Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages

Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) Certificate

Learn more about this certificate

Certificate Requirements: 3 courses, 12 credits

Core Requirements (2 courses, 8 credits)

Credits:

4

Description:

This course examines the specific needs and challenges of the various language and cultural groups in schools. Topics include: theories of 1st and 2nd language acquisition, strategies for teaching academic content, modifying instruction in the mainstream classroom, creating classroom cultures that invite all students into learning, the role of advocacy and professional collaboration in ESL, and analysis of policies related to assessment and placement of English Language Learners.

Prerequisites:

Take EDUC-315

Credits:

4

Description:

Students will have opportunities to put the theories and techniques learned in EDUC 315- Strategies for Working with English Learners into practice. Students will be placed in various Suffolk University sites or classrooms where they will work to meet the specific needs and challenges of educating various language and cultural groups. Students will be required to spend 30 hours working in their placements. Students will attend a weekly seminar where connections between theory and practice are explored, experiences are shared, and Teaching & Service Portfolios will be created.

Elective (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of communication variations and cultural viewpoints and their impact on cross-cultural communication. A special emphasis is placed on rituals and message patterns in non-Western cultures.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course helps students learn to communicate with and speak to culturally diverse audiences. Audience analysis, organizational patterns, speech creation, research skills, and delivery skills are all critical to understanding when interacting with diverse audiences. Students are provided with opportunities for oral presentations and interactions in different contexts.

Prerequisites:

This class fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

Credits:

4.00- 8.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. Students complete 35 hours per semester of educational tutoring in a local school (K-5), in conjunction with a weekly seminar on campus. Open to all majors. No previous experience required.

Credits:

4

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course introduces students to the basic competencies of school teaching. Topics include: lesson planning, classroom management, grouping for instruction, effective pedagogical practices, assessment methods, requirements for licensure in Massachusetts, and discipline specific curriculum development using the curriculum frameworks/common core state standards. Field observations (25 hours) required.

Credits:

4

Description:

The relationship between cultural diversity and schooling is explored by examining impediments to academic achievement and advancement by minority students, non-native English speaking students, and other under-represented groups. Topics include: standardized testing, identification of inequities, legal and ethical responsibilities of teachers, and promoting equity. Ten pre-practicum observation hours required for teacher candidates.

Credits:

4

Description:

A study of the major genres in creative writing (poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction) in which students will read as writers. Students will write a combination of analytical and original works, and learn the format and processes of writing workshops of writing workshops. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4

Description:

This course seeks to answer the following questions. What is literature? Why do we study literature? What methods aid the study of literature? What are English Studies all about? This course extends reading and writing skills, and provides more specialized terms, knowledge, and approaches to prepare students for study at the junior and senior level. Topics vary from term to term.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4

Description:

This course provides a thorough review and analysis of the rules of standard English grammar and usage, including the debate between prescriptive and descriptive grammar, the origin and authority of the rules taught in school and in handbooks of English, and the insights of modern linguistics. Normally offered alternate years

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4

Description:

This course studies a variety of workplace writing including summaries,memos, letters, directions, descriptions, reports and other technical and professional documents. Students may be required to complete certain assignments in collaborative teams. Document design and layout will also be emphasized. Normally offered alternate years

Credits:

4

Description:

Enables students to examine, as well as develop an awareness and appreciation of, diversity within today's society. Providing an overview of the major racial, ethnic, and cultural groups in the U.S., the focus is on the ways in which cultural awareness enhances professional helping relationships and improves the operation of human services systems.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: Spanish 202, 203 or 250 or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

Develops written and oral skills in various contexts and registers. Emphasis on strengthening written skills and learning to speak clearly and persuasively in Spanish. Short texts and audio-visual materials provide the basis for classroom activities which include regularly assigned essays, group discussions and debates.

Note: Some elective course offerings may have prerequisites. Any French course above FR-306 or any Spanish course above SPAN-290 may also fulfill the elective requirement.

Education Studies Courses

Credits:

4

Description:

Working with children and adolescents is a facet of many professions. This course will introduce students to the study of education occurring in formal and informal settings. This course focuses on the relationships among, and between, teachers, discourse, and community. Students will glean insight into the relationship of school and society as well as power and control in American Education. Required of all education minors. Five hours of field work required.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the nature and development of human abilities and the teaching-learning process. Considers the facts and generalizations of child and adolescent growth and development, working with diverse cultures, and special needs children in school settings. Ten hours of field work.

Prerequisites:

This class fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

Credits:

4.00- 8.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. Students complete 35 hours per semester of educational tutoring in a local school (K-5), in conjunction with a weekly seminar on campus. Open to all majors. No previous experience required.

Credits:

4

Description:

Students complete a minimum of 35 hours of tutoring and coaching in an educational setting, or a community organization in conjunction with a weekly seminar on campus. Programs include COACH, Connections to College, and others. Open to all majors. No previous experience required.

Prerequisites:

Open to all majors,Instructor's signature required

Credits:

4

Description:

Students complete all research, travel, and reporting requirements in conjunction with Suffolk University's Alternative Spring Break. Open to all majors. No previous experience required.

Credits:

4

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course introduces students to the basic competencies of school teaching. Topics include: lesson planning, classroom management, grouping for instruction, effective pedagogical practices, assessment methods, requirements for licensure in Massachusetts, and discipline specific curriculum development using the curriculum frameworks/common core state standards. Field observations (25 hours) required.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is designed for Jumpstart Corps members to develop competencies in teaching strategies for reading and writing. The course introduces theoretical and instructional issues in the development of literacy skills. Students will be engaged in reflective, critical consideration of students' diverse needs in the acquisition of literacy.

Credits:

4

Description:

The relationship between cultural diversity and schooling is explored by examining impediments to academic achievement and advancement by minority students, non-native English speaking students, and other under-represented groups. Topics include: standardized testing, identification of inequities, legal and ethical responsibilities of teachers, and promoting equity. Ten pre-practicum observation hours required for teacher candidates.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course examines the specific needs and challenges of the various language and cultural groups in schools. Topics include: theories of 1st and 2nd language acquisition, strategies for teaching academic content, modifying instruction in the mainstream classroom, creating classroom cultures that invite all students into learning, the role of advocacy and professional collaboration in ESL, and analysis of policies related to assessment and placement of English Language Learners.

Prerequisites:

Take EDUC-315

Credits:

4

Description:

Students will have opportunities to put the theories and techniques learned in EDUC 315- Strategies for Working with English Learners into practice. Students will be placed in various Suffolk University sites or classrooms where they will work to meet the specific needs and challenges of educating various language and cultural groups. Students will be required to spend 30 hours working in their placements. Students will attend a weekly seminar where connections between theory and practice are explored, experiences are shared, and Teaching & Service Portfolios will be created.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the evolution of schooling in the United States from The English High School to present. Theorists include: Mann, Franklin, Dewey, Sizer, and others.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course focuses on the exploration and understanding of issues, strategies and frameworks related to developing and implementing youth programs. Students will be exposed to developmental theories, and various components of effective youth programmatic planning. Topics include: conducting needs assessments, developing goals and objectives, logistics planning, recruitment and training, and program evaluation.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course is an in-depth investigation of policies effecting urban schools; topics include: demographic influence on education, influences of national and state regulations on urban schools, sociological factors unique to urban schools, and in-depth analysis of equity and achievement.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines major current issues of educational policy against the background of demographic trends, technological innovations, standardized testing, and curricular shifts.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Members of the Department will meet with students to direct their research in areas of special interest to them. Projects of this sort will be authorized only in unusual circumstances upon the recommendations of the Department Chairperson and with the approval of the Dean. Offered by arrangement only.