Radiation Science and Therapy

Radiation Science Major Requirements

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Radiation Science Major Requirements: 20 courses and corresponding laboratories, 74 credits

Clinical training is not included as part of the Radiation Science degree.

Students in this major must earn the BS.

Core Requirements (12 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 42 credits)

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO L111 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explanation of key biological structures and reactions of the cell. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

Concurrently with BIO 111

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Sessions are designed to familiarize the student with biological molecules, and the techniques used in their study. The techniques covered include basic solution preparation, separation and quantification of molecules, enzyme catalysis,and cell isolation.

Prerequisites:

BIO L203 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY BIO 111, BIO L111.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

First part of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course emphasizes histology and physiology in the understanding of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Medical terminology will be used.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111; Must take BIO-203 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A study of the human skeletal system and a comparative look at other organ systems involving observation of anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes microscopy and computer simulations of physiological processes.

Prerequisites:

BIO 203, BIO L203; BIO L204 must be taken concurrently;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Conclusion of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course investigates the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems as well as the physiology of immune responses, nutrition, and acid-base balance. Medical terminology will be used.

Prerequisites:

BIO 203/L203 and BIO 204 must be taken concurrently;

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A study of the human viscera using anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes microscopy of tissues and physiological experiments.

Prerequisites:

CAS students only. SBS students by special permission. Restricted to the following majors: Art History, Asian Studies, Biology, Economics, English, French, History, Humanities, International Economics, Music History, Philosophy, Physics, Radiation Science, Spanish, and Undeclared. Instructor consent required for all other majors.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course engages students in the early stages of career planning. Students will explore their interests, skills, values, and strengths, which will allow them to begin setting appropriate goals for professional development. Once students understand themselves in relation to the world of work, they will learn how to research careers and employment paths that fit with their goals.

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH 104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH 104 must take MATH 104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-L111.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces atomic structure, stoichiometry, the periodic table, the nature of chemical bonds, and chemical reactions. This course is recommended for science majors or those considering careers in the health sciences.

Prerequisites:

MATH-104 MATH-108 MATH-121 MATH-128 MATH-130 MATH-134 MATH-164 MATH-165 MATHT-MPEL1 MATHT-MPEL2 or MATHT-MPEL3. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 111.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Introduces the basic principles of chemistry through "discovery" laboratory experiments. Learn safe laboratory practices and basic techniques such as determining mass and volume, representing data in the form of tables and graphs, and synthesizing and isolating a metal complex. Participate in workshop activities that include understanding modern approaches to the scientific method, reading and understanding the scientific literature, and building molecular models. This laboratory is designed around the foundational laboratory skills practiced by science students in a wide variety of majors.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 111/L111; CHEM-L112 must be taken concurrently. MATH 104 placement or higher.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I. Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces thermochemistry, gases, solution chemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base systems, and thermodynamics.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-111/L111; CHEM-112 must be take concurrently. MATH-104 placement or higher.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I Laboratory. Apply the basic principles of chemistry through discovery laboratory experiments with an emphasis on quantitative analysis. Execute basic analytical techniques such as the application of Beer's Law and acid-base titrations. This laboratory is designed around the foundational laboratory skills practiced by science students in a wide variety of majors.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 112 and CHEM-L112. CHEM-L211 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces basic theories of structure, bonding, and chemical reactivity as specifically applied to modern organic chemistry. Includes functional groups, acid/base chemistry, nomenclature, resonance, spectroscopy, and stereochemistry.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 211.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Introduces synthetic organic chemistry techniques. Includes melting point determination, distillation, crystallization, extraction, chromatographic separations, and infrared spectroscopy. Discusses experimental design within the context of green organic chemistry.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 211 and CHEM L211. Must take CHEM-L212 concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Builds on the core competencies acquired in Organic Chemistry I. Includes detailed mechanistic discussions of substitution, elimination, and addition reactions. Emphasizes organic synthesis, structure determination, and spectroscopy.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211. Must be take CHEM-212 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Builds on the core competencies acquired in Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. Emphasizes the characterization of organic molecules via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Discusses experimental design within the context of green organic chemistry.

Prerequisites:

RAD L315 concurrently; Radiation Biology, Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate), or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Content is designed to establish a thorough knowledge of the radiation physics used in radiation therapy treatments. Topics to be covered in this course include a review of basic physics (energy, mass, matter, SI units), structure of matter, types of radiations, nuclear transformations, radioactive decay, the fundamentals of x-ray generators and x-ray production, interactions of x and gamma rays with matter, absorbed dose, measurements of dose, principles of and practical use of ionization chambers and electrometers, Geiger counters and other survey meters, principles and practical use of TLDs, film, calorimetry, scintillation detectors, radiation protection and quality assurance.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS L315 concurrently; Radiation Biology, Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate), or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Explores topics including quality assurance measurements for radiation therapy, calibration of radiation teletherapy unit using ionization chambers, measurements of dose distribution via film, measurements of dose in a phantom via TLDs, radiation protection survey of therapy installation and brachytherapy sources, and radiation biology.

Prerequisites:

RAD 315; Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Expands on the concepts and theories presented in Radiation Physics I. It will provide a detailed analysis of the treatment units used in external beam radiation therapy, their beam geometry, basic dose calculations and dose distributions. Students will also learn the principles, theories, and uses of brachytherapy.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS 315; Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry Students only (including Radiation Science minors)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics covered include: physio-chemical aspects of energy absorption, the sequence of events after irradiation occurring on the molecular, cellular and organized tissue levels, radiation response and repair of eukaryotic cells, effects of radiation quality, dose rate, environmental conditions, cell cycle kinetics, tumor and normal cell population dynamics, radiation-induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis, tumor pathophysiology and radiobiology, and recent advances in experimental radiation oncology.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Science and Radiation Therapy students only. Senior status required.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Promotes expansion of professional development skills for Radiation Science majors. Assists students with job search, networking, and professional cover letter and resume preparation, as well as discusses techniques necessary to make job interviews successful.

Cancer Care Requirement (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers, as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes, detection, and prevention. Psychosocial aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, and bone marrow transplants.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers, as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes, detection, and prevention. Psychosocial aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, and bone marrow transplants. Service-learning is a pedagogy integrating academically relevant service activities that address human and community needs into a course. Students connect knowledge and theory to practice by combining service with reflection in a structured learning environment. Students will engage in service-learning with an underserved community partner in regards to cancer by working directly with cancer patients or by assisting on a project that supports cancer patients.

Physics Requirement (2 courses and corresponding laboratories, 8 credits)

Choose one of the following 4-course sequences:

Prerequisites:

Take MATH-121 or MATH-134 or MATH-165 or permission of Physics department chair; PHYS-L111 taken concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics. Study of kinematics, vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, energy and work, momentum,heat and thermodynamics, kinetic theory. The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course.

Prerequisites:

PHYS 111 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics. Study of kinematics, vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, energy and work, momentum,heat and thermodynamics, kinetic theory. The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks and formal reports required.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-111 and PHYS-L11. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS-L112.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Continuation of the fundamental principles of physics. Study of simple harmonic motion, waves, fluids, electric forces and fields, electric potential, DC circuits, electromagnetic induction, magnetic fields, AC circuits, introduction to optics, introduction to atomic, nuclear and particle physics.

Prerequisites:

PHYS 111 and PHYS L111; PHYS 112 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Continuation of the fundamental principles of physics. Study of simple harmonic motion, waves, fluids, electric forces and fields, electric potential, DC circuits, electromagnetic induction, magnetic fields, AC circuits, introduction to optics, introduction to atomic, nuclear and particle physics. The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks, and formal reports required.

or

Prerequisites:

MATH-121, MATH-165 or MATH-164 and PHYS L151 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

PHYS 151 is the first of three courses (PHYS 151, 152, 153) that comprise the calculus based introductory physics sequence at Suffolk University intended for students majoring in the physical sciences, engineering and mathematics. This course aims to teach basic techniques in physics that fall under the topic of classical mechanics and their application in understanding the natural world. Specific topics include the study of vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, fluid mechanics, simple harmonic motion, mechanical waves, sound and hearing. The student will learn how to analyze physical situations by using simple models, and also how to solve those models and derive useful conclusions from them. This course will show students how experimental results and mathematical representations are combined to create testable scientific theories, and how the complexities of most real-life physical situations can be reduced to simple problems by identifying the essential physical features and ignoring the rest. The student will learn to distinguish the scientific approach to physical situations from other ways of looking at them, for example, artistic, humanistic, and business.

Prerequisites:

PHYS 151 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: measurements, propagation of errors, vectors, Newton's laws, work and energy, momentum, rotations, oscillations, simple harmonic motion, fluid. Knowledge of algebra, trigonometry, differentiation and integration required.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-151 and PHYS-L151. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS-L152.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This calculus based course begins with topics in kinetic theory and the laws of thermodynamics. It then covers electric charge and field, Gauss' law, electrical potential and capacitance, electric currents and DC circuits. Next magnetism, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law and AC circuits are discussed. This is followed by Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, and properties of light.

Prerequisites:

PHYS 151 and L151 and PHYS 152 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: heat, gas laws, electric forces, field, and potential, DC and AC circuits, magnetic field, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law, optics. Calculus, algebra, trigonometry are required. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks, and formal reports required.

Mathematics Requirement (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Prerequisites:

MATH-104, MATH-121 or MATH level 4

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A one-semester introduction to differential and integral calculus. Theory is presented informally and topics and techniques are limited to polynomials, rational functions, logarithmic and exponential functions. Topics include a review of precalculus, limits and continuity, derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives to graphing, minima/maxima, applications of the derivative, marginal analysis, differential equations of growth and decay, anti-derivatives, the definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and area measurements. This course cannot be used to satisfy core or complementary requirements by students majoring in chemistry, computer science, engineering, mathematics, or physics. Several sections offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121 with a minimum grade of C, MATH-075, or MATH level 5

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Functions, limits and continuity, squeeze theorem, limits at infinity; instantaneous rate of change, tangent slopes, and the definition of the derivative of a function; power, product, and quotient rules, trig derivatives, chain rule, implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; derivatives of other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions, exponential and log functions, hyperbolic trig functions); applications of the derivative (implicit differentiation, related rates, optimization, differentials, curve sketching, L'Hopital's rule); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Note:

If planning to apply to the Medical Dosimetry graduate program during senior year or after graduation, students must take both MATH-165 and MATH-166.

Biostatistics Requirement (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduction to the statistical methods used to evaluate biological problems. Sampling, probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, experimental design, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation are some of the topics offered. Software for data handling, graphics, and analysis will be used.

Prerequisites:

MATH 128 or higher. REMINDER: STATS 250 is a required prerequisite MKT 220, FIN 200 and ISOM 201(prerequisite for ISOM 319)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Application of statistical analysis to real-world business and economic problems. Topics include data presentation, descriptive statistics including measures of location and dispersion, introduction to probability, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions including binomial and normal distributions, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical inference including estimation and hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression analysis. The use of computers is emphasized throughout the course. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114; Restricted to majors only unless with permission of instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the use of statistics as tools for description and decision-making, including hypothesis testing. Prepares students for the analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of psychological research. Required for psychology majors; should be taken before the junior year. Offered every semester.

Electives (3 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 12 credits)

Choose three of the following:

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO L114 concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Rigorous introduction to organismal biology emphasizing evolution, phylogenetics, form, and function. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO 114 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A series of laboratory experiences in evolution, diversity, anatomy and physiology.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111 and BIO 114/L114;

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This interactive introduction to nutrition explores the science of human nutrition and further reviews concepts of how nutrition can promote health and well being. The course will review specific nutrient needs and functions, nutrient digestion, and the role of diet in well being and in the presence of chronic disease. Weekly course work encourages scientific literacy and fosters critical evaluation of nutrition in the news and in social media.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111, L111 and BIO 114, L114 and CHEM 111, L111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The course is designed as an application base educational experience that will allow students to learn the standard techniques associated with successful cell culture. As such, students are responsible for the maintenance, propagation, isolation, and preservation of their cells. A number of cell types and experimental manipulations of the cultures are investigated throughout the semester.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111 and BIO 114/L114; BIO L274 concurrently;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An examination of the basic principles of genetics in eukaryotes and prokaryotes at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. Topics include Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, structure and function of chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, and population genetics.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114. Must be taken concurrently with BIO 274.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Experiments designed to demonstrate principles presented in lecture, using a range of genetic model organisms that include E. coli, B. subtilis, S. cerevisiae, D. melanogaster, S. fimicola, and C. elegans.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111; BIO-L285 concurrently;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Viruses and bacteria are surveyed in terms of their ecology, biochemistry, taxonomy, molecular biology and control.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111; BIO 285 concurrently;

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Introduction to microbiological techniques and their applications to health, research and industry.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114. Must take BIO-L304 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Mechanisms of physiological adaptations to environmental challenges are studied. Examples of gas exchange, osmoregulation, fluid transport, temperature regulation, nervous control, and movement are examined in various animal forms through class lecture and discussion, required readings, and external lectures. Spring semester.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114. Must take BIO-304 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Selected physiological processes and mechanisms or adaptation in invertebrate and vertebrate animals are examined by observation and controlled experiments.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, BIO-L114, BIO-274, and BIO-L274

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to the development of cancer. Factors contributing to tumorgenesis, angiogenesis, and metastasis will be discussed; these factors, oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and signal transduction networks. In addition, an investigation of current strategies for cancer prevention and treatment will be considered.

Prerequisites:

Take BIO-274

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The concept of immunity, response to infection, structure of the immune system, biochemistry of immunoglobins, antigen-antibody interactions, allergy, immunological injury, lymphocyte subpopulations and cellular immunity, tolerance suppression and enhancement. Taught alternate/even years.

Prerequisites:

BIO-274 and BIO-L274 or BIO-285 and BIO-L285; BIO-L385 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The molecular mechanisms of host-microbe interactions and the epidemiology and public health aspects of microorganisms are stressed. Also covered are current topics in microbiology including antimicrobial therapy and resistance, emerging pathogens and novel applications of microbiology. Experimental design and troubleshooting skills are developed, using contemporary microbiology and molecular biology laboratory techniques. Taught alternate/odd years.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111; CHEM-211/L211; BIO-L403 concurrently;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The study of cells, approached through examinations of biochemical mechanisms, the relation between the structure and function of biological molecules and organelles, and the regulation of normal and diseased cells.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L11 and CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211. Must take BIO-403 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Examination of biological molecules and their role in cell function. Techniques used in these examinations will include enzymatic analyses, gel electrophoresis, immunologic identification, chromatography, and spectroscopy. Students are expected to develop their proficiency in the laboratory techniques used, to analyze their results in a quantitative manner, and to present their findings.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-311 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274 and BIO-L474 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An examination of concepts and techniques of modern molecular biology. Topics include the structure and function of DNA, RNA, and proteins, the regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, genetic modification of organisms, and genome analysis. This course will incorporate readings and discussions of primary scientific literature. Spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Take CHEM-331 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274. BIO-474 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This upper level laboratory course will consist of a semester-long project in the form of a series of consecutive experiments involving the generation of a genetically modified organism and its subsequent molecular analysis. Techniques employed will include genetic screens, DNA isolation, restriction endonuclease analysis, transformation of bacteria,gel electrophoresis, gene reported assays, RNA isolation, reverse transcription, and quantitative PCR.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114, L114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on embryonic development in vertebrates. The conceptual focus on evolutionary developmental biology includes comparative developmental mechanisms and Epigenetic processes.

Prerequisites:

BIO111/BIOL111, BIO114/BIOL114. BIO274/BIOL274 may be taken as a corequisite

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Biology Internship: This course provides students with credit for an unpaid internship completed during the semester when credit is earned. Students must secure an approved internship and provide documentation from the internship's overseer to a full time faculty member sponsor in order to register for the course. The internship must involve participation in research and / or patient care. Students or their overseers will be required to submit monthly records of internship hours and provide the faculty sponsor with a written summary of internship experiences and accomplishments by the last week of classes. Only one internship may be used as a biology elective. This course is available for variable credit. Prerequisites: An Internship for Credit form must be submitted to the department chair Credits: 1-4

Prerequisites:

CHEM 211; CHEM L314 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the basic techniques of collecting and analyzing data from different types of instrumentation, including: ultraviolet, visible, fluorescence, atomic and emission spectroscopy; chromatographic methods; electrochemical measurements. Students will apply these techniques to problems in chemistry, forensics, and environmental science.

Prerequisites:

CHEM L211; CHEM 314 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory experiments in chemical analysis using instrumental techniques, including spectroscopy and chromatography. Data collection and evaluation includes computer-based methods. Reports are prepared in professional style.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 212/L212 or permission of instructor. CHEM L331 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the foundations of biochemistry, including the structure, organization and behavior of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Topics include enzyme catalysis, kinetics, and inhibition as well as protein regulation and membrane structure. Introduces the use of biochemical literature and bioinformatics techniques.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 212/L212 or permission of instructor. CHEM 331 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory course introducing biochemical techniques. Includes buffer preparation, PCR, purification of DNA and proteins, agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, protein quantitation and detection, and enzyme kinetic assays.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 331 and CHEM-L332 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the principles of bioenergetics and metabolism of biomolecules. Includes intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and oxidative phosphorylation. Additional topics include signal transduction and the regulation and integration of metabolism.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 331/L331. CHEM 332 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Advanced biochemistry laboratory course where students learn experimental design and critical analysis of the scientific literature while conducting novel research. Projects vary from year to year, but may include recombinant DNA techniques, purification and quantitation of DNA and proteins, protein detection, enzyme kinetics, and bioinformatics. Research is presented as a poster at the annual STEM banquet.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: CHEM 212.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Expands on topics introduced in Organic Chemistry I and II; depending on student interest, may include in-depth discussions of carbonyl chemistry, industrial organic chemistry, organometallic chemistry and biomolecules.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course presents an overview of the origins, components, organization, and operation of the health system in the United States. It is an introduction to the major health issues and institutions, including the settings in which health services are delivered, providers of these services, and the public and private payers for services.

Prerequisites:

MATH-104, or MATH-121, or MATH level 3

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Linear Modeling (for example, using linear functions to model supply/demand situations), graphing, linear programming, financial functions (compound interest, annuities, and amortization of loans) sets, Venn diagrams, counting and combinatorics, discrete probability, conditional probability, Bernoulli experiments, Bayes theorem. Several sections offered each semester. *This course cannot be applied toward a departmental concentration in Mathematics by Sawyer Business School students.

Prerequisites:

MATH-164 or MATH-165 with a minimum grade of C

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Riemann sums and definite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (areas); integration of exponential functions, trig functions, and inverse trig functions; techniques of integration (substitution, by parts, trig integrals, trig substitution, partial fractions); area, volume, and average value applications; differential equations (separable, exponential growth, linear); improper integrals; infinite sequences and series; convergence tests; power series; Taylor and Maclaurin series (computation, convergence, error estimates, differentiation and integration of Taylor series). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

MATH-165 or MATH-164 with a grade of C or better

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics include: random variable and distribution; expectation and variance; special discrete/continuous distributions (uniform, binomial, negative binomial, geometric, hypergeometric, Poisson, normal, and exponential distributions); joint distribution, marginal distribution and conditional distribution; covariance; limit theorems (law of large numbers and central limit theorem); introduction to confidence interval and hypothesis testing; regression analysis. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites:

MATH 166 with grade of C or better

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Parametric equations and polar coordinates (curves, areas, conic sections); vectors and the geometry of space (the dot product, vector arithmetic, lines and planes in 3-space, the cross product, cylinders and quadratic surfaces); vector functions (limits, derivatives and integrals, motion in space); partial derivatives (functions of several variables, limits and continuity, tangent planes and differentials, chain rule, directional derivatives, gradient, extrema, Lagrange multipliers); multiple integrals (double integrals, applications); vector calculus (vector fields, line integrals, fundamental theorem for line integrals, Green's Theorem, curl and divergence, parametric surfaces, surface integrals). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

Take MATH-185 with a grade of C or better

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics covered include: Algorithms, growth of functions (big O notation), computational complexity of algorithms, divide-and-conquer algorithms, graphs and their properties (isomorphisms of graphs, Euler and Hamilton paths, shortest path problem, graph coloring) trees (tree traversal, minimum spanning trees). As time allows: matrices and linear transformations.

Prerequisites:

Take MATH-185 with a grade of C or better

Credits:

4.00

Description:

this course is intended to provide a firm foundation for and a taste of the study of advanced mathematics. While the course content varies somewhat, it is designed to give students a deeper understanding of the algebraic and analytical structure of the integers, the rational numbers and the real numbers and how they act as a building block to a variety of fields of mathematics. Students are introduced to the process of mathematical discovery and the language of mathematics. Exercises and projects are designed to illustrate the need for proof and to further refine the student's ability to analyze, conjecture and write mathematical proofs. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level mathematics courses and, after completing it a student will be in a position to determine realistically if he or she ought to major or minor in mathematics.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: Phil 119, or 123, or 127.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of the moral problems facing health-care practitioners, their patients, and others involved with the practice of medicine in today's society. Issues include euthanasia, the ethics of medical experimentation, the use of reproductive technologies, genetic counseling and genetic engineering, truth-telling and confidentiality in doctor-patient relationships, the cost and availability of medical care. Normally offered every third year.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 111-112 or PHYS 111-112 Or Permission of Instructor

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is designed as an introduction to nanotechnology and some of its important uses. It is aimed at science majors who have taken basic courses in physics or chemistry. The course will cover the properties and uses of carbon-nanotubes, nanocomposites, and other nanomaterials that are being fabricated in labs and industries around the world. It will serve as an introduction to the important role of nanomaterials in solving modern-day energy problems.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys core theoretical concepts and contemporary empirical research from the major sub-fields of psychology: physiology; perception; cognition; learning; emotion; motivation; development; personality; psychopathology; psychotherapy; and social behavior. Required for psychology majors. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development in youth (i.e., from conception through adolescence). Surveys major developmental approaches including biological, learning, and contextual/environmental theories. Major focus is on normal development. Normally offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114 and Sophomore standing

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores and examines basic models of helping and provides supervised practice of helping skills. Format includes lecture, discussion, role play, and video feedback. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114, and Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the concepts of psychological disorder and focuses on description and etiology of various mental health problems from a variety of different theoretical perspectives. Students develop familiarity with the DSM classification system and major disorders described within it, including mood and anxiety disorders, thought disorders, and personality disorders. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114 and Sophomore Standing.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys theory and research about the physical, mental, and psychological aspects of life-span development. Age-related changes in mental health, personality, self-image, sexual relations, friendships, career development and spirituality are explored. Aging may also be explored as a global, demographic and cross-cultural issue. Research surrounding death and dying, bereavement, and hospice/nursing home care is also presented. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114 and sophomore standing

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the etiology and symptoms of disorders of childhood and adolescence, as well as current therapeutic approaches. Developmental changes in the incidence of externalizing disorders, such as conduct disorder and attention deficit disorder, and internalizing disorders, such as depression and eating disorders, are addressed. Disorders that affect both behavioral and mental functioning such as Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and autism may also be included. The role of development in the understanding and treatment of the childhood disorders is reviewed. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Science and Radiation Therapy majors only.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Enables opportunity for students to participate in career-related experiential internship. Assists students in preparing for Radiation Science-related career and provides exposure to potential career option. Promotes development of necessary professional skills.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to the sociological understanding of human interaction, group process and social structures. Students are introduced to basic concepts, theories and methods of sociological investigation. Majors and minors must pass with a grade of "C" or better.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the development of children and adolescents from biological, psychological, and sociological perspectives. Major themes and changes associated with each developmental stage are discussed. The course explores practical implications of theory and research (parenting, juvenile justice, etc.), and current topics in child and adolescent development. Class format includes lectures discussion, debates and direct observation of children.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will look at the special opportunities and obligations of those in the health and legal professions to protect human rights. There will be an overview of human rights doctrine and key documents. Students will learn to apply human rights principles to particular occupations in the health and legal professions.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides students with an introduction to how social norms, structures, and practices shape experiences of illness and health. Among the topics that will be covered are: health and the environment, the reasons some groups of people are less healthy than others, living with chronic illness and disabilities, and public debates surrounding issues such as performance enhancing drugs and sports, Attention Deficit Disorder and the HPV vaccine. Required for all students in the health, Medicine and the Body Concentration.

Prerequisites:

This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. In this course, students will learn about how the U.S. health care system works. We will study the politics and economics of the health care system and discuss the key health care policy issues of this decade. Using the theoretical perspectives provided by sociology, we will look at issues of power, hierarchy, race, and gender vis-a-vis the health care system. Reading for this course centers on first person narratives by people working in the health care system. This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Consideration of the physiological, psychological and social factors associated with the aging process. Contemporary American values toward the elderly are compared and contrasted with historical and cross-cultural studies. Current opportunities and techniques enabling the elderly to enrich and expand their societal roles are explored.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of changing definitions of life and death, social factors affecting causes and rates of death, care of the dying and their families, institutionalization, the funeral industry, suicide, crisis intervention, and the impact of technology on the dying process.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An exploration of topics that relate particularly to women as providers and consumers in the health care system. The course will consider historical and current information on issues of reproduction, technology, health and illness.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of how different cultures understand health and illness. Healing approaches from Asia, Africa and the Americas will be explored.

Please check with the program director for potential Radiation Science elective approval of other biology, chemistry, physics, math, psychology, or sociology courses.

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Radiation Science Learning Goals & Objectives

Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.

Learning Goals Learning Objectives
Students will...
Students will be able to...
Demonstrate knowledge of the functions of the human body.
  • Demonstrate understanding of the functions of the human body and organ systems
Obtain knowledge of radiation physics, radioactivity, and its effects on the body.
  • Understand concepts such as radiation exposure and absorbed dose of radiation
  • Demonstrate understanding of cell survival curves and radiation exposure syndromes
Obtain skills to prepare them for gaining employment or pursing interest in general science or healthcare.
  • Identify career or further education options
  • Demonstrate ability to apply and interview for a job
  • Demonstrate professionalism in an area of interest during an internship

Radiation Therapy Major Requirements

Learn more about this major

Radiation Therapy Major Requirements: 22 courses and corresponding laboratories, 78 credits

Students must apply to this selective program in their sophomore year. 
 
Students in this major must earn the BS.

Core Requirements (16 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 58 credits)

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO L111 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explanation of key biological structures and reactions of the cell. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

Concurrently with BIO 111

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Sessions are designed to familiarize the student with biological molecules, and the techniques used in their study. The techniques covered include basic solution preparation, separation and quantification of molecules, enzyme catalysis,and cell isolation.

Prerequisites:

BIO L203 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY BIO 111, BIO L111.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

First part of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course emphasizes histology and physiology in the understanding of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Medical terminology will be used.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111; Must take BIO-203 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A study of the human skeletal system and a comparative look at other organ systems involving observation of anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes microscopy and computer simulations of physiological processes.

Prerequisites:

BIO 203, BIO L203; BIO L204 must be taken concurrently;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Conclusion of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course investigates the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems as well as the physiology of immune responses, nutrition, and acid-base balance. Medical terminology will be used.

Prerequisites:

BIO 203/L203 and BIO 204 must be taken concurrently;

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A study of the human viscera using anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes microscopy of tissues and physiological experiments.

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH 104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH 104 must take MATH 104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-L111.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces atomic structure, stoichiometry, the periodic table, the nature of chemical bonds, and chemical reactions. This course is recommended for science majors or those considering careers in the health sciences.

Prerequisites:

MATH-104 MATH-108 MATH-121 MATH-128 MATH-130 MATH-134 MATH-164 MATH-165 MATHT-MPEL1 MATHT-MPEL2 or MATHT-MPEL3. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 111.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Introduces the basic principles of chemistry through "discovery" laboratory experiments. Learn safe laboratory practices and basic techniques such as determining mass and volume, representing data in the form of tables and graphs, and synthesizing and isolating a metal complex. Participate in workshop activities that include understanding modern approaches to the scientific method, reading and understanding the scientific literature, and building molecular models. This laboratory is designed around the foundational laboratory skills practiced by science students in a wide variety of majors.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 111/L111; CHEM-L112 must be taken concurrently. MATH 104 placement or higher.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I. Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces thermochemistry, gases, solution chemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base systems, and thermodynamics.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-111/L111; CHEM-112 must be take concurrently. MATH-104 placement or higher.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I Laboratory. Apply the basic principles of chemistry through discovery laboratory experiments with an emphasis on quantitative analysis. Execute basic analytical techniques such as the application of Beer's Law and acid-base titrations. This laboratory is designed around the foundational laboratory skills practiced by science students in a wide variety of majors.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS 206; Radiation Therapy & Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Studying through a systems-based approach, this course reviews anatomy and physiology while teaching medical terminology. Topics will include discussing the major cancers associated with each anatomical system and introducing the student to radiation therapy treatment techniques and procedures.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A continuation of RAD 301. Through the same didactic approach, students will learn all of the anatomical systems and their related medical terminology not taught in RAD 301.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS L302; Radiation Therapy Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS-301 and RAD/PHYS-L301

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care.

Prerequisites:

RAD L315 concurrently; Radiation Biology, Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate), or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Content is designed to establish a thorough knowledge of the radiation physics used in radiation therapy treatments. Topics to be covered in this course include a review of basic physics (energy, mass, matter, SI units), structure of matter, types of radiations, nuclear transformations, radioactive decay, the fundamentals of x-ray generators and x-ray production, interactions of x and gamma rays with matter, absorbed dose, measurements of dose, principles of and practical use of ionization chambers and electrometers, Geiger counters and other survey meters, principles and practical use of TLDs, film, calorimetry, scintillation detectors, radiation protection and quality assurance.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS L315 concurrently; Radiation Biology, Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate), or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Explores topics including quality assurance measurements for radiation therapy, calibration of radiation teletherapy unit using ionization chambers, measurements of dose distribution via film, measurements of dose in a phantom via TLDs, radiation protection survey of therapy installation and brachytherapy sources, and radiation biology.

Prerequisites:

RAD 315; Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Expands on the concepts and theories presented in Radiation Physics I. It will provide a detailed analysis of the treatment units used in external beam radiation therapy, their beam geometry, basic dose calculations and dose distributions. Students will also learn the principles, theories, and uses of brachytherapy.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS 315; RAD L415 concurrently; Radiation Therapy & Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Discusses the factors that influence treatment planning and govern the clinical aspects of patient treatment. Topics to be covered include treatment planning with 3-D CT and MRI beams, isodose plan descriptions, clinical applications of treatment beams and advanced dosimetric calculations. Students will also contrast new emerging technologies with conventional radiation therapy techniques (SRT, SRS, IMRT, Image Guided Therapy, Respiratory Gating).

Prerequisites:

RAD 415 concurrently; Radiation Therapy & Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the student with the opportunity to apply clinical dosimetry principles and theories learned in the classroom to actual treatment planning situations within the clinic. Through hands-on lab exercises the student will demonstrate the use of the treatment planning instruments and interpret information they compute.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS 315; Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry Students only (including Radiation Science minors)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics covered include: physio-chemical aspects of energy absorption, the sequence of events after irradiation occurring on the molecular, cellular and organized tissue levels, radiation response and repair of eukaryotic cells, effects of radiation quality, dose rate, environmental conditions, cell cycle kinetics, tumor and normal cell population dynamics, radiation-induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis, tumor pathophysiology and radiobiology, and recent advances in experimental radiation oncology.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students will review cancer epidemiology, etiology, detection, diagnosis and prevention, lymphatic drainage, and treatment. The pathology(s) of each cancer will be presented in detail including the rationale for each preferred modality of treatment.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will begin Beginning with an introduction to radiology, students reviewing x-ray production and discussing basic radiation physics, image formation (Kv, mA) and distortion (blur, magnification), conventional processing and digital imaging. The above-mentioned radiographic imaging concepts will be presented with conventional lectures as well as with several imaging laboratories. In addition, the basic principles of each imaging modality, including mammography, CT, MRI, Nuc Med, and Ultra Sound, will be presented. With the use of departmental tours and guest lecturers, the use, benefits and limitations of each will be discussed. Building upon the information previously presented, radiographic anatomy will also be covered with an emphasis on cross sectional anatomy. Students will review basic anatomy viewed in sectional planes (axial/transverse) of the body. Using CT and MRI images, the topographic relationship between internal organs and surface anatomy will be interpreted and discussed.

Prerequisites:

Senior status, Radiation Therapy Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Available to senior students enrolled in the Radiation Therapy program. A seminar style course that serves many purposes; one of which will be preparing our graduating students for board certification (ARRT). Exam preparation will include the use of lectures, online teaching tools, mini mock exams, and a full-length mock exam. The seminar will also assist students with the preparation of their professional resumes including discussions regarding the skills necessary to make job interviews successful.

Cancer Care Requirement (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers, as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes, detection, and prevention. Psychosocial aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, and bone marrow transplants.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers, as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes, detection, and prevention. Psychosocial aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, and bone marrow transplants. Service-learning is a pedagogy integrating academically relevant service activities that address human and community needs into a course. Students connect knowledge and theory to practice by combining service with reflection in a structured learning environment. Students will engage in service-learning with an underserved community partner in regards to cancer by working directly with cancer patients or by assisting on a project that supports cancer patients.

Physics Requirement (2 courses and corresponding laboratories, 8 credits)

Choose one of the following 4-course sequences:

Prerequisites:

Take MATH-121 or MATH-134 or MATH-165 or permission of Physics department chair; PHYS-L111 taken concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics. Study of kinematics, vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, energy and work, momentum,heat and thermodynamics, kinetic theory. The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course.

Prerequisites:

PHYS 111 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics. Study of kinematics, vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, energy and work, momentum,heat and thermodynamics, kinetic theory. The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks and formal reports required.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-111 and PHYS-L11. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS-L112.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Continuation of the fundamental principles of physics. Study of simple harmonic motion, waves, fluids, electric forces and fields, electric potential, DC circuits, electromagnetic induction, magnetic fields, AC circuits, introduction to optics, introduction to atomic, nuclear and particle physics.

Prerequisites:

PHYS 111 and PHYS L111; PHYS 112 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Continuation of the fundamental principles of physics. Study of simple harmonic motion, waves, fluids, electric forces and fields, electric potential, DC circuits, electromagnetic induction, magnetic fields, AC circuits, introduction to optics, introduction to atomic, nuclear and particle physics. The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks, and formal reports required.

or

Prerequisites:

MATH-121, MATH-165 or MATH-164 and PHYS L151 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

PHYS 151 is the first of three courses (PHYS 151, 152, 153) that comprise the calculus based introductory physics sequence at Suffolk University intended for students majoring in the physical sciences, engineering and mathematics. This course aims to teach basic techniques in physics that fall under the topic of classical mechanics and their application in understanding the natural world. Specific topics include the study of vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, fluid mechanics, simple harmonic motion, mechanical waves, sound and hearing. The student will learn how to analyze physical situations by using simple models, and also how to solve those models and derive useful conclusions from them. This course will show students how experimental results and mathematical representations are combined to create testable scientific theories, and how the complexities of most real-life physical situations can be reduced to simple problems by identifying the essential physical features and ignoring the rest. The student will learn to distinguish the scientific approach to physical situations from other ways of looking at them, for example, artistic, humanistic, and business.

Prerequisites:

PHYS 151 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: measurements, propagation of errors, vectors, Newton's laws, work and energy, momentum, rotations, oscillations, simple harmonic motion, fluid. Knowledge of algebra, trigonometry, differentiation and integration required.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-151 and PHYS-L151. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS-L152.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This calculus based course begins with topics in kinetic theory and the laws of thermodynamics. It then covers electric charge and field, Gauss' law, electrical potential and capacitance, electric currents and DC circuits. Next magnetism, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law and AC circuits are discussed. This is followed by Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, and properties of light.

Prerequisites:

PHYS 151 and L151 and PHYS 152 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

The laboratory consists of experiments to illustrate the basic concepts studied in the course: heat, gas laws, electric forces, field, and potential, DC and AC circuits, magnetic field, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law, optics. Calculus, algebra, trigonometry are required. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks, and formal reports required.

Mathematics Requirement (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Prerequisites:

MATH-104, MATH-121 or MATH level 4

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A one-semester introduction to differential and integral calculus. Theory is presented informally and topics and techniques are limited to polynomials, rational functions, logarithmic and exponential functions. Topics include a review of precalculus, limits and continuity, derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives to graphing, minima/maxima, applications of the derivative, marginal analysis, differential equations of growth and decay, anti-derivatives, the definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and area measurements. This course cannot be used to satisfy core or complementary requirements by students majoring in chemistry, computer science, engineering, mathematics, or physics. Several sections offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121 with a minimum grade of C, MATH-075, or MATH level 5

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Functions, limits and continuity, squeeze theorem, limits at infinity; instantaneous rate of change, tangent slopes, and the definition of the derivative of a function; power, product, and quotient rules, trig derivatives, chain rule, implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; derivatives of other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions, exponential and log functions, hyperbolic trig functions); applications of the derivative (implicit differentiation, related rates, optimization, differentials, curve sketching, L'Hopital's rule); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Note:

If planning to apply to the Medical Dosimetry graduate program during senior year or after graduation, students must take both MATH-165 and MATH-166.

Biostatistics Requirement (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduction to the statistical methods used to evaluate biological problems. Sampling, probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, experimental design, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation are some of the topics offered. Software for data handling, graphics, and analysis will be used.

Prerequisites:

MATH 128 or higher. REMINDER: STATS 250 is a required prerequisite MKT 220, FIN 200 and ISOM 201(prerequisite for ISOM 319)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Application of statistical analysis to real-world business and economic problems. Topics include data presentation, descriptive statistics including measures of location and dispersion, introduction to probability, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions including binomial and normal distributions, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical inference including estimation and hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression analysis. The use of computers is emphasized throughout the course. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114; Restricted to majors only unless with permission of instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the use of statistics as tools for description and decision-making, including hypothesis testing. Prepares students for the analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of psychological research. Required for psychology majors; should be taken before the junior year. Offered every semester.

Required Clinical Hours:

14 hours per week; Semester 2, Junior Year
40 hours per week; 12 week Summer Session
24 hours per week; Senior Year

Note: The department reserves the right to require the withdrawal of a student from the Radiation Therapy major if, in its estimation, the probability of the student’s success is doubtful. Factors such as academic performance, interest, effort, professionalism, compliance, attendance, and suitability for the field will be considered. Issues or concerns correlated with any one of these factors could result in withdrawal of the student from the program. Students who defer entry into the program, for any reason, will forfeit their space in the program and will be required to reapply for the following year. A student may be dismissed from the Radiation Therapy major if they fail to maintain the minimum GPA of 3.0 or if they achieve a final grade lower than "B" in any of the Radiation Therapy (RAD) major courses listed above.

If admitted into the Radiation Therapy major, part-time and full-time students must complete clinical requirements within three years of being admitted. Radiation Therapy graduates may seek employment immediately following graduation and will also be eligible to apply for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) Radiation Therapy Certification Exam.

Residency Requirement Policy:

In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Radiation Therapy Learning Goals & Requirements

Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.

Learning Goals Learning Objectives
Students will...
Students will be able to...
Know critical thinking and problem-solving skills.
  • Ask relevant questions
  • Apply theories to clinical situations
Know principles that demonstrate clinical competence.
  • Use/maneuver equipment in a safe manner
  • Apply proper techniques and procedures
  • Utilize proper body mechanics and universal precautions
Understand how to communicate in a clinical setting.
  • Explain procedures to patients accurately
  • Utilize information acquired to problem solve
  • Demonstrate effective written and verbal communication skills
Understand the importance of professionalism, growth, and development.
  • Demonstrate professional behavior
  • Become a member of a professional organization such as American Society of Radiologic Technologists
  • Exhibit personal growth by continuously demonstrating interest to learn

Minor Requirements

Learn more about this minor

Radiation Science Minor Requirements: 6 courses and corresponding laboratories, 24 credits

Core Requirements (4 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 16 credits)

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO L111 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explanation of key biological structures and reactions of the cell. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

Concurrently with BIO 111

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Sessions are designed to familiarize the student with biological molecules, and the techniques used in their study. The techniques covered include basic solution preparation, separation and quantification of molecules, enzyme catalysis,and cell isolation.

Prerequisites:

BIO L203 MUST BE TAKEN CONCURRENTLY BIO 111, BIO L111.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

First part of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course emphasizes histology and physiology in the understanding of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Medical terminology will be used.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111; Must take BIO-203 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A study of the human skeletal system and a comparative look at other organ systems involving observation of anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes microscopy and computer simulations of physiological processes.

Prerequisites:

BIO 203, BIO L203; BIO L204 must be taken concurrently;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Conclusion of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course investigates the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems as well as the physiology of immune responses, nutrition, and acid-base balance. Medical terminology will be used.

Prerequisites:

BIO 203/L203 and BIO 204 must be taken concurrently;

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A study of the human viscera using anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes microscopy of tissues and physiological experiments.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS 315; Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry Students only (including Radiation Science minors)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics covered include: physio-chemical aspects of energy absorption, the sequence of events after irradiation occurring on the molecular, cellular and organized tissue levels, radiation response and repair of eukaryotic cells, effects of radiation quality, dose rate, environmental conditions, cell cycle kinetics, tumor and normal cell population dynamics, radiation-induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis, tumor pathophysiology and radiobiology, and recent advances in experimental radiation oncology.

Cancer Care Requirement (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one (1) of the following:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers, as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes, detection, and prevention. Psychosocial aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, and bone marrow transplants.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers, as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes, detection, and prevention. Psychosocial aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, and bone marrow transplants. Service-learning is a pedagogy integrating academically relevant service activities that address human and community needs into a course. Students connect knowledge and theory to practice by combining service with reflection in a structured learning environment. Students will engage in service-learning with an underserved community partner in regards to cancer by working directly with cancer patients or by assisting on a project that supports cancer patients.

Radiation Science Elective (1 course and its corresponding laboratory where applicable, 4 credits)

Choose one of the following and corresponding laboratory where applicable:

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO L114 concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Rigorous introduction to organismal biology emphasizing evolution, phylogenetics, form, and function. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO 114 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A series of laboratory experiences in evolution, diversity, anatomy and physiology.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111 and BIO 114/L114;

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This interactive introduction to nutrition explores the science of human nutrition and further reviews concepts of how nutrition can promote health and well being. The course will review specific nutrient needs and functions, nutrient digestion, and the role of diet in well being and in the presence of chronic disease. Weekly course work encourages scientific literacy and fosters critical evaluation of nutrition in the news and in social media.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111, L111 and BIO 114, L114 and CHEM 111, L111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The course is designed as an application base educational experience that will allow students to learn the standard techniques associated with successful cell culture. As such, students are responsible for the maintenance, propagation, isolation, and preservation of their cells. A number of cell types and experimental manipulations of the cultures are investigated throughout the semester.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111 and BIO 114/L114; BIO L274 concurrently;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An examination of the basic principles of genetics in eukaryotes and prokaryotes at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. Topics include Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, structure and function of chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, and population genetics.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114. Must be taken concurrently with BIO 274.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Experiments designed to demonstrate principles presented in lecture, using a range of genetic model organisms that include E. coli, B. subtilis, S. cerevisiae, D. melanogaster, S. fimicola, and C. elegans.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111; BIO-L285 concurrently;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Viruses and bacteria are surveyed in terms of their ecology, biochemistry, taxonomy, molecular biology and control.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111; BIO 285 concurrently;

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Introduction to microbiological techniques and their applications to health, research and industry.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114. Must take BIO-L304 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Mechanisms of physiological adaptations to environmental challenges are studied. Examples of gas exchange, osmoregulation, fluid transport, temperature regulation, nervous control, and movement are examined in various animal forms through class lecture and discussion, required readings, and external lectures. Spring semester.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114. Must take BIO-304 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Selected physiological processes and mechanisms or adaptation in invertebrate and vertebrate animals are examined by observation and controlled experiments.

Prerequisites:

Take BIO-274

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The concept of immunity, response to infection, structure of the immune system, biochemistry of immunoglobins, antigen-antibody interactions, allergy, immunological injury, lymphocyte subpopulations and cellular immunity, tolerance suppression and enhancement. Taught alternate/even years.

Prerequisites:

BIO-274 and BIO-L274 or BIO-285 and BIO-L285; BIO-L385 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The molecular mechanisms of host-microbe interactions and the epidemiology and public health aspects of microorganisms are stressed. Also covered are current topics in microbiology including antimicrobial therapy and resistance, emerging pathogens and novel applications of microbiology. Experimental design and troubleshooting skills are developed, using contemporary microbiology and molecular biology laboratory techniques. Taught alternate/odd years.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111; CHEM-211/L211; BIO-L403 concurrently;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The study of cells, approached through examinations of biochemical mechanisms, the relation between the structure and function of biological molecules and organelles, and the regulation of normal and diseased cells.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L11 and CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211. Must take BIO-403 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Examination of biological molecules and their role in cell function. Techniques used in these examinations will include enzymatic analyses, gel electrophoresis, immunologic identification, chromatography, and spectroscopy. Students are expected to develop their proficiency in the laboratory techniques used, to analyze their results in a quantitative manner, and to present their findings.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-311 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274 and BIO-L474 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An examination of concepts and techniques of modern molecular biology. Topics include the structure and function of DNA, RNA, and proteins, the regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, genetic modification of organisms, and genome analysis. This course will incorporate readings and discussions of primary scientific literature. Spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Take CHEM-331 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274. BIO-474 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This upper level laboratory course will consist of a semester-long project in the form of a series of consecutive experiments involving the generation of a genetically modified organism and its subsequent molecular analysis. Techniques employed will include genetic screens, DNA isolation, restriction endonuclease analysis, transformation of bacteria,gel electrophoresis, gene reported assays, RNA isolation, reverse transcription, and quantitative PCR.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114, L114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on embryonic development in vertebrates. The conceptual focus on evolutionary developmental biology includes comparative developmental mechanisms and Epigenetic processes.

Prerequisites:

BIO111/BIOL111, BIO114/BIOL114. BIO274/BIOL274 may be taken as a corequisite

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Biology Internship: This course provides students with credit for an unpaid internship completed during the semester when credit is earned. Students must secure an approved internship and provide documentation from the internship's overseer to a full time faculty member sponsor in order to register for the course. The internship must involve participation in research and / or patient care. Students or their overseers will be required to submit monthly records of internship hours and provide the faculty sponsor with a written summary of internship experiences and accomplishments by the last week of classes. Only one internship may be used as a biology elective. This course is available for variable credit. Prerequisites: An Internship for Credit form must be submitted to the department chair Credits: 1-4

Prerequisites:

CHEM 211; CHEM L314 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the basic techniques of collecting and analyzing data from different types of instrumentation, including: ultraviolet, visible, fluorescence, atomic and emission spectroscopy; chromatographic methods; electrochemical measurements. Students will apply these techniques to problems in chemistry, forensics, and environmental science.

Prerequisites:

CHEM L211; CHEM 314 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory experiments in chemical analysis using instrumental techniques, including spectroscopy and chromatography. Data collection and evaluation includes computer-based methods. Reports are prepared in professional style.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 212/L212 or permission of instructor. CHEM L331 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the foundations of biochemistry, including the structure, organization and behavior of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Topics include enzyme catalysis, kinetics, and inhibition as well as protein regulation and membrane structure. Introduces the use of biochemical literature and bioinformatics techniques.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 212/L212 or permission of instructor. CHEM 331 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory course introducing biochemical techniques. Includes buffer preparation, PCR, purification of DNA and proteins, agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, protein quantitation and detection, and enzyme kinetic assays.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 331 and CHEM-L332 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the principles of bioenergetics and metabolism of biomolecules. Includes intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and oxidative phosphorylation. Additional topics include signal transduction and the regulation and integration of metabolism.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 331/L331. CHEM 332 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Advanced biochemistry laboratory course where students learn experimental design and critical analysis of the scientific literature while conducting novel research. Projects vary from year to year, but may include recombinant DNA techniques, purification and quantitation of DNA and proteins, protein detection, enzyme kinetics, and bioinformatics. Research is presented as a poster at the annual STEM banquet.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 211, or permission of instructor

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A study of the chemical processes (including biologically mediated ones) that affect the cycling and ultimate fate of chemicals in the environment. Topics include air, water, and soil chemistry as well as energy and climate change. The effects of pollutant loads on natural systems and the remediation and treatment methods used to minimize pollutant loads are investigated. 3 hour lecture. Normally offered spring, odd numbered years.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 355 must be taken concurrently. Take CHEM-L211;

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate principles covered by topics in CHEM 355. Prerequisites: CHEM L211, concurrent enrollment in CHEM 355 required. 4-hour laboratory. Normally offered spring, odd numbered years.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: CHEM 212.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Expands on topics introduced in Organic Chemistry I and II; depending on student interest, may include in-depth discussions of carbonyl chemistry, industrial organic chemistry, organometallic chemistry and biomolecules.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course presents an overview of the origins, components, organization, and operation of the health system in the United States. It is an introduction to the major health issues and institutions, including the settings in which health services are delivered, providers of these services, and the public and private payers for services.

Prerequisites:

MATH-104, or MATH-121, or MATH level 3

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Linear Modeling (for example, using linear functions to model supply/demand situations), graphing, linear programming, financial functions (compound interest, annuities, and amortization of loans) sets, Venn diagrams, counting and combinatorics, discrete probability, conditional probability, Bernoulli experiments, Bayes theorem. Several sections offered each semester. *This course cannot be applied toward a departmental concentration in Mathematics by Sawyer Business School students.

Prerequisites:

MATH-164 or MATH-165 with a minimum grade of C

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Riemann sums and definite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (areas); integration of exponential functions, trig functions, and inverse trig functions; techniques of integration (substitution, by parts, trig integrals, trig substitution, partial fractions); area, volume, and average value applications; differential equations (separable, exponential growth, linear); improper integrals; infinite sequences and series; convergence tests; power series; Taylor and Maclaurin series (computation, convergence, error estimates, differentiation and integration of Taylor series). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

MATH-165 or MATH-164 with a grade of C or better

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics include: random variable and distribution; expectation and variance; special discrete/continuous distributions (uniform, binomial, negative binomial, geometric, hypergeometric, Poisson, normal, and exponential distributions); joint distribution, marginal distribution and conditional distribution; covariance; limit theorems (law of large numbers and central limit theorem); introduction to confidence interval and hypothesis testing; regression analysis. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites:

MATH 166 with grade of C or better

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Parametric equations and polar coordinates (curves, areas, conic sections); vectors and the geometry of space (the dot product, vector arithmetic, lines and planes in 3-space, the cross product, cylinders and quadratic surfaces); vector functions (limits, derivatives and integrals, motion in space); partial derivatives (functions of several variables, limits and continuity, tangent planes and differentials, chain rule, directional derivatives, gradient, extrema, Lagrange multipliers); multiple integrals (double integrals, applications); vector calculus (vector fields, line integrals, fundamental theorem for line integrals, Green's Theorem, curl and divergence, parametric surfaces, surface integrals). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

Take MATH-185 with a grade of C or better

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics covered include: Algorithms, growth of functions (big O notation), computational complexity of algorithms, divide-and-conquer algorithms, graphs and their properties (isomorphisms of graphs, Euler and Hamilton paths, shortest path problem, graph coloring) trees (tree traversal, minimum spanning trees). As time allows: matrices and linear transformations.

Prerequisites:

Take MATH-185 with a grade of C or better

Credits:

4.00

Description:

this course is intended to provide a firm foundation for and a taste of the study of advanced mathematics. While the course content varies somewhat, it is designed to give students a deeper understanding of the algebraic and analytical structure of the integers, the rational numbers and the real numbers and how they act as a building block to a variety of fields of mathematics. Students are introduced to the process of mathematical discovery and the language of mathematics. Exercises and projects are designed to illustrate the need for proof and to further refine the student's ability to analyze, conjecture and write mathematical proofs. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level mathematics courses and, after completing it a student will be in a position to determine realistically if he or she ought to major or minor in mathematics.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: Phil 119, or 123, or 127.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of the moral problems facing health-care practitioners, their patients, and others involved with the practice of medicine in today's society. Issues include euthanasia, the ethics of medical experimentation, the use of reproductive technologies, genetic counseling and genetic engineering, truth-telling and confidentiality in doctor-patient relationships, the cost and availability of medical care. Normally offered every third year.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 111-112 or PHYS 111-112 Or Permission of Instructor

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is designed as an introduction to nanotechnology and some of its important uses. It is aimed at science majors who have taken basic courses in physics or chemistry. The course will cover the properties and uses of carbon-nanotubes, nanocomposites, and other nanomaterials that are being fabricated in labs and industries around the world. It will serve as an introduction to the important role of nanomaterials in solving modern-day energy problems.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys core theoretical concepts and contemporary empirical research from the major sub-fields of psychology: physiology; perception; cognition; learning; emotion; motivation; development; personality; psychopathology; psychotherapy; and social behavior. Required for psychology majors. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development in youth (i.e., from conception through adolescence). Surveys major developmental approaches including biological, learning, and contextual/environmental theories. Major focus is on normal development. Normally offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114 and Sophomore standing

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores and examines basic models of helping and provides supervised practice of helping skills. Format includes lecture, discussion, role play, and video feedback. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114, and Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the concepts of psychological disorder and focuses on description and etiology of various mental health problems from a variety of different theoretical perspectives. Students develop familiarity with the DSM classification system and major disorders described within it, including mood and anxiety disorders, thought disorders, and personality disorders. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114 and Sophomore Standing.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys theory and research about the physical, mental, and psychological aspects of life-span development. Age-related changes in mental health, personality, self-image, sexual relations, friendships, career development and spirituality are explored. Aging may also be explored as a global, demographic and cross-cultural issue. Research surrounding death and dying, bereavement, and hospice/nursing home care is also presented. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114 and sophomore standing

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the etiology and symptoms of disorders of childhood and adolescence, as well as current therapeutic approaches. Developmental changes in the incidence of externalizing disorders, such as conduct disorder and attention deficit disorder, and internalizing disorders, such as depression and eating disorders, are addressed. Disorders that affect both behavioral and mental functioning such as Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and autism may also be included. The role of development in the understanding and treatment of the childhood disorders is reviewed. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Science and Radiation Therapy majors only.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Enables opportunity for students to participate in career-related experiential internship. Assists students in preparing for Radiation Science-related career and provides exposure to potential career option. Promotes development of necessary professional skills.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to the sociological understanding of human interaction, group process and social structures. Students are introduced to basic concepts, theories and methods of sociological investigation. Majors and minors must pass with a grade of "C" or better.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the development of children and adolescents from biological, psychological, and sociological perspectives. Major themes and changes associated with each developmental stage are discussed. The course explores practical implications of theory and research (parenting, juvenile justice, etc.), and current topics in child and adolescent development. Class format includes lectures discussion, debates and direct observation of children.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will look at the special opportunities and obligations of those in the health and legal professions to protect human rights. There will be an overview of human rights doctrine and key documents. Students will learn to apply human rights principles to particular occupations in the health and legal professions.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides students with an introduction to how social norms, structures, and practices shape experiences of illness and health. Among the topics that will be covered are: health and the environment, the reasons some groups of people are less healthy than others, living with chronic illness and disabilities, and public debates surrounding issues such as performance enhancing drugs and sports, Attention Deficit Disorder and the HPV vaccine. Required for all students in the health, Medicine and the Body Concentration.

Prerequisites:

This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. In this course, students will learn about how the U.S. health care system works. We will study the politics and economics of the health care system and discuss the key health care policy issues of this decade. Using the theoretical perspectives provided by sociology, we will look at issues of power, hierarchy, race, and gender vis-a-vis the health care system. Reading for this course centers on first person narratives by people working in the health care system. This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Consideration of the physiological, psychological and social factors associated with the aging process. Contemporary American values toward the elderly are compared and contrasted with historical and cross-cultural studies. Current opportunities and techniques enabling the elderly to enrich and expand their societal roles are explored.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of changing definitions of life and death, social factors affecting causes and rates of death, care of the dying and their families, institutionalization, the funeral industry, suicide, crisis intervention, and the impact of technology on the dying process.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An exploration of topics that relate particularly to women as providers and consumers in the health care system. The course will consider historical and current information on issues of reproduction, technology, health and illness.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of how different cultures understand health and illness. Healing approaches from Asia, Africa and the Americas will be explored.

Please check with the program director for potential Radiation Science elective approval of other biology, chemistry, physics, math, psychology, or sociology courses.

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

Honors in Radiation Science

To complete requirements for honors in the major, a candidate must:
  1. Graduate with a major GPA of 3.5 or higher
  2. Graduate with an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher
  3. Complete BIO-H503 or BIO-510
  4. Complete a research project and paper
  5. CAS Honors Program students only: Present work from your senior honors experience at the Honors Symposium or Pecha Kucha event

Radiation Therapy Certificate

Certificate Requirements: 17 courses and corresponding laboratories and clinical hours, 62 credits

Core Requirements (12 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 42 credits)

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Offers an introduction to the role of the radiation therapist and medical dosimetrist in a Radiation Oncology department. Through a combination of detailed lectures, discussions, role-playing, case studies, and hands-on laboratory exercises, students will be introduced to the professional and clinical aspects of their respective professions. Additional topics included radiation safety, patients rights, infection control, communication for the clinic, patient assessment, and psychosocial aspects of cancer including death and dying.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS 206; Radiation Therapy & Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Studying through a systems-based approach, this course reviews anatomy and physiology while teaching medical terminology. Topics will include discussing the major cancers associated with each anatomical system and introducing the student to radiation therapy treatment techniques and procedures.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A continuation of RAD 301. Through the same didactic approach, students will learn all of the anatomical systems and their related medical terminology not taught in RAD 301.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS L302; Radiation Therapy Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS-301 and RAD/PHYS-L301

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care.

Prerequisites:

RAD L315 concurrently; Radiation Biology, Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate), or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Content is designed to establish a thorough knowledge of the radiation physics used in radiation therapy treatments. Topics to be covered in this course include a review of basic physics (energy, mass, matter, SI units), structure of matter, types of radiations, nuclear transformations, radioactive decay, the fundamentals of x-ray generators and x-ray production, interactions of x and gamma rays with matter, absorbed dose, measurements of dose, principles of and practical use of ionization chambers and electrometers, Geiger counters and other survey meters, principles and practical use of TLDs, film, calorimetry, scintillation detectors, radiation protection and quality assurance.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS L315 concurrently; Radiation Biology, Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate), or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Explores topics including quality assurance measurements for radiation therapy, calibration of radiation teletherapy unit using ionization chambers, measurements of dose distribution via film, measurements of dose in a phantom via TLDs, radiation protection survey of therapy installation and brachytherapy sources, and radiation biology.

Prerequisites:

RAD 315; Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Expands on the concepts and theories presented in Radiation Physics I. It will provide a detailed analysis of the treatment units used in external beam radiation therapy, their beam geometry, basic dose calculations and dose distributions. Students will also learn the principles, theories, and uses of brachytherapy.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS 315; RAD L415 concurrently; Radiation Therapy & Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Discusses the factors that influence treatment planning and govern the clinical aspects of patient treatment. Topics to be covered include treatment planning with 3-D CT and MRI beams, isodose plan descriptions, clinical applications of treatment beams and advanced dosimetric calculations. Students will also contrast new emerging technologies with conventional radiation therapy techniques (SRT, SRS, IMRT, Image Guided Therapy, Respiratory Gating).

Prerequisites:

RAD 415 concurrently; Radiation Therapy & Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the student with the opportunity to apply clinical dosimetry principles and theories learned in the classroom to actual treatment planning situations within the clinic. Through hands-on lab exercises the student will demonstrate the use of the treatment planning instruments and interpret information they compute.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS 315; Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry Students only (including Radiation Science minors)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics covered include: physio-chemical aspects of energy absorption, the sequence of events after irradiation occurring on the molecular, cellular and organized tissue levels, radiation response and repair of eukaryotic cells, effects of radiation quality, dose rate, environmental conditions, cell cycle kinetics, tumor and normal cell population dynamics, radiation-induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis, tumor pathophysiology and radiobiology, and recent advances in experimental radiation oncology.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students will review cancer epidemiology, etiology, detection, diagnosis and prevention, lymphatic drainage, and treatment. The pathology(s) of each cancer will be presented in detail including the rationale for each preferred modality of treatment.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will begin Beginning with an introduction to radiology, students reviewing x-ray production and discussing basic radiation physics, image formation (Kv, mA) and distortion (blur, magnification), conventional processing and digital imaging. The above-mentioned radiographic imaging concepts will be presented with conventional lectures as well as with several imaging laboratories. In addition, the basic principles of each imaging modality, including mammography, CT, MRI, Nuc Med, and Ultra Sound, will be presented. With the use of departmental tours and guest lecturers, the use, benefits and limitations of each will be discussed. Building upon the information previously presented, radiographic anatomy will also be covered with an emphasis on cross sectional anatomy. Students will review basic anatomy viewed in sectional planes (axial/transverse) of the body. Using CT and MRI images, the topographic relationship between internal organs and surface anatomy will be interpreted and discussed.

Prerequisites:

Senior status, Radiation Therapy Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Available to senior students enrolled in the Radiation Therapy program. A seminar style course that serves many purposes; one of which will be preparing our graduating students for board certification (ARRT). Exam preparation will include the use of lectures, online teaching tools, mini mock exams, and a full-length mock exam. The seminar will also assist students with the preparation of their professional resumes including discussions regarding the skills necessary to make job interviews successful.

Cancer Care Requirement: (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers, as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes, detection, and prevention. Psychosocial aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, and bone marrow transplants.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers, as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes, detection, and prevention. Psychosocial aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, and bone marrow transplants. Service-learning is a pedagogy integrating academically relevant service activities that address human and community needs into a course. Students connect knowledge and theory to practice by combining service with reflection in a structured learning environment. Students will engage in service-learning with an underserved community partner in regards to cancer by working directly with cancer patients or by assisting on a project that supports cancer patients.

Mathematics Requirement: 1 course, 4 credits

Choose one of the following:

Prerequisites:

MATH-104, MATH-121 or MATH level 4

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A one-semester introduction to differential and integral calculus. Theory is presented informally and topics and techniques are limited to polynomials, rational functions, logarithmic and exponential functions. Topics include a review of precalculus, limits and continuity, derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives to graphing, minima/maxima, applications of the derivative, marginal analysis, differential equations of growth and decay, anti-derivatives, the definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and area measurements. This course cannot be used to satisfy core or complementary requirements by students majoring in chemistry, computer science, engineering, mathematics, or physics. Several sections offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121 with a minimum grade of C, MATH-075, or MATH level 5

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Functions, limits and continuity, squeeze theorem, limits at infinity; instantaneous rate of change, tangent slopes, and the definition of the derivative of a function; power, product, and quotient rules, trig derivatives, chain rule, implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; derivatives of other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions, exponential and log functions, hyperbolic trig functions); applications of the derivative (implicit differentiation, related rates, optimization, differentials, curve sketching, L'Hopital's rule); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Biostatistics Requirement: 1 course 4 credits

Choose one of the following:

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduction to the statistical methods used to evaluate biological problems. Sampling, probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, experimental design, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation are some of the topics offered. Software for data handling, graphics, and analysis will be used.

Prerequisites:

MATH 128 or higher. REMINDER: STATS 250 is a required prerequisite MKT 220, FIN 200 and ISOM 201(prerequisite for ISOM 319)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Application of statistical analysis to real-world business and economic problems. Topics include data presentation, descriptive statistics including measures of location and dispersion, introduction to probability, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions including binomial and normal distributions, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical inference including estimation and hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression analysis. The use of computers is emphasized throughout the course. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114; Restricted to majors only unless with permission of instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the use of statistics as tools for description and decision-making, including hypothesis testing. Prepares students for the analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of psychological research. Required for psychology majors; should be taken before the junior year. Offered every semester.

Ethics Requirement: 1 course, 4 credits

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A systematic introduction to the major thinkers and their positions on the main issues of ethics, such as: What is morality? What are moral values? How should we live our lives? Are there objective, universal, absolute moral standards? If so, what are they, and what is their basis? 1 term - credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of contemporary Western society, particularly in the United States, in relation to philosophical attempts to define the "good life." Current books that exhibit a philosophical approach towards important contemporary social issues will be discussed, as well as classics in philosophy. Topics may include: civic virtue, consumerism, current events, economic justice, popular culture (film, music, television), religion and secularism, etc. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A critical examination of a number of contemporary moral issues such as: abortion, affirmative action, animal rights, capital punishment, cloning, drug legalization, environmental ethics, euthanasia, genetic engineering, gun control, pornography, same-sex marriage, suicide, war and terrorism, etc. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: Phil 119, or 123, or 127.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of the moral problems facing health-care practitioners, their patients, and others involved with the practice of medicine in today's society. Issues include euthanasia, the ethics of medical experimentation, the use of reproductive technologies, genetic counseling and genetic engineering, truth-telling and confidentiality in doctor-patient relationships, the cost and availability of medical care. Normally offered every third year.

Radiation Science Elective: 1 course and its corresponding laboratory where applicable, 4 credits

Choose one of the following:

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO L114 concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Rigorous introduction to organismal biology emphasizing evolution, phylogenetics, form, and function. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

Must take BIO 114 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A series of laboratory experiences in evolution, diversity, anatomy and physiology.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111 and BIO 114/L114;

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This interactive introduction to nutrition explores the science of human nutrition and further reviews concepts of how nutrition can promote health and well being. The course will review specific nutrient needs and functions, nutrient digestion, and the role of diet in well being and in the presence of chronic disease. Weekly course work encourages scientific literacy and fosters critical evaluation of nutrition in the news and in social media.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111, L111 and BIO 114, L114 and CHEM 111, L111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The course is designed as an application base educational experience that will allow students to learn the standard techniques associated with successful cell culture. As such, students are responsible for the maintenance, propagation, isolation, and preservation of their cells. A number of cell types and experimental manipulations of the cultures are investigated throughout the semester.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111 and BIO 114/L114; BIO L274 concurrently;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An examination of the basic principles of genetics in eukaryotes and prokaryotes at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. Topics include Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, structure and function of chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, and population genetics.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114. Must be taken concurrently with BIO 274.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Experiments designed to demonstrate principles presented in lecture, using a range of genetic model organisms that include E. coli, B. subtilis, S. cerevisiae, D. melanogaster, S. fimicola, and C. elegans.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111; BIO-L285 concurrently;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Viruses and bacteria are surveyed in terms of their ecology, biochemistry, taxonomy, molecular biology and control.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111; BIO 285 concurrently;

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Introduction to microbiological techniques and their applications to health, research and industry.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114. Must take BIO-L304 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Mechanisms of physiological adaptations to environmental challenges are studied. Examples of gas exchange, osmoregulation, fluid transport, temperature regulation, nervous control, and movement are examined in various animal forms through class lecture and discussion, required readings, and external lectures. Spring semester.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114. Must take BIO-304 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Selected physiological processes and mechanisms or adaptation in invertebrate and vertebrate animals are examined by observation and controlled experiments.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, BIO-L114, BIO-274, and BIO-L274

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to the development of cancer. Factors contributing to tumorgenesis, angiogenesis, and metastasis will be discussed; these factors, oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and signal transduction networks. In addition, an investigation of current strategies for cancer prevention and treatment will be considered.

Prerequisites:

Take BIO-274

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The concept of immunity, response to infection, structure of the immune system, biochemistry of immunoglobins, antigen-antibody interactions, allergy, immunological injury, lymphocyte subpopulations and cellular immunity, tolerance suppression and enhancement. Taught alternate/even years.

Prerequisites:

BIO-274 and BIO-L274 or BIO-285 and BIO-L285; BIO-L385 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The molecular mechanisms of host-microbe interactions and the epidemiology and public health aspects of microorganisms are stressed. Also covered are current topics in microbiology including antimicrobial therapy and resistance, emerging pathogens and novel applications of microbiology. Experimental design and troubleshooting skills are developed, using contemporary microbiology and molecular biology laboratory techniques. Taught alternate/odd years.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111/L111; CHEM-211/L211; BIO-L403 concurrently;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The study of cells, approached through examinations of biochemical mechanisms, the relation between the structure and function of biological molecules and organelles, and the regulation of normal and diseased cells.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L11 and CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211. Must take BIO-403 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Examination of biological molecules and their role in cell function. Techniques used in these examinations will include enzymatic analyses, gel electrophoresis, immunologic identification, chromatography, and spectroscopy. Students are expected to develop their proficiency in the laboratory techniques used, to analyze their results in a quantitative manner, and to present their findings.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-311 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274 and BIO-L474 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An examination of concepts and techniques of modern molecular biology. Topics include the structure and function of DNA, RNA, and proteins, the regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, genetic modification of organisms, and genome analysis. This course will incorporate readings and discussions of primary scientific literature. Spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Take CHEM-331 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274. BIO-474 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This upper level laboratory course will consist of a semester-long project in the form of a series of consecutive experiments involving the generation of a genetically modified organism and its subsequent molecular analysis. Techniques employed will include genetic screens, DNA isolation, restriction endonuclease analysis, transformation of bacteria,gel electrophoresis, gene reported assays, RNA isolation, reverse transcription, and quantitative PCR.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114, L114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on embryonic development in vertebrates. The conceptual focus on evolutionary developmental biology includes comparative developmental mechanisms and Epigenetic processes.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 211; CHEM L314 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the basic techniques of collecting and analyzing data from different types of instrumentation, including: ultraviolet, visible, fluorescence, atomic and emission spectroscopy; chromatographic methods; electrochemical measurements. Students will apply these techniques to problems in chemistry, forensics, and environmental science.

Prerequisites:

CHEM L211; CHEM 314 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory experiments in chemical analysis using instrumental techniques, including spectroscopy and chromatography. Data collection and evaluation includes computer-based methods. Reports are prepared in professional style.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 212/L212 or permission of instructor. CHEM L331 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the foundations of biochemistry, including the structure, organization and behavior of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Topics include enzyme catalysis, kinetics, and inhibition as well as protein regulation and membrane structure. Introduces the use of biochemical literature and bioinformatics techniques.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 212/L212 or permission of instructor. CHEM 331 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory course introducing biochemical techniques. Includes buffer preparation, PCR, purification of DNA and proteins, agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, protein quantitation and detection, and enzyme kinetic assays.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 331 and CHEM-L332 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the principles of bioenergetics and metabolism of biomolecules. Includes intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and oxidative phosphorylation. Additional topics include signal transduction and the regulation and integration of metabolism.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: CHEM 212.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Expands on topics introduced in Organic Chemistry I and II; depending on student interest, may include in-depth discussions of carbonyl chemistry, industrial organic chemistry, organometallic chemistry and biomolecules.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course presents an overview of the origins, components, organization, and operation of the health system in the United States. It is an introduction to the major health issues and institutions, including the settings in which health services are delivered, providers of these services, and the public and private payers for services.

Prerequisites:

MATH-104, or MATH-121, or MATH level 3

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Linear Modeling (for example, using linear functions to model supply/demand situations), graphing, linear programming, financial functions (compound interest, annuities, and amortization of loans) sets, Venn diagrams, counting and combinatorics, discrete probability, conditional probability, Bernoulli experiments, Bayes theorem. Several sections offered each semester. *This course cannot be applied toward a departmental concentration in Mathematics by Sawyer Business School students.

Prerequisites:

MATH-164 or MATH-165 with a minimum grade of C

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Riemann sums and definite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (areas); integration of exponential functions, trig functions, and inverse trig functions; techniques of integration (substitution, by parts, trig integrals, trig substitution, partial fractions); area, volume, and average value applications; differential equations (separable, exponential growth, linear); improper integrals; infinite sequences and series; convergence tests; power series; Taylor and Maclaurin series (computation, convergence, error estimates, differentiation and integration of Taylor series). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

MATH-165 or MATH-164 with a grade of C or better

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics include: random variable and distribution; expectation and variance; special discrete/continuous distributions (uniform, binomial, negative binomial, geometric, hypergeometric, Poisson, normal, and exponential distributions); joint distribution, marginal distribution and conditional distribution; covariance; limit theorems (law of large numbers and central limit theorem); introduction to confidence interval and hypothesis testing; regression analysis. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites:

MATH 166 with grade of C or better

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Parametric equations and polar coordinates (curves, areas, conic sections); vectors and the geometry of space (the dot product, vector arithmetic, lines and planes in 3-space, the cross product, cylinders and quadratic surfaces); vector functions (limits, derivatives and integrals, motion in space); partial derivatives (functions of several variables, limits and continuity, tangent planes and differentials, chain rule, directional derivatives, gradient, extrema, Lagrange multipliers); multiple integrals (double integrals, applications); vector calculus (vector fields, line integrals, fundamental theorem for line integrals, Green's Theorem, curl and divergence, parametric surfaces, surface integrals). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

Take MATH-185 with a grade of C or better

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics covered include: Algorithms, growth of functions (big O notation), computational complexity of algorithms, divide-and-conquer algorithms, graphs and their properties (isomorphisms of graphs, Euler and Hamilton paths, shortest path problem, graph coloring) trees (tree traversal, minimum spanning trees). As time allows: matrices and linear transformations.

Prerequisites:

Take MATH-185 with a grade of C or better

Credits:

4.00

Description:

this course is intended to provide a firm foundation for and a taste of the study of advanced mathematics. While the course content varies somewhat, it is designed to give students a deeper understanding of the algebraic and analytical structure of the integers, the rational numbers and the real numbers and how they act as a building block to a variety of fields of mathematics. Students are introduced to the process of mathematical discovery and the language of mathematics. Exercises and projects are designed to illustrate the need for proof and to further refine the student's ability to analyze, conjecture and write mathematical proofs. This course is a prerequisite for most upper level mathematics courses and, after completing it a student will be in a position to determine realistically if he or she ought to major or minor in mathematics.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: Phil 119, or 123, or 127.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of the moral problems facing health-care practitioners, their patients, and others involved with the practice of medicine in today's society. Issues include euthanasia, the ethics of medical experimentation, the use of reproductive technologies, genetic counseling and genetic engineering, truth-telling and confidentiality in doctor-patient relationships, the cost and availability of medical care. Normally offered every third year.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 111-112 or PHYS 111-112 Or Permission of Instructor

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is designed as an introduction to nanotechnology and some of its important uses. It is aimed at science majors who have taken basic courses in physics or chemistry. The course will cover the properties and uses of carbon-nanotubes, nanocomposites, and other nanomaterials that are being fabricated in labs and industries around the world. It will serve as an introduction to the important role of nanomaterials in solving modern-day energy problems.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys core theoretical concepts and contemporary empirical research from the major sub-fields of psychology: physiology; perception; cognition; learning; emotion; motivation; development; personality; psychopathology; psychotherapy; and social behavior. Required for psychology majors. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development in youth (i.e., from conception through adolescence). Surveys major developmental approaches including biological, learning, and contextual/environmental theories. Major focus is on normal development. Normally offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114 and Sophomore standing

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores and examines basic models of helping and provides supervised practice of helping skills. Format includes lecture, discussion, role play, and video feedback. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114, and Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the concepts of psychological disorder and focuses on description and etiology of various mental health problems from a variety of different theoretical perspectives. Students develop familiarity with the DSM classification system and major disorders described within it, including mood and anxiety disorders, thought disorders, and personality disorders. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114 and Sophomore Standing.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys theory and research about the physical, mental, and psychological aspects of life-span development. Age-related changes in mental health, personality, self-image, sexual relations, friendships, career development and spirituality are explored. Aging may also be explored as a global, demographic and cross-cultural issue. Research surrounding death and dying, bereavement, and hospice/nursing home care is also presented. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH 114 and sophomore standing

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the etiology and symptoms of disorders of childhood and adolescence, as well as current therapeutic approaches. Developmental changes in the incidence of externalizing disorders, such as conduct disorder and attention deficit disorder, and internalizing disorders, such as depression and eating disorders, are addressed. Disorders that affect both behavioral and mental functioning such as Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and autism may also be included. The role of development in the understanding and treatment of the childhood disorders is reviewed. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Science and Radiation Therapy majors only.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Enables opportunity for students to participate in career-related experiential internship. Assists students in preparing for Radiation Science-related career and provides exposure to potential career option. Promotes development of necessary professional skills.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to the sociological understanding of human interaction, group process and social structures. Students are introduced to basic concepts, theories and methods of sociological investigation. Majors and minors must pass with a grade of "C" or better.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the development of children and adolescents from biological, psychological, and sociological perspectives. Major themes and changes associated with each developmental stage are discussed. The course explores practical implications of theory and research (parenting, juvenile justice, etc.), and current topics in child and adolescent development. Class format includes lectures discussion, debates and direct observation of children.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will look at the special opportunities and obligations of those in the health and legal professions to protect human rights. There will be an overview of human rights doctrine and key documents. Students will learn to apply human rights principles to particular occupations in the health and legal professions.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides students with an introduction to how social norms, structures, and practices shape experiences of illness and health. Among the topics that will be covered are: health and the environment, the reasons some groups of people are less healthy than others, living with chronic illness and disabilities, and public debates surrounding issues such as performance enhancing drugs and sports, Attention Deficit Disorder and the HPV vaccine. Required for all students in the health, Medicine and the Body Concentration.

Prerequisites:

This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. In this course, students will learn about how the U.S. health care system works. We will study the politics and economics of the health care system and discuss the key health care policy issues of this decade. Using the theoretical perspectives provided by sociology, we will look at issues of power, hierarchy, race, and gender vis-a-vis the health care system. Reading for this course centers on first person narratives by people working in the health care system. This course fulfills the ECR requirement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Consideration of the physiological, psychological and social factors associated with the aging process. Contemporary American values toward the elderly are compared and contrasted with historical and cross-cultural studies. Current opportunities and techniques enabling the elderly to enrich and expand their societal roles are explored.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of changing definitions of life and death, social factors affecting causes and rates of death, care of the dying and their families, institutionalization, the funeral industry, suicide, crisis intervention, and the impact of technology on the dying process.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An exploration of topics that relate particularly to women as providers and consumers in the health care system. The course will consider historical and current information on issues of reproduction, technology, health and illness.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of how different cultures understand health and illness. Healing approaches from Asia, Africa and the Americas will be explored.

Please check with the program director for potential Radiation Science elective approval of other biology, chemistry, physics, math, psychology, or sociology courses.

Required Clinical Hours

14 hours per week; Semester 2, Year 1
40 hours per week; 12 week Summer Session
24 hours per week, Year 2

Note: The department reserves the right to require the withdrawal of a student from the Radiation Therapy certificate program if, in its estimation, the probability of the student's success is doubtful. Factors such as academic performance, interest, effort, professionalism, compliance, attendance, and suitability for the field will be considered. Issues or concerns correlated with any one of these factors could result in withdrawal of the student from the program. Students who defer entry into the program, for any reason, will forfeit their space in the program and will be required to reapply for the following year. A student may be dismissed from the Radiation Therapy program if they fail to maintain the minimum GPA of 3.0 or if they achieve a final grade lower than “B” in any of the Radiation Therapy (RAD) courses listed above.

If admitted into the Radiation Therapy program, part-time and full-time students must complete clinical requirements within three years of being admitted. Radiation Therapy graduates may seek employment immediately following graduation and will also be eligible to apply for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) Radiation Therapy Certification Exam.

Gainful Employment Disclosure

Radiation Science and Therapy Courses

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Offers an introduction to the role of the radiation therapist and medical dosimetrist in a Radiation Oncology department. Through a combination of detailed lectures, discussions, role-playing, case studies, and hands-on laboratory exercises, students will be introduced to the professional and clinical aspects of their respective professions. Additional topics included radiation safety, patients rights, infection control, communication for the clinic, patient assessment, and psychosocial aspects of cancer including death and dying.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS 206; Radiation Therapy & Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Studying through a systems-based approach, this course reviews anatomy and physiology while teaching medical terminology. Topics will include discussing the major cancers associated with each anatomical system and introducing the student to radiation therapy treatment techniques and procedures.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A continuation of RAD 301. Through the same didactic approach, students will learn all of the anatomical systems and their related medical terminology not taught in RAD 301.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS L302; Radiation Therapy Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS-301 and RAD/PHYS-L301

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care.

Prerequisites:

Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Under the supervision of a Certified Medical Dosimetrist, students will gain hands on treatment planning experience in a clinical setting.

Prerequisites:

Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Under the supervision of a certified medical dosimetrist, students will gain hands on treatment planning experience in a clinical setting.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS L312, Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Under the supervision of a Certified Medical Dosimetrist, students will gain hands on treatment planning experience in a clinical setting.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS-301 and RAD/PHYS-L311

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Under the supervision of a Certified Medical Dosimetrist, students will gain hands on treatment planning experience in a clinical setting.

Prerequisites:

RAD L315 concurrently; Radiation Biology, Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate), or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Content is designed to establish a thorough knowledge of the radiation physics used in radiation therapy treatments. Topics to be covered in this course include a review of basic physics (energy, mass, matter, SI units), structure of matter, types of radiations, nuclear transformations, radioactive decay, the fundamentals of x-ray generators and x-ray production, interactions of x and gamma rays with matter, absorbed dose, measurements of dose, principles of and practical use of ionization chambers and electrometers, Geiger counters and other survey meters, principles and practical use of TLDs, film, calorimetry, scintillation detectors, radiation protection and quality assurance.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS L315 concurrently; Radiation Biology, Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate), or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Explores topics including quality assurance measurements for radiation therapy, calibration of radiation teletherapy unit using ionization chambers, measurements of dose distribution via film, measurements of dose in a phantom via TLDs, radiation protection survey of therapy installation and brachytherapy sources, and radiation biology.

Prerequisites:

RAD 315; Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Expands on the concepts and theories presented in Radiation Physics I. It will provide a detailed analysis of the treatment units used in external beam radiation therapy, their beam geometry, basic dose calculations and dose distributions. Students will also learn the principles, theories, and uses of brachytherapy.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS 315; RAD L415 concurrently; Radiation Therapy & Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Discusses the factors that influence treatment planning and govern the clinical aspects of patient treatment. Topics to be covered include treatment planning with 3-D CT and MRI beams, isodose plan descriptions, clinical applications of treatment beams and advanced dosimetric calculations. Students will also contrast new emerging technologies with conventional radiation therapy techniques (SRT, SRS, IMRT, Image Guided Therapy, Respiratory Gating).

Prerequisites:

RAD 415 concurrently; Radiation Therapy & Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the student with the opportunity to apply clinical dosimetry principles and theories learned in the classroom to actual treatment planning situations within the clinic. Through hands-on lab exercises the student will demonstrate the use of the treatment planning instruments and interpret information they compute.

Prerequisites:

RAD/PHYS 315; Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry Students only (including Radiation Science minors)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics covered include: physio-chemical aspects of energy absorption, the sequence of events after irradiation occurring on the molecular, cellular and organized tissue levels, radiation response and repair of eukaryotic cells, effects of radiation quality, dose rate, environmental conditions, cell cycle kinetics, tumor and normal cell population dynamics, radiation-induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis, tumor pathophysiology and radiobiology, and recent advances in experimental radiation oncology.

Prerequisites:

Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A continuation of Dosimetry I that focuses on advanced treatment planning techniques including intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), arc therapy, stereotactic treatment planning, and proton therapy. The advantages of each technique/modality over conventional 3D-treatment planning will be discussed. This will also be contrasted against the specific challenges presented by each technique such as the need for better immobilization, need for 4D CT scanning and daily IGRT (kV matching and/or CBCT).

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students will review cancer epidemiology, etiology, detection, diagnosis and prevention, lymphatic drainage, and treatment. The pathology(s) of each cancer will be presented in detail including the rationale for each preferred modality of treatment.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will begin Beginning with an introduction to radiology, students reviewing x-ray production and discussing basic radiation physics, image formation (Kv, mA) and distortion (blur, magnification), conventional processing and digital imaging. The above-mentioned radiographic imaging concepts will be presented with conventional lectures as well as with several imaging laboratories. In addition, the basic principles of each imaging modality, including mammography, CT, MRI, Nuc Med, and Ultra Sound, will be presented. With the use of departmental tours and guest lecturers, the use, benefits and limitations of each will be discussed. Building upon the information previously presented, radiographic anatomy will also be covered with an emphasis on cross sectional anatomy. Students will review basic anatomy viewed in sectional planes (axial/transverse) of the body. Using CT and MRI images, the topographic relationship between internal organs and surface anatomy will be interpreted and discussed.

Prerequisites:

Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics will include, radioactive sources, calibration, instrumentation, factors affecting dose calculations, definitions of LDR, MDR and HDR, treatment planning and clinical dose calculation, implantation techniques, implant localization/verification, regulations, radiation safety, storage and QA. Detailed coverage of prostate brachytherapy including LDR and HDR will be emphasized.

Prerequisites:

Senior Status; Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Includes a general overview of computer systems and networking in the field of radiation oncology. A historical view of computers will be covered as well as the intricate uses in the medical field today. Oncology information record and verification systems, as well as radiation therapy software used for imaging, contouring, treatment planning, and patient charting applications will be covered. Data and system security will also be addressed.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Science and Radiation Therapy majors only.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Enables opportunity for students to participate in career-related experiential internship. Assists students in preparing for Radiation Science-related career and provides exposure to potential career option. Promotes development of necessary professional skills.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Science and Radiation Therapy students only. Senior status required.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Promotes expansion of professional development skills for Radiation Science majors. Assists students with job search, networking, and professional cover letter and resume preparation, as well as discusses techniques necessary to make job interviews successful.

Prerequisites:

Senior status, Radiation Therapy Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Available to senior students enrolled in the Radiation Therapy program. A seminar style course that serves many purposes; one of which will be preparing our graduating students for board certification (ARRT). Exam preparation will include the use of lectures, online teaching tools, mini mock exams, and a full-length mock exam. The seminar will also assist students with the preparation of their professional resumes including discussions regarding the skills necessary to make job interviews successful.

Prerequisites:

Senior Status and Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will be available to second year clinical students enrolled in the Medical Dosimetry program. This seminar style course will serve a number of purposes; one will be to prepare our graduating students for board certification in MDCB for Medical Dosimetry. Exam preparation will include the use of lectures, online teaching tools, mini mock exams, and a full-length mock exam. The seminar will also assist students with the preparation of their professional resumes including discussions regarding the skills necessary to make job interviews successful.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will serve an an introduction to the role of the radiation therapist and medical dosimetrist in a Radiation Oncology department. Through a combination of detailed lectures, discussions, role-playing, case studies, and hands-on laboratory exercises, students will be introduced to the professional and clinical aspects of their respective professions. Additional topics included radiation safety, patients rights, infection control, communication for the clinic, patient assessment, and psychosocial aspects of cancer including death and dying.

Prerequisites:

PHYS 206; Radiation Therapy & Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Through a systems-based approach, this course will review anatomy and physiology while teaching medical terminology. This course will also discuss the major cancers associated with each anatomical system and introduce the student to radiation therapy treatment techniques and procedures.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care. These labs are available only to students enrolled in the "clinical track".

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of MS 301. Through the same didactic approach, the course will cover all of the anatomical systems and their related medical terminology NOT covered in MS 301.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care. These labs are available only to students enrolled in the "clinical track".

Prerequisites:

PHYS L302; Radiation Therapy Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides the necessary clinical experience to become a radiation therapist. All labs are conducted at our clinical affiliates. Under the supervision of licensed radiation therapists, the students will become increasingly proficient in the manipulation of treatment equipment, will gain a thorough understanding of radiation treatment plans, will deliver a prescribed radiation dose to cancer patients, and will acquire knowledge of all relevant aspects of patient care. These labs are available only to students enrolled in the "clinical track".

Prerequisites:

Take PHYS-301 PHYS-L301;*Course fulfills the following: Expanded Classroom Requirement.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Student radiation therapists will spend 12 weeks (full-time, 40 hrs/wk) gaining hands on patient care experience in the department of radiation oncology at our clinical affiliates. Under constant supervision by licensed therapists, the student will be guided toward the application of theory in the real world of cancer treatment.

Prerequisites:

Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Under the supervision of a Certified Medical Dosimetrist, students will gain hands on treatment planning experience in a clinical setting. Two,8-hour days per week, TTH.

Prerequisites:

Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Under the supervision of a certified medical dosimetrist, students will gain hands on treatment planning experience in a clinical setting. Three 8-hour days per week, MWF.

Prerequisites:

PHYS L312, Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Under the supervision of a Certified Medical Dosimetrist, students will gain hands on treatment planning experience in a clinical setting. Three, 8-hour days per week, MWF.

Prerequisites:

Take PHYS-301 and PHYS-L311; *Course fulfills the following: Expanded Classroom Requirement.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Student dosimetrists will spend 12 weeks (full-time, 40 hrs/wk) gaining hands on treatment planning experience in the department of radiation oncology at our clinical affiliates. Under constant supervision of certified medical dosimetrists, the student will be guided toward the application of theory in the real world of cancer treatment planning.

Prerequisites:

PHYS L315 concurrently; Radiation Biology, Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate), or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Content is designed to establish a thorough knowledge of the radiation physics used in radiation therapy treatments. Topics to be covered in this course include a review of basic physics (energy, mass, matter, SI units), structure of matter, types of radiations, nuclear transformations, radioactive decay, the fundamentals of x-ray generators and x-ray production, interactions of x and gamma rays with matter, absorbed dose, measurements of dose, principles of and practical use of ionization chambers and electrometers, Geiger counters and other survey meters, principles and practical use of TLDs, film, calorimetry, scintillation detectors, radiation protection and quality assurance.

Prerequisites:

PHYS 315 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This lab will cover a broad range of experiments associated with the Department of Radiation Oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital. Topics include: Quality assurance measurements for radiation therapy, calibration of radiation teletherapy unit using ionization chambers, measurements of dose distribution via film, measurements of dose in a phantom via TLDs, radiation protection survey of therapy installation and brachytherapy sources, and radiation biology.

Prerequisites:

PHYS 315; Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is intended to expand on the concepts and theories presented in Radiation Physics I. It will provide a detailed analysis of the treatment units used in external beam radiation therapy, their beam geometry, basic dose calculations and dose distributions. This course will also cover the principles, theories, and uses of brachytherapy. This course was previously MS 412

Prerequisites:

PHYS 315; PHYS L415 concurrently; Radiation Therapy & Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will discuss the factors that influence treatment planning and govern the clinical aspects of patient treatment. Topics to be covered include treatment planning with 3-D CT and MRI beams, isodose plan descriptions, clinical applications of treatment beams and advanced dosimetric calculations. This course will also contrast new emerging technologies with conventional radiation therapy techniques (SRT, SRS, IMRT, Image Guided Therapy, Respiratory Gating).

Prerequisites:

PHYS 415 concurrently; Radiation Therapy & Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This lab will provide the student with the opportunity to apply clinical dosimetry principles and theories learned in the classroom to actual treatment planning situations within the clinic. Through hands-on lab exercises the student will demonstrate the use of the treatment planning instruments and interpret information they compute.

Prerequisites:

PHYS 315; Radiation Science, Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry Students only (including Radiation Science minors)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics covered include: physio-chemical aspects of energy absorption, the sequence of events after irradiation occurring on the molecular, cellular and organized tissue levels, radiation response and repair of eukaryotic cells, effects of radiation quality, dose rate, environmental conditions, cell cycle kinetics, tumor and normal cell population dynamics, radiation-induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis, tumor pathophysiology and radiobiology, and recent advances in experimental radiation oncology.

Prerequisites:

Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of Clinical Dosimetry I and will focus on advanced treatment planning techniques including intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), arc therapy, stereotactic treatment planning, and proton therapy. The advantages of each technique/modality over conventional 3D-treatment planning will be discussed. This will also be contrasted against the specific challenges presented by each technique such as the need for better immobilization, need for 4D CT scanning and daily IGRT (kV matching and/or CBCT).

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course, taught by Massachusetts General Hospital physicians will review cancer epidemiology, etiology, detection, diagnosis and prevention, lymphatic drainage, and treatment. The pathology(s) of each cancer will be presented in detail including the rationale for each preferred modality of treatment.

Prerequisites:

Radiation Therapy (Major or Certificate) or Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will begin with an introduction to radiology, reviewing x-ray production and discussing basic radiation physics, image formation (Kv, mA) and distortion (blur, magnification), conventional processing and digital imaging. The above-mentioned radiographic imaging concepts will be presented with conventional lectures as well as with several imaging laboratories. In addition, the basic principles of each imaging modality, including mammography, CT, MRI, Nuc Med, and Ultra Sound, will be presented. With the use of departmental tours and guest lecturers, the use, benefits and limitations of each will be discussed. Building upon the information previously presented, radiographic anatomy will also be covered with an emphasis on cross sectional anatomy. Students will review basic anatomy viewed in sectional planes (axial/transverse) of the body. Using CT and MRI images, the topographic relationship between internal organs and surface anatomy will be interpreted and discussed.

Prerequisites:

Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics in this course will include, radioactive sources, calibration, instrumentation, factors affecting dose calculations, definitions of LDR, MDR and HDR, treatment planning and clinical dose calculation, implantation techniques, implant localization/verification, regulations, radiation safety, storage and QA. Detailed coverage of prostate brachytherapy including LDR and HDR will be emphasized.

Prerequisites:

Senior Status; Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is designed for the medical dosimetry student, to include a general overview of computer systems and networking in the field of radiation oncology. A historical view of computers will be covered as well as the intricate uses in the medical field today. Oncology information systems such as MOSAIC and ARIA, as well as radiation therapy software used for imaging, contouring, treatment planning, and patient charting applications will be covered. Data and system security will also be addressed.

Prerequisites:

Senior status, Radiation Therapy Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will be available to senior students enrolled in the Radiation Therapy and Medical Dosimetry programs. This seminar style course will serve a number of purposes; one will be to prepare our graduating students for board certification in their respective disciplines (AART for Radiation Therapy and MDCB for Medical Dosimetry). Exam preparation will include the use of lectures, student teaching, online teaching tools, mini mock exams, and a full-length mock exam. The seminar will also assist students with the preparation of their professional resumes including discussions regarding the skills necessary to make job interviews successful.

Prerequisites:

Senior Status and Medical Dosimetry Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will be available to second year clinical students enrolled in the Medical Dosimetry program. This seminar style course will serve a number of purposes; one will be to prepare our graduating students for board certification in MDCB for Medical Dosimetry. Exam preparation will include the use of lectures, online teaching tools, mini mock exams, and a full-length mock exam. The seminar will also assist students with the preparation of their professional resumes including discussions regarding the skills necessary to make job interviews successful.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers, as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes, detection, and prevention. Psychosocial aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy, surgery, chemotherapy, and bone marrow transplants.