History

History Major

Learn more about this major

Major Requirements: 11 courses, 41 credits

Core Requirements (2 courses, 5 credits)

Prerequisites:

CAS 101. CAS students only. SBS students by special permission. Restricted to the following majors: Art History, Asian Studies, Biology, Economics, English, French, History, Humanities, International Economics, Music History, Philosophy, Physics, Radiation Science, Spanish, and Undeclared. Instructor consent required for all other majors.

Credits:

1

Description:

This course engages students in the early stages of career planning. Students will explore their interests, skills, values, and strengths, which will allow them to begin setting appropriate goals for professional development. Once students understand themselves in relation to the world of work, they will learn how to research careers and employment paths that fit with their goals.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores history as an evolving academic discipline, a method of inquiry into the past, and a profession. Students learn historical thinking and research skills that enable them to frame a research question, identify and retrieve required sources, and make an argument about the ideas and actions of past peoples and societies. Required for history majors. Offered annually during Fall term.

Introductory Elective (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

4

Description:

An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history, politics, economics, philosophy, geography, arts, and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy, religious and cultural exchanges, international relations, the Asian experience in America, and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

Credits:

4

Description:

Presenting the major trends relevant to social, cultural, and economic transformations that can be seen in Asia today. Especially, students will explore the following trends: the Diaspora of the Chinese and Indian People; the hold of Traditional Religious Beliefs in a Modernizing Asia such as the influences of Buddhism and Islam; the preservation of Martial Values and in Militarism in Asia; Issues related to Gender and Sexuality; Pop Culture among young people in Asia.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the major themes of human history to 1500. Topics include: hunter-gathering, the migration of humans across the globe, transitions to food production, and the development of complex societies based on agriculture. Major early Eurasian civilizations (China, India, the Middle East, and Europe) are examined (alongside their interactions with Inner Asia and the Arabian Peninsula). So too are Sub-Saharan Africa and the Americas.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the major themes of human history since 1500. Topics include: the outward expansion of Europe, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, the Age of Revolutions, the Industrial Revolution, the creation of a great-power dominated global system, the two world wars, the Cold War, the Third World, globalization, climate change, and modern social and political movements.

Credits:

4

Description:

Surveys American history from European colonization up through the era of the Civil War. Topics include interactions with Native Americans; slavery; the American Revolution; the founding of a new republic; social and economic developments in the early nineteenth century; expansion; party politics; sectional conflict; the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Credits:

4

Description:

Surveys American history from the 1870s to the present. Topics include the new industrial order; farmer and worker protests; progressivism; America's emergence as a world power; the two World Wars; the Great Depression; the New Deal; the Cold War; post-World War II American society; the Civil rights movement; Vietnam; dissent and counterculture in the 1960s; the women's movement; economic, social, and political changes in the late-twentieth century; America's relationship to a globalized world.

Advanced Electives (3 courses, 12 credits)

Choose three History courses at the 200-level or above.

Capstone Experience (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one of the following in consultation with the major advisor:

Prerequisites:

Permission of instructor required.

Credits:

4

Description:

Requires approximately 14-15 hours of work per week in a history-related position, at a museum, historical society, or archive. Designed to introduce the student to the professional opportunities and responsibilities in the fields of public history or historic preservation. Interested students should consult the Internship Director, Professor Kathryn Lasdow,in advance. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor is required.

Prerequisites:

HST 200 and Instructor Permission

Credits:

4

Description:

The Capstone Project is an opportunity for non-honors History majors to demonstrate the skills and knowledge they have gained throughout their studies in History, including their internships. Students will undertake independent research that yields a well-designed product. These may include a research paper of no less than 20 pages, digital products such as an online exhibit, an oral history project, a walking tour of historic sites, lesson plans for use in middle-school or high school classrooms, etc. Students should consult with the course faculty to design a clear, explicit plan for project completion. Prerequisite: completion of HST 200 Gateway to the Past: the Historian's Craft before starting the Capstone Project.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to History majors who are CAS Honors students or other History majors with a 3.5 overall grade point average, and a 3.7 grade point average in History courses, admitted by application to the department by the end of the junior year.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

An individual program of reading, research, and writing on an approved topic, under the supervision of a full-time History faculty member. The completed thesis will be at least 20-25 pages reflecting original research. The qualifying student must have a 3.5 overall grade point average, and a 3.7 grade point average in History classes, must be recommended by two History faculty members, and must submit a writing sample of at least 5 pages to the Department chair by the end of their junior year. Normally taken for one credit in the Fall and three credits in Spring of the senior year.

Concentration Requirement (4 courses, 16 credits)

Choose one of the following areas of concentration:

  1. United States History
  2. Regional and Global Histories
  3. Public History
 

Advanced Placement Credit: Students who scored a 4 or 5 in A.P. American and/or European History may count these toward the Introductory Electives requirement.

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

History Learning Goals & Objectives

Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.

Learning Goals Learning Objectives
Students will...
Students will be able to...
Understand the discipline of history
  • Communicate how and why historians frame questions on human experience
  • Recognize that history is an interpretative account of the past, which historians create in the present from surviving evidence
  • Explain the origins of historians’ different interpretations of the past
  • Describe and apply the ethical standards for historical practice as defined by the profession
  • Understand a body of historical knowledge pertaining to a society, nation, and/or region
  • Communicate how historical actors shaped and were shaped by their historical period
  • Interpret historical ideas and actions in their social, cultural, and political contexts
  • Analyze the histories of a society, nation, and/or region within the context of global developments
  • Understand  the sources and methods used by historians to interpret the past
  • Distinguish primary and secondary sources and their uses in explaining the past
  • Analyze sources for their credibility, context, perspective, and bias
  • Describe quantitative and qualitative research methods and their uses by historians
  • Know how to create credible historical arguments and narratives
  • Articulate open-ended, clear, and interesting research questions about historical actors, events, and/or developments
  • Design a research strategy that comprises academic databases, archival collections, and digitized sources
  • Explain historical phenomena chronologically and in terms of historical continuities, discontinuities, and cause and effect
  • Identify the characteristics of a focused, reasoned, and valid historical argument
  • Communicate the significance of the research findings
  • Understand how to apply historical knowledge and historical thinking to contemporary issues
  • Describe how history shapes their lives and contemporary society
  • Explain the value of historical thinking for lifelong learning and engaged citizenship
  • Concentrations

    United States History Concentration

    Choose four of the following, at least one must be at the 400-level:

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Using literature and film to present aspects of the African American experience in the United States. By using film and literature it is possible to present the broad range of cultural styles, regional variations, class differences, gender issues, family structures and multiple viewpoints that make up the African American experience. Through lectures and in-class presentations a historical context will be provided for each of the films or texts that are used during the semester.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Using the documentary series, Eyes on the Prize, a History of the Civil Rights Movement, the class will present the history of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States during the 20th century. Each week of the class will be focused around one of the 14 parts of the series. The presentation of the film segment will be accompanied by readings of texts, articles and documents.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the history of Africans in the United States from their arrival in the colonies to the Civil War and the end of legal slavery. Topics examined include: the development of the slave system, African-Americans, and the Declaration of Independence, and the abolition movement.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines African American history from the end of slavery to the twenty first century. Topics examined include: Emancipation and Reconstruction, Reconstruction and the Constitution, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, and African-Americans at the start of the twenty-first century.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some are complete disasters. Find out why some Presidents have been consistently ranked as great, been enshrined on Mount Rushmore, and why others have not. Even the greatest have been subject to criticism and ridicule, and even the worst have had their triumphs. Explore the reasons for this, and come to understand the historical context in which different chief executives have acted.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The life and times of Alexander Hamilton--soldier, politician, financier, husband, father, philanderer, writer--through primary documents and biographical materials. We will uncover the world of the American founding and discover how we know what we know about the world that once was.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the history of the United States from 1810 to 1910. Students study the growth of American institutions, the rise and effects of a market society, westward expansion and Indian affairs, the enlivening of U.S. civic ideals, debates over free labor and slavery, the causes and effects of the Civil War, post-Civil War redefinitions of citizenship, immigration, Progressivism, and the nation's entry on to the world stage.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Surveys the history of the U.S. as a world power. Examines officials' motives and methods, as well as influences on policy in the form of social and economic forces, interest groups, and foreign challenges. Explores public debates over America's role (as well as debates among historians and international relations theorists), and discusses the domestic and foreign impact of America's world role. Major events addressed include the two world wars, the Cold War, Vietnam, and the U.S. recent history of involvement in the Middle East.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    From the ancient cliff dwellings of the Pueblo people to the iconic nineteenth-century street grid of Manhattan, Americans throughout history have built cities distinguished by architectural creativity. This course explores the design history of the buildings and landscapes of America's early cities, from the pre-contact period through the 1850s. Each week students will study a different early-American city to learn about the environmental, architectural, social, and political forces that shaped these places. They will also practice the techniques used by historians, preservationists, and urban planners to examine the built environment and to find traces of this history in today's cities.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Using music as a window this class explores the history of Black America as well as the history of all America. Through a combination of texts, videos, and recordings this class examines the music of Black America, from it's African roots to hip hop in the 21st century. This will be done in the context and communities in which black music was created and performed, and also in relationship to the wider world.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Addresses social, intellectual, and cultural developments as well as politics and economics; foreign relations (and their connection to the domestic scene) are also discussed. Topics include: the labor movement, civil rights, woman suffrage, progressivism, the rise of the U.S. as a world power, the First World War, the cultural and social crosscurrents of the nineteen-twenties, Fordism, new developments in advertising and industrial engineering, the Great Depression, the New Deal, and World War II.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    American history in the decades immediately following World War II. Topics include the origins of the Cold War, McCarthyism, the emergence of a consumer society, the growth of the suburbs, the Civil Rights movement, the new women's movement, Vietnam, and the political upheavals of the 1960s.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the transformation of America in the decades since the early nineteen-seventies, taking up social, intellectual, and cultural developments as well as politics and economics; foreign relations (and their connection to the domestic scene) are also emphasized. Topics include: Watergate, the aftermath of the Vietnam War, the end of the post-World War II economic boom, the culture wars, the rise of the New Right and decline of the New Deal order, the end of the cold War, America's growing involvement in the Middle East globalization, the impact and aftermath of 9/11, and the Great Recession of the early twenty-first century.

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of the Instructor required.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) rose from relative poverty and obscurity to become one of the most powerful and successful men of his century. Examines the political, scientific, and literary, an diplomatic cultures of the eighteenth century by focusing on Franklin's life, reading Franklin's Autobiography, and selections from his political, scientific, and satirical writings. This is an Honors-level course.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Topics will include the Plains Indian Wars; ethnological aspects of Indian tribes; the pitfalls of Indian reform movements; Indian resistance to U.S. assimilation and reservation policies; the Indian New Deal; activism and the American Indian Movement; Indians' future prospects. Cultural Diversity A

    Prerequisites:

    03 Feb 2010 02:57pm Eric A Hatch

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    In 1794 Boston's citizens watched the largest ship built here up to that time come together at the water's edge. Students will explore the 203-year story of Constitution by learning how craftsmen built this massive ship without electric tools; by following her two hundred years of naval service to the nation; by examining life at sea for the 450 sailors and officers who lived on board for voyages lasting several months; and by surveying the ways Americans have adopted Constitution as a national symbol, using her image to adorn decorative as well as utilitarian objects. Meets at the USS CONSTITUTION Museum and the USS CONSTITUTION.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Traces the roles, images and experiences of women in America from colonial times to 1865. Topics include the family, work, religion, education, health care, motherhood, sexuality, social and political activism legal status, labor activism and popular culture. With attention to ethnicity, race, class, age, region of residence, disability and sexual orientation, the course focuses primarily on the everyday lives of ordinary women.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Though the American colonies could claim victory in the Revolution, the war's end did not guarantee a unified national identity. People struggled to reconcile the promise of Revolution with the realities of daily life and politics in the new republic. This class explores the various voices competing to be heard on the national and international stage, from the political leaders who drafted founding documents," to the women who learned to ""stand and speak"" despite repeated demands for their silence. We will encounter stories of African-American men and women who called attention to the Revolution's unfulfilled commitment to freedom"

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the founding and settlement of North America; the social, economic, and political development of European colonies and their interactions with Native People; the social religious, and cultural world of early America; witchcraft, slavery, and warfare; the British-French struggle for control of the North American continent; and the background and causes of the American Revolution.

    Prerequisites:

    One History course

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Boston from its foundation in 1630 to its development as a 21st century metropolis. From the Massachusetts Bay Colony, to cradle of the American Revolution, to a Yankee merchant capital, Brahmin cultural center,and immigrant melting pot. When offered in the hybrid format, this course will meet at the regularly-scheduled time, but lectures and other course materials will be available on the course Blackboard site in case you cannot attend.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Topics will be selected from the following: the nature of slavery; the origins of slavery in America and the process of enslavement; the economics of slavery; the American Revolution and slavery; the slave trade; black and white women and the institution of slavery; rebellions of enslaved people; the pro-slavery argument; racial thought; masters and the culture of the South; the movement to abolish slavery; the literature of slavery; the Civil War and the end of slavery; Reconstruction; Segregation; the Civil Rights Movement; race and racism in contemporary America.

    Prerequisites:

    Sophomore Standing Required

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Investigates the development of American constitutional government, from the political crisis of the 1780s to the Civil War. The problems of individual liberty versus government power; state rights; race and slavery; war powers; pluralism.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    A seminar on slavery in the United States as depicted in history, literature, and film. Topics may include resistance to slavery, honor, the attack on slavery, the cultural and social worlds of masters and enslaved people, the thought of masters and enslaved people, women and slavery, and/or slavery as an economic institution.

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of Instructor Required

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the history of the United States from perspectives of some of America's racial and ethnic groups. Through readings, writings, and discussions students will examine the history of difference and diversity in the United States.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces students to the Reconstruction era in American history, and uses Reconstruction as a bridge to look at enslavement, which preceded the era, and the issue of freedom during, and after the era. In the first half of the class students read from texts that will provide them with an understanding of slavery, emancipation and reconstruction. The second half of the class will utilize on-line collections of the Freedman's Bureau Papers to allow students to use documents to deepen their understanding of the Reconstruction era. The class will also provide a comparative approach by considering questions of citizenship in the 19th century for people of African descent in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean. This course is identical to BLKST 469.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Investigates how Americans have understood and responded to health, illness, and death from the eighteenth century to the present. Examine interactions among patients, healers (orthodox and heterodox), the medical and scientific professions, business, and government. Explore the effects of scientific and technological advancements, industrialization, urbanization, immigration, war, and social movements on the nation's moral and political economies of health, and on evolving ideas about bodily integrity and autonomy, linked to historical relations of gender, race, class, and sexuality.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the impact of organized reform movements on American history from the 1800s to the twenty first century. In each era presented, students will explore the various dynamics that impact reform.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores how Americans have understood the environment and their relationship to it through analysis of classic environmental texts, historical contexts, and societal perspectives. Analyzes how the environment has changed from pre-colonial times to the present and how these changes have been described through the lens of environmental history. Themes include differing viewpoints of European and indigenous peoples toward the natural environment, the impacts of the Western expansion on native species and landscapes, the rise of industrialism and its impacts on natural resources and ecosystems, and the rise of 20th century environmentalism.

    Regional and Global Histories Concentration

    Choose four of the following, at least one must be at the 400-level:

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the history and culture of West Africa through its portrayal in literature and film. The specific countries that will be focused on are Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana and Nigeria. This class will also recognize the fact that borders are a modern, man-made element of the West African landscape serving to both separate people who have historically and traditionally seen themselves as connected, and to bring together people into a nation who have historically and traditionally seen themselves as distinct from one another.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Introduces participants to the sabar music and dance tradition of Senegal through a study of music, dance, language and history. Taught by professional practitioners of the sabar tradition, students will develop a sense of how music and dance are used in both traditional and popular contexts. This course will be directed by Prof. Robert A. Bellinger.

    Prerequisites:

    An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Independent study in Black Studies

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom.Immigration is one of the crucial topics of the 21st century. This course provides historical context for migration flows in Spain in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The syllabus follows a chronological overview of immigration history in Spain. Traditionally a country of emigrants, Spain became the EU country receiving the largest numbers of immigrants in 2018. Topics to be covered in class include Spain's unprecedented modernization in 40 years of democracy; immigration, Islamophobia and xenophobia; immigration and citizenship; family, gender and sexuality; refugees and asylum policy; globalization and migration; illegal immigrant rights; border walls, policing and illegal trafficking; deportation; integration and assimilation; the 2015 refugee crisis and its impact; emigration in Spain during the Great Recession; and the future of immigration in Spain. Immigration to Spain : Past, Present and Future includes an array primary and secondary sources together with documentary material relevant to these topics.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the broad historical forces, conflicts and major events that have shaped the contemporary nations of the modern Middle East. Topic include: the emergence of the modern Middle East from the empires of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; the age of colonialism; the rise of nationalism; socialism, capitalism; the impact of Israeli and Palestinian conflict on the region; oil, the Islamic Revolution in Iran and the rise of Islamic fundamentalist movements; U.S. policy; and Saddam Hussein's Iraq.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    China, Japan, and Korea - East Asia's critical players - share many historical influences, but each has a distinct culture, and they competed with each other for much of the twentieth century, proud of their achievements but feeling threatened by their neighbors. Lectures interspersed with movies and documentaries to show how East Asia has developed in the past one-hundred-plus years.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    In this course each student will select a topic about Asia that they wish to study. Virtually any topic, to be approved by the professor, is acceptable. The goal will be to write a five to seven page paper about that topic by the end of the course. As a class, we will work together through each step of the process of defining a topic, gathering materials about it, and organizing and reporting the final paper.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Introduces the peoples of Asia and the cultures they have created. Particular attention is paid to the lives of the common people in both historical and contemporary times. By understanding the richness and complexities of daily life in Asia, we will understand the continuities and discontinuities brought on by social, cultural, and economic changes. We will gain an appreciation of our fellow human beings in Asia.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the history of Africa from prehistoric times to the nineteenth century to give students an introduction to African Studies and a sense of Africa's place in world history. Topics include: the Nile Valley civilizations, West African empires, the trans-Saharan trade, the slave trade, the spread and impact of Islam.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the history of Africa from 1800 to the present and enable students to develop an understanding of issues that affect the relationship between modern Africa and the world. Topics include: the African tradition; the impact of Islam and Christianity, abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism and colonialism, African independence movements, African nationalism, Pan Africanism.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Compares and analyzes the history of race and politics in South Africa and the United States from the 17th century to the present. Examines how race as a social and ideological construct influenced and informed political conflicts over land, labor, and social relations in the two countries including slavery, segregation, apartheid, and the struggle to create racial democracies.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the history of the Mediterranean from the ancient times to the 20th century, with emphasis on the extraordinary interaction between the rich cultural, ethnic and religious backgrounds of the peoples of Europe, Middle East, and North Africa.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the condition of European women from 1800 to 1914. Readings focus primarily on women's experiences in France and Great Britain. Topics include: the effects of industrialization on the lives of working-class women; working and middle-class women's negotiation of marriage, work, and family life; the rise of feminism, women's greater participation in the public sphere, and conservative reaction to these changes in women's place in society; women and crime; Victorian ideas about female sexuality; the politics of class and gender in nineteenth-century European society.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the changing place of women in European society since 1900. Topics include: women's suffrage and the political advances of the 1920s and 1930s; the revolution in sexual mores, birth control, and the rise of companionate marriage; women and the consumer economy; the anti-woman policies of Fascist Italy and Germany under National Socialism; liberation of women and retrenchment in the Soviet Union; World War II; feminism, sexual liberation, and women's political engagement since the 1960s; and, throughout the twentieth century, women's continuing negotiation of work and family responsibilities.

    Credits:

    2

    Description:

    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the United Nations, exploring the historical, institutional, theoretical foundations as well as the political processes and issues facing the organization today.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course offers an introduction to the Golden Age of Roman culture and power. Close readings of selections from major historians, poets, political thinkers, and philosophers will be examined in the context of Augustan Rome. Topics such as pietas, virtus, and gravitas, as well as the competing claims of public duty and private devotion, stoic maxim and erotic love lyric, will be discussed from the perspectives of writers such as Virgil, Livy, Tacitus, Horace, Catullus, and Lucretius. Cross-listed with ENG 490.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the intellectual and cultural developments of the Renaissance, and of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations in their social and political contexts. Topics include: Humanism, the rise of the city-state; art, and science; changes in family and social life; the causes of the Reformation (intellectual, social, technological); Calvinists, Lutherans, and Radical Reformers; Counter-Reformation and its political consequences; the Wars of Religion.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Presents a coherent account of the origin and history of Islam since its foundation in Arabia in the seventh century A.D. to the present. Analyzes the terms, events, characteristics, developments, movements, and institutions that have been part of the shaping of Islam. Ideological challenges and impact of Islam in the world today from both spiritual and political perspectives are examined.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the long Russian Revolution (1900-1930), one of the most important events of the 20th century. Topics include: the long-term trends and challenges that helped unleash the crises of 1917-1919; Rasputin's influence at the imperial court; challenges to the new Bolshevik regime; progress, modernization, and similarities to the new capitalist democracies of the West; the status and role of workers, women, and peasants in USSR; Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin as leaders and individuals. (Formerly HST 433)

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Emphasizes the continuities and changes that take place within civilizations; the similarities, differences, and relationships that exist among contemporary civilizations around the world. Special attention given to the evolving conflict between traditionalism and modernity.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    An introduction to Periclean Athens, the golden age of classical Greek literature and thought. Close readings of selections from the historians Herodotus and Thucydides, the dramatists Aeschylus and Euripides, the poetry of Pindar, and Plato's great work on politics, The Republic. Cross-listed with ENG 316.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines German and European preconditions; the VersaillesTreaty and the failure of the Weimar Republic; Hitler's ideas, collaborators and institutions; Nazi foreign and domestic policy; World War II and the concentration camps.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines politics, culture, and society, with a focus on the power of social inequality, national identity, war, and the politics of violence to shape the 20th-century European experience. Texts will include films, memoirs, novels, political speeches, caricature and other writings, as well as historical scholarship, to explore topics such as: Europe in 1900; World War I; social and economic dislocation in the 1920s and 1930s; modern sexuality and gender relations; the rise of Fascism and National Socialism; World War II and the Holocaust; colonialism, race, and the end of empire; the Cold War; modernization and Americanization since the 1960s; European Union; the collapse of Communism; the Balkan Wars; and since the 1990s, Europe's continuing engagement with the meaning of its past.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Outlines the history of Chinese martial arts in five movies, highlighting Chinese views of violence, personal loyalty, government, and justice.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Discusses the rise of China as the world's largest economy and its impact on our life through films, media, and history.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the history of samurai and its cultural meaning for Japanese society. It examines not only how the samurai class developed into a major political force, but also how it has been represented by literatures and films in different eras.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the outbreak, course, and the consequences of World War II stressing the global nature of this 20th-century military conflict. Topics will include: the rise of fascist regimes in Germany and Japan; origins and outbreak of the war; key battles in Europe, the Pacific, and Asia; Pearl Harbor; civilian life in Axis and Allied countries; collaboration and resistance in occupied territories; the Holocaust; racial implications of the war in the East as well as Europe; Anglo-American firebombing of Germany; the use of atomic weapons; and the politics of memory.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Surveys the most transcendental social, cultural, economic and political developments in the history of Spain from the Neolithic to the Early Modern Period. Examines the broad history of the nation and its peoples and placing emphasis on three central themes: diversity within the Iberian Peninsula, the region's social and geo-political structures, and the transformation of the Old Order of the ancient kingdoms into a modern, nation-state. Topics include: the Pre-historical period, Roman Hispania, the Medieval Kingdoms, Islamic Civilization, the Christian Reconquest, the Catholic Monarchy, Imperial Spain under the Habsburgs, and the Crisis of the Spanish Empire in the 17th century.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the political, economic, and social history of Spain from 1700 to the present. Topics include: the War of Spanish Succession; the Bourbon state; the Enlightenment in Spain; the impact of the French Revolution; Spain in the Napoleonic Wars; the rise of liberalism, socialism, and anarchism; the crisis of 1898; the problems of modernization; the Spanish Civil War and the Franco regime; the transition from dictatorship to democracy; Spain's international position today.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the historical reality of pirates and piracy, focusing on the Golden Age years of 1650 to 1730, reasons why men (and some women) turned pirate, and why there has existed a continuing fascination with pirates for centuries. Particular emphasis is placed on the interaction between pirates and New England. Students will read primary sources and accounts, secondary sources, and fictional presentations - both books and films - to better understand piracy, why it happened, and why it continues to fascinate.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the global dispersion of African people outside of the African continent. The history and culture of African descendant people and their communities in the Americas, Europe, and Asia will be included.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the social and political development of European society between the two world wars, primarily through the literature, art, and films of the period. Topics include: the dissolution of pre-1914 middle class society; deviance and sexuality in the 1920s; the role of decadence in art and the Fascist response to deviance in life and art; women, workers, and the new technology; the rise of Fascism; political engagement and polarization throughout European society in the face of economic and social crisis.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Discusses the emergence of early Chinese states, feudalism during Chinese antiquity, the emergence of Confucianism and other competing political ideologies, and the consolidation of the imperial power.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores ideas about emotional life from the fields of history, anthropology, sociology, and psychology as well as the evolution of emotion rules and prescriptions, focusing on western Europe and the United States since 1700. In the eighteenth century, emotions were seen as a positive influence on politics and public life, especially during the French Revolution. After the fall of Robespierre, the emotions were banished to the private sphere - so we will read both primary sources and recent scholarship on 19th- and 20th- century ideas about masculinity and femininity, romantic love and marriage, childrearing, and about what parents and children are supposed feel toward each other, how ideas about these subjects have changed over time, and whether our feelings change with them.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explore the deep antipathy women have faced at nearly every turn in their struggles for civic and social inclusion. Anti-feminist denials of women's rights have taken the form of attacks on women's nature, bodies, and fitness for public life, tagging them with labels of otherness: opponents of women's rights deem them irrational, unnatural, traitors to society, even sexual deviants. This course will examine the dangers that women allegedly represent to social stability from the Enlightenment to the present day, as well as how women have fought back to assert their rights and independence.

    Public History Concentration

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the key concepts and current practices of public history as an academic discipline and professional field in museums, libraries, archives, historical societies, historic houses, and preservation organizations. Examines the presentation and interpretation of history to popular audiences through documentaries, motion pictures, Web sites, and other forms of media. Topics covered will include curation, conservation, fundraising, educational and interpretive programming. Students will gain practical experience by participating in substantive, directed projects with partnering organizations.

    Choose three of the following, at least one must be at the 400-level:

    Prerequisites:

    CJN-152

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Practical exposure to methods of production and production equipment of the media. Students are introduced to basic theoretical concepts, such as three-point lighting and white balancing, and apply those to their productions. Students create a variety of non-fiction videos in teams and/or by themselves.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the way that African American history is presented through public history in the United States. This exploration will include monuments, memorials and historic sites that both focus on the African American experience and examine how they fit into the context of American history. Time will also be given to look at the use of films, architecture and archaeology. This will be done through reading texts, viewing of films and visiting local historic sites that explore public history and the African American experience from various geographical perspectives.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the practices and ethics of oral history, a field of study and profession focused on collecting, preserving, and curating the memories of participants in past events. Addresses the use of oral history as historical evidence and a research methodology. Students will learn oral history techniques by conducting, recording, and evaluating their own interviews.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Introduces students to the nuts and bolts of collaborating effectively with community groups to research and document their local history. Their stories contain a wealth of details about the effects of large-scale historical developments on the lives of ordinary people and community formation. The class will investigate how the preservation of local history contributes to place making, the community-based planning of public spaces, and the historical construction of identity in a community.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    An introduction to the use of information technologies to narrate, preserve, access, analyze, research, and publish interpretations of the past. Students will learn how historical content is produced, presented, and published in digital form; how to find and evaluate digital primary and secondary sources; and how to use basic computational techniques to work with digital resources. No programming experience is required.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the opportunities and challenges of presenting and interpreting history through exhibits at public institutions. Examines the role of history curator as traditional keeper of the past and current presenter and communicator of history and the role of history museums/heritage centers as educational institutions for diverse, multiple audiences. Students will learn how to evaluate objects and other materials to create an historical narrative. Students will experience how to research, design, plan, fund, install, and promote exhibits of historical subjects.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Surveys the world of archives, differing types of manuscript collections, the ideas and values that inform archival practice, and the ways that archives shape our understanding of the past. Hands-on instruction will acquaint students with collection selection, appraisal, acquisition, arrangement and description, reference services and access, preservation and protection, outreach, advocacy, promotion, management, and professional ethical and legal responsibilities.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Working with historic houses in Boston, students will learn that art of interpreting history. Using collections, archives, and other repositories, students will research the houses and the people who lived in them. Many of these houses have existed from colonial times and had various uses. Formerly: HST 368 Introduction to Historical Interpretation.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores American history through material objects - from colonial silver teapots to 1960s lava lamps. Students will investigate an object's purpose, how it was made and who made it, and interpret the object's cultural meanings for American history. Topics covered will include the decorative arts, vernacular architecture, archaeology, industrial design, ethnicity and gender, visual culture, and landscapes. Lectures and discussions will be complemented with visits to museums, historic houses, and other sites. Students will learn how to research and write about material cultures, placing objects or spaces in their historical context.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores German history since 1945 through film, newsreels and other archival footage, war memorials and museums, novels, published diaries, memoirs, and recent historical scholarship. Topics include the representation, in film and other texts, of: post-war rebuilding; the German Economic Miracle; divided Berlin; 1960s and 70s radical politics; coming to terms since 1945," with Germany's Nazi past and the Holocaust; coming to terms since 1990 with the Stasi and East German past; ""Ostalgie"" (nostalgia in the 21st century for some aspects of East German socialism); the multi-cultural society that is Germany today"

    History Minor

    Learn more about this minor

    Minor Requirements: 5 courses, 20 credits

    Introductory Elective (1 course, 4 credits)

    Choose one of the following:

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history, politics, economics, philosophy, geography, arts, and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy, religious and cultural exchanges, international relations, the Asian experience in America, and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Presenting the major trends relevant to social, cultural, and economic transformations that can be seen in Asia today. Especially, students will explore the following trends: the Diaspora of the Chinese and Indian People; the hold of Traditional Religious Beliefs in a Modernizing Asia such as the influences of Buddhism and Islam; the preservation of Martial Values and in Militarism in Asia; Issues related to Gender and Sexuality; Pop Culture among young people in Asia.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the major themes of human history to 1500. Topics include: hunter-gathering, the migration of humans across the globe, transitions to food production, and the development of complex societies based on agriculture. Major early Eurasian civilizations (China, India, the Middle East, and Europe) are examined (alongside their interactions with Inner Asia and the Arabian Peninsula). So too are Sub-Saharan Africa and the Americas.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the major themes of human history since 1500. Topics include: the outward expansion of Europe, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, the Age of Revolutions, the Industrial Revolution, the creation of a great-power dominated global system, the two world wars, the Cold War, the Third World, globalization, climate change, and modern social and political movements.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Surveys American history from European colonization up through the era of the Civil War. Topics include interactions with Native Americans; slavery; the American Revolution; the founding of a new republic; social and economic developments in the early nineteenth century; expansion; party politics; sectional conflict; the Civil War and Reconstruction.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Surveys American history from the 1870s to the present. Topics include the new industrial order; farmer and worker protests; progressivism; America's emergence as a world power; the two World Wars; the Great Depression; the New Deal; the Cold War; post-World War II American society; the Civil rights movement; Vietnam; dissent and counterculture in the 1960s; the women's movement; economic, social, and political changes in the late-twentieth century; America's relationship to a globalized world.

    Advanced Electives (4 courses, 16 credits)

    Choose 4 History courses at the 200-level or above.

    Advanced Placement Credit: Students who scored a 4 or 5 in A.P. American and/or European History may count these toward the Introductory Elective requirement.

    Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

    Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major or double major combination to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

    Honor Societies

    Phi Alpha Theta, the National History Honor Society, has had a presence at Suffolk since 1962 in the form of its Theta Lambda Chapter. It is composed of both faculty and student members. Student membership is determined by the completion of at least 20 semester hours of History courses with an average of 3.6, plus a general cumulative average of 3.5. Transferred credits cannot be counted in the requirements. Invitations to membership are extended in the spring, and induction will take place at the annual reception for graduating History majors and minors at the end of April.

    Honors

    To complete requirements for honors in the major, a candidate must:

    1. Graduate with a major GPA of 3.7 or higher
    2. Graduate with an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher
    3. Complete HST-H555 (normally 1 credit in the fall, 3 credits in the spring)
    4. Complete a senior thesis in HST-H555 that is approved by the department
    5. Pass a thesis defense
    6. CAS Honors Program students only: Present work from the senior honors experience at the Honors Symposium or Pecha Kucha event

    To become a candidate for honors in the major, a student must:

    1. Have a major GPA of 3.7 or higher
    2. Have an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher

    CAS Honors Program students only: CAS Honors program students who fulfill the GPA requirement above declare intent to the honors coordinator in the spring of junior year, when attending an honors thesis orientation session and completing an honors contract and a declaration of topic/advisor form for the thesis, which must be signed by the faculty member who has agreed to supervise the project

    All other students: Consult their academic advisor and/or the department chair in the first semester of junior year

    History Courses

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history, politics, economics, philosophy, geography, arts, and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy, religious and cultural exchanges, international relations, the Asian experience in America, and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Surveys European culture, politics, and society from antiquity to the seventeenth century. Topics include: the Greek, Judaic, and Roman heritage; the rise of Christianity; feudal society in the Middle Ages; Renaissance and Reformation; the Scientific Revolution; and the development of absolutist and constitutional governments.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Surveys European culture, politics, and society from the Scientific Revolution to the present. Topics include: the development of absolutist and constitutional governments; the Enlightenment; the French Revolution; Industrialization and urbanization; nationalism and imperialism; World War I, World War II, and the Cold War; the decline of Europe as a world power.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Presenting the major trends relevant to social, cultural, and economic transformations that can be seen in Asia today. Especially, students will explore the following trends: the Diaspora of the Chinese and Indian People; the hold of Traditional Religious Beliefs in a Modernizing Asia such as the influences of Buddhism and Islam; the preservation of Martial Values and in Militarism in Asia; Issues related to Gender and Sexuality; Pop Culture among young people in Asia.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Discusses Chinese civilization from its origins to its recent rise as a world power. Spark students' interest in China and enable them to relate Chinese history and society to their lives and careers.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the major themes of human history to 1500. Topics include: hunter-gathering, the migration of humans across the globe, transitions to food production, and the development of complex societies based on agriculture. Major early Eurasian civilizations (China, India, the Middle East, and Europe) are examined (alongside their interactions with Inner Asia and the Arabian Peninsula). So too are Sub-Saharan Africa and the Americas.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the major themes of human history since 1500. Topics include: the outward expansion of Europe, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, the Age of Revolutions, the Industrial Revolution, the creation of a great-power dominated global system, the two world wars, the Cold War, the Third World, globalization, climate change, and modern social and political movements.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This is the first of the two-course series of Empires and Globalization in World History. Course discusses the origins and development of globalization and capitalism from the perspective of economic history. Major issues include the formation of the medieval trade system, the development of finance and capitalism in the early modern ages, and economic changes prior to the Industrial Revolution. The specific topics may change every year due to new academic developments and publications.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This is the second of the two-course series of Empires and Globalization in World History. Course discusses the origins and development of globalization and capitalism from the perspective of economic history. Major issues include state-making, wars, and the rivalry among early modern empires, economic development, the Industrial Revolution and the formation of the global trade system. The specific topics may change every year due to new academic developments and publications.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Surveys American history from European colonization up through the era of the Civil War. Topics include interactions with Native Americans; slavery; the American Revolution; the founding of a new republic; social and economic developments in the early nineteenth century; expansion; party politics; sectional conflict; the Civil War and Reconstruction.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Surveys American history from the 1870s to the present. Topics include the new industrial order; farmer and worker protests; progressivism; America's emergence as a world power; the two World Wars; the Great Depression; the New Deal; the Cold War; post-World War II American society; the Civil rights movement; Vietnam; dissent and counterculture in the 1960s; the women's movement; economic, social, and political changes in the late-twentieth century; America's relationship to a globalized world.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores history as an evolving academic discipline, a method of inquiry into the past, and a profession. Students learn historical thinking and research skills that enable them to frame a research question, identify and retrieve required sources, and make an argument about the ideas and actions of past peoples and societies. Required for history majors. Offered annually during Fall term.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom.Immigration is one of the crucial topics of the 21st century. This course provides historical context for migration flows in Spain in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The syllabus follows a chronological overview of immigration history in Spain. Traditionally a country of emigrants, Spain became the EU country receiving the largest numbers of immigrants in 2018. Topics to be covered in class include Spain's unprecedented modernization in 40 years of democracy; immigration, Islamophobia and xenophobia; immigration and citizenship; family, gender and sexuality; refugees and asylum policy; globalization and migration; illegal immigrant rights; border walls, policing and illegal trafficking; deportation; integration and assimilation; the 2015 refugee crisis and its impact; emigration in Spain during the Great Recession; and the future of immigration in Spain. Immigration to Spain : Past, Present and Future includes an array primary and secondary sources together with documentary material relevant to these topics.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Using the documentary series, Eyes on the Prize, a History of the Civil Rights Movement, the class will present the history of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States during the 20th century. Each week of the class will be focused around one of the 14 parts of the series. The presentation of the film segment will be accompanied by readings of texts, articles and documents.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the way that African American history is presented through public history in the United States. This exploration will include monuments, memorials and historic sites that both focus on the African American experience and examine how they fit into the context of American history. Time will also be given to look at the use of films, architecture and archaeology. This will be done through reading texts, viewing of films and visiting local historic sites that explore public history and the African American experience from various geographical perspectives.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines Russia, the world's largest country, leading energy exporter, a major nuclear and space power, and a permanent member of the UN Security Council. Topics include: the Byzantine, Nomadic, and West European cultural layers that helped form Russian civilization; the impact of the Mongols; Russia's competition and expansion against more advanced and wealthier foes; Ivan the Terrible and Peter the Great's reforms.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explore the modern Winter Olympics and the development of athletic events such as the Boston Marathon; as well as the history of basketball (invented in Massachusetts)and baseball and their importance to Boston's history. Examine some of the iconic sports figures of Boston, and the statues and monuments made to them.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the key concepts and current practices of public history as an academic discipline and professional field in museums, libraries, archives, historical societies, historic houses, and preservation organizations. Examines the presentation and interpretation of history to popular audiences through documentaries, motion pictures, Web sites, and other forms of media. Topics covered will include curation, conservation, fundraising, educational and interpretive programming. Students will gain practical experience by participating in substantive, directed projects with partnering organizations.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the practices and ethics of oral history, a field of study and profession focused on collecting, preserving, and curating the memories of participants in past events. Addresses the use of oral history as historical evidence and a research methodology. Students will learn oral history techniques by conducting, recording, and evaluating their own interviews.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Introduces students to the nuts and bolts of collaborating effectively with community groups to research and document their local history. Their stories contain a wealth of details about the effects of large-scale historical developments on the lives of ordinary people and community formation. The class will investigate how the preservation of local history contributes to place making, the community-based planning of public spaces, and the historical construction of identity in a community.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    An introduction to the use of information technologies to narrate, preserve, access, analyze, research, and publish interpretations of the past. Students will learn how historical content is produced, presented, and published in digital form; how to find and evaluate digital primary and secondary sources; and how to use basic computational techniques to work with digital resources. No programming experience is required.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Reviews modern Iranian politics with a special attention on the history of the Islamic Revolution of 1979; evaluates the factors which caused the revolution and its impacts on Iranian society, the Middle East, and the world. Among the important topics of discussion will be the role of the United States in Iranian politics (1953-1979); the policies of Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi (1941-1979); the hostage crisis (1979-1981); the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988); the Reform Movement (1997-2005); and the re-emergence of radical policies under Ahmadinejad since 2005.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the broad historical forces, conflicts and major events that have shaped the contemporary nations of the modern Middle East. Topic include: the emergence of the modern Middle East from the empires of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; the age of colonialism; the rise of nationalism; socialism, capitalism; the impact of Israeli and Palestinian conflict on the region; oil, the Islamic Revolution in Iran and the rise of Islamic fundamentalist movements; U.S. policy; and Saddam Hussein's Iraq.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Outlines the history of Chinese martial arts in five movies, highlighting Chinese views of violence, personal loyalty, government, and justice.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    China, Japan, and Korea - East Asia's critical players - share many historical influences, but each has a distinct culture, and they competed with each other for much of the twentieth century, proud of their achievements but feeling threatened by their neighbors. Lectures interspersed with movies and documentaries to show how East Asia has developed in the past one-hundred-plus years.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Discusses the rise of China as the world's largest economy and its impact on our life through films, media, and history.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    In this course each student will select a topic about Asia that they wish to study. Virtually any topic, to be approved by the professor, is acceptable. The goal will be to write a five to seven page paper about that topic by the end of the course. As a class, we will work together through each step of the process of defining a topic, gathering materials about it, and organizing and reporting the final paper.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Introduces the peoples of Asia and the cultures they have created. Particular attention is paid to the lives of the common people in both historical and contemporary times. By understanding the richness and complexities of daily life in Asia, we will understand the continuities and discontinuities brought on by social, cultural, and economic changes. We will gain an appreciation of our fellow human beings in Asia.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the history of Africa from prehistoric times to the nineteenth century to give students an introduction to African Studies and a sense of Africa's place in world history. Topics include: the Nile Valley civilizations, West African empires, the trans-Saharan trade, the slave trade, the spread and impact of Islam.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the history of Africa from 1800 to the present and enable students to develop an understanding of issues that affect the relationship between modern Africa and the world. Topics include: the African tradition; the impact of Islam and Christianity, abolition of the slave trade, European imperialism and colonialism, African independence movements, African nationalism, Pan Africanism.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Compares and analyzes the history of race and politics in South Africa and the United States from the 17th century to the present. Examines how race as a social and ideological construct influenced and informed political conflicts over land, labor, and social relations in the two countries including slavery, segregation, apartheid, and the struggle to create racial democracies.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the history of the Mediterranean from the ancient times to the 20th century, with emphasis on the extraordinary interaction between the rich cultural, ethnic and religious backgrounds of the peoples of Europe, Middle East, and North Africa.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the history of Africans in the United States from their arrival in the colonies to the Civil War and the end of legal slavery. Topics examined include: the development of the slave system, African-Americans, and the Declaration of Independence, and the abolition movement.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines African American history from the end of slavery to the twenty first century. Topics examined include: Emancipation and Reconstruction, Reconstruction and the Constitution, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, and African-Americans at the start of the twenty-first century.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the condition of European women from 1800 to 1914. Readings focus primarily on women's experiences in France and Great Britain. Topics include: the effects of industrialization on the lives of working-class women; working and middle-class women's negotiation of marriage, work, and family life; the rise of feminism, women's greater participation in the public sphere, and conservative reaction to these changes in women's place in society; women and crime; Victorian ideas about female sexuality; the politics of class and gender in nineteenth-century European society.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the changing place of women in European society since 1900. Topics include: women's suffrage and the political advances of the 1920s and 1930s; the revolution in sexual mores, birth control, and the rise of companionate marriage; women and the consumer economy; the anti-woman policies of Fascist Italy and Germany under National Socialism; liberation of women and retrenchment in the Soviet Union; World War II; feminism, sexual liberation, and women's political engagement since the 1960s; and, throughout the twentieth century, women's continuing negotiation of work and family responsibilities.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The development of Latin American states: society, economy and culture, from colonial origins to the present. Cultural Diversity B

    Credits:

    2

    Description:

    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the United Nations, exploring the historical, institutional, theoretical foundations as well as the political processes and issues facing the organization today.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    An introduction to Latin America's colonial history through the Revolutionary Wars for Independence. The course examines topics that are relevant to issues and challenges facing Latin American and Caribbean peoples today, including poverty, corruption, human rights, the power of religion, race and identity, the environment, international trade, political representation, foreign intervention, cultural survival, and the exploitation of land, labor and resources.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some are complete disasters. Find out why some Presidents have been consistently ranked as great, been enshrined on Mount Rushmore, and why others have not. Even the greatest have been subject to criticism and ridicule, and even the worst have had their triumphs. Explore the reasons for this, and come to understand the historical context in which different chief executives have acted.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The life and times of Alexander Hamilton--soldier, politician, financier, husband, father, philanderer, writer--through primary documents and biographical materials. We will uncover the world of the American founding and discover how we know what we know about the world that once was.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the history of the United States from 1810 to 1910. Students study the growth of American institutions, the rise and effects of a market society, westward expansion and Indian affairs, the enlivening of U.S. civic ideals, debates over free labor and slavery, the causes and effects of the Civil War, post-Civil War redefinitions of citizenship, immigration, Progressivism, and the nation's entry on to the world stage.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Surveys the history of the U.S. as a world power. Examines officials' motives and methods, as well as influences on policy in the form of social and economic forces, interest groups, and foreign challenges. Explores public debates over America's role (as well as debates among historians and international relations theorists), and discusses the domestic and foreign impact of America's world role. Major events addressed include the two world wars, the Cold War, Vietnam, and the U.S. recent history of involvement in the Middle East.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    From the ancient cliff dwellings of the Pueblo people to the iconic nineteenth-century street grid of Manhattan, Americans throughout history have built cities distinguished by architectural creativity. This course explores the design history of the buildings and landscapes of America's early cities, from the pre-contact period through the 1850s. Each week students will study a different early-American city to learn about the environmental, architectural, social, and political forces that shaped these places. They will also practice the techniques used by historians, preservationists, and urban planners to examine the built environment and to find traces of this history in today's cities.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course offers an introduction to the Golden Age of Roman culture and power. Close readings of selections from major historians, poets, political thinkers, and philosophers will be examined in the context of Augustan Rome. Topics such as pietas, virtus, and gravitas, as well as the competing claims of public duty and private devotion, stoic maxim and erotic love lyric, will be discussed from the perspectives of writers such as Virgil, Livy, Tacitus, Horace, Catullus, and Lucretius. Cross-listed with ENG 490.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the key concepts and current practices of public history as an academic discipline and professional field in museums, libraries, archives, historical societies, historic houses, and preservation organizations. Examines the presentation and interpretation of history to popular audiences through documentaries, motion pictures, Web sites, and other forms of media. Topics covered will include curation, conservation, fundraising, educational and interpretive programming. Students will gain practical experience by participating in substantive, directed projects with partnering organizations.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the intellectual and cultural developments of the Renaissance, and of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations in their social and political contexts. Topics include: Humanism, the rise of the city-state; art, and science; changes in family and social life; the causes of the Reformation (intellectual, social, technological); Calvinists, Lutherans, and Radical Reformers; Counter-Reformation and its political consequences; the Wars of Religion.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the political, economic, social and cultural development of the urban experience in Europe in the 14-1700s. The history of the most important cities of the continent and Mediterranean, and their common path in business, urbanism, society and imperialism.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Using music as a window this class explores the history of Black America as well as the history of all America. Through a combination of texts, videos, and recordings this class examines the music of Black America, from it's African roots to hip hop in the 21st century. This will be done in the context and communities in which black music was created and performed, and also in relationship to the wider world.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Presents a coherent account of the origin and history of Islam since its foundation in Arabia in the seventh century A.D. to the present. Analyzes the terms, events, characteristics, developments, movements, and institutions that have been part of the shaping of Islam. Ideological challenges and impact of Islam in the world today from both spiritual and political perspectives are examined.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the origins of revolution in 18th-Century France; the outbreak of revolution; the French Republic; the Reign of Terror; the European impact of the Revolution; the career of Bonaparte; Napoleonic warfare, the rise, fall and significance of the Empire.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Begins with an overview of the Old Worlds (Africa, America, Asia and Europe) before the rise of the European hegemony. Next we will look at the growth of Europe's nation-states and their movement into the control of world trade. Then we will cover the period from the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries - the transition from exploration to colonization to imperialism. The final segment of the class will pick up with the colonial/imperial system and its impacts on the modern world. Cultural Diversity B

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the long Russian Revolution (1900-1930), one of the most important events of the 20th century. Topics include: the long-term trends and challenges that helped unleash the crises of 1917-1919; Rasputin's influence at the imperial court; challenges to the new Bolshevik regime; progress, modernization, and similarities to the new capitalist democracies of the West; the status and role of workers, women, and peasants in USSR; Lenin, Trotsky, and Stalin as leaders and individuals. (Formerly HST 433)

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Emphasizes the continuities and changes that take place within civilizations; the similarities, differences, and relationships that exist among contemporary civilizations around the world. Special attention given to the evolving conflict between traditionalism and modernity.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Addresses social, intellectual, and cultural developments as well as politics and economics; foreign relations (and their connection to the domestic scene) are also discussed. Topics include: the labor movement, civil rights, woman suffrage, progressivism, the rise of the U.S. as a world power, the First World War, the cultural and social crosscurrents of the nineteen-twenties, Fordism, new developments in advertising and industrial engineering, the Great Depression, the New Deal, and World War II.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    American history in the decades immediately following World War II. Topics include the origins of the Cold War, McCarthyism, the emergence of a consumer society, the growth of the suburbs, the Civil Rights movement, the new women's movement, Vietnam, and the political upheavals of the 1960s.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the transformation of America in the decades since the early nineteen-seventies, taking up social, intellectual, and cultural developments as well as politics and economics; foreign relations (and their connection to the domestic scene) are also emphasized. Topics include: Watergate, the aftermath of the Vietnam War, the end of the post-World War II economic boom, the culture wars, the rise of the New Right and decline of the New Deal order, the end of the cold War, America's growing involvement in the Middle East globalization, the impact and aftermath of 9/11, and the Great Recession of the early twenty-first century.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    An introduction to Periclean Athens, the golden age of classical Greek literature and thought. Close readings of selections from the historians Herodotus and Thucydides, the dramatists Aeschylus and Euripides, the poetry of Pindar, and Plato's great work on politics, The Republic. Cross-listed with ENG 316.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines German and European preconditions; the VersaillesTreaty and the failure of the Weimar Republic; Hitler's ideas, collaborators and institutions; Nazi foreign and domestic policy; World War II and the concentration camps.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines politics, culture, and society, with a focus on the power of social inequality, national identity, war, and the politics of violence to shape the 20th-century European experience. Texts will include films, memoirs, novels, political speeches, caricature and other writings, as well as historical scholarship, to explore topics such as: Europe in 1900; World War I; social and economic dislocation in the 1920s and 1930s; modern sexuality and gender relations; the rise of Fascism and National Socialism; World War II and the Holocaust; colonialism, race, and the end of empire; the Cold War; modernization and Americanization since the 1960s; European Union; the collapse of Communism; the Balkan Wars; and since the 1990s, Europe's continuing engagement with the meaning of its past.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Outlines the history of Chinese martial arts in five movies, highlighting Chinese views of violence, personal loyalty, government, and justice.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Discusses the rise of China as the world's largest economy and its impact on our life through films, media, and history.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the history of samurai and its cultural meaning for Japanese society. It examines not only how the samurai class developed into a major political force, but also how it has been represented by literatures and films in different eras.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the outbreak, course, and the consequences of World War II stressing the global nature of this 20th-century military conflict. Topics will include: the rise of fascist regimes in Germany and Japan; origins and outbreak of the war; key battles in Europe, the Pacific, and Asia; Pearl Harbor; civilian life in Axis and Allied countries; collaboration and resistance in occupied territories; the Holocaust; racial implications of the war in the East as well as Europe; Anglo-American firebombing of Germany; the use of atomic weapons; and the politics of memory.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Surveys the most transcendental social, cultural, economic and political developments in the history of Spain from the Neolithic to the Early Modern Period. Examines the broad history of the nation and its peoples and placing emphasis on three central themes: diversity within the Iberian Peninsula, the region's social and geo-political structures, and the transformation of the Old Order of the ancient kingdoms into a modern, nation-state. Topics include: the Pre-historical period, Roman Hispania, the Medieval Kingdoms, Islamic Civilization, the Christian Reconquest, the Catholic Monarchy, Imperial Spain under the Habsburgs, and the Crisis of the Spanish Empire in the 17th century.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the political, economic, and social history of Spain from 1700 to the present. Topics include: the War of Spanish Succession; the Bourbon state; the Enlightenment in Spain; the impact of the French Revolution; Spain in the Napoleonic Wars; the rise of liberalism, socialism, and anarchism; the crisis of 1898; the problems of modernization; the Spanish Civil War and the Franco regime; the transition from dictatorship to democracy; Spain's international position today.

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of the Instructor required.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) rose from relative poverty and obscurity to become one of the most powerful and successful men of his century. Examines the political, scientific, and literary, an diplomatic cultures of the eighteenth century by focusing on Franklin's life, reading Franklin's Autobiography, and selections from his political, scientific, and satirical writings. This is an Honors-level course.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the native people of North America before and after the European conquest. Native Americans' relations with one another and their reactions to the Europeans; European and Native American perceptions of one another; white Indians and noble savages; resistance and assimilation; the United States and Indian removal.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Topics will include the Plains Indian Wars; ethnological aspects of Indian tribes; the pitfalls of Indian reform movements; Indian resistance to U.S. assimilation and reservation policies; the Indian New Deal; activism and the American Indian Movement; Indians' future prospects. Cultural Diversity A

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the historical reality of pirates and piracy, focusing on the Golden Age years of 1650 to 1730, reasons why men (and some women) turned pirate, and why there has existed a continuing fascination with pirates for centuries. Particular emphasis is placed on the interaction between pirates and New England. Students will read primary sources and accounts, secondary sources, and fictional presentations - both books and films - to better understand piracy, why it happened, and why it continues to fascinate.

    Prerequisites:

    Restricted to CAS Honors Students Only

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the historical reality of pirates and piracy, focusing on the Golden Age years of 1650 to 1730, reasons why men (and some women) turned pirate, and why there has existed a continuing fascination with pirates for centuries. Particular emphasis is placed on the interaction between pirates and New England. Students will read primary sources and accounts, secondary sources, and fictional presentations - both books and films - to better understand piracy, why it happened, and why it continues to fascinate.

    Prerequisites:

    03 Feb 2010 02:57pm Eric A Hatch

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    In 1794 Boston's citizens watched the largest ship built here up to that time come together at the water's edge. Students will explore the 203-year story of Constitution by learning how craftsmen built this massive ship without electric tools; by following her two hundred years of naval service to the nation; by examining life at sea for the 450 sailors and officers who lived on board for voyages lasting several months; and by surveying the ways Americans have adopted Constitution as a national symbol, using her image to adorn decorative as well as utilitarian objects. Meets at the USS CONSTITUTION Museum and the USS CONSTITUTION.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the opportunities and challenges of presenting and interpreting history through exhibits at public institutions. Examines the role of history curator as traditional keeper of the past and current presenter and communicator of history and the role of history museums/heritage centers as educational institutions for diverse, multiple audiences. Students will learn how to evaluate objects and other materials to create an historical narrative. Students will experience how to research, design, plan, fund, install, and promote exhibits of historical subjects.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Surveys the world of archives, differing types of manuscript collections, the ideas and values that inform archival practice, and the ways that archives shape our understanding of the past. Hands-on instruction will acquaint students with collection selection, appraisal, acquisition, arrangement and description, reference services and access, preservation and protection, outreach, advocacy, promotion, management, and professional ethical and legal responsibilities.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Working with historic houses in Boston, students will learn that art of interpreting history. Using collections, archives, and other repositories, students will research the houses and the people who lived in them. Many of these houses have existed from colonial times and had various uses. Formerly: HST 368 Introduction to Historical Interpretation.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores American history through material objects - from colonial silver teapots to 1960s lava lamps. Students will investigate an object's purpose, how it was made and who made it, and interpret the object's cultural meanings for American history. Topics covered will include the decorative arts, vernacular architecture, archaeology, industrial design, ethnicity and gender, visual culture, and landscapes. Lectures and discussions will be complemented with visits to museums, historic houses, and other sites. Students will learn how to research and write about material cultures, placing objects or spaces in their historical context.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Traces the roles, images and experiences of women in America from colonial times to 1865. Topics include the family, work, religion, education, health care, motherhood, sexuality, social and political activism legal status, labor activism and popular culture. With attention to ethnicity, race, class, age, region of residence, disability and sexual orientation, the course focuses primarily on the everyday lives of ordinary women.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the history of human rights from the Enlightenment to the present, including the historical origins of human rights and its evolution over time as well as topics such as slavery, imperialism, women's rights, and genocide.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Though the American colonies could claim victory in the Revolution, the war's end did not guarantee a unified national identity. People struggled to reconcile the promise of Revolution with the realities of daily life and politics in the new republic. This class explores the various voices competing to be heard on the national and international stage, from the political leaders who drafted founding documents," to the women who learned to ""stand and speak"" despite repeated demands for their silence. We will encounter stories of African-American men and women who called attention to the Revolution's unfulfilled commitment to freedom"

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    A look at the migration of people, along with their culture, to and from the Caribbean and Latin America. The first half of the course looks at how European, Asian and African diasporas settled in the region, assimilated and contributed to the ethnic and cultural base of Caribbean and Latin America countries in the colonial period. The second half offers insight into how and why people from the Caribbean and Latin America would later form diasporas of their own in countries like the United States in the twentieth century. Students taking this course will get a sense of the struggles, accomplishments and culture of Caribbean and Latin American peoples in the United States. Formerly HST 286.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the founding and settlement of North America; the social, economic, and political development of European colonies and their interactions with Native People; the social religious, and cultural world of early America; witchcraft, slavery, and warfare; the British-French struggle for control of the North American continent; and the background and causes of the American Revolution.

    Prerequisites:

    One History course

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Boston from its foundation in 1630 to its development as a 21st century metropolis. From the Massachusetts Bay Colony, to cradle of the American Revolution, to a Yankee merchant capital, Brahmin cultural center,and immigrant melting pot. When offered in the hybrid format, this course will meet at the regularly-scheduled time, but lectures and other course materials will be available on the course Blackboard site in case you cannot attend.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Topics will be selected from the following: the nature of slavery; the origins of slavery in America and the process of enslavement; the economics of slavery; the American Revolution and slavery; the slave trade; black and white women and the institution of slavery; rebellions of enslaved people; the pro-slavery argument; racial thought; masters and the culture of the South; the movement to abolish slavery; the literature of slavery; the Civil War and the end of slavery; Reconstruction; Segregation; the Civil Rights Movement; race and racism in contemporary America.

    Prerequisites:

    Sophomore Standing Required

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Investigates the development of American constitutional government, from the political crisis of the 1780s to the Civil War. The problems of individual liberty versus government power; state rights; race and slavery; war powers; pluralism.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    A seminar on slavery in the United States as depicted in history, literature, and film. Topics may include resistance to slavery, honor, the attack on slavery, the cultural and social worlds of masters and enslaved people, the thought of masters and enslaved people, women and slavery, and/or slavery as an economic institution.

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of Instructor Required

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the history of the United States from perspectives of some of America's racial and ethnic groups. Through readings, writings, and discussions students will examine the history of difference and diversity in the United States.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the global dispersion of African people outside of the African continent. The history and culture of African descendant people and their communities in the Americas, Europe, and Asia will be included.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines German and European preconditions; the VersaillesTreaty and the failure of the Weimar Republic; Hitler's ideas, collaborators and institutions; Nazi foreign and domestic policy; World War II and the concentration camps.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the social and political development of European society between the two world wars, primarily through the literature, art, and films of the period. Topics include: the dissolution of pre-1914 middle class society; deviance and sexuality in the 1920s; the role of decadence in art and the Fascist response to deviance in life and art; women, workers, and the new technology; the rise of Fascism; political engagement and polarization throughout European society in the face of economic and social crisis.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    A case-study approach to studying the various means by which people in the Caribbean sought to overcome the legacies of colonial exploitation of their land, labor and resources. The course also offers lessons from the case-studies for approaching/achieving positive social change. Students will learn about the people's struggles to improve their social lives, reduce poverty, access land, expand human rights, reduce illiteracy, and gain accountability from their governments through violent and non-violent means.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Discusses the emergence of early Chinese states, feudalism during Chinese antiquity, the emergence of Confucianism and other competing political ideologies, and the consolidation of the imperial power.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces students to the Reconstruction era in American history, and uses Reconstruction as a bridge to look at enslavement, which preceded the era, and the issue of freedom during, and after the era. In the first half of the class students read from texts that will provide them with an understanding of slavery, emancipation and reconstruction. The second half of the class will utilize on-line collections of the Freedman's Bureau Papers to allow students to use documents to deepen their understanding of the Reconstruction era. The class will also provide a comparative approach by considering questions of citizenship in the 19th century for people of African descent in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean. This course is identical to BLKST 469.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Investigates how Americans have understood and responded to health, illness, and death from the eighteenth century to the present. Examine interactions among patients, healers (orthodox and heterodox), the medical and scientific professions, business, and government. Explore the effects of scientific and technological advancements, industrialization, urbanization, immigration, war, and social movements on the nation's moral and political economies of health, and on evolving ideas about bodily integrity and autonomy, linked to historical relations of gender, race, class, and sexuality.

    Prerequisites:

    Sophomore status required. GPA 3.3 or higher OR instructor permission.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Investigates how Americans have understood and responded to health, illness, and death from the eighteenth century to the present. Examines interactions among patients, healers (orthodox and heterodox), the medical and scientific professions, business, and government. Explores the effects of scientific and technological advancements, industrialization, urbanization, immigration, war, and social movements on the nation's moral and political economies of health, and on evolving ideas about bodily integrity and autonomy, linked to historical relations of gender, race, class, and sexuality. This is an honors-level course.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores ideas about emotional life from the fields of history, anthropology, sociology, and psychology as well as the evolution of emotion rules and prescriptions, focusing on western Europe and the United States since 1700. In the eighteenth century, emotions were seen as a positive influence on politics and public life, especially during the French Revolution. After the fall of Robespierre, the emotions were banished to the private sphere - so we will read both primary sources and recent scholarship on 19th- and 20th- century ideas about masculinity and femininity, romantic love and marriage, childrearing, and about what parents and children are supposed feel toward each other, how ideas about these subjects have changed over time, and whether our feelings change with them.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores German history since 1945 through film, newsreels and other archival footage, war memorials and museums, novels, published diaries, memoirs, and recent historical scholarship. Topics include the representation, in film and other texts, of: post-war rebuilding; the German Economic Miracle; divided Berlin; 1960s and 70s radical politics; coming to terms since 1945," with Germany's Nazi past and the Holocaust; coming to terms since 1990 with the Stasi and East German past; ""Ostalgie"" (nostalgia in the 21st century for some aspects of East German socialism); the multi-cultural society that is Germany today"

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines the impact of organized reform movements on American history from the 1800s to the twenty first century. In each era presented, students will explore the various dynamics that impact reform.

    Prerequisites:

    An Independent Study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    By special arrangement, members of the History department will schedule seminars or individual discussion sessions with students interested in directed reading and research. Open to Juniors and Seniors with the permission of the instructor.

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor Consent Required

    Credits:

    1

    Description:

    Students will undertake independent research focused on a topic relevant to a History course (200-level or above) in which they are enrolled in the same semester. Students should consult the course instructor to design a clear, explicit plan for project completion.

    Prerequisites:

    Permission of instructor required.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Requires approximately 14-15 hours of work per week in a history-related position, at a museum, historical society, or archive. Designed to introduce the student to the professional opportunities and responsibilities in the fields of public history or historic preservation. Interested students should consult the Internship Director, Professor Kathryn Lasdow,in advance. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor is required.

    Prerequisites:

    HST 200 and Instructor Permission

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The Capstone Project is an opportunity for non-honors History majors to demonstrate the skills and knowledge they have gained throughout their studies in History, including their internships. Students will undertake independent research that yields a well-designed product. These may include a research paper of no less than 20 pages, digital products such as an online exhibit, an oral history project, a walking tour of historic sites, lesson plans for use in middle-school or high school classrooms, etc. Students should consult with the course faculty to design a clear, explicit plan for project completion. Prerequisite: completion of HST 200 Gateway to the Past: the Historian's Craft before starting the Capstone Project.

    Prerequisites:

    Restricted to History majors who are CAS Honors students or other History majors with a 3.5 overall grade point average, and a 3.7 grade point average in History courses, admitted by application to the department by the end of the junior year.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    An individual program of reading, research, and writing on an approved topic, under the supervision of a full-time History faculty member. The completed thesis will be at least 20-25 pages reflecting original research. The qualifying student must have a 3.5 overall grade point average, and a 3.7 grade point average in History classes, must be recommended by two History faculty members, and must submit a writing sample of at least 5 pages to the Department chair by the end of their junior year. Normally taken for one credit in the Fall and three credits in Spring of the senior year.