Entrepreneurship

Students can major or minor in entrepreneurship. The major consists of 21 credits (7 courses). Students may select a concentration to further refine the entrepreneurship major. Concentrations include: Launching a New Venture, Corporate Entrepreneurship, Family Entrepreneurship, and Social Entrepreneurship. The minor consists of 9 credits (3 courses).

Course descriptions may be updated periodically to reflect changes since the last published catalog.

Entrepreneurship Major Requirements

Learn more about this major

Entrepreneurship Major Requirements

The entrepreneurship major consists of a minimum of twenty-one (21) semester hours, which includes four (4) required courses and three (3) elective courses taken at Suffolk University.

The core entrepreneurship courses occur in a four (4) semester sequence starting in your first semester of your junior year (you may begin in your second semester of your sophomore year, but no later than the second semester of your junior year).

The BSBA in Entrepreneurship requires completion of a minimum of 21 credit hours (7 classes) in Entrepreneurship. A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in the Entrepreneurship major and a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 overall must be maintained to graduate. Students may choose to specialize in one of four concentration areas– Launching a New Venture, Corporate Entrepreneurship, Family Entrepreneurship, and Social Entrepreneurship.

Choosing a concentration is optional.

Entrepreneurship Required Courses (4 courses, 12 credits)

Prerequisites:

36 or more credits needed to enroll

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you create value within a new venture or existing firm? Entrepreneurs will explore their innovative mindset, action orientation, and willingness to assume the responsibility necessary to bring new products, services and businesses to the market. Methods of detecting pain or gaps in the market place (idea generation), pursuing dreams, and utilizing design thinking, as well as business models around leveraging new opportunities will be explored. Students will gain the knowledge necessary for generating and vetting opportunities.

Prerequisites:

ENT-280 or ENT-309 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you measure the value-added by a new business opportunity? In this course, you will start developing a financial toolkit and skill set to assess the value of a new product, service, or business. Financial implications of different business models and characteristics of various industries will be discussed. Major topics covered will include 1) forecasting (generating pro-forma financial statements), 2) financial analysis (liquidity, profitability, break-even, and feasibility analyses), 3) sources of funding (bootstrapping, family & friends, crowdfunding, angel investors, venture capital funds, and loans) and 4) basics of valuation.

Prerequisites:

ENT-280 or ENT-309; Junior standing or higher.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How does protection of intellectual property, and human, physical, and financial capital add value to the new or existing organization? Entrepreneurs will learn appropriate legal protections related to people and property associated with the firm. Major topics covered will include 1)legal protection (patents, copyrights, trademarks, service marks, trade secrets, business organizations, confidentiality and non-disclosure agreements, employment agreements, stock/ownership restrictions), 2)human resources(creating and managing teams, hiring, firing, organizational structure, employment/independent contractor issues, and compensation strategies), and 3)growing business value(merger, acquisition, and other expansion techniques).

Prerequisites:

ENT-280 - OR - ENT-309, AND ENT-300 - OR - ENT-319, AND ENT-326 - OR - ENT-329 and Senior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Before you launch your venture, our capstone course gives you an opportunity to assess and consult with other startups through the eyes of their founders. This course is held in an experiential setting to help entrepreneurial majors develop and practice their business skills working with real startups and small business under pro bono consulting arrangements. This course is a transition from student to professional under the supervision of a faculty member who serves as a coach and advisor. Students will learn to interview client organizations, assess the current business, negotiate a statement of work, and develop a project management plan that leads to the consultant-client negotiated deliverable(s). Depending on the client organization, this course will most likely include visiting the client location.

Entrepreneurship Elective Courses (3 courses, 9 credits)

Choose three (3) from the following list:

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you manage the day-to-day challenges of starting a new venture or working on a small business? This course is designed around problem-solving techniques that help you research the facts of a given situation, identify the problem, develop alternative solutions and defending the best solution. This course utilizes case analysis, role-plays, simulations, and other experiential lessons to help provide you with the knowledge and skills necessary to build and lead a new or innovative organization.

Prerequisites:

MGT-217 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Are you interested in managing the family business and the challenges of succession between generations? If so, this course focuses on the challenges of adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and at least 54 credits

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The business of the family business is just as critical as the family dynamics. This course focuses on issues related to adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include the development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and ENT-309, Junior standing or higher, and instructor permission.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

As nascent entrepreneurs how can you start or grow your business when you are undercapitalized while at the same time building brand awareness? One potential source of capital that allows for additional value creation (i.e., building a customer base and brand ambassadors) is crowdfunding. This course will examine, factors that lead to crowdfunding success during the creation (e.g., the idea, the pitch, the prototype, etc.) and maintenance (e.g., social presence) of a crowdfunding campaign as well as the execution of any promised deliverable. Focusing on an experiential process this course will guide student teams though the creation and execution of their own live crowdfunding campaign.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Social entrepreneurs are people who harness their energy, talent and commitment to make the world a more humane, safe and just place. This is accomplished by applying vision, passion, persistence and leadership to the creation of businesses that are focused on a mission of social responsibility. While the social mission is important, so is the fact that the business funding the mission must be sustainable via revenue generation, market need, and operational efficiency. Creating balance between business effectiveness and serving the needs of the community the business is dedicate to helping, provides a unique challenge to social entrepreneurship to stay entrepreneurial in terms of the business model, thus providing the necessary resources to the social mission.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Over the past decade, the world of business and the environment has exploded. Beginning as an engineering-driven movement among a handful of companies during the 1980's, many firms have learned that improved environment performance can save money and create a competitive advantage. In this course, we will cover how businesses of all sizes are more attentive to environmental issues and the realization that a green business: improves employee morale and health in the workplace, holds a marketing edge over the competition, strengthens the bottom line through operating efficiencies, is recognized as an environmental leader, can have a strong impact in the community and beyond, and can improve public relations.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Corporate entrepreneurship refers to alternative approaches that existing firms use to innovatively generate new products, new services, new businesses and new business models. This course emphasizes the cultivation of each student's ability to evaluate innovations and business models for development in a corporate setting. It emphasizes various kinds of internal corporate ventures and multiple external collaborative approaches that include corporate venture capital investments, licensing and different types of alliances and formal joint ventures. Special emphasis will be placed on skills needed to promote and manage corporate entrepreneurship. Students will also learn to identify the elements of an organization's culture, structure and reward and control systems that either inhibit or support the corporate entrepreneurship, and analyze how corporate entrepreneurial activities relate to a company's ability to drive innovation throughout the organization.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Do you want to know how to take advantage of our global economy? This course will leverage the knowledge acquired from other entrepreneurship and global courses coupled with an overview of the global economy every entrepreneur must compete in and how to transition your business models into real world opportunities. This course will discuss the entrepreneurial process from concept to product feasibility to venture launch answering the following question: How and when should an entrepreneur plan on competing in a global market?

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Ever wonder what great breakthroughs are on the horizon to improve business thinking, processes, products, and services? If you have, this course is for you. We will learn about how businesses are using principles of design thinking and biomimicry to create entirely new ways of meeting the challenges of modern business: those are, needs to reduce costs, increase revenues, minimize waste & energy use, maximize novel approaches, & meet consumer and business needs. You may recognize the term "design thinking" if you are a follower of Apple, Inc. which has used this process in the development of all of their products and services over the past 15 years. Biomimicry principles are those that seek their inspiration from nature; after all, nature has been problem-solving for 3.8 billion years -- surely there is something to learn from this to be adapted to solving modern challenges. The course will be both conceptual and practical with various experiential learning opportunities.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will focus on the steps that innovators/entrepreneurs need to follow that will take ideas and launch them into new products. This is accomplished by taking the concept directly to the prospective customers. This course will cover: creating specifications, product sell sheets, prototype development, drafting an executive summary, intellectual property protection, manufacturing and quality control considerations, identifying vendors, customers, and funding sources, and developing a marketing and sales plan for launching the product. During the semester, students will be required to interact with their potential customers, vendors and other key players for the launch.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you sell new products and services? Revenue is key to business survival, and this isn't by accident and a strong marketing strategy is not enough. Sales is a process, as well as an attitude. Strong organizations drive revenue through sound sales processes that are effectively designed, implemented, and scaled. In this course, you will learn how to sell new products and services through selling techniques, as well as create a value statement, identify a target market, create an effective approach, develop a sales activity and pipeline tracking system, design and effective sales management and coaching program.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Do you want to start or manage a restaurant? The restaurant industry is highly competitive with high turnover. The challenges are tough enough when you understand the business, however, too many entrepreneurs who start or many restaurants lack the necessary experience. This course will help you understand the crucial elements of launching or managing a restaurant, including: business organization, funding, location, market analysis, lease v. buy, facility layout, professional resources, licensing, human resources, technology, purchasing, advertising, insurance, record-keeping, and expansion.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Franchising is a multi-trillion dollar market worldwide and 1/3 of the US retail market. "Franchising" is a very specific term referring to a business that licenses its brand, operating model, and provides support to franchisees who pay a number of fees and then invest their own capital to build the corporate brand. Students will gain the insight and practical knowledge necessary to operate as a successful franchiser or franchisee.

Prerequisites:

ENT-309, ENT-319, and either ENT-326 or ENT-329; Senior Standing required

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Are you looking for the nuts and bolts of launching a new venture? If so, this course will allow you to earn credits working with our Center for Entrepreneurship. Students will draft a launch plan, with specific executables, necessary to launch a new venture. Students will use knowledge from major core courses to determine business organization, capitalization, hiring employees, building the team, establishing benefits, selecting facilities, etc.

Prerequisites:

Senior Standing; Instructor Consent Required

Credits:

1.00- 3.00

Description:

Are you looking for an ENT major elective to help you continue with research associated with your opportunity of venture? This independent study is available to students who are looking to expand on their classroom experience by doing additional research related to their prospective opportunity or venture. Students must draft the statement of work related to the independent study, with a primary focus on solving a problem or problems through extensive research, as well as have an ENT faculty member supervise the student during the study. The statement of work must provide evidence sufficient to support the number of credits being requested. Once the statement of work is completed, the student must attach the statement of work to the Independent Study request form and obtain the required approvals before the course will be opened. Maximum of 3 credits allowed.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing and instructor approval

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This experiential class is recommended for students who plan to innovate in an existing firm or to join their family business. Recommended for first or second semester senior year.

Prerequisites:

Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of timely special issues in international business. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled.

Accelerated Degrees

If you’re earning an undergraduate business degree at Suffolk or another U.S. institution, you may qualify to earn both your Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in just 5 years.

Learning Goals & Objectives

Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.

Learning Goals
Learning Objectives
Text Item
Students will…
Upon completion of the program, each student should be able to...
Deliver value to a client organization.
  • Define delivering value in the context of your client engagement.
  • Provide evidence that you have delivered value to your client.
  • Demonstrate overall ability to deliver value to the client.

Entrepreneurship Concentrations

These Entrepreneurship concentrations consist of a minimum of nine (9) semester hours. Students are required to take any three (3) ENT courses above the 300-level for all Entrepreneurship concentrations.

Take any three (3) courses from the following list:

Corporate Entrepreneurship (3 courses, 9 credits)

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Over the past decade, the world of business and the environment has exploded. Beginning as an engineering-driven movement among a handful of companies during the 1980's, many firms have learned that improved environment performance can save money and create a competitive advantage. In this course, we will cover how businesses of all sizes are more attentive to environmental issues and the realization that a green business: improves employee morale and health in the workplace, holds a marketing edge over the competition, strengthens the bottom line through operating efficiencies, is recognized as an environmental leader, can have a strong impact in the community and beyond, and can improve public relations.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Corporate entrepreneurship refers to alternative approaches that existing firms use to innovatively generate new products, new services, new businesses and new business models. This course emphasizes the cultivation of each student's ability to evaluate innovations and business models for development in a corporate setting. It emphasizes various kinds of internal corporate ventures and multiple external collaborative approaches that include corporate venture capital investments, licensing and different types of alliances and formal joint ventures. Special emphasis will be placed on skills needed to promote and manage corporate entrepreneurship. Students will also learn to identify the elements of an organization's culture, structure and reward and control systems that either inhibit or support the corporate entrepreneurship, and analyze how corporate entrepreneurial activities relate to a company's ability to drive innovation throughout the organization.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing and instructor approval

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This experiential class is recommended for students who plan to innovate in an existing firm or to join their family business. Recommended for first or second semester senior year.

Family Entrepreneurship (3 courses, 9 credits)

Prerequisites:

MGT-217 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Are you interested in managing the family business and the challenges of succession between generations? If so, this course focuses on the challenges of adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and at least 54 credits

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The business of the family business is just as critical as the family dynamics. This course focuses on issues related to adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include the development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing and instructor approval

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This experiential class is recommended for students who plan to innovate in an existing firm or to join their family business. Recommended for first or second semester senior year.

Launching the New Venture (3 courses, 9 credits)

Prerequisites:

Senior Standing; Instructor Consent Required

Credits:

1.00- 3.00

Description:

Are you looking for an ENT major elective to help you continue with research associated with your opportunity of venture? This independent study is available to students who are looking to expand on their classroom experience by doing additional research related to their prospective opportunity or venture. Students must draft the statement of work related to the independent study, with a primary focus on solving a problem or problems through extensive research, as well as have an ENT faculty member supervise the student during the study. The statement of work must provide evidence sufficient to support the number of credits being requested. Once the statement of work is completed, the student must attach the statement of work to the Independent Study request form and obtain the required approvals before the course will be opened. Maximum of 3 credits allowed.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will focus on the steps that innovators/entrepreneurs need to follow that will take ideas and launch them into new products. This is accomplished by taking the concept directly to the prospective customers. This course will cover: creating specifications, product sell sheets, prototype development, drafting an executive summary, intellectual property protection, manufacturing and quality control considerations, identifying vendors, customers, and funding sources, and developing a marketing and sales plan for launching the product. During the semester, students will be required to interact with their potential customers, vendors and other key players for the launch.

Prerequisites:

ENT-309, ENT-319, and either ENT-326 or ENT-329; Senior Standing required

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Are you looking for the nuts and bolts of launching a new venture? If so, this course will allow you to earn credits working with our Center for Entrepreneurship. Students will draft a launch plan, with specific executables, necessary to launch a new venture. Students will use knowledge from major core courses to determine business organization, capitalization, hiring employees, building the team, establishing benefits, selecting facilities, etc.

Social Entrepreneurship (3 courses, 9 credits)

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Social entrepreneurs are people who harness their energy, talent and commitment to make the world a more humane, safe and just place. This is accomplished by applying vision, passion, persistence and leadership to the creation of businesses that are focused on a mission of social responsibility. While the social mission is important, so is the fact that the business funding the mission must be sustainable via revenue generation, market need, and operational efficiency. Creating balance between business effectiveness and serving the needs of the community the business is dedicate to helping, provides a unique challenge to social entrepreneurship to stay entrepreneurial in terms of the business model, thus providing the necessary resources to the social mission.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Over the past decade, the world of business and the environment has exploded. Beginning as an engineering-driven movement among a handful of companies during the 1980's, many firms have learned that improved environment performance can save money and create a competitive advantage. In this course, we will cover how businesses of all sizes are more attentive to environmental issues and the realization that a green business: improves employee morale and health in the workplace, holds a marketing edge over the competition, strengthens the bottom line through operating efficiencies, is recognized as an environmental leader, can have a strong impact in the community and beyond, and can improve public relations.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing and instructor approval

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This experiential class is recommended for students who plan to innovate in an existing firm or to join their family business. Recommended for first or second semester senior year.

Entrepreneurship Minor Requirements

Learn more about this minor

Entrepreneurship Minor Requirements (3 courses, 9 credits)

The Entrepreneurship minor consists of a minimum of nine (9) semester hours.

Students are required to take any three (3) ENT courses above the 300-level for the Entrepreneurship Minor. Take any three (3) courses from the following list:

Prerequisites:

36 or more credits needed to enroll

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you create value within a new venture or existing firm? Entrepreneurs will explore their innovative mindset, action orientation, and willingness to assume the responsibility necessary to bring new products, services and businesses to the market. Methods of detecting pain or gaps in the market place (idea generation), pursuing dreams, and utilizing design thinking, as well as business models around leveraging new opportunities will be explored. Students will gain the knowledge necessary for generating and vetting opportunities.

Prerequisites:

ENT-280 or ENT-309 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you measure the value-added by a new business opportunity? In this course, you will start developing a financial toolkit and skill set to assess the value of a new product, service, or business. Financial implications of different business models and characteristics of various industries will be discussed. Major topics covered will include 1) forecasting (generating pro-forma financial statements), 2) financial analysis (liquidity, profitability, break-even, and feasibility analyses), 3) sources of funding (bootstrapping, family & friends, crowdfunding, angel investors, venture capital funds, and loans) and 4) basics of valuation.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you manage the day-to-day challenges of starting a new venture or working on a small business? This course is designed around problem-solving techniques that help you research the facts of a given situation, identify the problem, develop alternative solutions and defending the best solution. This course utilizes case analysis, role-plays, simulations, and other experiential lessons to help provide you with the knowledge and skills necessary to build and lead a new or innovative organization.

Prerequisites:

ENT-280 or ENT-309; Junior standing or higher.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How does protection of intellectual property, and human, physical, and financial capital add value to the new or existing organization? Entrepreneurs will learn appropriate legal protections related to people and property associated with the firm. Major topics covered will include 1)legal protection (patents, copyrights, trademarks, service marks, trade secrets, business organizations, confidentiality and non-disclosure agreements, employment agreements, stock/ownership restrictions), 2)human resources(creating and managing teams, hiring, firing, organizational structure, employment/independent contractor issues, and compensation strategies), and 3)growing business value(merger, acquisition, and other expansion techniques).

Prerequisites:

MGT-217 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Are you interested in managing the family business and the challenges of succession between generations? If so, this course focuses on the challenges of adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and at least 54 credits

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The business of the family business is just as critical as the family dynamics. This course focuses on issues related to adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include the development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and ENT-309, Junior standing or higher, and instructor permission.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

As nascent entrepreneurs how can you start or grow your business when you are undercapitalized while at the same time building brand awareness? One potential source of capital that allows for additional value creation (i.e., building a customer base and brand ambassadors) is crowdfunding. This course will examine, factors that lead to crowdfunding success during the creation (e.g., the idea, the pitch, the prototype, etc.) and maintenance (e.g., social presence) of a crowdfunding campaign as well as the execution of any promised deliverable. Focusing on an experiential process this course will guide student teams though the creation and execution of their own live crowdfunding campaign.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Social entrepreneurs are people who harness their energy, talent and commitment to make the world a more humane, safe and just place. This is accomplished by applying vision, passion, persistence and leadership to the creation of businesses that are focused on a mission of social responsibility. While the social mission is important, so is the fact that the business funding the mission must be sustainable via revenue generation, market need, and operational efficiency. Creating balance between business effectiveness and serving the needs of the community the business is dedicate to helping, provides a unique challenge to social entrepreneurship to stay entrepreneurial in terms of the business model, thus providing the necessary resources to the social mission.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Over the past decade, the world of business and the environment has exploded. Beginning as an engineering-driven movement among a handful of companies during the 1980's, many firms have learned that improved environment performance can save money and create a competitive advantage. In this course, we will cover how businesses of all sizes are more attentive to environmental issues and the realization that a green business: improves employee morale and health in the workplace, holds a marketing edge over the competition, strengthens the bottom line through operating efficiencies, is recognized as an environmental leader, can have a strong impact in the community and beyond, and can improve public relations.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Corporate entrepreneurship refers to alternative approaches that existing firms use to innovatively generate new products, new services, new businesses and new business models. This course emphasizes the cultivation of each student's ability to evaluate innovations and business models for development in a corporate setting. It emphasizes various kinds of internal corporate ventures and multiple external collaborative approaches that include corporate venture capital investments, licensing and different types of alliances and formal joint ventures. Special emphasis will be placed on skills needed to promote and manage corporate entrepreneurship. Students will also learn to identify the elements of an organization's culture, structure and reward and control systems that either inhibit or support the corporate entrepreneurship, and analyze how corporate entrepreneurial activities relate to a company's ability to drive innovation throughout the organization.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Do you want to know how to take advantage of our global economy? This course will leverage the knowledge acquired from other entrepreneurship and global courses coupled with an overview of the global economy every entrepreneur must compete in and how to transition your business models into real world opportunities. This course will discuss the entrepreneurial process from concept to product feasibility to venture launch answering the following question: How and when should an entrepreneur plan on competing in a global market?

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Ever wonder what great breakthroughs are on the horizon to improve business thinking, processes, products, and services? If you have, this course is for you. We will learn about how businesses are using principles of design thinking and biomimicry to create entirely new ways of meeting the challenges of modern business: those are, needs to reduce costs, increase revenues, minimize waste & energy use, maximize novel approaches, & meet consumer and business needs. You may recognize the term "design thinking" if you are a follower of Apple, Inc. which has used this process in the development of all of their products and services over the past 15 years. Biomimicry principles are those that seek their inspiration from nature; after all, nature has been problem-solving for 3.8 billion years -- surely there is something to learn from this to be adapted to solving modern challenges. The course will be both conceptual and practical with various experiential learning opportunities.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will focus on the steps that innovators/entrepreneurs need to follow that will take ideas and launch them into new products. This is accomplished by taking the concept directly to the prospective customers. This course will cover: creating specifications, product sell sheets, prototype development, drafting an executive summary, intellectual property protection, manufacturing and quality control considerations, identifying vendors, customers, and funding sources, and developing a marketing and sales plan for launching the product. During the semester, students will be required to interact with their potential customers, vendors and other key players for the launch.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you sell new products and services? Revenue is key to business survival, and this isn't by accident and a strong marketing strategy is not enough. Sales is a process, as well as an attitude. Strong organizations drive revenue through sound sales processes that are effectively designed, implemented, and scaled. In this course, you will learn how to sell new products and services through selling techniques, as well as create a value statement, identify a target market, create an effective approach, develop a sales activity and pipeline tracking system, design and effective sales management and coaching program.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Do you want to start or manage a restaurant? The restaurant industry is highly competitive with high turnover. The challenges are tough enough when you understand the business, however, too many entrepreneurs who start or many restaurants lack the necessary experience. This course will help you understand the crucial elements of launching or managing a restaurant, including: business organization, funding, location, market analysis, lease v. buy, facility layout, professional resources, licensing, human resources, technology, purchasing, advertising, insurance, record-keeping, and expansion.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Franchising is a multi-trillion dollar market worldwide and 1/3 of the US retail market. "Franchising" is a very specific term referring to a business that licenses its brand, operating model, and provides support to franchisees who pay a number of fees and then invest their own capital to build the corporate brand. Students will gain the insight and practical knowledge necessary to operate as a successful franchiser or franchisee.

Note for College of Arts & Sciences Students (4 courses, 12 credits)

CAS students take four (4) courses for the minor. In addition to ENT 309 and ENT 319 students from the College of Arts & Sciences are required to take any two ENT electives above the 300-level.

Required courses:

Prerequisites:

36 or more credits needed to enroll

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you create value within a new venture or existing firm? Entrepreneurs will explore their innovative mindset, action orientation, and willingness to assume the responsibility necessary to bring new products, services and businesses to the market. Methods of detecting pain or gaps in the market place (idea generation), pursuing dreams, and utilizing design thinking, as well as business models around leveraging new opportunities will be explored. Students will gain the knowledge necessary for generating and vetting opportunities.

Prerequisites:

ENT-280 or ENT-309 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you measure the value-added by a new business opportunity? In this course, you will start developing a financial toolkit and skill set to assess the value of a new product, service, or business. Financial implications of different business models and characteristics of various industries will be discussed. Major topics covered will include 1) forecasting (generating pro-forma financial statements), 2) financial analysis (liquidity, profitability, break-even, and feasibility analyses), 3) sources of funding (bootstrapping, family & friends, crowdfunding, angel investors, venture capital funds, and loans) and 4) basics of valuation.

Choose two (2) of the following:

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you manage the day-to-day challenges of starting a new venture or working on a small business? This course is designed around problem-solving techniques that help you research the facts of a given situation, identify the problem, develop alternative solutions and defending the best solution. This course utilizes case analysis, role-plays, simulations, and other experiential lessons to help provide you with the knowledge and skills necessary to build and lead a new or innovative organization.

Prerequisites:

ENT-280 or ENT-309; Junior standing or higher.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How does protection of intellectual property, and human, physical, and financial capital add value to the new or existing organization? Entrepreneurs will learn appropriate legal protections related to people and property associated with the firm. Major topics covered will include 1)legal protection (patents, copyrights, trademarks, service marks, trade secrets, business organizations, confidentiality and non-disclosure agreements, employment agreements, stock/ownership restrictions), 2)human resources(creating and managing teams, hiring, firing, organizational structure, employment/independent contractor issues, and compensation strategies), and 3)growing business value(merger, acquisition, and other expansion techniques).

Prerequisites:

MGT-217 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Are you interested in managing the family business and the challenges of succession between generations? If so, this course focuses on the challenges of adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and at least 54 credits

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The business of the family business is just as critical as the family dynamics. This course focuses on issues related to adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include the development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and ENT-309, Junior standing or higher, and instructor permission.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

As nascent entrepreneurs how can you start or grow your business when you are undercapitalized while at the same time building brand awareness? One potential source of capital that allows for additional value creation (i.e., building a customer base and brand ambassadors) is crowdfunding. This course will examine, factors that lead to crowdfunding success during the creation (e.g., the idea, the pitch, the prototype, etc.) and maintenance (e.g., social presence) of a crowdfunding campaign as well as the execution of any promised deliverable. Focusing on an experiential process this course will guide student teams though the creation and execution of their own live crowdfunding campaign.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Social entrepreneurs are people who harness their energy, talent and commitment to make the world a more humane, safe and just place. This is accomplished by applying vision, passion, persistence and leadership to the creation of businesses that are focused on a mission of social responsibility. While the social mission is important, so is the fact that the business funding the mission must be sustainable via revenue generation, market need, and operational efficiency. Creating balance between business effectiveness and serving the needs of the community the business is dedicate to helping, provides a unique challenge to social entrepreneurship to stay entrepreneurial in terms of the business model, thus providing the necessary resources to the social mission.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Over the past decade, the world of business and the environment has exploded. Beginning as an engineering-driven movement among a handful of companies during the 1980's, many firms have learned that improved environment performance can save money and create a competitive advantage. In this course, we will cover how businesses of all sizes are more attentive to environmental issues and the realization that a green business: improves employee morale and health in the workplace, holds a marketing edge over the competition, strengthens the bottom line through operating efficiencies, is recognized as an environmental leader, can have a strong impact in the community and beyond, and can improve public relations.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Corporate entrepreneurship refers to alternative approaches that existing firms use to innovatively generate new products, new services, new businesses and new business models. This course emphasizes the cultivation of each student's ability to evaluate innovations and business models for development in a corporate setting. It emphasizes various kinds of internal corporate ventures and multiple external collaborative approaches that include corporate venture capital investments, licensing and different types of alliances and formal joint ventures. Special emphasis will be placed on skills needed to promote and manage corporate entrepreneurship. Students will also learn to identify the elements of an organization's culture, structure and reward and control systems that either inhibit or support the corporate entrepreneurship, and analyze how corporate entrepreneurial activities relate to a company's ability to drive innovation throughout the organization.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Do you want to know how to take advantage of our global economy? This course will leverage the knowledge acquired from other entrepreneurship and global courses coupled with an overview of the global economy every entrepreneur must compete in and how to transition your business models into real world opportunities. This course will discuss the entrepreneurial process from concept to product feasibility to venture launch answering the following question: How and when should an entrepreneur plan on competing in a global market?

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Ever wonder what great breakthroughs are on the horizon to improve business thinking, processes, products, and services? If you have, this course is for you. We will learn about how businesses are using principles of design thinking and biomimicry to create entirely new ways of meeting the challenges of modern business: those are, needs to reduce costs, increase revenues, minimize waste & energy use, maximize novel approaches, & meet consumer and business needs. You may recognize the term "design thinking" if you are a follower of Apple, Inc. which has used this process in the development of all of their products and services over the past 15 years. Biomimicry principles are those that seek their inspiration from nature; after all, nature has been problem-solving for 3.8 billion years -- surely there is something to learn from this to be adapted to solving modern challenges. The course will be both conceptual and practical with various experiential learning opportunities.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will focus on the steps that innovators/entrepreneurs need to follow that will take ideas and launch them into new products. This is accomplished by taking the concept directly to the prospective customers. This course will cover: creating specifications, product sell sheets, prototype development, drafting an executive summary, intellectual property protection, manufacturing and quality control considerations, identifying vendors, customers, and funding sources, and developing a marketing and sales plan for launching the product. During the semester, students will be required to interact with their potential customers, vendors and other key players for the launch.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you sell new products and services? Revenue is key to business survival, and this isn't by accident and a strong marketing strategy is not enough. Sales is a process, as well as an attitude. Strong organizations drive revenue through sound sales processes that are effectively designed, implemented, and scaled. In this course, you will learn how to sell new products and services through selling techniques, as well as create a value statement, identify a target market, create an effective approach, develop a sales activity and pipeline tracking system, design and effective sales management and coaching program.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Do you want to start or manage a restaurant? The restaurant industry is highly competitive with high turnover. The challenges are tough enough when you understand the business, however, too many entrepreneurs who start or many restaurants lack the necessary experience. This course will help you understand the crucial elements of launching or managing a restaurant, including: business organization, funding, location, market analysis, lease v. buy, facility layout, professional resources, licensing, human resources, technology, purchasing, advertising, insurance, record-keeping, and expansion.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Franchising is a multi-trillion dollar market worldwide and 1/3 of the US retail market. "Franchising" is a very specific term referring to a business that licenses its brand, operating model, and provides support to franchisees who pay a number of fees and then invest their own capital to build the corporate brand. Students will gain the insight and practical knowledge necessary to operate as a successful franchiser or franchisee.

These additional Entrepreneurship minors consist of a minimum of nine (9) semester hours. Students are required to take any three (3) ENT courses above the 300-level for all Entrepreneurship minors.

Take any three (3) courses from the following list:

Corporate Entrepreneurship (3 courses, 9 credits)

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Over the past decade, the world of business and the environment has exploded. Beginning as an engineering-driven movement among a handful of companies during the 1980's, many firms have learned that improved environment performance can save money and create a competitive advantage. In this course, we will cover how businesses of all sizes are more attentive to environmental issues and the realization that a green business: improves employee morale and health in the workplace, holds a marketing edge over the competition, strengthens the bottom line through operating efficiencies, is recognized as an environmental leader, can have a strong impact in the community and beyond, and can improve public relations.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Corporate entrepreneurship refers to alternative approaches that existing firms use to innovatively generate new products, new services, new businesses and new business models. This course emphasizes the cultivation of each student's ability to evaluate innovations and business models for development in a corporate setting. It emphasizes various kinds of internal corporate ventures and multiple external collaborative approaches that include corporate venture capital investments, licensing and different types of alliances and formal joint ventures. Special emphasis will be placed on skills needed to promote and manage corporate entrepreneurship. Students will also learn to identify the elements of an organization's culture, structure and reward and control systems that either inhibit or support the corporate entrepreneurship, and analyze how corporate entrepreneurial activities relate to a company's ability to drive innovation throughout the organization.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing and instructor approval

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This experiential class is recommended for students who plan to innovate in an existing firm or to join their family business. Recommended for first or second semester senior year.

Family Entrepreneurship (3 courses, 9 credits)

Prerequisites:

MGT-217 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Are you interested in managing the family business and the challenges of succession between generations? If so, this course focuses on the challenges of adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and at least 54 credits

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The business of the family business is just as critical as the family dynamics. This course focuses on issues related to adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include the development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing and instructor approval

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This experiential class is recommended for students who plan to innovate in an existing firm or to join their family business. Recommended for first or second semester senior year.

Launching the New Venture (3 courses, 9 credits)

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and ENT-309, Junior standing or higher, and instructor permission.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

As nascent entrepreneurs how can you start or grow your business when you are undercapitalized while at the same time building brand awareness? One potential source of capital that allows for additional value creation (i.e., building a customer base and brand ambassadors) is crowdfunding. This course will examine, factors that lead to crowdfunding success during the creation (e.g., the idea, the pitch, the prototype, etc.) and maintenance (e.g., social presence) of a crowdfunding campaign as well as the execution of any promised deliverable. Focusing on an experiential process this course will guide student teams though the creation and execution of their own live crowdfunding campaign.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will focus on the steps that innovators/entrepreneurs need to follow that will take ideas and launch them into new products. This is accomplished by taking the concept directly to the prospective customers. This course will cover: creating specifications, product sell sheets, prototype development, drafting an executive summary, intellectual property protection, manufacturing and quality control considerations, identifying vendors, customers, and funding sources, and developing a marketing and sales plan for launching the product. During the semester, students will be required to interact with their potential customers, vendors and other key players for the launch.

Prerequisites:

ENT-309, ENT-319, and either ENT-326 or ENT-329; Senior Standing required

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Are you looking for the nuts and bolts of launching a new venture? If so, this course will allow you to earn credits working with our Center for Entrepreneurship. Students will draft a launch plan, with specific executables, necessary to launch a new venture. Students will use knowledge from major core courses to determine business organization, capitalization, hiring employees, building the team, establishing benefits, selecting facilities, etc.

Social Entrepreneurship (3 courses, 9 credits)

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Social entrepreneurs are people who harness their energy, talent and commitment to make the world a more humane, safe and just place. This is accomplished by applying vision, passion, persistence and leadership to the creation of businesses that are focused on a mission of social responsibility. While the social mission is important, so is the fact that the business funding the mission must be sustainable via revenue generation, market need, and operational efficiency. Creating balance between business effectiveness and serving the needs of the community the business is dedicate to helping, provides a unique challenge to social entrepreneurship to stay entrepreneurial in terms of the business model, thus providing the necessary resources to the social mission.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Over the past decade, the world of business and the environment has exploded. Beginning as an engineering-driven movement among a handful of companies during the 1980's, many firms have learned that improved environment performance can save money and create a competitive advantage. In this course, we will cover how businesses of all sizes are more attentive to environmental issues and the realization that a green business: improves employee morale and health in the workplace, holds a marketing edge over the competition, strengthens the bottom line through operating efficiencies, is recognized as an environmental leader, can have a strong impact in the community and beyond, and can improve public relations.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing and instructor approval

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This experiential class is recommended for students who plan to innovate in an existing firm or to join their family business. Recommended for first or second semester senior year.

Entrepreneurship Undergraduate Courses

 

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to foundational concepts in business, including functional areas, the life cycle, competition, stakeholders and ethical considerations. Students develop critical thinking by learning and using a problem solving process through a business situation analysis model to analyze various situations that confront managers and founders of small, medium, and large organizations. Students will also develop tools for analysis, allowing them to critically view business in a new and thoughtful way. The class culminates with student- teams presenting a detailed analysis and recommendations to a panel of executives and persuading them that the recommended strategy is not only feasible, but also practical for the stakeholders involved.

Prerequisites:

SBS-H100 to be taken concurrently or previously. SBS honors students only. Must have less than 30 credits.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to foundational concepts in business, including functional areas, the life cycle, competition, stakeholders and ethical considerations. Students develop critical thinking by learning and using a problem solving process through a business situation analysis model to analyze various situations that confront managers and founders of small, medium, and large organizations. Students will also develop tools for analysis, allowing them to critically view business in a new and thoughtful way. The class culminates with student- teams presenting a detailed analysis and recommendations to a panel of executives and persuading them that the recommended strategy is not only feasible, but also practical for the stakeholders involved.

Prerequisites:

Must have completed at least 15 credits

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Do you want to start a business? This survey course is designed to help students learn about starting a business and assess their personal interest in pursuing such activity. Topics cover the range of business start-up activities from personal evaluation to opportunity recognition, market assessment, feasibility determination, financial planning, legal, human resources, and business planning.

Prerequisites:

36 or more credits needed to enroll

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you create value within a new venture or existing firm? Entrepreneurs will explore their innovative mindset, action orientation, and willingness to assume the responsibility necessary to bring new products, services and businesses to the market. Methods of detecting pain or gaps in the market place (idea generation), pursuing dreams, and utilizing design thinking, as well as business models around leveraging new opportunities will be explored. Students will gain the knowledge necessary for generating and vetting opportunities.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you manage the day-to-day challenges of starting a new venture or working on a small business? This course is designed around problem-solving techniques that help you research the facts of a given situation, identify the problem, develop alternative solutions and defending the best solution. This course utilizes case analysis, role-plays, simulations, and other experiential lessons to help provide you with the knowledge and skills necessary to build and lead a new or innovative organization.

Prerequisites:

ENT-280 or ENT-309; Junior standing or higher.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How does protection of intellectual property, and human, physical, and financial capital add value to the new or existing organization? Entrepreneurs will learn appropriate legal protections related to people and property associated with the firm. Major topics covered will include 1)legal protection (patents, copyrights, trademarks, service marks, trade secrets, business organizations, confidentiality and non-disclosure agreements, employment agreements, stock/ownership restrictions), 2)human resources(creating and managing teams, hiring, firing, organizational structure, employment/independent contractor issues, and compensation strategies), and 3)growing business value(merger, acquisition, and other expansion techniques).

Prerequisites:

MGT-217 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Are you interested in managing the family business and the challenges of succession between generations? If so, this course focuses on the challenges of adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and at least 54 credits

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The business of the family business is just as critical as the family dynamics. This course focuses on issues related to adapting corporate-type managerial skills to family-owned and operated enterprises that typically reject such practices. The goals of this course include the development of a working knowledge of managing the family business, reinterpretation of corporate management concepts for the family business, and personal reflection on the roles and conditions of operating a family business.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and ENT-309, Junior standing or higher, and instructor permission.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

As nascent entrepreneurs how can you start or grow your business when you are undercapitalized while at the same time building brand awareness? One potential source of capital that allows for additional value creation (i.e., building a customer base and brand ambassadors) is crowdfunding. This course will examine, factors that lead to crowdfunding success during the creation (e.g., the idea, the pitch, the prototype, etc.) and maintenance (e.g., social presence) of a crowdfunding campaign as well as the execution of any promised deliverable. Focusing on an experiential process this course will guide student teams though the creation and execution of their own live crowdfunding campaign.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Social entrepreneurs are people who harness their energy, talent and commitment to make the world a more humane, safe and just place. This is accomplished by applying vision, passion, persistence and leadership to the creation of businesses that are focused on a mission of social responsibility. While the social mission is important, so is the fact that the business funding the mission must be sustainable via revenue generation, market need, and operational efficiency. Creating balance between business effectiveness and serving the needs of the community the business is dedicate to helping, provides a unique challenge to social entrepreneurship to stay entrepreneurial in terms of the business model, thus providing the necessary resources to the social mission.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Over the past decade, the world of business and the environment has exploded. Beginning as an engineering-driven movement among a handful of companies during the 1980's, many firms have learned that improved environment performance can save money and create a competitive advantage. In this course, we will cover how businesses of all sizes are more attentive to environmental issues and the realization that a green business: improves employee morale and health in the workplace, holds a marketing edge over the competition, strengthens the bottom line through operating efficiencies, is recognized as an environmental leader, can have a strong impact in the community and beyond, and can improve public relations.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Corporate entrepreneurship refers to alternative approaches that existing firms use to innovatively generate new products, new services, new businesses and new business models. This course emphasizes the cultivation of each student's ability to evaluate innovations and business models for development in a corporate setting. It emphasizes various kinds of internal corporate ventures and multiple external collaborative approaches that include corporate venture capital investments, licensing and different types of alliances and formal joint ventures. Special emphasis will be placed on skills needed to promote and manage corporate entrepreneurship. Students will also learn to identify the elements of an organization's culture, structure and reward and control systems that either inhibit or support the corporate entrepreneurship, and analyze how corporate entrepreneurial activities relate to a company's ability to drive innovation throughout the organization.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Do you want to know how to take advantage of our global economy? This course will leverage the knowledge acquired from other entrepreneurship and global courses coupled with an overview of the global economy every entrepreneur must compete in and how to transition your business models into real world opportunities. This course will discuss the entrepreneurial process from concept to product feasibility to venture launch answering the following question: How and when should an entrepreneur plan on competing in a global market?

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Ever wonder what great breakthroughs are on the horizon to improve business thinking, processes, products, and services? If you have, this course is for you. We will learn about how businesses are using principles of design thinking and biomimicry to create entirely new ways of meeting the challenges of modern business: those are, needs to reduce costs, increase revenues, minimize waste & energy use, maximize novel approaches, & meet consumer and business needs. You may recognize the term "design thinking" if you are a follower of Apple, Inc. which has used this process in the development of all of their products and services over the past 15 years. Biomimicry principles are those that seek their inspiration from nature; after all, nature has been problem-solving for 3.8 billion years -- surely there is something to learn from this to be adapted to solving modern challenges. The course will be both conceptual and practical with various experiential learning opportunities.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will focus on the steps that innovators/entrepreneurs need to follow that will take ideas and launch them into new products. This is accomplished by taking the concept directly to the prospective customers. This course will cover: creating specifications, product sell sheets, prototype development, drafting an executive summary, intellectual property protection, manufacturing and quality control considerations, identifying vendors, customers, and funding sources, and developing a marketing and sales plan for launching the product. During the semester, students will be required to interact with their potential customers, vendors and other key players for the launch.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you sell new products and services? Revenue is key to business survival, and this isn't by accident and a strong marketing strategy is not enough. Sales is a process, as well as an attitude. Strong organizations drive revenue through sound sales processes that are effectively designed, implemented, and scaled. In this course, you will learn how to sell new products and services through selling techniques, as well as create a value statement, identify a target market, create an effective approach, develop a sales activity and pipeline tracking system, design and effective sales management and coaching program.

Prerequisites:

ENT-101 and Junior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Do you want to start or manage a restaurant? The restaurant industry is highly competitive with high turnover. The challenges are tough enough when you understand the business, however, too many entrepreneurs who start or many restaurants lack the necessary experience. This course will help you understand the crucial elements of launching or managing a restaurant, including: business organization, funding, location, market analysis, lease v. buy, facility layout, professional resources, licensing, human resources, technology, purchasing, advertising, insurance, record-keeping, and expansion.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Franchising is a multi-trillion dollar market worldwide and 1/3 of the US retail market. "Franchising" is a very specific term referring to a business that licenses its brand, operating model, and provides support to franchisees who pay a number of fees and then invest their own capital to build the corporate brand. Students will gain the insight and practical knowledge necessary to operate as a successful franchiser or franchisee.

Prerequisites:

ENT-280 - OR - ENT-309, AND ENT-300 - OR - ENT-319, AND ENT-326 - OR - ENT-329 and Senior Standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Before you launch your venture, our capstone course gives you an opportunity to assess and consult with other startups through the eyes of their founders. This course is held in an experiential setting to help entrepreneurial majors develop and practice their business skills working with real startups and small business under pro bono consulting arrangements. This course is a transition from student to professional under the supervision of a faculty member who serves as a coach and advisor. Students will learn to interview client organizations, assess the current business, negotiate a statement of work, and develop a project management plan that leads to the consultant-client negotiated deliverable(s). Depending on the client organization, this course will most likely include visiting the client location.

Prerequisites:

ENT-309, ENT-319, and either ENT-326 or ENT-329; Senior Standing required

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Are you looking for the nuts and bolts of launching a new venture? If so, this course will allow you to earn credits working with our Center for Entrepreneurship. Students will draft a launch plan, with specific executables, necessary to launch a new venture. Students will use knowledge from major core courses to determine business organization, capitalization, hiring employees, building the team, establishing benefits, selecting facilities, etc.

Prerequisites:

Senior Standing; Instructor Consent Required

Credits:

1.00- 3.00

Description:

Are you looking for an ENT major elective to help you continue with research associated with your opportunity of venture? This independent study is available to students who are looking to expand on their classroom experience by doing additional research related to their prospective opportunity or venture. Students must draft the statement of work related to the independent study, with a primary focus on solving a problem or problems through extensive research, as well as have an ENT faculty member supervise the student during the study. The statement of work must provide evidence sufficient to support the number of credits being requested. Once the statement of work is completed, the student must attach the statement of work to the Independent Study request form and obtain the required approvals before the course will be opened. Maximum of 3 credits allowed.

Prerequisites:

ENT 326 and Senior Standing This course may be used as an ENT major elective or taken instead of ENT 419.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Are you looking for guidance to launch your venture? If so, this course will allow you to earn credits through an independent study working with faculty and alumni through our Center for Entrepreneurial Studies. Students must draft a launch plan based on their business plan prepared in ENT 326, modified based on feedback received from faculty and judges during the ENT 326 presentations. Students must demonstrate enough evidence to support that the venture will be launched, as well as completing all tasks identified in the launch plan by the end of the semester to receive credit for the course. An ENT faculty member must supervise the student during the launch. The launch plan must provide evidence sufficient to support the number of credits being requested. Once the launch plan is completed, the student must attach the plan to the Independent Study request form and obtain the required approvals before the course will be opened. Maximum of 3 credits allowed.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing and instructor approval

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This experiential class is recommended for students who plan to innovate in an existing firm or to join their family business. Recommended for first or second semester senior year.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to demystify the creative process by introducing students to creative practice as a disciplined approach to problem-solving and innovation. Students will be encouraged to synthesize existing ideas, images, concepts, and skill sets in original way, embrace ambiguity and support divergent thinking and risk taking. More than one-third of our global population lives in poverty, earning less than two dollars a day. Governments, businesses, social enterprises, and charitable organizations have tried to solve the global poverty issue with mixed results. What is the solution? Is entrepreneurship the solution, part of the solution, or has no impact whatsoever? In this course, you will gain an understanding of the power of entrepreneurship (in the context of creativity and innovation), the definition and depth of global poverty (in the context of constraints, such as human, financial and physical resources embedded in local, regional, national and global cultures), and successes and failures of past initiatives to reduce poverty. This is not a course about politics or business, but rather finding a solution to a problem that has eluded mankind since the beginning of time.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to demystify the creative process by introducing students to creative practice as a disciplined approach to problem-solving and innovation. Students will be encouraged to synthesize existing ideas, images, concepts, and skill sets in original way, embrace ambiguity and support divergent thinking and risk taking. Did you know Netscape was the internet browser? What about MySpace, arguably the Facebook of the last decade? What led Apple from being innovative pioneers of the 70's to the verge of extinction in the 80's to the technological giant they are today? Technologies come and go, but what leads to organizations lasting more than 100 years such as IBM, General Electric, etc.? What role does failure play in successful innovation, decision-making, and business viability? In this course, you will learn about innovation that may have been successful and well-executed. You will also learn about innovation that was a viable business opportunity, but poorly executed: one phase of failure. In addition, you will learn about innovation that had no real market viability, but was launched anyway: another phase of failure. Can failure lead to success? If so, how?

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you and your story drive business? This course takes an innovative look at human creativity and entrepreneurship. As an entrepreneur needs perseverance and high motivation, we will explore the importance of values, risk taking, problem solving, and the discovery of the market opportunities. In order for you to be creative and essentially create successful ventures, you will discover the nuances between the three factors and explore them further through interactive discussion and debate as well as collaborative group work. You will be encouraged to think in non-conforming ways and apply new concepts and develop your own personal operating principles.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

As the majority of the world population now lives in cities, for the first time in human history, issues of urban sustainability have become more complex and more important than ever before. Presented with case studies of urban efforts to gain a sustainability foothold, students will utilize ideation, critical thinking, and strategic decision making to both identify root problems and to present solutions. This course will lean heavily on ideation processes, teamwork, and logical methods of analysis to pursue actionable solutions for significant problems. The methods of problem identification and solution analysis learned in this class will be readily adaptable to many complex problems, helping the students to make informed and decisive determinations in their careers.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Every successful venture today is based on effective teamwork. Unlike a typical lecture format, Creating the Dream Team is a course that utilizes experiential group learning to provide students with pivotal team-building skills. These essential skills are vital for everyone's future success in the business world. As team players, students are challenged to think creatively. A collaborative problem-solving process is used to analyze "real life" business situations. Teamwork involves research, data collection and information analysis to develop creative solutions to typical business problems. Teams will utilize multi-media tools to present their innovative ideas. Classmates will provide peer feedback and review. Through iterations, all students will assume roles as project leaders, keynote speakers and collaborators on a series of Team Challenges. Upon successful completion of this course, all students will have formed working "dream teams". As reinforcement and final evaluation, Dream Teams are required to create a multi-media Capstone Event as a course performance measure. This capstone presentation will "showcase" all of their newly acquired "dream" team-player skills.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course students will be introduced to the practice of creativity as a rigorous approach to problem solving requiring research, persistence and grit. Students will work collaboratively to effectively synthesize existing ideas, images, and skill sets in original ways. They will embrace risk, and support divergent thinking. In the process, they will become more confident life-long learners.

Prerequisites:

SBS Honors or 3.3 GPA

Credits:

1.00

Description:

What are the steps necessary for starting a new business? What happens after you have an idea that you think solves a problem in the marketplace? Is starting a new business easy, difficult, or both? In this course, you will learn the step-by-step process of starting a new business ranging from ownership, business organization choices and process, filing for a tax identification number, setting up payroll and withholding, unemployment, and other related taxes, understanding tax filing requirements and collection of sales taxes, choosing an accounting system and setting up a chart of accounts, researching a bank and keeping track of business transactions, integrating automated best practices such as linking bank accounts and credit/debit card accounts to your accounting system, selecting customer resource management and sales systems, and more.