The relationship between cultural diversity and schooling is explored by examining impediments to academic achievement and advancement by minority students, non-native English speaking students, and other under-represented groups. Topics include: standardized testing, identification of inequities, legal and ethical responsibilities of teachers, and promoting equity. Ten pre-practicum observation hours required for teacher candidates.

Elective Courses (3 courses, 12 credits)

Choose three of the following, at least one of which should be an EDUC course and one must be a 300-level or higher course:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the nature and development of human abilities and the teaching-learning process. Considers the facts and generalizations of child and adolescent growth and development, working with diverse cultures, and special needs children in school settings. Ten hours of field work.

Prerequisites:

This class fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

Credits:

4.00- 8.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. Students complete 35 hours per semester of educational tutoring in a local school (K-5), in conjunction with a weekly seminar on campus. Open to all majors. No previous experience required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students complete a minimum of 35 hours of tutoring and coaching in an educational setting, or a community organization in conjunction with a weekly seminar on campus. Programs include COACH, Connections to College, and others. Open to all majors. No previous experience required.

Prerequisites:

Open to all majors,Instructor's signature required

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students complete all research, travel, and reporting requirements in conjunction with Suffolk University's Alternative Spring Break. Open to all majors. No previous experience required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course introduces students to the basic competencies of school teaching. Topics include: lesson planning, classroom management, grouping for instruction, effective pedagogical practices, assessment methods, requirements for licensure in Massachusetts, and discipline specific curriculum development using the curriculum frameworks/common core state standards. Field observations (25 hours) required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines communication between and among teachers and students in the classroom setting. Topics include: communication apprehension, building oral fluency, use of media technology to enhance student learning, cooperative learning, and related professional and legal responsibilities of teachers. Ten pre-practicum observation hours required for Teacher Candidates.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the specific needs and challenges of the various language and cultural groups in schools. Topics include: theories of 1st and 2nd language acquisition, strategies for teaching academic content, modifying instruction in the mainstream classroom, creating classroom cultures that invite all students into learning, the role of advocacy and professional collaboration in ESL, and analysis of policies related to assessment and placement of English Language Learners.

Prerequisites:

Take EDUC-315

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students will have opportunities to put the theories and techniques learned in EDUC 315- Strategies for Working with English Learners into practice. Students will be placed in various Suffolk University sites or classrooms where they will work to meet the specific needs and challenges of educating various language and cultural groups. Students will be required to spend 30 hours working in their placements. Students will attend a weekly seminar where connections between theory and practice are explored, experiences are shared, and Teaching & Service Portfolios will be created.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on the exploration and understanding of issues, strategies and frameworks related to developing and implementing youth programs. Students will be exposed to developmental theories, and various components of effective youth programmatic planning. Topics include: conducting needs assessments, developing goals and objectives, logistics planning, recruitment and training, and program evaluation.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth investigation of policies effecting urban schools; topics include: demographic influence on education, influences of national and state regulations on urban schools, sociological factors unique to urban schools, and in-depth analysis of equity and achievement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines major current issues of educational policy against the background of demographic trends, technological innovations, standardized testing, and curricular shifts.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Members of the Department will meet with students to direct their research in areas of special interest to them. Projects of this sort will be authorized only in unusual circumstances upon the recommendations of the Department Chairperson and with the approval of the Dean. Offered by arrangement only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to the sociological understanding of human interaction, group process and social structures. Students are introduced to basic concepts, theories and methods of sociological investigation. Majors and minors must pass with a grade of "C" or better.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of traditional and contemporary problems associated with major social institutions such as the family, economics, government and education. Social forces related to ethnicity, social class, health and welfare, and urbanization are also included. Alternative remedial measures based on behavioral science theories are discussed. Majors and minors must pass with a grade of "C" or better.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The goal of the course is to provide a broad overview of children and youth and their place in American society. Particular attention is paid to (1) the impact of geographical location, social class, gender, race, sexuality, popular culture, mass media, and technology; (2)the intersection of youth cultures and mainstream society; and (3) the contention that some youth cultures are "deviant".

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Considers the problems surrounding the legal definition and handling of juveniles who confront the law as offenders, clients and victims. Attention is devoted to the study of the special legal categories and procedures established for juveniles, the problems facing professionals providing juvenile services and the most significant directions of legal and social change affecting youth in our society. Normally offered every year. Fulfills the Sociology Department's Social Policy requirement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides an overview of youth gangs and their sociological underpinnings, which are rooted in poverty and racism. Topical areas are discussed in relation to these key factors. Study topics include the history of gangs, theories about gang formation and individual membership, gangs and criminal behavior, socio-cultural importance of gangs, and strategies to control gang behavior. The course will utilize current gang issues in the US generally and in Massachusetts in particular as a basis to better understand the nuances of youth gangs.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will examine the mechanisms through which U.S. social institutions, particularly schools, facilitate youth involvement in the juvenile and criminal justice systems. These mechanisms include: inequity, disability tracking, zero-tolerance policies, push-out, and the criminalization of adolescent behavior. Students will engage in activities aimed at analyzing these processes and developing methods to disrupt them at the social, political, educational, and instructional levels.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Education is key in a democracy in which students need to develop themselves into knowledgeable people, with a strong sense of self, able to think critically with a developed ability to question others and to feel and act as empowered, active citizens. This is a tall order given the varieties of pressures on schools these days. But it is extremely important for these skills to be developed. With the shift in the economy, schools are going to be the critical factor in enabling students to compete in a globalized workplace and world.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the principles of restorative justice and to examine the programs, practices and policies within schools, juvenile justice and the adult criminal justice system which implement a restorative practices. Restorative justice is a different philosophy of responding to harm which provides new roles for the victim, offender, community and professionals . We will compare a restorative approach to crime with the traditional system of discipline and crime control and critique the shortcomings of an adversarial or retributive response to criminal behavior. We will explore the theoretical and historical origins of traditional justice systems and restorative approaches. We will also examine how these ideas are being applied in practical partnerships between the justice system and the community here in the United States and around the world.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A study of the different types and functions of communities. Through identifying community needs, resources, and structure, students learn effective ways to organize for change.

Please note that students majoring in Sociology may only double count one sociology course within the Education Studies minor.

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

Education Studies Courses

Education Studies Courses

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Working with children and adolescents is a facet of many professions. This course will introduce students to the study of education occurring in formal and informal settings. This course focuses on the relationships among, and between, teachers, discourse, and community. Students will glean insight into the relationship of school and society as well as power and control in American Education. Required of all education minors. Five hours of field work required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the nature and development of human abilities and the teaching-learning process. Considers the facts and generalizations of child and adolescent growth and development, working with diverse cultures, and special needs children in school settings. Ten hours of field work.

Prerequisites:

This class fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

Credits:

4.00- 8.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. Students complete 35 hours per semester of educational tutoring in a local school (K-5), in conjunction with a weekly seminar on campus. Open to all majors. No previous experience required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students complete a minimum of 35 hours of tutoring and coaching in an educational setting, or a community organization in conjunction with a weekly seminar on campus. Programs include COACH, Connections to College, and others. Open to all majors. No previous experience required.

Prerequisites:

Open to all majors,Instructor's signature required

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students complete all research, travel, and reporting requirements in conjunction with Suffolk University's Alternative Spring Break. Open to all majors. No previous experience required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course introduces students to the basic competencies of school teaching. Topics include: lesson planning, classroom management, grouping for instruction, effective pedagogical practices, assessment methods, requirements for licensure in Massachusetts, and discipline specific curriculum development using the curriculum frameworks/common core state standards. Field observations (25 hours) required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is designed for Jumpstart Corps members to develop competencies in teaching strategies for reading and writing. The course introduces theoretical and instructional issues in the development of literacy skills. Students will be engaged in reflective, critical consideration of students' diverse needs in the acquisition of literacy.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The relationship between cultural diversity and schooling is explored by examining impediments to academic achievement and advancement by minority students, non-native English speaking students, and other under-represented groups. Topics include: standardized testing, identification of inequities, legal and ethical responsibilities of teachers, and promoting equity. Ten pre-practicum observation hours required for teacher candidates.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines communication between and among teachers and students in the classroom setting. Topics include: communication apprehension, building oral fluency, use of media technology to enhance student learning, cooperative learning, and related professional and legal responsibilities of teachers. Ten pre-practicum observation hours required for Teacher Candidates.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the specific needs and challenges of the various language and cultural groups in schools. Topics include: theories of 1st and 2nd language acquisition, strategies for teaching academic content, modifying instruction in the mainstream classroom, creating classroom cultures that invite all students into learning, the role of advocacy and professional collaboration in ESL, and analysis of policies related to assessment and placement of English Language Learners.

Prerequisites:

Take EDUC-315

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students will have opportunities to put the theories and techniques learned in EDUC 315- Strategies for Working with English Learners into practice. Students will be placed in various Suffolk University sites or classrooms where they will work to meet the specific needs and challenges of educating various language and cultural groups. Students will be required to spend 30 hours working in their placements. Students will attend a weekly seminar where connections between theory and practice are explored, experiences are shared, and Teaching & Service Portfolios will be created.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the evolution of schooling in the United States from The English High School to present. Theorists include: Mann, Franklin, Dewey, Sizer, and others.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on the exploration and understanding of issues, strategies and frameworks related to developing and implementing youth programs. Students will be exposed to developmental theories, and various components of effective youth programmatic planning. Topics include: conducting needs assessments, developing goals and objectives, logistics planning, recruitment and training, and program evaluation.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth investigation of policies effecting urban schools; topics include: demographic influence on education, influences of national and state regulations on urban schools, sociological factors unique to urban schools, and in-depth analysis of equity and achievement.

Prerequisites:

Coordinator of Student Teaching or Program Director's Consent

Credits:

8.00

Description:

A 12-week practicum experience as a student teacher in a middle school. See regulations regarding student teaching.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines major current issues of educational policy against the background of demographic trends, technological innovations, standardized testing, and curricular shifts.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Members of the Department will meet with students to direct their research in areas of special interest to them. Projects of this sort will be authorized only in unusual circumstances upon the recommendations of the Department Chairperson and with the approval of the Dean. Offered by arrangement only.