Psychology

Psychology Major

Learn more about this major

Major Requirements: 11 courses, 41 credits

Core Requirements (3 courses, 12 credits)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys core theoretical concepts and contemporary empirical research from the major sub-fields of psychology: physiology; perception; cognition; learning; emotion; motivation; development; personality; psychopathology; psychotherapy; and social behavior. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114; Restricted to majors only unless with permission of instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the use of statistics as tools for description and decision-making, including hypothesis testing. Prepares students for the analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of psychological research. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114 and PSYCH 215

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Provides an overview of the historical background of psychology as a science before introducing students to research methods employed in psychology including naturalistic observation, qualitative, correlational, quasi-experimental, and experimental designs. Offered every semester

Area Requirements (3 courses, 12 credits)

A) Choose one course from Group A:

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys the major theoretical approaches to personality including representative theorists from the psychoanalytic, trait, cognitive, behavioral, and humanistic perspectives. Topics include personality dynamics, personality development, and the study of individual differences. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Studies the social determinants of the behavior of individuals in relation to groups and surveys current research findings in such major content areas as attribution, prejudice, conformity, obedience, social cognition, interpersonal attraction, altruism, and aggression. Normally offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114 and Sophomore Standing.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines historical, political and social conceptions of self and identity. Explores processes by which self-knowledge, self-awareness, self-conception, self-esteem, self-consciousness, and self-blame are developed, maintained, and transformed at individual, community and global levels. Considers how contemporary views of self and identity affect the theory and practice of psychology.

B) Choose one course from Group B:

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114, PSYCH 215, PSYCH 216 and sophomore standing.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines theory and research on a number of human cognitive processes, including topics of attention, perception, learning, memory, language processing, problem solving, social cognition, emotion, and reasoning. The field of cognition integrates knowledge from the multiple disciplines of neuropsychology, neuroscience, linguistics, and information science. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114, PSYCH 215 and PSYCH 216.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the organic basis for human and animal behavior. Topics include nervous system structure and function as well as neurological contributions to motivation, emotion, stress, and abnormal functioning. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114 and Sophomore Standing

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines how biological, psychological and social factors interact with and affect physical health and well-being. Topics include: the role of stress, coping, and behavioral patterns in acute and chronic illness, the psychosocial adjustment of patients with serious health problems, psychological factors impacting treatment adherence, and social determinants of health, and disparities in healthcare.

C) Choose one course from Group C:

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development in youth (i.e., from conception through adolescence). Surveys major developmental approaches including biological, learning, and contextual/environmental theories. Major focus is on normal development. Normally offered every semester.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development across the lifespan, with attention to the role of culture and context. Explores how various major theories of development can be used to adaptive and maladaptive behaviors and trajectories and considers. Implications for treatment, prevention, and positive development across the lifespan. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114 and Sophomore Standing.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the physical, social, and psychological aspects of adult development, with attention to the role of culture and context. Explores age-related changes in mental health, personality, self-image, sexual relations, friendships, work-life, and spirituality. Examines the topics of bereavement, hospice/nursing home care, and death and dying.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH-114 and sophomore standing

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the physical, cognitive, emotional and social aspects of adolescence. Attention is given to identity, parent-adolescent relationships, values, sexuality, and career development as well as psychopathology, drug use and abuse, delinquency, and alienation. Normally offered yearly.

Electives (2 courses, 6 credits)

Choose two of the following:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines contemporary ways of conceptualizing, assessing, and treating psychological consequences resulting from exposure to traumatic stress. Topics include the psychological consequences of war, natural disaster, and interpersonal trauma (e.g., physical and sexual abuse), Combines community service with classroom study and reflection.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the field of human sexuality across the life span. Topics include: sexual anatomy and physiology, sexual development, typical and atypical sexual behavior, sexual dysfunctions, current research on human sexuality, and relationship issues as they relate to sexuality and intimacy.

Prerequisites:

Take PSYCH-114;

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the application of psychological theories and principles to organizations and the workplace with attention to the role of culture and context. Topics includes job analysis, recruitment, selection, evaluation, training, retention, and termination. Employee morale, well-being, stress, and hardiness are considered.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines theoretical and empirical approaches that provide insight into Asian viewpoints on socialization practices, family systems, health/well-being, cultural traditions/values, and spiritual philosophy/literature. Explores the diversity among Asian cultures in terms of language, history, religion/spiritual faith, and healthcare practices, all of which play a significant role in shaping the psychological characteristics, interpersonal relationships, and work dynamics of Asians and Asian immigrants.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the theories, concepts, and intervention techniques of sport psychology. Topics include an exploration of the personal and contextual facts that influence performance and the use of psychologically informed strategies used to enhance athletic performance,

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114 and Sophomore standing

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the complex interplay of physiological, sociocultural, and psychological influences on the development, maintenance, and treatment of addiction. Topics include an introduction to substances that are commonly abused and compulsive and addictive behaviors, an overview of major theories on the genetic, neurobiological, sociocultural, and psychological determinants of addiction, and a review of evidence-based approaches to prevention and treatment.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114 and Sophomore standing

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the processes and behaviors that support and detract from the establishment and maintenance of an effective professional helping relationship. Explores cultural factors that influence relationship building and provides supervised practice of helping skills that promote behavior change and effective problem-solving.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114, and Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the concepts of psychological disorder highlighting the complexities and consequences inherent in labeling human behaviors and experiences as "abnormal." Examines the prevalence and core features of the most common psychological disorders and explores psychological, biological, and sociocultural perspectives on their etiology and treatment.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114 and sophomore standing

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Provides an overview of behavioral and emotional disorders of childhood and adolescence. Examines the prevalence, symptom presentation, etiology and methods of treating disorders from a variety of psychological, developmental, and sociocultural perspectives.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114. 54 credits or more only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the interface between psychology and the law by exploring the theoretical, conceptual, and applied facets of forensic psychology. Topics include: the assessment of competence, civil commitment, insanity defenses, violence risk assessment, the detection of deception, expert testimony, assessment of child abuse and neglect, child custody/visitation and ethical issues in the practice of forensic psychology.

Experiential Requirement (2 courses, 5 credits)

Prerequisites:

PSYCH-114; Psychology majors with 32 or more credits;

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Explores the broad range of career options that are available to psychology majors. Provides guidance on the development of internship and job search skills and introduces students to on- and off-campus resources aimed at maximizing their opportunities for success post-graduation.

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Considers the reciprocal relationship between individuals and their social context and explores the strength-based, systems-oriented, and socially responsible methods that community psychologists use in their work with underserved communities. Uses service-learning to connect knowledge and theory acquired through weekly lectures and discussions on key concepts in community psychology with reflective practice. Specifically, in addition to scheduled class meetings students are required to complete five hours a week (60 hours total) of community service.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH-340 and Junior Standing. Restricted to majors only unless permission of instructor. This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Provides majors the opportunity to gain a meaningful field experience in a professional setting that is consistent with their academic background and career goals. Using resources available through the psychological department and career services, students are required to secure an approved internship before the course begins. Students are on site a minimum of 6 hours each week of the semester and must accrue at least 60 hours of field experience. Weekly seminar discussions focus on the integration of academic knowledge with the demands of the workplace and advanced professional development Normally offered every semester.

Those students who intend to complete PSYCH-350 must secure their own internship position prior to the start of the semester.

Senior Capstone Requirement (1 course, 4 credits)

The capstone requirement should be completed during the senior year by taking one of the following courses:

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114, PSYCH 215, & PSYCH 216; Senior standing.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Presents the historical context for the development of core ideas, theoretical positions, and research in the field of Psychology. Examines interconnections between systematic orientations and domains of psychology and their relation to contemporary concepts and issues in the field of psychology. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114, PSYCH 215, and PSYCH 216; By invitation only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines both historical and contemporary theories in the field, along with current empirical research. Emphasizes the reading of primary source material, critical thinking, and seminar discussion. Assessment and measurement issues emphasized, along with substantive writing, typically in the form of an empirical research proposal or a critical review of the theory and research in a focused domain. Admission by invitation only. Normally offered yearly.

Note: PSYCH-H428 is by invitation only.

 

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Learning Goals & Objectives

Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.

Learning Goals Learning Objectives
Students will...
Students will be able to...
Increase knowledge base in psychology.
  • Describe key concepts, principles and overarching themes in psychology
  • Develop a working knowledge of psychology's content domain
  • Describe applications of psychology
  • Increase skill in scientific inquiry and critical thinking.
  • Use scientific reasoning to interpret psychological phenomena (e.g., learning, cognition, emotion)
  • Demonstrate psychology information literacy
  • Engage in innovative and integrative thinking and problem solving
  • Interpret, design and conduct basic psychological research
  • Incorporate sociocultural factors in scientific inquiry with demonstrated understanding of diverse populations
  • Increase knowledge and understanding of ethical and social responsibility in a diverse world.
  • Apply ethical standards to evaluate psychological science and practice
  • Establish and enhance interpersonal work relationships
  • Learn communication skills.
  • Demonstrate effective scientific, persuasive, descriptive, and argumentative writing
  • Exhibit effective scientific, persuasive, descriptive and argumentative presentation skills
  • Demonstrate an ability to effectively interact with others on group projects and in classroom discussion
  • Receive skills necessary for professional development.
  • Apply psychological content and skills to career goals
  • Demonstrate self-efficacy and self-regulation with psychologically related work
  • Refine project management skills
  • Demonstrate an increased ability for teamwork
  • Develop meaningful professional direction for life after graduation

  • Psychology Minor

    Learn more about this minor

    Minor Requirements: 5 courses, 20 credits

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys core theoretical concepts and contemporary empirical research from the major sub-fields of psychology: physiology; perception; cognition; learning; emotion; motivation; development; personality; psychopathology; psychotherapy; and social behavior. Offered every semester.

    Choose one course at the 300-level or above

    Choose three additional Psychology courses at any level

     

    Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

    Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

    Accelerated Bachelor's/Master's in Mental Health Counseling Degree

    Degree Requirements

    1. Students admitted to this dual degree program must meet all the requirements of the undergraduate Psychology degree program.
    2. Students must also meet all requirements for the Master’s degree in Mental Health Counseling.
    3. The two graduate courses taken during the senior year will count toward BOTH the undergraduate and graduate degree requirements. Credit hours will be awarded based on the graduate course description.
    4. Before enrolling in a particular graduate course during the senior year, a student must obtain permission from the MHC graduate program director.
    5. Students are subject to the usual standards for academic standing, i.e., undergraduate standards for undergraduate courses and graduate standards for graduate courses.

    Upon successful completion of all of the degree requirements, a student will receive a dual Bachelor’s and Master’s degree. The exact degree (BA/BS and Master’s) will be awarded based on the specific undergraduate program the student completes. A student may permanently exit the dual degree program and opt to graduate with a Bachelor’s degree if all the requirements for a Bachelor’s degree have been met. In this case, the graduate courses taken in the senior year will be counted as 4-credit courses applied toward the undergraduate degree requirements.

    Societies and Honors

    Honors Program in Psychology

    To complete requirements for honors in the major, a candidate must:

    1. Graduate with a major GPA of 3.75 or higher
    2. Complete PSYCH-H555 with a passing grade and a thesis approved by thesis advisor.
      1. Note: In order to qualify to enroll in PSYCH-H555, a student must:
        1. Apply to the department before the start of the senior year
        2. Have a major GPA of 3.75 or higher
        3. Have completed PSYCH-215 and PSYCH-216 with a minimum grade of B+ in each course
    3. CAS Honors Program students only: Present work from your senior honors experience at the Honors Symposium or Pecha Kucha event

    Psi Chi, the National Honor Society in Psychology

    The Suffolk University chapter of Psi Chi, the national honor society in psychology, was chartered on April 28, 1978. Psi Chi is a member of the American Association of College Honor Societies. At Suffolk University we invite the top ten percent of our junior and senior class to join. Students will be contacted in the spring semester with an invitation. Criteria for membership include:

    1. Junior or senior class status
    2. Completion of at least five courses in Psychology at Suffolk
    3. Cumulative GPA in the top 10% of juniors and seniors

    New members are inducted into the Psi Chi National Honor Society at a ceremony held in April.

    Psychology Courses

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces the field of neuroscience, the study of the organization and function of the nervous system of humans and other animals. Topics include the neuron and neural transmission, the overall function and organization of the nervous system, the development of the brain, neural plasticity, sleep, memory and other higher cognitive functions.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys core theoretical concepts and contemporary empirical research from the major sub-fields of psychology: physiology; perception; cognition; learning; emotion; motivation; development; personality; psychopathology; psychotherapy; and social behavior. Offered every semester.

    Prerequisites:

    Restricted to honor students in the CAS and SBS schools, or instructor permission.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys core theoretical concepts and contemporary empirical research from the major sub-fields of psychology: physiology; perception; cognition; learning; emotion; motivation; development; personality; psychopathology; psychotherapy; and social behavior. Offered every semester.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114; Restricted to majors only unless with permission of instructor.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces the use of statistics as tools for description and decision-making, including hypothesis testing. Prepares students for the analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of psychological research. Offered every semester.

    Prerequisites:

    Must be taken concurrent with PSYCH-215

    Credits:

    0.00

    Description:

    Introduces students to computer software used to conduct statistical analyses in psychological research.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114 and PSYCH 215

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Provides an overview of the historical background of psychology as a science before introducing students to research methods employed in psychology including naturalistic observation, qualitative, correlational, quasi-experimental, and experimental designs. Offered every semester

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines contemporary ways of conceptualizing, assessing, and treating psychological consequences resulting from exposure to traumatic stress. Topics include the psychological consequences of war, natural disaster, and interpersonal trauma (e.g., physical and sexual abuse), Combines community service with classroom study and reflection.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the field of human sexuality across the life span. Topics include: sexual anatomy and physiology, sexual development, typical and atypical sexual behavior, sexual dysfunctions, current research on human sexuality, and relationship issues as they relate to sexuality and intimacy.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys the major theoretical approaches to personality including representative theorists from the psychoanalytic, trait, cognitive, behavioral, and humanistic perspectives. Topics include personality dynamics, personality development, and the study of individual differences. Normally offered yearly.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114; CAS Honors

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Surveys the major theoretical approaches to personality including representative theorists from the psychoanalytic, trait, cognitive, behavioral, and humanistic perspectives. Topics include personality dynamics, personality development, and the study of individual differences. Normally offered yearly.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development in youth (i.e., from conception through adolescence). Surveys major developmental approaches including biological, learning, and contextual/environmental theories. Major focus is on normal development. Normally offered every semester.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114; Restricted to CAS Honor Students

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development in youth (i.e., from conception through adolescence). Surveys major developmental approaches including biological, learning, and contextual/environmental theories. Major focus is on normal development. Normally offered every semester.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Studies the social determinants of the behavior of individuals in relation to groups and surveys current research findings in such major content areas as attribution, prejudice, conformity, obedience, social cognition, interpersonal attraction, altruism, and aggression. Normally offered every semester.

    Prerequisites:

    Take PSYCH-114;

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the application of psychological theories and principles to organizations and the workplace with attention to the role of culture and context. Topics includes job analysis, recruitment, selection, evaluation, training, retention, and termination. Employee morale, well-being, stress, and hardiness are considered.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines theoretical and empirical approaches that provide insight into Asian viewpoints on socialization practices, family systems, health/well-being, cultural traditions/values, and spiritual philosophy/literature. Explores the diversity among Asian cultures in terms of language, history, religion/spiritual faith, and healthcare practices, all of which play a significant role in shaping the psychological characteristics, interpersonal relationships, and work dynamics of Asians and Asian immigrants.

    Credits:

    2.00

    Description:

    Introduces contemporary theory and research on mindfulness as a psychological construct. Examines challenges that arise in defining and assessing mindfulness and explores its applications in psychotherapy, education, and business.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development across the lifespan, with attention to the role of culture and context. Explores how various major theories of development can be used to adaptive and maladaptive behaviors and trajectories and considers. Implications for treatment, prevention, and positive development across the lifespan. Normally offered yearly.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces the theories, concepts, and intervention techniques of sport psychology. Topics include an exploration of the personal and contextual facts that influence performance and the use of psychologically informed strategies used to enhance athletic performance,

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114, PSYCH 215, PSYCH 216 and sophomore standing.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines theory and research on a number of human cognitive processes, including topics of attention, perception, learning, memory, language processing, problem solving, social cognition, emotion, and reasoning. The field of cognition integrates knowledge from the multiple disciplines of neuropsychology, neuroscience, linguistics, and information science. Normally offered yearly.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114, PSYCH 215 and PSYCH 216.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the organic basis for human and animal behavior. Topics include nervous system structure and function as well as neurological contributions to motivation, emotion, stress, and abnormal functioning. Normally offered yearly.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114 and Sophomore standing

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the complex interplay of physiological, sociocultural, and psychological influences on the development, maintenance, and treatment of addiction. Topics include an introduction to substances that are commonly abused and compulsive and addictive behaviors, an overview of major theories on the genetic, neurobiological, sociocultural, and psychological determinants of addiction, and a review of evidence-based approaches to prevention and treatment.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114 and Sophomore standing

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the processes and behaviors that support and detract from the establishment and maintenance of an effective professional helping relationship. Explores cultural factors that influence relationship building and provides supervised practice of helping skills that promote behavior change and effective problem-solving.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114 and Sophomore Standing.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines historical, political and social conceptions of self and identity. Explores processes by which self-knowledge, self-awareness, self-conception, self-esteem, self-consciousness, and self-blame are developed, maintained, and transformed at individual, community and global levels. Considers how contemporary views of self and identity affect the theory and practice of psychology.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114 and Sophomore Standing

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines how biological, psychological and social factors interact with and affect physical health and well-being. Topics include: the role of stress, coping, and behavioral patterns in acute and chronic illness, the psychosocial adjustment of patients with serious health problems, psychological factors impacting treatment adherence, and social determinants of health, and disparities in healthcare.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114, and Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Introduces the concepts of psychological disorder highlighting the complexities and consequences inherent in labeling human behaviors and experiences as "abnormal." Examines the prevalence and core features of the most common psychological disorders and explores psychological, biological, and sociocultural perspectives on their etiology and treatment.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114 and Sophomore Standing.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Explores the physical, social, and psychological aspects of adult development, with attention to the role of culture and context. Explores age-related changes in mental health, personality, self-image, sexual relations, friendships, work-life, and spirituality. Examines the topics of bereavement, hospice/nursing home care, and death and dying.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH-114 and sophomore standing

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the physical, cognitive, emotional and social aspects of adolescence. Attention is given to identity, parent-adolescent relationships, values, sexuality, and career development as well as psychopathology, drug use and abuse, delinquency, and alienation. Normally offered yearly.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114 and sophomore standing

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Provides an overview of behavioral and emotional disorders of childhood and adolescence. Examines the prevalence, symptom presentation, etiology and methods of treating disorders from a variety of psychological, developmental, and sociocultural perspectives.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH-114; Psychology majors with 32 or more credits;

    Credits:

    1.00

    Description:

    Explores the broad range of career options that are available to psychology majors. Provides guidance on the development of internship and job search skills and introduces students to on- and off-campus resources aimed at maximizing their opportunities for success post-graduation.

    Prerequisites:

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the substantial influence of culture on psychological processes and human behavior. Explores the complex, multi-faceted, intersecting nature of cultural identity and uses a cultural framework to explore and challenge our current knowledge and understanding of major topics in psychology including development, personality, gender, cognition, emotion, social behavior and psychological health.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Considers the reciprocal relationship between individuals and their social context and explores the strength-based, systems-oriented, and socially responsible methods that community psychologists use in their work with underserved communities. Uses service-learning to connect knowledge and theory acquired through weekly lectures and discussions on key concepts in community psychology with reflective practice. Specifically, in addition to scheduled class meetings students are required to complete five hours a week (60 hours total) of community service.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114. 54 credits or more only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines the interface between psychology and the law by exploring the theoretical, conceptual, and applied facets of forensic psychology. Topics include: the assessment of competence, civil commitment, insanity defenses, violence risk assessment, the detection of deception, expert testimony, assessment of child abuse and neglect, child custody/visitation and ethical issues in the practice of forensic psychology.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH-340 and Junior Standing. Restricted to majors only unless permission of instructor. This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Provides majors the opportunity to gain a meaningful field experience in a professional setting that is consistent with their academic background and career goals. Using resources available through the psychological department and career services, students are required to secure an approved internship before the course begins. Students are on site a minimum of 6 hours each week of the semester and must accrue at least 60 hours of field experience. Weekly seminar discussions focus on the integration of academic knowledge with the demands of the workplace and advanced professional development Normally offered every semester.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114,PSYCH 215, PSYCH 216 and senior standing

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Presents the historical context for the development of core ideas, theoretical positions, and research in the field of Psychology. The interconnections between systematic orientations and domains of psychology are examined along with their relation to contemporary concepts and issues in the field of psychology. Offered every semester.

    Prerequisites:

    Senior status and permission of department chair required.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    An overview of the various group counseling formats utilized in schools, and related theories. Issues related to the development and implementation of small counseling groups (e.g., group dynamics and processes for group member selection) and larger educational and prevention-based groups (e.g., fostering positive mental health, career-related programming, anti-bullying) will be explored and discussed.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114, PSYCH 215, & PSYCH 216; Senior standing.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Presents the historical context for the development of core ideas, theoretical positions, and research in the field of Psychology. Examines interconnections between systematic orientations and domains of psychology and their relation to contemporary concepts and issues in the field of psychology. Offered every semester.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH 114, PSYCH 215, and PSYCH 216; By invitation only.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Examines both historical and contemporary theories in the field, along with current empirical research. Emphasizes the reading of primary source material, critical thinking, and seminar discussion. Assessment and measurement issues emphasized, along with substantive writing, typically in the form of an empirical research proposal or a critical review of the theory and research in a focused domain. Admission by invitation only. Normally offered yearly.

    Prerequisites:

    JR or SR status; Majors Only; Department chair consent.

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Substantive reading/research in area of special interest directed by a faculty member.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH-350; Instructor Consent Required

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Provides majors who have successfully completed an internship the opportunity to gain additional field experience in a professional setting. Individual learning goals and objectives will be formulated for each student, based on their placement, interest and career goals. Students are required to secure an approved internship before the course begins.

    Prerequisites:

    PSYCH-350; CAS Honors; Instructor Consent Required

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Provides majors who have successfully completed an internship the opportunity to gain additional field experience in a professional setting. Individual learning goals and objectives will be formulated for each student, based on their placement, interest and career goals. Students are required to secure an approved internship before the course begins.

    Prerequisites:

    Take PSYCH-114, PSYCH-215, and PSYCH-216; Instructor Approval Required

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    An individual program of reading, research, and writing on an approved topic under the supervision of a Psychology faculty member. Students must be candidates for Honors in Psychology who plan to prepare a thesis for submission to the honors committee. Admission by invitation only.