Mathematics

Mathematics Major

Learn more about this major

Degree Requirements - 126 credits

Students can earn a bachelor of arts degree with this major.  See the requirements for the bachelor of arts degree.

Students can earn a bachelor of science degree with this major.  See the requirements for the bachelor of science degree.

Major Requirements: 15-16 courses, 53-57 credits

Core Requirements (9 courses, 33 credits)

Prerequisites:

MATH-121 with a minimum grade of C, MATH-075, or MATH level 5

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Functions limits and continuity squeeze theorem limits at infinity; instantaneous rate of change tangent slopes and the definition of the derivative of a function; power product and quotient rules trig derivatives chain rule implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; derivatives of other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions exponential and log functions hyperbolic trig functions); applications of the derivative (implicit differentiation related rates optimization differentials curve sketching L'Hopital's rule); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

MATH-164 or MATH-165 with a minimum grade of C

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Riemann sums and definite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (areas); integration of exponential functions trig functions and inverse trig functions; techniques of integration (substitution by parts trig integrals trig substitution partial fractions); area volume and average value applications; differential equations (separable exponential growth linear); improper integrals; infinite sequences and series; convergence tests; power series; Taylor and Maclaurin series (computation convergence error estimates differentiation and integration of Taylor series). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

Take MATH-121, MATH-164, MATH-165, or MATH-166

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics covered include: Logic basic techniques of proof set theory relations and functions cardinality elementary number theory mathematical induction counting and discrete probability. Math/CS majors/minors should take this course in their freshman year.

Prerequisites:

MATH-166 with grade of C or better

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Parametric equations and polar coordinates (curves areas conic sections); vectors and the geometry of space (the dot product vector arithmetic lines and planes in 3-space the cross product cylinders and quadratic surfaces); vector functions (limits derivatives and integrals motion in space); partial derivatives (functions of several variables limits and continuity tangent planes and differentials chain rule directional derivatives gradient extrema Lagrange multipliers); multiple integrals (double integrals applications); vector calculus (vector fields line integrals fundamental theorem for line integrals Green's Theorem curl and divergence parametric surfaces surface integrals). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

Take MATH-185 with a grade of C or better

Credits:

4.00

Description:

this course is intended to provide a firm foundation for and a taste of the study of advanced mathematics. While the course content varies somewhat it is designed to give students a deeper understanding of the algebraic and analytical structure of the integers the rational numbers and the real numbers and how they act as a building block to a variety of fields of mathematics. Students are introduced to the process of mathematical discovery and the language of mathematics. Exercises and projects are designed to illustrate the need for proof and to further refine the student's ability to analyze conjecture and write mathematical proofs. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level mathematics courses and after completing it a student will be in a position to determine realistically if he or she ought to major or minor in mathematics.

Prerequisites:

Math-331 with a grade C or higher

Credits:

4.00

Description:

System of linear equations Gaussian elimination matrices and their algebra inverse of a matrix determinants cofactor expansion Cramer's rule vectors in and their algebra abstract vector spaces subspaces linear independence basis and dimension linear transformations isomorphism of vector spaces rank and nullity matrix of a linear transformation inner product spaces angle and orthogonality eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a linear transformation characteristic equation Cayley-Hamilton theorem diagonalization.

Prerequisites:

MATH-331 with at least a grade of C

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A detailed treatment of the basic concepts of analysis including the real numbers; completeness and its equivalence to other properties of the reals such as monotone convergence Archimedean property Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem; the topology of Euclidean spaces compactness and the Heine-Borel theorem connectedness continuity and uniform continuity and uniform continuity pointwise and uniform convergence of functions and an introduction to metric spaces.

Prerequisites:

Junior or Senior standing

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This team-taught course is designed to explore career opportunities in Mathematics in depth. This course focuses on career search the application process entry transition and networking for career success. Alternative options such as graduate school will also be explored. Students articulate and reflect on academic work and co-curricular experiences from the perspective of professionals entering or advancing their careers. The goal of this course is to help students reach their fullest professional potential following graduation.

Prerequisites:

MATH placement 3 or higher, MATH-121, MATH-164, or MATH-165 (previous or concurrent)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This is a rigorous introduction to computer science in Python with an emphasis on problem solving structured programming object-oriented programming and graphical user interfaces. Topics include expressions input/output control structures intrinsic data types classes and methods iteration top-down programming arrays graphical user interfaces and elements of UML. Normally offered each semester.

Concentration Requirement (6-7 courses, 20-24 credits)

Choose one of the following areas of concentration:

  1. Actuarial Science (7 courses, 24 credits)
  2. Pure Mathematics (6 courses, 20 credits)

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Concentrations

Actuarial Science Concentration: 7 courses, 24 credits

Concentration Requirements (6 courses, 21 credits)

Prerequisites:

Non CAS majors need to have completed at least 15 credits.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to foundational principles of microeconomic theory with an emphasis on applications of concepts to management decision-making in specific industry and market settings. It describes and analyzes the interaction of supply and demand and the behavior of the prices of goods services. It explains the determinations of costs output strategic pricing and governance by firms under conditions of perfect and imperfect competition in a global economy. In addition it describes the supply demand for factors of production and the impact of taxes and government regulation and intervention on firms and consumers.

Prerequisites:

Non-CAS majors need to have completed at least 15 credits

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines the workings of the national and the global economy. It will describe the determination of Gross Domestic Product the problems of unemployment inflation and the determination of economic growth. It will also describe and analyze the determination of the country's exchange rate the balance of payments and international borrowing and lending. A particular focus will be on understanding economic fluctuations (booms busts and recessions) in the domestic economy and its effects on other economies. It will analyze the role of the government and the effects of government spending and taxation on the economy. Furthermore it will describe and analyze the determination of the quantity of money and interest rates in the economy and the role of the country's central bank. It examines the basis and pattern of international trade and the effects of a country's trade policy on the economy.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-201, MATH-128 or higher, and STATS-240 or STATS-250. (STATS can be taken concurrently with FIN-200); Sophomore standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focuses on basic financial principles such as time value of money risk and return tradeoffs and asset valuation. Formally FIN 310.

Prerequisites:

MATH-165 or MATH-164 with a grade of C or better

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics include: random variable and distribution; expectation and variance; special discrete/continuous distributions (uniform binomial negative binomial geometric hypergeometric Poisson normal and exponential distributions); joint distribution marginal distribution and conditional distribution; covariance; limit theorems (law of large numbers and central limit theorem); and (when time permits) introduction to confidence interval and hypothesis testing; regression analysis. Offered in each fall.

Prerequisites:

MATH-166, MATH-164 or MATH-165 with a minimum grade of C

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is mainly designed for students who are interested in financial mathematics and/or actuarial sciences especially if they plan to take the second actuarial exam and/or if they plan to study more in financial mathematics. The materials covered include time value of money annuities loans bonds cash flows and interest rate sensitivity. If time permits materials from derivatives markets will be introduced such as general derivatives options hedging and investment strategies forwards and futures and swaps. Offered in each spring.

Prerequisites:

MATH-255 with a minimum C grade

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Calculus based introduction to statistical analysis. Topics include sampling distribution point estimation interval estimation hypothesis testing regression and correlation analysis.

Concentration Elective (1 course, 3 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Prerequisites:

FIN-200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Intermediate Finance expands on basic financial concepts and introduces more advanced topics. Material emphasizes solutions to problems of capital structure investment and financing. Other major topics include distribution policy working capital management derivative corporate securities and corporate restructuring.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course includes the theory practice and problems of risk bearing in business and personal pursuits including life property and casualty insurance and dealing with contract analysis and investments as well as corporate risk management.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the investment of funds by individuals and institutions. Focuses on analysis of investments and security markets and the mechanics of trading and investing. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed including stocks bonds futures and options.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth analysis of derivatives: futures options and swaps. The course explains why these securities exist where and how they are traded how to employ them in managing risk and how to accurately price them. It also covers the use of these derivatives in the context hedging or speculation.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an advanced course in investment analysis stressing efficient frontier and diversification. Also studies portfolio construction and management and the tradeoff of risk versus return.

Courses required in the major follow recommendations of the Society of Actuaries (SOA). Some Economics and Finance courses contribute to the Validation by Educational Experience (VEE) recommendations of the SOA. 

Note: Although not required, it is strongly recommended that Mathematics majors also take CMPSC-F132 Computer Science II and an internship in Mathematics. 

Pure Mathematics Concentration: 6 courses, 20 credits

Concentration Requirements (3 courses, 8 credits)

Prerequisites:

MATH-431

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to elementary group theory including properties of groups subgroups first isomorphism theorem for groups normal subgroups finite group classification; elementary properties of rings such as homomorphisms of rings ideals fields Euclidean algorithm rings of polynomials factorization theory integral domains associates primes and units in domains and other topics in number theory. Prerequisite: MATH 431 with a grade of C or higher.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121 or MATH-134 with a grade of C or better. MATH-165 can replace these prerequisites if taken concurrently with PHYS-151.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

PHYS 151 is the first of three courses (PHYS 151 152 153) that comprise the calculus-based introductory physics sequence intended for students majoring in the physical sciences engineering and mathematics. This course covers basic techniques in physics that fall under the topic of classical mechanics and their application in understanding the natural world. Specific topics include the study of vectors Newton's laws rotations kinetic and potential energy momentum and collisions rigid body statics and dynamics fluid mechanics gravitation simple harmonic motion mechanical waves sound and hearing. The student will learn how to analyze physical situations by using simple models and also how to solve those models and derive useful conclusions from them. This course will show students how experimental results and mathematical representations are combined to create testable scientific theories.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121, MATH-165, MATH-166 or MATH-134(with a minimum grade of C). PHYS-151 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This laboratory course consists of experiments and exercises to illustrate the basic concepts studied in PHYS 151: measurements propagation of errors vectors Newton's laws work and energy momentum rotations oscillations simple harmonic motion fluid. Knowledge of algebra trigonometry differentiation and integration required.

Concentration Electives (3 courses, 12 credits)

Choose two additional 4-credit Math courses at the 200-level or higher

Choose one additional 4-credit Math course at the 300-level or higher

Note: Although not required, it is strongly recommended that Mathematics majors also take CMPSC-F132 Computer Science II and an internship in Mathematics.

Mathematics-Actuarial Science Learning Goals and Objectives

Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.

Learning Goals Learning Objectives
Students will...
Students will be able to...
Strengthen their problem-solving skills and further develop their mathematical maturity
  • Make use of reasoning along with suitable theorems, ideas, or methods of proof to solve problems and prove mathematical facts
  • Correctly implement suitable algorithms and perform multi-step computations
  • Interpret and evaluate the practical merits of computed answers
  • Understand, evaluate, and interpret quantitative information given in a variety of formats
  • Make estimates and apply data given in graphical, tabular, or algebraic formats, and translate data between various formats
  • Sketch graphs of given formulaic relationships with input from calculus, and identify and interpret graphical representations
  • Understand the need for proof and what comprises mathematical proof
  • Correctly apply techniques of logic and abstract reasoning in formulating and proving statements
  • Read, write and understand proofs, and evaluate the correctness of a given proof
  • Use various proof techniques successfully
  • Have a working knowledge of foundational technical material
  • Understand and express the statements of key theorems, and identify the main ideas in the proofs of certain of these theorems
  • Analyze various mathematical situations and codify them in suitable mathematical language
  • Understand and express conceptual motivations for computations
  • Know how to frame appropriate real-world problems in mathematical language
  • Use data in various forms to set up an abstract mathematical version of a problem
  • Translate between information in practical real-world scenarios and the mathematical context, and back
  • Recognize real-world manifestations of concepts from calculus and other mathematical disciplines, and problems to which these subjects can be applied
  • Skillfully communicate (both orally and in writing) mathematical ideas and applications
  • Explain mathematical processes and computations to others (both mathematicians and a general audience), orally or in writing
  • Collaborate with others in the formulation, solution, and presentation of a [calculus, etc.] problem
  • Use professional and domain-specific terminology correctly
  • Demonstrate competency in probability and financial mathematics
  • Show solid understanding and apply common distributions (binomial, Poisson, Normal, exponential)
  • Work with joint distributions, and identify linear relations between two random variables
  • Demonstrate solid understanding of central limit theorem and apply it
  • Show solid understanding and apply the theory of interest

  • Mathematics-Pure Math Learning Goals & Objectives

    Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.

    Learning Goals Learning Objectives
    Students will...
    Students will be able to...
    Strengthen their problem-solving skills and further develop their mathematical maturity
  • Make use of reasoning along with suitable theorems, ideas, or methods of proof to solve problems and prove mathematical facts
  • Correctly implement suitable algorithms and perform multi-step computations
    Interpret and evaluate the practical merits of computed answers
  • Understand, evaluate, and interpret quantitative information given in a variety of formats
  • Make estimates and apply data given in graphical, tabular, or algebraic formats, and translate data between various formats
  • Sketch graphs of given formulaic relationships with input from calculus, and identify and interpret graphical representations
  • Understand the need for proof and what comprises mathematical proof
  • Correctly apply techniques of logic and abstract reasoning in formulating and proving statements
  • Read, write and understand proofs, and evaluate the correctness of a given proof
  • Use various proof techniques successfully
  • Have a working knowledge of foundational technical material
  • Understand and express the statements of key theorems, and identify the main ideas in the proofs of certain of these theorems
  • Analyze various mathematical situations and codify them in suitable mathematical language
  • Understand and express conceptual motivations for computations
  • Know how to frame appropriate real-world problems in mathematical language
  • Use data in various forms to set up an abstract mathematical version of a problem
  • Translate between information in practical real-world scenarios and the mathematical context, and back
  • Recognize real-world manifestations of concepts from calculus and other mathematical disciplines, and problems to which these subjects can be applied
  • Skillfully communicate (both orally and in writing) mathematical ideas and applications
  • Explain mathematical processes and computations to others (both mathematicians and a general audience) orally or in writing
  • Collaborate with others in the formulation, solution, and presentation of a [calculus, etc.] problem
  • Use professional and domain-specific terminology correctly
  • Actuarial Mathematics Minor

    Learn more about this minor

    Minor Requirements: 7 courses, 26 credits

    Prerequisites:

    Non CAS majors need to have completed at least 15 credits.

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course introduces students to foundational principles of microeconomic theory with an emphasis on applications of concepts to management decision-making in specific industry and market settings. It describes and analyzes the interaction of supply and demand and the behavior of the prices of goods services. It explains the determinations of costs output strategic pricing and governance by firms under conditions of perfect and imperfect competition in a global economy. In addition it describes the supply demand for factors of production and the impact of taxes and government regulation and intervention on firms and consumers.

    Prerequisites:

    Non-CAS majors need to have completed at least 15 credits

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    This course examines the workings of the national and the global economy. It will describe the determination of Gross Domestic Product the problems of unemployment inflation and the determination of economic growth. It will also describe and analyze the determination of the country's exchange rate the balance of payments and international borrowing and lending. A particular focus will be on understanding economic fluctuations (booms busts and recessions) in the domestic economy and its effects on other economies. It will analyze the role of the government and the effects of government spending and taxation on the economy. Furthermore it will describe and analyze the determination of the quantity of money and interest rates in the economy and the role of the country's central bank. It examines the basis and pattern of international trade and the effects of a country's trade policy on the economy.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-121 with a minimum grade of C, MATH-075, or MATH level 5

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Functions limits and continuity squeeze theorem limits at infinity; instantaneous rate of change tangent slopes and the definition of the derivative of a function; power product and quotient rules trig derivatives chain rule implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; derivatives of other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions exponential and log functions hyperbolic trig functions); applications of the derivative (implicit differentiation related rates optimization differentials curve sketching L'Hopital's rule); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-164 or MATH-165 with a minimum grade of C

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Riemann sums and definite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (areas); integration of exponential functions trig functions and inverse trig functions; techniques of integration (substitution by parts trig integrals trig substitution partial fractions); area volume and average value applications; differential equations (separable exponential growth linear); improper integrals; infinite sequences and series; convergence tests; power series; Taylor and Maclaurin series (computation convergence error estimates differentiation and integration of Taylor series). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-165 or MATH-164 with a grade of C or better

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Topics include: random variable and distribution; expectation and variance; special discrete/continuous distributions (uniform binomial negative binomial geometric hypergeometric Poisson normal and exponential distributions); joint distribution marginal distribution and conditional distribution; covariance; limit theorems (law of large numbers and central limit theorem); and (when time permits) introduction to confidence interval and hypothesis testing; regression analysis. Offered in each fall.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-166, MATH-164 or MATH-165 with a minimum grade of C

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is mainly designed for students who are interested in financial mathematics and/or actuarial sciences especially if they plan to take the second actuarial exam and/or if they plan to study more in financial mathematics. The materials covered include time value of money annuities loans bonds cash flows and interest rate sensitivity. If time permits materials from derivatives markets will be introduced such as general derivatives options hedging and investment strategies forwards and futures and swaps. Offered in each spring.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-255 with a minimum C grade

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Calculus based introduction to statistical analysis. Topics include sampling distribution point estimation interval estimation hypothesis testing regression and correlation analysis.

    Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

    Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major or double major combination to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

    Pure Mathematics Minor

    Learn more about this minor

    Minor Requirements: 6 courses, 24 credits

    Core Requirements (5 courses, 20 credits)

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-121 with a minimum grade of C, MATH-075, or MATH level 5

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Functions limits and continuity squeeze theorem limits at infinity; instantaneous rate of change tangent slopes and the definition of the derivative of a function; power product and quotient rules trig derivatives chain rule implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; derivatives of other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions exponential and log functions hyperbolic trig functions); applications of the derivative (implicit differentiation related rates optimization differentials curve sketching L'Hopital's rule); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-164 or MATH-165 with a minimum grade of C

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Riemann sums and definite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (areas); integration of exponential functions trig functions and inverse trig functions; techniques of integration (substitution by parts trig integrals trig substitution partial fractions); area volume and average value applications; differential equations (separable exponential growth linear); improper integrals; infinite sequences and series; convergence tests; power series; Taylor and Maclaurin series (computation convergence error estimates differentiation and integration of Taylor series). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    Prerequisites:

    Take MATH-121, MATH-164, MATH-165, or MATH-166

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Topics covered include: Logic basic techniques of proof set theory relations and functions cardinality elementary number theory mathematical induction counting and discrete probability. Math/CS majors/minors should take this course in their freshman year.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-166 with grade of C or better

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Parametric equations and polar coordinates (curves areas conic sections); vectors and the geometry of space (the dot product vector arithmetic lines and planes in 3-space the cross product cylinders and quadratic surfaces); vector functions (limits derivatives and integrals motion in space); partial derivatives (functions of several variables limits and continuity tangent planes and differentials chain rule directional derivatives gradient extrema Lagrange multipliers); multiple integrals (double integrals applications); vector calculus (vector fields line integrals fundamental theorem for line integrals Green's Theorem curl and divergence parametric surfaces surface integrals). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    Prerequisites:

    Take MATH-185 with a grade of C or better

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    this course is intended to provide a firm foundation for and a taste of the study of advanced mathematics. While the course content varies somewhat it is designed to give students a deeper understanding of the algebraic and analytical structure of the integers the rational numbers and the real numbers and how they act as a building block to a variety of fields of mathematics. Students are introduced to the process of mathematical discovery and the language of mathematics. Exercises and projects are designed to illustrate the need for proof and to further refine the student's ability to analyze conjecture and write mathematical proofs. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level mathematics courses and after completing it a student will be in a position to determine realistically if he or she ought to major or minor in mathematics.

    Elective (1 course, 4 credits)

    Choose one additional 4-credit Mathematics course at the 200-, 300-, or 400-level.

    Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

    Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major or double major combination to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

    Honors

    To complete requirements for honors in the major, a candidate must:

    1. Graduate with a major GPA of 3.5 or higher
    2. Graduate with an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher
    3. Complete one of the two following options:
      1. Mathematics courses
        1. Complete MATH-H555 with a grade of A- or higher
      2. Actuarial Exam
        1. A student must pass at least one of the Actuarial Exams given by the Society of Actuaries
    4. CAS Honors Program students only: Present work from the senior honors experience at the Honors Symposium or Pecha Kucha event

    To become a candidate for honors in the major, a student must:

    1. Apply to the supervising faculty member by meeting and agreeing upon the topic of study and the scope of the project

    CAS Honors Program students only: CAS Honors Program students are assumed to be candidates for departmental honors and should consult with a major advisor(s) during junior year about registering for major honors requirements as described above

    All other students: Apply to their advisor and consult with their advisor to schedule classes as described above

    Mathematics Courses

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    A NON-CREDIT full semester workshop designed for students who need substantial review before starting MATH 104 MATH 121 or MATH 128. Similar to a course MATHSHOP meets three hours per week throughout the semester. Topics covered are tailored to the needs of students and include basic math material basic algebra use of calculators ways of dealing with math fears and study methods. Several sections normally offered each semester.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH level 2 or MATH-000

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A selection of topics in algebra and elementary analytic geometry including (but not restricted to): properties of real numbers linear equations and inequalities absolute value equations and inequalities polynomials rational expressions exponents and radicals quadratic equations functions linear quadratic and polynomial models rational exponential and logarithmic functions. Applications and graphs are stressed throughout the course. Students may not use this course alone to satisfy the C.A.S. math requirement. Qualifying math placement exam score required. Students who are not prepared for this course should take MATHSHOP. Several sections offered each semester. *This course cannot be applied toward a departmental concentration in Mathematics by Sawyer Business School students. This course cannot be taken for credit by a student who already has credit for a more advanced course.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-104 with a minimum grade of B or MATH level 4

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A review of topics in algebra trigonometry and analytic geometry including (but not restricted to): graphs and transformations of functions; properties of polynomial rational radical exponential and logarithmic functions; solving quadratic exponential and logarithmic equations; conic sections; the unit circle and right angle trigonometry; graphs of trigonometric functions; inverse trigonometric functions; analytic trigonometry; trigonometric identities and trigonometric equations. Intended for students needing one additional semester of preparation before taking MATH 165. Students may not use this course alone to satisfy the CAS math requirement. Prerequisites: MATH 104 with B or higher or qualifying placement exam score indicating solid grounding in intermediate algebra. 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session per week. Normally offered every semester. *This course cannot be applied toward a departmental concentration in Mathematics by Sawyer Business School students. This course does not satisfy the core math requirement for CAS or SBS. This course cannot be taken for credit by a student who already has credit for a more advanced course.

    Prerequisites:

    Take MATH-121 (with grade of D or above) or MATH-134. Must take MATH-165 concurrently.

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This course is intended to supplement the precalculus knowledge required to successfully complete MATH-165. It includes a thorough review of trigonometry and should be taken by students who are concurrently enrolled in MATH-165 but who otherwise do not meet the prerequisites for MATH-165.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH level 2, or MATH-000, or MATH-104

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    From the ISBN on a book to buying a car from the size of small chips in a cell phone to the size of the national debt or just reading a graph in the daily newspaper mathematics plays an important and vital role in countless areas of life and your future career and courses included. Mathematics is both an art and a tool created by humans. The common bond is a way of thinking and a way of reasoning to describe and solve problems of many types. This course uses the context of modern real life problems to introduce math needed for literacy and problem solving in contemporary life and work. It uses a minimal amount of algebra and focuses on math models concepts and basic math manipulations. It encourages students to move from anxiety about math to using formulas well to thinking critically in the math context to use math to solve problems and pose new problems. Topics include scientific notation basic financial math linear exponential and polynomial models and an introduction to probability. (Formerly Math 132)

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-104, or MATH-121, or MATH level 3

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Linear Modeling (for example using linear functions to model supply/demand situations) graphing linear programming financial functions (compound interest annuities and amortization of loans) sets Venn diagrams counting and combinatorics discrete probability conditional probability Bernoulli experiments Bayes theorem. Several sections offered each semester. *This course cannot be applied toward a departmental concentration in Mathematics by Sawyer Business School students.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-104, MATH-121 or MATH level 4

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A one-semester introduction to differential and integral calculus. Theory is presented informally and topics and techniques are limited to polynomials rational functions logarithmic and exponential functions. Topics include a review of precalculus limits and continuity derivatives differentiation rules applications of derivatives to graphing minima/maxima applications of the derivative marginal analysis differential equations of growth and decay anti-derivatives the definite integral the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and area measurements. This course cannot be used to satisfy core or complementary requirements by students majoring in chemistry computer science engineering mathematics or physics. Several sections offered each semester.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-121 with a minimum grade of C, MATH-075, or MATH level 5

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Functions limits and continuity squeeze theorem limits at infinity; instantaneous rate of change tangent slopes and the definition of the derivative of a function; power product and quotient rules trig derivatives chain rule implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; derivatives of other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions exponential and log functions hyperbolic trig functions); applications of the derivative (implicit differentiation related rates optimization differentials curve sketching L'Hopital's rule); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-164 or MATH-165 with a minimum grade of C

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Riemann sums and definite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (areas); integration of exponential functions trig functions and inverse trig functions; techniques of integration (substitution by parts trig integrals trig substitution partial fractions); area volume and average value applications; differential equations (separable exponential growth linear); improper integrals; infinite sequences and series; convergence tests; power series; Taylor and Maclaurin series (computation convergence error estimates differentiation and integration of Taylor series). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    Prerequisites:

    Take MATH-121, MATH-164, MATH-165, or MATH-166

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Topics covered include: Logic basic techniques of proof set theory relations and functions cardinality elementary number theory mathematical induction counting and discrete probability. Math/CS majors/minors should take this course in their freshman year.

    Prerequisites:

    Freshman or Sophomore Status

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This one credit course aims to help freshmen and sophomore students form an idea of the scope of the vast and rapidly growing field of mathematics and the many career options and begin to map out steps toward a potential career path. Mathematics is a diverse discipline that is constantly evolving. It ranges from applied mathematics (tailored to specific real world problems) to mathematical physics (which crafts the mathematical basis for the understanding of physical phenomena) to pure mathematics (which is studied for its intrinsic interest). As the study of such varied concepts as quantity structure space and change mathematics has something for everyone; and valuable applications to many other fields from business and finance to meteorology chemistry ecology and biology among many others. This module aims to move beyond the foundational math generally taught in freshmen and sophomore year by presenting several areas of recent development and application. In this team-taught seminar-style course two or three different professors will introduce students to their research areas and related topics. Some of the areas represented among the faculty include fractal geometry number theory algebraic geometry and probability. Students will also be introduced to resources provided by national mathematical communities on mathematical career paths and backgrounds needed.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-165 or MATH-164 with a grade of C or better

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Topics include: random variable and distribution; expectation and variance; special discrete/continuous distributions (uniform binomial negative binomial geometric hypergeometric Poisson normal and exponential distributions); joint distribution marginal distribution and conditional distribution; covariance; limit theorems (law of large numbers and central limit theorem); and (when time permits) introduction to confidence interval and hypothesis testing; regression analysis. Offered in each fall.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-166 with grade of C or better

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Parametric equations and polar coordinates (curves areas conic sections); vectors and the geometry of space (the dot product vector arithmetic lines and planes in 3-space the cross product cylinders and quadratic surfaces); vector functions (limits derivatives and integrals motion in space); partial derivatives (functions of several variables limits and continuity tangent planes and differentials chain rule directional derivatives gradient extrema Lagrange multipliers); multiple integrals (double integrals applications); vector calculus (vector fields line integrals fundamental theorem for line integrals Green's Theorem curl and divergence parametric surfaces surface integrals). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

    Prerequisites:

    Take MATH-166

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Geometry and algebra of vectors in Euclidean spaces systems of linear equations Gaussian elimination Vector spaces spanning sets linear independence subspaces basis and dimension; matrices algebra of matrices the LU factorization linear transformations invertible matrices determinants eigenvectors and eigenvalues orthogonality the Gram-Schmidt process. Though basic theory of Linear Algebra will be covered an emphasis will be given to techniques and applications of Linear Algebra to a set of areas such as Allocation of Resources Linear Programming Problems Markov Chains Linear Economic Models Population Growth Least Squares Data Fitting and Machine Learning.

    Prerequisites:

    Take MATH-185 with a grade of C or better

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Topics covered include: Algorithms growth of functions (big O notation) computational complexity of algorithms divide-and-conquer algorithms graphs and their properties (isomorphisms of graphs Euler and Hamilton paths shortest path problem graph coloring) trees (tree traversal minimum spanning trees). As time allows: matrices and linear transformations.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-166, MATH-164 or MATH-165 with a minimum grade of C

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course is mainly designed for students who are interested in financial mathematics and/or actuarial sciences especially if they plan to take the second actuarial exam and/or if they plan to study more in financial mathematics. The materials covered include time value of money annuities loans bonds cash flows and interest rate sensitivity. If time permits materials from derivatives markets will be introduced such as general derivatives options hedging and investment strategies forwards and futures and swaps. Offered in each spring.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-165 with a grade of C or above.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    This course covers a special topic in mathematics or applied mathematics at the upper intermediate level.

    Prerequisites:

    Take MATH-185 with a grade of C or better

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    this course is intended to provide a firm foundation for and a taste of the study of advanced mathematics. While the course content varies somewhat it is designed to give students a deeper understanding of the algebraic and analytical structure of the integers the rational numbers and the real numbers and how they act as a building block to a variety of fields of mathematics. Students are introduced to the process of mathematical discovery and the language of mathematics. Exercises and projects are designed to illustrate the need for proof and to further refine the student's ability to analyze conjecture and write mathematical proofs. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level mathematics courses and after completing it a student will be in a position to determine realistically if he or she ought to major or minor in mathematics.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-255 with a minimum C grade

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Calculus based introduction to statistical analysis. Topics include sampling distribution point estimation interval estimation hypothesis testing regression and correlation analysis.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-265 (may be taken concurrently)

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A first course in differential equations. Topics generally include separable homogeneous exact and linear first order differential equations; variations of parameters differential operators the Laplace transform inverse transforms systems of differential equations power series solutions Fourier series and applications.

    Prerequisites:

    Math-331 with a grade C or higher

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    System of linear equations Gaussian elimination matrices and their algebra inverse of a matrix determinants cofactor expansion Cramer's rule vectors in and their algebra abstract vector spaces subspaces linear independence basis and dimension linear transformations isomorphism of vector spaces rank and nullity matrix of a linear transformation inner product spaces angle and orthogonality eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a linear transformation characteristic equation Cayley-Hamilton theorem diagonalization.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-431

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An introduction to elementary group theory including properties of groups subgroups first isomorphism theorem for groups normal subgroups finite group classification; elementary properties of rings such as homomorphisms of rings ideals fields Euclidean algorithm rings of polynomials factorization theory integral domains associates primes and units in domains and other topics in number theory. Prerequisite: MATH 431 with a grade of C or higher.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-331 with at least a grade of C

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    A detailed treatment of the basic concepts of analysis including the real numbers; completeness and its equivalence to other properties of the reals such as monotone convergence Archimedean property Bolzano-Weierstrass theorem; the topology of Euclidean spaces compactness and the Heine-Borel theorem connectedness continuity and uniform continuity and uniform continuity pointwise and uniform convergence of functions and an introduction to metric spaces.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-331

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Construction and properties of complex numbers calculus in the complex plane analytic functions contour integrals and the basics of Cauchy theory power series representations. Prerequisite: MATH 331 or instructor's consent.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Members of the department will hold conference hours with students and will direct their readings and study of topics in mathematics which may be of interest to them. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 term - credits to be arranged.

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor consent required.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Members of the department will hold conference hours with students and will direct their readings and study of topics in mathematics which may be of interest to them. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1 term - credits to be arranged.

    Prerequisites:

    Junior or Senior standing

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    This team-taught course is designed to explore career opportunities in Mathematics in depth. This course focuses on career search the application process entry transition and networking for career success. Alternative options such as graduate school will also be explored. Students articulate and reflect on academic work and co-curricular experiences from the perspective of professionals entering or advancing their careers. The goal of this course is to help students reach their fullest professional potential following graduation.

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor consent required

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Students study a particular topic in advanced mathematics.

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor consent required.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Students study an advanced mathematics topic in depth. Work typically results in a project of significant depth and breadth.

    Math Statistics Courses

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-128 or higher

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduction to statistics and application to statistical analysis by using real-world data. Topics include: data presentation measures of central locations and dispersion probability discrete and continuous probability distributions sampling and sampling distribution estimation hypothesis testing with applications simple and multiple regression models. The use of Excel and SPSS will be emphasized throughout the lab class. Normally offered each semester this course meets 4 hours each week. STATS 240 satisfies the same requirements as STATS 250

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-128 or higher, GPA of 3.3 or higher, honors students only

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    The course is designed based on the STATS 240 curriculum to deepen course materials and cover broader statistics topics and applications to real-world statistical analysis. The honors course also adds a heavier weight on software labs for students to earn hands-on experiences with data analysis. (STATS-H240 satisfies the same requirements as STATS-240 & STATS-250) Topics include: data presentation measures of central locations and dispersion probability discrete and continuous probability distributions sampling and sampling distribution estimation hypothesis testing with applications simple and multiple regression models with statistical inference. The use of Excel and SPSS will be emphasized via software lab projects throughout the course.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-128 or higher

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Application of statistical analysis to real-world business and economic problems. Topics include data presentation descriptive statistics including measures of location and dispersion introduction to probability discrete and continuous random variables probability distributions including binomial and normal distributions sampling and sampling distributions statistical inference including estimation and hypothesis testing simple and multiple regression analysis. The use of computers is emphasized throughout the course. Normally offered each semester.

    Prerequisites:

    MATH-128, MATH-130, MATH-134, MATH-164 or MATH-165 and Honors Course; GPA of 3.3 or higher

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Application of statistical analysis to real-world business and economic problems. Topics include data presentation descriptive statistics including measures of location and dispersion introduction to probability discrete and continuous random variables probability distributions including binomial and normal distributions sampling and sampling distributions statistical inference including estimation and hypothesis testing simple and multiple regression analyses. The use of computers is emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisite: MATH 130 MATH 134 MATH 146 or MATH 165 Honors Course GPA of 3.2 or higher required. 1 term - 4 credits Normally offered every year.