Global Cultural Studies

Global Cultural Studies Major

Learn more about this major

Degree Requirements - 126 credits

Students can earn a bachelor of arts degree with this major.  See the requirements for the bachelor of arts degree.

Major Requirements: 12 courses, 41 credits

The major in Global Cultural Studies consists of the following required core courses plus ONE of the concentrations listed below.

Students in this major must earn the BA degree.

Core Requirements (5 courses, 14 credits)

Prerequisites:

CAS 101. CAS students only. SBS students by special permission. Restricted to the following majors: Art History, Asian Studies, Biology, Economics, English, French, History, Humanities, International Economics, Music History, Philosophy, Physics, Radiation Science, Spanish, and Undeclared. Instructor consent required for all other majors.

Credits:

1

Description:

This course engages students in the early stages of career planning. Students will explore their interests, skills, values, and strengths, which will allow them to begin setting appropriate goals for professional development. Once students understand themselves in relation to the world of work, they will learn how to research careers and employment paths that fit with their goals.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of communication variations and cultural viewpoints and their impact on cross-cultural communication. A special emphasis is placed on rituals and message patterns in non-Western cultures.

Credits:

4

Description:

The primary goal of this course is to provide basic tools of analysis and synthesis utilized in the study of world art, literature, theatre and music from past to present. A parallel aim of this course is to examine the changing intellectual, social and artistic currents relating to seminal events across many cultures. Our approach to the material will be both chronological and thematic, covering the significant currents that exemplify social trends and practices of the various periods.

Prerequisites:

GCS majors in senior standing only. Instructor Permission Only

Credits:

1

Description:

The primary aim of this course is to encourage reflection on the student's college career and the development of a personal strategy for attaining one's professional goals. The student will demonstrate an understanding of ethical guidelines and professional conventions by examining the differences between the diverse work cultures encountered in the concentration and by applying this understanding to a transnational/diverse professional world. The student will be exposed to resources to evaluate current employment and graduate school opportunities in the field for Global Studies majors.

Choose one of the following courses:

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces the main actors, ideas, institutions, and processes that shape the international system. Analyzes key international developments, including imperialism, nationalism, the causes of wars and peace, and globalization. Integrates international relations concepts with history to explain the unprecedented levels of prosperity and violence in Europe, particularly in light of its dominant role in recent centuries. Emphasizes contemporary developments taking place in other regions such as Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Helps students understand the global arena as a space of complex interconnections and sets the foundations for other courses in international relations and regional studies. Normally offered every semester. This course sets the foundations for other courses in International Relations and Regional Studies

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the major themes of human history since 1500. Topics include: the outward expansion of Europe, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, the Age of Revolutions, the Industrial Revolution, the creation of a great-power dominated global system, the two world wars, the Cold War, the Third World, globalization, climate change, and modern social and political movements.

Credits:

4

Description:

This is the first of the two-course series of Empires and Globalization in World History. Course discusses the origins and development of globalization and capitalism from the perspective of economic history. Major issues include the formation of the medieval trade system, the development of finance and capitalism in the early modern ages, and economic changes prior to the Industrial Revolution. The specific topics may change every year due to new academic developments and publications.

Credits:

4

Description:

This is the second of the two-course series of Empires and Globalization in World History. Course discusses the origins and development of globalization and capitalism from the perspective of economic history. Major issues include state-making, wars, and the rivalry among early modern empires, economic development, the Industrial Revolution and the formation of the global trade system. The specific topics may change every year due to new academic developments and publications.

Elective (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one elective from the course listings below from any concentration.

Concentration Requirement (6 courses, 24 credits)

Students must complete one of the following concentrations:

  • Culture, Conflict, & Communication
  • Interdisciplinary Arts
  • Regional Practices
Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Global Cultural Studies Learning Goals & Objectives

Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.
Learning Goals Learning Objectives
Students will… Students will be able to…
Understand cultural issues and the power dynamics inherent in transnational and intercultural relations
  • Think critically and with an informed historical perspective about a range of global and regional issues
  • Identify historical, social, cultural and political interrelationships among different cultures and worldviews
  • Identify similarities and differences among various cultures and analyze how and why certain similarities and differences exist
Enhance their cross-cultural competency and will broaden their outlook on local and regional issues through theoretical and practical opportunities
  • Participate in cross-cultural exchanges through study abroad or internships
  • Acquire competency in at least one foreign language
  • Exercise effective intercultural communication skills
Understand what “global” is from an interdisciplinary perspective
  • Reflect on their global citizenship and engage effectively in situations that involve cultural diversity
  • Think critically about a range of global and regional issues from a variety of perspectives

Culture, Conflict, & Communication Concentration

Concentration Requirements: 6 courses, 24 credits

Core Requirements (3 courses, 12 credits)

Prerequisites:

CJN-216;

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Conflict is universal. Effective leadership is essential at any and all levels to ensure that the potential for social change and positive resolution inherent in conflict is realized. This course explores the phenomenon of conflict at various levels including interpersonal, organizational, and cultural contexts.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Rhetoric is the strategic use of symbols to create meaning. Films, television, music, and new media communicate these meanings. This course explores how rhetorical messages in popular culture shape our personal and cultural identities. Current communication trends in areas such as gender, social networking, food, politics, religion, and fashion are explored.

Prerequisites:

CJN-216

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In a world of globalization and multiculturalism, communication is critical to understanding. This course explores theoretical approaches to intercultural communication and apply them to specific contexts. Emerging trends in global, ethical, legal, political communication, and social justice issues are studied.

Elective courses (3 courses, 12 credits)

Choose three of the following:

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines persuasion strategies and tactics for advancing public policy proposals and concerns. Students will learn how to apply the principles of Public Relations, Advertising, Negotiations and Persuasion to influence the public and government decision-makers.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The course focus is on some of the divisions and conflicts within Israeli society. Students analyze and compare mainstream media discourse to alternative representations in documentary film. Analysis also covers media representation of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Prerequisites:

Instructor Consent Required

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

The student will engage in an internship in a business or non-profit organization that addresses global issues. The student may complete the internship either in the U.S. or in a region related to the focus of the student's major. The student will complete appropriate exercises and reports to document the learning.

Prerequisites:

Instructor Permission Required

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

The student will work with a Global Cultural Studies professor to craft an educational experience directly related to the field of major concentration. The course must include such exercises as writing a substantive research paper or undertaking a research project. The student must follow CAS Independent Study Guidelines and must complete appropriate exercises and reports to document the learning.

Prerequisites:

Not open to freshmen

Credits:

4

Description:

This course examines the interaction between gender and globalization. It discusses the centrality of gender in international development by focusing on gender as one of the most critical factors that affect the success or the failure of globalization. Critically reviewing general theories of globalization, the course presents a historical overview of gender and development. It then explores selected topics: global restructuring and feminization of the labor force, gender in multinational corporations, gender and international migration, sex-tourism, AIDS, and the impact of the state, religion, and culture in creating social dislocations and inequalities. Finally, we will consider strategies of change and diverse forms of resistance by women. Offered as needed. Cultural Diversity B

Prerequisites:

Junior status or higher

Credits:

4

Description:

This course introduces the concept and practices of transitional justice, which addresses current and past human rights violations. We review the various mechanisms of transitional justice, including: criminal prosecution; lustrations; truth and reconciliation commissions; reparations; and apologies. Our focus will be on understanding the nature of the political and moral dilemmas encountered by countries that consider and apply these mechanisms. We will consider broad theoretical questions as well as specific examples (e.g., Germany after the Holocaust; The South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission; The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda). The course will also emphasize the practical implications of transitional justice: how do we empirically measure the effects of transitional justice; what is the role of traditional mechanisms of justice; how does one balance between the global human rights regime and local realities; what is the relationship between gender and religion and transitional justice; and, what is the role of transitional justice mechanisms in conflict resolution.

Prerequisites:

Junior status or above

Credits:

4

Description:

This course explains the main components of the international legal system. It begins by exploring the rules, principles and norms that govern the relationship among states, the different cultural and philosophical legal perspectives and the history of the international legal system. The second part of the course covers the study of the sources and subjects of the international law, the jurisdiction of states, the peaceful settlement of disputes, the use of force and the legal personality of international actors. The third part of the course addresses a number of significant topics derived from the process of globalization legal norms: human rights, humanitarian intervention, law of the sea, environmental law, and economic relations.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: SOC 113 or SOC 116.

Credits:

4

Description:

Globalization is shrinking the world. How and why did this happen? This course will explore global change and the global processes which effect key social institutions: culture, the economy and politics. Students will study the processes of globalization and its impact on our lives and people around the globe.

Credits:

4

Description:

An examination of how different cultures understand health and illness. Healing approaches from Asia, Africa and the Americas will be explored.

Prerequisites:

ENG-102 or ENG-103 or Instructor's consent. Span 302 is strongly recommended for Spanish and Latin American & Caribbean Studies majors and minors.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the myth of a singular Latino experience in the United States through a variety of genres and authors. Issues relating to culture, language, family, and religion are among some of the topics explored. Authors include Sandra Cisneros, House on Mango Street, Junot Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Julia Alvarez, How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents, Tato Laviera, and American.

Interdisciplinary Arts Concentration

Concentration Requirements: 6 courses, 24 credits

Choose six of the following courses, with two from each of the three areas of disciplinary studies (History of Art and Design; History of Cinema, Music, and Performing Arts; Literary Studies). Students may also choose GCS-503 GCS Internship (1-4 credits) and/or GCS-510 Independent Study (1-4 credits) to count toward fulfillment of the concentration requirements.

History of Art & Design

Credits:

4

Description:

The first part of the course will focus on the history of graphic design from prehistoric times to the Industrial Revolution, including the origins of graphic communications in the ancient world, the development of the alphabet and early printing and typography. The second portion will concentrate on the period from the late 19th century to the present, and will include the Arts and Crafts Movement, the various-isms and their influence on modern art, the Bauhaus and International Style, and contemporary visual systems and image making.

Credits:

4

Description:

Surveys the art of Western civilization from prehistoric caves to medieval cathedrals. Considers works from the Ancient Near East, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece and Rome, the Byzantine Era, the Romanesque Period, and the Gothic Period in their historical contexts. Introduces students to formal analysis, iconography, and critical thinking.

Credits:

4

Description:

Surveys the art of Europe and America from the Renaissance to the present. Considers work of painting, sculpture, and architecture from periods such as the Renaissance, the Baroque, the Rococo, Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Abstract Impressionism, and Post-Modernism in their historical contexts. Introduces students to formal analysis, iconography, and critical thinking.

Credits:

4

Description:

Surveys painting, sculpture, and architecture in Asia from prehistoric times to the modern era, including the Middle East, India, China, Korea, and Japan. Emphasizes the connection between visual arts, belief systems, and historical contexts with a focus on Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam as well as secular literature.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores issues of sexuality, gender, race, and social class in the ancient and medieval worlds. Examines key artworks from ancient Greece, the Roman Empire and medieval Europe within historical, social and cultural contexts.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines painting, sculpture and architecture of the 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries in Italy in their cultural context. Artists include Giotto, Masaccio, Donatello, Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Michelangelo, and Titian.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores painting,sculpture and architecture in Italy, Spain and Northern Europe during the 17th and 18th century. Works by Rembrandt, Rubens, Caravaggio, Bernini, Poussin, Velasquez, Watteau, Boucher, Fragonard, Chardin, Hogarth and others considered within their historical contexts.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism and Impression in the European painting. Considers works by artists such as David, Ingres, Friedrich, Constable, Delacroix, Goya, Courbet, Millet, Daumier, Manet, Monet, Renoir, Degas, and Cassatt within their historical contexts.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines European painting and sculpture from around 1880 to 1940, including Symbolism, Post-Impressionism, Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, The Bauhaus, Dada, and Surrealism. Considers works by artists such as Gauguin, Cezanne, Van Gogh, Matisse, Kandinsky, Picasso, Braque, Mondrian, Duchamp, Magritte, Dali, and Ernst within their historical contexts.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines painting, sculpture, and architecture of the 14th,15th and 16th centuries in Northern Europe, within their historical context. Topics include the rise of oil painting, the development of woodcut and engraving, the effect of the Reformation on art. Artists include van Eyck,Bosch, Durer, Holbein and Brueghel.

Prerequisites:

Permission of instructor required

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the art of Caravaggio within the historical context of the Early Baroque period in Italy. The course emphasizes research skills and the methodology of art history. Designed as a foundation for students intending to pursue a career in the world of art and/or museums.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's consent required.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the art of Gian Lorenzo Bernini, arguably the most important and influential figure in the world of 17th-century art. Designed for art history majors & minors, the seminar explores Bernini's career within the context of the religious, political, and artistic upheavals of his time; it also helps students develop research skills and provides a foundation that will be valuable for anyone pursuing a career in the world of art and museums.

Prerequisites:

Permission of instructor required

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the Impressionist movement of the late nineteenth-century, including Monet, Renoir, and Pissaro, within its historical context. The course emphasizes research skills and the methodology of art history. Designed as a foundation for students intending to pursue a career in the world of art and/or museums.

History of Cinema, Music, & Performing Arts

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces participants to the sabar music and dance tradition of Senegal through a study of music, dance, language and history. Taught by professional practitioners of the sabar tradition, students will develop a sense of how music and dance are used in both traditional and popular contexts. This course will be directed by Prof. Robert A. Bellinger.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introductory course in film studies with a focus on foreign films. Movies studied include masterpieces of cinema from Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and other nations (Films have subtitles).

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students critically analyze Asian popular culture since the 1980s using a cultural ethnographic approach. Students apply the lenses of gender, identity, globalization, and business strategies to examine pop phenomena such as Korean Wave, Cool Japan, and Cantonese popular music.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introductory film studies course that covers the history of the film medium from its birth until the 1970s. It provides an introduction to major film theory concepts, such as genre and/or auteur studies, as well as key films and stars in movie history.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

By examining the film texts of Hong Kong auteurs such as John Woo, Wong Kar-wai, Tsui Hark, Andrew Lau, and Alan Mak, the course examines issues such as film genres, colonization/decolonization, transnational political economy, the Greater Chinese media market, and the diaspora.

Credits:

4

Description:

Discusses and deepens understanding of French and Francophone cinema from its origins in the late nineteenth century to the early twenty-first century. Explores early works from France, by the Lumiere Brothers and Georges Melies as well as contemporary films from France, Algeria, Burkina Faso, Canada, Haiti, and Senegal.

Prerequisites:

Take FR-205 and FR-305 or instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

Studies the major plays written in French from the seventeenth through the twenty-first centuries, with a focus on the socio-historical contexts in which the plays emerged. Analyzes and produces scenes from the plays, and reads and performs select scenes at the end of the semester. Explores authors such as Anouilh, Beckett, Cesaire, Genet, Ionesco, Marivaux, Moliere, Py, Racine, Reza, Sartre, and Schwarz-Bart.

Credits:

4

Description:

Surveys Western music from CE800-1800, from Gregorian to Beethoven; selected major composers, representative masterworks, and the musical styles of the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical periods; links the music to some of the major historical, cultural, artistic, and intellectual trends of these periods. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

4

Description:

Surveys Western art music from 1800-present, from Schubert to Jennifer Higdon; selected major composers, representative masterworks, and the musical styles of Romantic, Contemporary, and post-Modern periods; links the music to some of the major historical, cultural, artistic, and intellectual trends of these periods. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

4

Description:

Surveys music in the lives of women, including composers, performers, producers, mothers, and educators from the Middle Ages to the present; examines issues of gender and control, perspective in historical narrative, and religious and secular traditions that impact the cross-cultural reception of women's music. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

Covers topics in folk, traditional, and modern music of Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and Europe in the context of the cultures and lives of the indigenous peoples of those regions; examines how music interacts with the issues of race, gender, class, religion, politics, and social movements. Normally offered every other year.

Prerequisites:

Take ENG-102 or ENG-103 or Instructor's consent. Span 302 is strongly recommended for Spanish and Latin American & Caribbean Studies majors and minors.

Credits:

4

Description:

Begins with the Cuban revolution as a point of departure and examines films from Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and other Latin American countries. Students explore the relationship between film & society and consider how knowledge of a culture and its history is influenced and shaped by what is seen on the screen. Films in Spanish with English subtitles.

Prerequisites:

SPAN 290 or SPAN 300 or Instructor's consent. Spanish 302 is strongly recommended

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces students to the most important movements and playwrights of Latin American Theater in the 20th and 21st Centuries. Students examine the history of Latin American Theatre since its inception and become familiar with the most important performing centers.

Prerequisites:

Span 290 or 300; Span 302 is strongly recommended

Credits:

4

Description:

Students examine the contemporary world of Latin American Theatre. A study of basic theatre concepts and methodology prepares students to perform in Noche de teatro latinoamericano, a public performance of three one-act plays from contemporary Latin American Playwrights. Publicity and set design are also part of the course framework.

Credits:

4

Description:

This survey course provides students with an historical, philosophical, and aesthetic overview of theatre practices from the Golden Age of Greek drama to 19th-century melodrama and early experiments in realism. Through readings, lectures, and discussions, the class will explore the theatre's persistent capacity to mirror the societies that produce it. Satisfies a core requirement for Theatre majors and the Humanities requirement. Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

4

Description:

Picking up chronologically where THETR 225 leaves off, this survey course is designed to provide students with an understanding of modern Western theatre. Beginning with a melodrama, plays will include representative works of realism, naturalism, expressionism, epic theatre, theatre of cruelty, theatre of the absurd, and metatheatricality. Lectures and class discussions will explore how these concepts translate to acting and production techniques as well as what they imply as artistic responses to a modern and post-modern world. Satisfies a core requirement for Theatre Majors.

Literary Studies

Credits:

4

Description:

Survey of drama and theatre as part of world culture from classical Greece through 18th-century China. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

4

Description:

Survey of drama and theatre as part of world culture from the 19th century to the present.

Credits:

4

Description:

Literary masterpieces from ancient times to the Renaissance, including: Homer's Odyssey, Sophocles' Oedipus, Virgil's Aeneid, selections from the Hebrew Bible and the Gospels, and Dante's Divine Comedy. List may vary at the discretion of the instructor.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will introduce students to a selection of Great Books from around the world from the 17th century to the 21st, such as Don Quixote (Spain), Madame Bovary (France), The Communist Manifesto (Germany), The Origin of Species (England), War and Peace (Russia), On Dreams (Austria), Night (Hungary), Things Fall Apart (Nigeria)," ""Satyagraha"" (India)\"

Credits:

4

Description:

A study of literature written in English from cultures around the world, with emphasis on major modern and contemporary writers from countries such as Australia, Canada, India, Ireland, Nigeria, South Africa and the Caribbean. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4

Description:

Ancient Greek and Roman myths, their motifs, themes and interpretations. Normally offered every third year.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores American and African American literature in the context of cosmopolitan thought and revolutionary action. This course considers how writers balance their interest in building a national culture with their desire for global adventure and their concern for matters of race, gender, politics, and civil rights that transcend their time and place. Includes readings from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as well as a contemporary American journalist's memoir about life in the Middle East.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4

Description:

This course follows the spirit of utopian experimentation as it travels through the linguistic patterns and imaginative conditions of brave new worlds in literature. We will consider how utopian thinking allows writers to take creative license with political systems, social relations, gender roles, and racial identities, and to blur dividing lines between nature, technology, and culture as well as between Earth and the cosmos. Our readings will balance such foundational texts as Plato's Republic and More's Utopia with revolutionary works from the nineteenth through the twenty-first centuries, and conjure utopian dreams as well as dystopian worlds gone wrong. Selected works of literary criticism and films will also be included.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4

Description:

"An Exploration of Post-colonial literature and how the ""empire writes back"" following the collapse of European colonialism. Special emphasis will be placed on the legacy of British Colonial rule and the contemporary use of literature and the English Language to both resist and problematize Eurocentric cultural assumptions. Authors studied will include E.M. Foster\"

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4

Description:

This course examines the rhetoric of memoirs written primarily by international figures who seek to use personal stories to shape readers' perspectives on political issues. After a brief introduction to rhetorical theory and to the genre of memoir, this course will examine contemporary memoirs that address such issues as racism, sexism, religious extremism, war, and genocide.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103 with a minimum grade of B+

Credits:

4

Description:

A survey of writings in Modern Greek from 1821 to the present exploring Hellenism and the Greek cultural identity. Authors studied will include Kostis Palamas, Georgios Vizyinos, Alexandros Papadiamantis, Stratis Myrivilis, Photis Kontoglou, Dido Sotiriou, George Seferis, Constantine Cavafy, and Odysseas Elytis. A section of the syllabus will be reserved for the Greek-American/diaspora writers Helen Papanikolas, Elia Kazan, Jeffrey Eugenides, Olga Broumas, and Tryfon Tolides. Films and music traditions will be sampled as well.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4

Description:

A survey of major works of literature and thought crucial to the transformation of pagan models of reason to Christian systems of belief, including works by Plato and Plotinus, St. Augustine and Dante. Of central concern is the changing conception of love, from Eros to Agape. Note: This course is cross-listed with HST 339.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4

Description:

This course offers an introduction to the Golden Age of Roman culture and power. Close readings of selections from major historians, poets, political thinkers, and philosophers will be examined in the context of Augustan Rome. Topics such as pietas, virtus, and gravitas, as well as the competing claims of public duty and private devotion, stoic maxim and erotic love lyric, will be discussed from the perspectives of writers such as Virgil, Livy, Tacitus, Horace, Catullus, and Lucretius. Note: This course is cross-listed with HST 304. Normally offered in alternate years.

Prerequisites:

FR 202 or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the francophone world through the study of short stories, print media, and film, by engaging with the rich textured and diverse francophone literary canon. Teaches advance notions of French grammar, write compositions, and the art of conversation related to cultural themes.

Credits:

4

Description:

Masterpieces of French and Francophone Literature in English Translation. Studies works translated into English by major authors from the Middle Ages to the present. Explores drama, fiction, and poetry from many regions of the world: Africa, Western Europe, North America, the Caribbean, and Vietnam.

Credits:

4

Description:

This class will explore the rich literary tradition of three Caribbean island-nations: Guadeloupe, Haiti, and Martinique. Class discussion will focus on a wide range of topics including: the different uses of Creole and French; the Negritude, Spiralisme, Antillanite and Creolite movements; the relationship between Africa and the African diaspora; gender and sexuality in the Caribbean; and postcolonial memory and post-colonial history as reflected in the work of prize-winning Caribbean women writers from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Normally offered alternate years. The class is taught in English, and is cross-listed with the Black Studies Program as well as the Women's and Gender Studies Program.

Credits:

4

Description:

Studies a specific theme related to art, culture, history,literature and politics from the end of World War II to the present day.

Prerequisites:

Spanish 202, 203, 250 or Instructor's consent.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores a selection of Peninsular and Latin American cultural materials. Primarily examines texts from different literary genres (narrative, drama, essay, and poetry). Develops critical skills required in more advanced Spanish courses, through close readings and textual analysis. Activities include regularly assigned essays, group discussions, and short scene work.

Prerequisites:

SPAN 300; SPAN 302 is strongly recommended

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines authors from Latin America and the Caribbean in their historical and cultural contexts. Reading and class discussions consider the relationship between the writer and society by covering such topics as colonialism, the oral tradition, modernism and the emergence of new narratives in the twentieth century. The Inca Garcilaso, Sor Juana, Carlos Fuentes, Rigoberta Menchu, and Pablo Neruda are among some writers studied.

Prerequisites:

SPAN 300 or Instructor's consent. SPAN 302 is strongly recommended.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the relationship between social history, cultural identity and artistic expression through a diversity of texts from Central and South America, Mexico and the Caribbean. Social justice, mass culture and gender are among the topics examined. Readings include novel, short story, poetry and drama. Films and documentaries further illustrate the connections between society and text.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores of various cultural worldviews in order to reveal and assess the voices of women from around the world as they respond to important global issues such as sexual violence and gendered oppression. Topics include: national citizenship, sexual politics, legal discourse, aesthetic representation, literary movements, genre, constructions of femininity, sexual identities, and representations of gender in relation to race and class and international cultures, and the relationship of self-image to the body politic.

Regional Practices Concentration

Concentration Requirements: 6 courses, 24 credits

Guided by the cluster groups below, students may create an area of focus or comparative studies through the advising process. The requirements for the concentration are as follows:

  • Take at least one course in History (HST) from among those listed in the clusters below
  • Take at least one course in Government (GVT) from among those listed in the clusters below
  • Take at least one language course in addition to language courses or other credentials counted toward fulfilling general education requirements for the BA degree. See the Language Course Options below
  • At least two courses must be at the level of 300 or higher
  • One of the six courses may be GCS-510 Independent Study (up to 4 credits)
  • One of the six courses may be GCS-503 Internship in Global Cultural Studies (up to 4 credits)
  • Other courses may be chosen from any of the clusters or language course options below

Cluster 1: Africa

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the history and culture of West Africa through its portrayal in literature and film. The specific countries that will be focused on are Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana and Nigeria. This class will also recognize the fact that borders are a modern, man-made element of the West African landscape serving to both separate people who have historically and traditionally seen themselves as connected, and to bring together people into a nation who have historically and traditionally seen themselves as distinct from one another.

Credits:

4

Description:

The study of how economic and human activity is distributed across space, the reasons for these spatial distributions, and the processes that change the spatial organization of economic activity over time. Topics include: maps, map projections, and geographic information systems; population geography; the organization and location of cities, towns and villages; transportation and communication policy; industrial location; the geography of world trade; and geographic features of economic development. The course takes a global perspective, and draws on cases and examples from all over the world. Cultural Diversity B

Prerequisites:

GVT 110 and GVT 120

Credits:

4

Description:

The political development of Africa in colonial and post-colonial periods. Analysis of the evolution of governmental institutions includes economic, social and personal factors; political forces at work in present day Africa.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the history of Africa from prehistoric times to the nineteenth century to give students an introduction to African Studies and a sense of Africa's place in world history. Topics include: the Nile Valley civilizations, West African empires, the trans-Saharan trade, the slave trade, the spread and impact of Islam.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the history of Africa from 1800 to the present and enable students to develop an understanding of issues that affect the relationship between modern Africa and the world. Topics include: the African tradition; the impact of Islam and Christianity, abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism and colonialism, African independence movements, African nationalism, Pan Africanism.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the history of the Mediterranean from the ancient times to the 20th century, with emphasis on the extraordinary interaction between the rich cultural, ethnic and religious backgrounds of the peoples of Europe, Middle East, and North Africa.

Cluster 2: Asia

Credits:

4

Description:

An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history, politics, economics, philosophy, geography, arts, and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy, religious and cultural exchanges, international relations, Asian experience in America, and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

Credits:

4

Description:

"Why do so many countries remain so poor? Why have some (e.g. the Asian ""tigers"") grown so rapidly? Why have most of the countries of Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union been slow to ignite economic growth? These questions are addressed by looking at domestic factors (government policies\"

Credits:

4

Description:

The study of how economic and human activity is distributed across space, the reasons for these spatial distributions, and the processes that change the spatial organization of economic activity over time. Topics include: maps, map projections, and geographic information systems; population geography; the organization and location of cities, towns and villages; transportation and communication policy; industrial location; the geography of world trade; and geographic features of economic development. The course takes a global perspective, and draws on cases and examples from all over the world. Cultural Diversity B

Prerequisites:

Take EC-101

Credits:

4

Description:

More than half of the world population lives in urban areas. This course sets out to explain the existence, growth, geographic patterns, and impact of cities, and the effects of public policy on urban form, structure, and activity. It addresses the urban issues of transportation, congestion, housing, crime, poverty and inequality, governance, and the environment, and asks how planning and policy can tackle these. The context of these discussions is the megacities of Asia: 24 of the world's 37 megacities (those with ten million or more inhabitants) are in Asia, where they are home to almost 500 million people. The choices made by these cities will be considered in comparative perspective, including with Boston, New York, Paris, and London.

Prerequisites:

Not open to freshmen.

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces the main political, economic, and social processes in South Asian countries. Provides with the understanding of the main regional trends and offers case studies of some of the political systems in the region. Applies the concepts and theories learned in the previous international relations, comparative politics courses and other social science courses. Topics include colonialism, religious/identity politics, democratization, economic development, ethnic conflict, terrorism, environmental protection, and human security. *On GVT 385, the original course description covers not only South Asian countries but also Western Asian ones too such as Afghanistan. When I taught the course I focused on South Asian countries, such as India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal.

Credits:

4

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. Current political trends in the Caribbean and in selected Central American nations. Emphasis will be placed on comparative analysis of public policies in the region, as well as on external factors which impact on politics in the Caribbean and Central America. Students will use academic sources in their analysis, as well as novels and other literary sources for the background of their analysis.

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces China studies as a subfield of comparative politics. Covers topics such as history, political structure, communist revolution, political and economic development, authoritarian resilience, current issues, and foreign policy. Compares China with other countries in and outside of Asia.

Prerequisites:

Junior Status required

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines cultural and historic backgrounds, political systems, political and economic development, and international relations of countries in North and South East Asia. Provides with the understanding of the main regional trends and offers case studies of some of the political systems in the region. Applies the concepts and theories learned in the previous international relations, comparative politics courses and other social science courses. * I do not include specific country names to make the description flexible for changes. In my class, I cover countries such as China, North and South Korea, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Philippines, and Burma.

Credits:

4

Description:

Presenting the major trends relevant to social, cultural, and economic transformations that can be seen in Asia today. Especially, students will explore the following trends: the Diaspora of the Chinese and Indian People; the hold of Traditional Religious Beliefs in a Modernizing Asia such as the influences of Buddhism and Islam; the preservation of Martial Values and in Militarism in Asia; Issues related to Gender and Sexuality; Pop Culture among young people in Asia.

Credits:

4

Description:

Discusses Chinese civilization from its origins to its recent rise as a world power. Spark students' interest in China and enable them to relate Chinese history and society to their lives and careers.

Credits:

4

Description:

Outlines the history of Chinese martial arts in five movies, highlighting Chinese views of violence, personal loyalty, government, and justice.

Credits:

4

Description:

China, Japan, and Korea - East Asia's critical players - share many historical influences, but each has a distinct culture, and they competed with each other for much of the twentieth century, proud of their achievements but feeling threatened by their neighbors. Lectures interspersed with movies and documentaries to show how East Asia has developed in the past one-hundred-plus years.

Credits:

4

Description:

Discusses the rise of China as the world's largest economy and its impact on our life through films, media, and history.

Credits:

4

Description:

In this course each student will select a topic about Asia that they wish to study. Virtually any topic, to be approved by the professor, is acceptable. The goal will be to write a five to seven page paper about that topic by the end of the course. As a class, we will work together through each step of the process of defining a topic, gathering materials about it, and organizing and reporting the final paper.

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces the peoples of Asia and the cultures they have created. Particular attention is paid to the lives of the common people in both historical and contemporary times. By understanding the richness and complexities of daily life in Asia, we will understand the continuities and discontinuities brought on by social, cultural, and economic changes. We will gain an appreciation of our fellow human beings in Asia.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the history of samurai and its cultural meaning for Japanese society. It examines not only how the samurai class developed into a major political force, but also how it has been represented by literatures and films in different eras.

Credits:

4

Description:

Discusses the emergence of early Chinese states, feudalism during Chinese antiquity, the emergence of Confucianism and other competing political ideologies, and the consolidation of the imperial power.

Credits:

4

Description:

The exposition and critical evaluation of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Islam. Special attention is given to foundation principles as well as to the similarities and differences of each of these philosophies to basic ideas in Western philosophy. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

Credits:

4

Description:

An historical survey of Buddhist philosophy. We will explore Buddhist origins, central teachings, devotional and meditational practices, ritual and institutions as developed from classical to modern times. Special attention given to the philosophical diversity of the Buddhist world view. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

Credits:

4

Description:

A survey of the main developments in Chinese Philosophy. The course begins with the early dynastic concept of humanism and then turns to Confucius and Mencius. Having developed the central Confucian doctrines, students next examine the Taoist response to Confucianism in the writings of Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu. The course then considers Zen Buddhism, which is called Ch'an Buddhism in China, where it originated. In particular, students study the concept of sudden enlightenment before turning to the Neo-Confucian scholars.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will examine a variety of Eastern religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shintoism. Possible connections to be explored will be the impact of these traditions on others, such as Pacific Islands and African religion, as well as the growing place of Eastern religion in the West. This course will explore the history and structure of each tradition, while attempting to recognize the similarities and the differences among them. Attention will be given to the reading of original texts when available. Requiring students to observe religious ceremonies will enhance practical understanding of many of the above traditions. Normally offered every year. Cultural Diversity B

Cluster 3: Europe

Prerequisites:

EC 101 and EC 102

Credits:

4

Description:

An economic analysis of the European Union, the history of European monetary and economic integration. and the creation of the Euro. A survey of the development and evolution of key European policies, such competition, industry, agriculture, environment, regional, etc. A discussion of economic implications of the enlargement of the European Union, as well as its trade relations with the U.S. and other countries within the context of the World Trade Organization.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is designed to provide students with a basic grounding in political institutions and processes in contemporary Spain. Political developments are presented in their socio-economic context, with special emphasis on the Spanish transition from a dictatorship to a democracy. Attention is also given to the issue of the Basque and Catalan nationalism, as well as the process of European integration. Prerequisite: GVT 281 or instructor's consent. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years at the Madrid Campus.

Credits:

4

Description:

This class will examine the political systems of the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom. It will look at the development of the Republic of Ireland from 1916 until the present paying particular attention to the role that the Irish Government has played in fostering economic development and social stability. It will further look at the country's relationships with the European Union and United States of America. The class will present Northern Ireland and the efforts to resolve the troubles there in as the nexus between these foreign relations, domestic politics in both countries and the relationship between the two of them. A key part of the class will be examining the way in which the British political system functions and is organized, paying particular attention to the multicultural and devolutionary policies that the UK government has enacted in the recent past. The impact that these changes in policy have had in resolving the conflict in Northern Ireland will be examined in depth.

Credits:

4

Description:

Why did 17 European countries surrender the sovereign control of their currency and create the Euro? Will Turkey become a member of the European Union? Will Europeans continue free riding the security protection of the United States? Is the integration process another layer of bureaucracy or an institutional instrument to dean with the permanent crises in Europe? There are some of the questions guiding the discussions in the class.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines Russia, the world's largest country, leading energy exporter, a major nuclear and space power, and a permanent member of the UN Security Council. Topics include: the Byzantine, Nomadic, and West European cultural layers that helped form Russian civilization; the impact of the Mongols; Russia's competition and expansion against more advanced and wealthier foes; Ivan the Terrible and Peter the Great's reforms.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the history of the Mediterranean from the ancient times to the 20th century, with emphasis on the extraordinary interaction between the rich cultural, ethnic and religious backgrounds of the peoples of Europe, Middle East, and North Africa.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the condition of European women from 1800 to 1914. Readings focus primarily on women's experiences in France and Great Britain. Topics include: the effects of industrialization on the lives of working-class women; working and middle-class women's negotiation of marriage, work, and family life; the rise of feminism, women's greater participation in the public sphere, and conservative reaction to these changes in women's place in society; women and crime; Victorian ideas about female sexuality; the politics of class and gender in nineteenth-century European society.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the changing place of women in European society since 1900. Topics include: women's suffrage and the political advances of the 1920s and 1930s; the revolution in sexual mores, birth control, and the rise of companionate marriage; women and the consumer economy; the anti-woman policies of Fascist Italy and Germany under National Socialism; liberation of women and retrenchment in the Soviet Union; World War II; feminism, sexual liberation, and women's political engagement since the 1960s; and, throughout the twentieth century, women's continuing negotiation of work and family responsibilities.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course offers an introduction to the Golden Age of Roman culture and power. Close readings of selections from major historians, poets, political thinkers, and philosophers will be examined in the context of Augustan Rome. Topics such as pietas, virtus, and gravitas, as well as the competing claims of public duty and private devotion, stoic maxim and erotic love lyric, will be discussed from the perspectives of writers such as Virgil, Livy, Tacitus, Horace, Catullus, and Lucretius. Cross-listed with ENG 490.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the political, economic, social and cultural development of the urban experience in Europe in the 14-1700s. The history of the most important cities of the continent and Mediterranean, and their common path in business, urbanism, society and imperialism.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the origins of revolution in 18th-Century France; the outbreak of revolution; the French Republic; the Reign of Terror; the European impact of the Revolution; the career of Bonaparte; Napoleonic warfare, the rise, fall and significance of the Empire.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the long Russian Revolution (1900-1930), one of the most important events of the 20th century. Topics include: the long-term trends and challenges that helped unleash the crises of 1917-1919; Rasputin's influence at the imperial court; challenges to the new Bolshevik regime; progress, modernization, and similarities to the new capitalist democracies of the West; the status and role of workers, women, and peasants in USSR; Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin as leaders and individuals. (Formerly HST 433)

Credits:

4

Description:

An introduction to Periclean Athens, the golden age of classical Greek literature and thought. Close readings of selections from the historians Herodotus and Thucydides, the dramatists Aeschylus and Euripides, the poetry of Pindar, and Plato's great work on politics, The Republic. Cross-listed with ENG 316.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines German and European preconditions; the VersaillesTreaty and the failure of the Weimar Republic; Hitler's ideas, collaborators and institutions; Nazi foreign and domestic policy; World War II and the concentration camps.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines politics, culture, and society, with a focus on the power of social inequality, national identity, war, and the politics of violence to shape the 20th-century European experience. Texts will include films, memoirs, novels, political speeches, caricature and other writings, as well as historical scholarship, to explore topics such as: Europe in 1900; World War I; social and economic dislocation in the 1920s and 1930s; modern sexuality and gender relations; the rise of Fascism and National Socialism; World War II and the Holocaust; colonialism, race, and the end of empire; the Cold War; modernization and Americanization since the 1960s; European Union; the collapse of Communism; the Balkan Wars; and since the 1990s, Europe's continuing engagement with the meaning of its past.

Credits:

4

Description:

Surveys the most transcendental social, cultural, economic and political developments in the history of Spain from the Neolithic to the Early Modern Period. Examines the broad history of the nation and its peoples and placing emphasis on three central themes: diversity within the Iberian Peninsula, the region's social and geo-political structures, and the transformation of the Old Order of the ancient kingdoms into a modern, nation-state. Topics include: the Pre-historical period, Roman Hispania, the Medieval Kingdoms, Islamic Civilization, the Christian Reconquest, the Catholic Monarchy, Imperial Spain under the Habsburgs, and the Crisis of the Spanish Empire in the 17th century.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the political, economic, and social history of Spain from 1700 to the present. Topics include: the War of Spanish Succession; the Bourbon state; the Enlightenment in Spain; the impact of the French Revolution; Spain in the Napoleonic Wars; the rise of liberalism, socialism, and anarchism; the crisis of 1898; the problems of modernization; the Spanish Civil War and the Franco regime; the transition from dictatorship to democracy; Spain's international position today.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the global dispersion of African people outside of the African continent. The history and culture of African descendant people and their communities in the Americas, Europe, and Asia will be included.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the social and political development of European society between the two world wars, primarily through the literature, art, and films of the period. Topics include: the dissolution of pre-1914 middle class society; deviance and sexuality in the 1920s; the role of decadence in art and the Fascist response to deviance in life and art; women, workers, and the new technology; the rise of Fascism; political engagement and polarization throughout European society in the face of economic and social crisis.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores German history since 1945 through film, newsreels and other archival footage, war memorials and museums, novels, published diaries, memoirs, and recent historical scholarship. Topics include the representation, in film and other texts, of: post-war rebuilding; the German Economic Miracle; divided Berlin; 1960s and 70s radical politics; coming to terms since 1945," with Germany's Nazi past and the Holocaust; coming to terms since 1990 with the Stasi and East German past; ""Ostalgie"" (nostalgia in the 21st century for some aspects of East German socialism); the multi-cultural society that is Germany today\"

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will explore the comparative history and structure of Western religious traditions, broadly understood, and their impact on other world religions, while attempting to recognize the similarities and the differences among them. Traditions to be studied include Greek and Roman religion, the monotheistic faiths (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as Zoroastrianism, Sikhism and Bahaism). We will also explore the impact of the Western religions on indigenous traditions, such as African religion, Native American religion, and Pacific Island religion. Attention will be given to the reading of original texts when available. Requiring students to observe religious ceremonies will enhance practical understanding of many of the above traditions. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

Spanish 202, 203 or 250. Spanish 290 or 300 are strongly recommended

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the civilization and culture of Spain highlighting its historical development and cultural manifestations from pre-historic times to the nineteenth century. Students improve their four skills through activities that include discussions, oral presentations, and writing assignments based on reading and films.

Cluster 4: Latin America and the Caribbean

Credits:

4

Description:

The study of how economic and human activity is distributed across space, the reasons for these spatial distributions, and the processes that change the spatial organization of economic activity over time. Topics include: maps, map projections, and geographic information systems; population geography; the organization and location of cities, towns and villages; transportation and communication policy; industrial location; the geography of world trade; and geographic features of economic development. The course takes a global perspective, and draws on cases and examples from all over the world. Cultural Diversity B

Prerequisites:

Junior or Senior status required

Credits:

4

Description:

This course examines the evolution of Latin America in the context of globalization. The first part analyzes the main political and economic trends of Latin America as a region, while the second presents the main challenges Mexico is facing today in the area of security. The third part moves forward into the detailed explanation of the transformations of the largest South American countries such as Colombia, Argentina, Chile and Venezuela, among others. The final section looks at the relationship between Latin America and the United States.

Credits:

4

Description:

The development of Latin American states: society, economy and culture, from colonial origins to the present. Cultural Diversity B

Credits:

4

Description:

An introduction to Latin America's colonial history through the Revolutionary Wars for Independence. The course examines topics that are relevant to issues and challenges facing Latin American and Caribbean peoples today, including poverty, corruption, human rights, the power of religion, race and identity, the environment, international trade, political representation, foreign intervention, cultural survival, and the exploitation of land, labor and resources.

Credits:

4

Description:

A look at the migration of people, along with their culture, to and from the Caribbean and Latin America. The first half of the course looks at how European, Asian and African diasporas settled in the region, assimilated and contributed to the ethnic and cultural base of Caribbean and Latin America countries in the colonial period. The second half offers insight into how and why people from the Caribbean and Latin America would later form diasporas of their own in countries like the United States in the twentieth century. Students taking this course will get a sense of the struggles, accomplishments and culture of Caribbean and Latin American peoples in the United States. Formerly HST 286.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the global dispersion of African people outside of the African continent. The history and culture of African descendant people and their communities in the Americas, Europe, and Asia will be included.

Credits:

4

Description:

A case-study approach to studying the various means by which people in the Caribbean sought to overcome the legacies of colonial exploitation of their land, labor and resources. The course also offers lessons from the case-studies for approaching/achieving positive social change. Students will learn about the people's struggles to improve their social lives, reduce poverty, access land, expand human rights, reduce illiteracy, and gain accountability from their governments through violent and non-violent means.

Prerequisites:

Spanish 202, 203 or 250 or Instructor's consent. Span 290 or 300 strongly recommended.

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces students to the complexity Latin America by examining its roots in pre-Columbian America and the impact of Spanish exploration and colonization. Places emphasis on cultural, economic, historical, philosophical, political and religious patterns that define the region. Includes class discussions, oral presentations, and writing assignments based on reading and audio-visual material.

Prerequisites:

SPAN 202 or 203 or Instructor's consent. SPAN 290 or 300 strongly recommended.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the path taken by Latin American and Caribbean countries to build independent nations out of colonial territories highlighting the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries, ethnic plurality, and cultural complexity in areas such as politics, religion, sociology, economics, customs, music & film. The cultural contributions of Spanish-speaking minorities in the United States are also addressed. Includes class discussions, oral presentations, and writing assignments based on readings and audio-visual material.

Prerequisites:

Span 290 or Span 300; Instructor's consent; Spanish 302 is strongly recommended

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the dynamic relationships that exist between art ( both visual and lyrical) and the written word. Through a juxtaposition of work by twentieth century authors from Latin America and the Caribbean and other artists who explore similar themes, students examine the multiple ways in which art and literature contribute to our understanding of life in Latin America and the Caribbean. Materials are drawn from the fields of music, photography, poetry, prose, theatre, and visual art.

Cluster 5: The Middle East

Credits:

4

Description:

The study of how economic and human activity is distributed across space, the reasons for these spatial distributions, and the processes that change the spatial organization of economic activity over time. Topics include: maps, map projections, and geographic information systems; population geography; the organization and location of cities, towns and villages; transportation and communication policy; industrial location; the geography of world trade; and geographic features of economic development. The course takes a global perspective, and draws on cases and examples from all over the world. Cultural Diversity B

Prerequisites:

TAKE GVT-281 OR INSTRUCTOR'S CONSENT Junior Status required

Credits:

4

Description:

Interlocking themes making the contemporary Middle East an area of chronic conflict: Big Power rivalries; social and political change within individual countries; unity and Arab rivalry involved in Arab nationalism; the Palestinian-Israeli-Arab dispute. Normally offered alternate years. Cultural Diversity B

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the history of the Mediterranean from the ancient times to the 20th century, with emphasis on the extraordinary interaction between the rich cultural, ethnic and religious backgrounds of the peoples of Europe, Middle East, and North Africa.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will explore the comparative history and structure of Western religious traditions, broadly understood, and their impact on other world religions, while attempting to recognize the similarities and the differences among them. Traditions to be studied include Greek and Roman religion, the monotheistic faiths (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as Zoroastrianism, Sikhism and Bahaism). We will also explore the impact of the Western religions on indigenous traditions, such as African religion, Native American religion, and Pacific Island religion. Attention will be given to the reading of original texts when available. Requiring students to observe religious ceremonies will enhance practical understanding of many of the above traditions. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Language Course Options

Prerequisites:

ARAB 101 or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

Continues to master Arabic alphabet, learn elementary formal grammar and develop reading, speaking, and writing skills.

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin) with an emphasis on developing conversational skills by using authentic materials such as video, audio, and various print media that teach fundamental grammatical patterns and vocabulary in functional contexts. Basic reading and writing (in Simplified Characters) are also taught.

Prerequisites:

CHIN 101 or Instructor's consent.

Credits:

4

Description:

Continues to develop proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin). Helps to develop listening comprehension skills with the use of authentic materials, such as print media, audio, and video materials. Advanced beginning level of reading and writing of Simplified Chinese characters is taught.

Credits:

4

Description:

Develops reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. Explores audio-visual and textual materials based on French and Francophone cultural themes.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

Continues to develop reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. Explores audio-visual and textual materials based on French and Francophone cultural themes.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

Reviews grammar, practice speaking, and continues to explore authentic cultural and literary texts in this writing-intensive course. Examines short readings, films, and print media.

Credits:

4

Description:

Practice in both oral and written language skills using German culture as background for language study. Emphasis on active use of German to master structure, pronunciation and vocabulary. One language laboratory session per week.

Prerequisites:

Ger-101 or instructor's permission

Credits:

4

Description:

Continuation of skills development from 101. One language laboratory session per week.

Prerequisites:

GER 201 or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

Continuation of skills development from 201. One language laboratory session per week.

Credits:

4

Description:

Practices and develops oral and written language skills. Explores the culture and language of Italy through audio-visual and textual materials.

Prerequisites:

ITAL-101 or instructor's permission

Credits:

4

Description:

Continues to practice oral and written language skills. Explores the culture and language of Italy through audio-visual and textual materials.

Credits:

4

Description:

Practice in both oral and written language skills. Class activities are organized around cultural themes. Weekly laboratory sessions required.

Prerequisites:

KOR-101

Credits:

4

Description:

A continuation of KOR 101. Practice in both oral and written language skills. Class activities are organized around cultural themes that reflect the diversity of the Hispanic world and its interconnections with the rest of the world. Weekly laboratory sessions required.

Credits:

4

Description:

Practice in both oral and written language skills. Class activities are organized around cultural themes that reflect the diversity of the Hispanic world and its interconnectedness with the rest of the world. Weekly laboratory sessions required.

Prerequisites:

SPAN 101 or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

Continues skills development from 101. Weekly laboratory sessions required.

Prerequisites:

SPAN 102 or or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

Reviews Spanish grammar and examines Spanish through authentic materials of cultural interest. Students develop written and oral skills through compositions and audio-visual materials. Weekly laboratory sessions required.

Prerequisites:

SPAN 201 or Instructor's consent.

Credits:

4

Description:

Continues skills development from 201. Students read a collection of short stories, write compositions, develop cultural insights through comparative and contrastive assignments, and practice listening and speaking skills in weekly conversation sessions.

Prerequisites:

SPAN 201 or or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

A writing and reading intensive course for students who are thinking about minoring and possibly majoring in Spanish. There will be a brief review of grammar, but the primary materials will come from the textbook, LAZOS,with ancillary materials from the print media and audio-visual sources. A weekly tertulia will be required instead of language lab.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: Spanish 202, 203 or 250 or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

Develops written and oral skills in various contexts and registers. Emphasis on strengthening written skills and learning to speak clearly and persuasively in Spanish. Short texts and audio-visual materials provide the basis for classroom activities which include regularly assigned essays, group discussions and debates.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed Spanish (201) at Suffolk or its equivalent elsewhere. Through a systematic review of grammar, a diversity of readings, and oral as well as written work, students will increase their lexical and grammatical knowledge of Spanish language specific to the workplace in order to communicate more easily and comfortably. Students will also be better prepared to deal with the specific themes related to business introduced in the course. (This course is not for Spanish minors or majors, but may be taken as a free elective.)

Prerequisites:

SPAN 290 or SPAN 300 or Instructor's consent.

Credits:

4

Description:

Integrates language learning with culture via business context of the Hispanic world. Spanish for banking and finance, marketing and advertising, and international commerce are highlighted. Students increase their cross-cultural understanding and written and oral proficiency in business Spanish through a wide range of assignments.

Note: These courses cannot double count with language courses taken for the BA degree requirements or with other credentials accepted as counting for the BA degree requirements

Global Cultural Studies Courses

Credits:

4

Description:

The primary goal of this course is to provide basic tools of analysis and synthesis utilized in the study of world art, literature, theatre and music from past to present. A parallel aim of this course is to examine the changing intellectual, social and artistic currents relating to seminal events across many cultures. Our approach to the material will be both chronological and thematic, covering the significant currents that exemplify social trends and practices of the various periods.

Prerequisites:

Instructor Consent Required

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

The student will engage in an internship in a business or non-profit organization that addresses global issues. The student may complete the internship either in the U.S. or in a region related to the focus of the student's major. The student will complete appropriate exercises and reports to document the learning.

Prerequisites:

Instructor Permission Required

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

The student will work with a Global Cultural Studies professor to craft an educational experience directly related to the field of major concentration. The course must include such exercises as writing a substantive research paper or undertaking a research project. The student must follow CAS Independent Study Guidelines and must complete appropriate exercises and reports to document the learning.

Prerequisites:

GCS majors in senior standing only. Instructor Permission Only

Credits:

1

Description:

The primary aim of this course is to encourage reflection on the student's college career and the development of a personal strategy for attaining one's professional goals. The student will demonstrate an understanding of ethical guidelines and professional conventions by examining the differences between the diverse work cultures encountered in the concentration and by applying this understanding to a transnational/diverse professional world. The student will be exposed to resources to evaluate current employment and graduate school opportunities in the field for Global Studies majors.