Associate of Science Degree

The AS degree program requires the successful completion of the following:
  • Core Requirements: 15 courses, 54-56 credits
  • Minimum Total Credits Required for Degree Conferral: 64 credits

First-Year Experience: 1 course, 1 credit

Students with 15+ transfer credits of college or university work are exempt.

Choose one of the following to be completed during the first semester of matriculation:

Prerequisites:

CAS students only. SBS students by special permission.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

CAS 101 is a one-credit course that meets once a week and is designed to help you have a successful transition to Suffolk University and our unique urban community. It is also designed to introduce you to the principles and concepts of Oral Communication and Presentation Skills. Through interactive exercises and engaging assignments you will explore the campus environment and learn about strategies for success as a student. You will present speeches about your research and activities to improve your abilities as a speaker.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

In this hands-on experiential course students examine potential career paths in Advertising Public Relations and Social Media become oriented to the university and the surrounding Boston area and identify professional resources in Boston that foster career development.

First-Year Seminar: 1 course, 4 credits

Students with 15+ transfer credits of college or university work are exempt.

Please note that not all courses are offered each semester. Students should contact their advisor to learn about current course offerings.

Choose one First-Year Seminar course from those listed below:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Two of the most daunting challenges the world faces (or will face) is how to provide for both its growing energy needs and potable drinking water. Regular news events include climate change droughts flooding and petroleum struggles. Human nature often requires a severe crisis before it responds. This course will investigate the historical science driving the use of energy since the Industrial Revolution to convert energy resources into work including the steam engine the electric motor and the internal combustion engine. It will also consider alternative energy options to fossil fuels such as solar wind geothermal and ocean power. Along the way we will consider the evidence for Global Warming and Climate Change. We will look into human nature simple life styles conspiracy theories and the influence of those in power to shape human opinion. We will also consider how our water supply is provided and where it goes after being used. What options do developing countries or drought racked areas have to remedy their water needs? Although the course pursues a scientific understanding of these issues the mathematics used will be gentle and a larger emphasis will be placed on the intuitive appreciation of these concerns.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Rain or shine the great 18th century Enlightenment philosophers would meet at the famous cafes of Paris to discuss their ideas and to observe and criticize society. From these informal debates emerged ideas that are at the core of our modern understanding of the nature of society marginality human nature civil rights the essence of creativity and genius. Come join us in the quest to understand define observe and analyze the key ideas and concepts of these great thinkers such as Rousseau Diderot and Voltaire still so relevant in our time. We will read key works of these creative thinkers and philosophers. We will enrich our experience and understanding through the use of film theatre performances museum visits as well as the occasional cafe debate.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This seminar will investigate the impact and legacy of the Beatles. The Fab Four deserve our scholarly attention as musical innovators and as cultural avatars of the 1960s an era that still exerts influence today. We will examine the many ways in which the Beatles rocked the establishment and became defining figures in post-war youth culture. We will also discuss other media (the visual arts film fashion style) and fields of study (mass media marketing recording technology copyright law English history) using the Beatles as our guides.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will focus on classic works of ancient and modern literature that examine the human condition from a tragic perspective. We will concentrate on close readings from the following texts: Homer's Iliad Sophocles' Antigone The Bhagavad-Gita Shakespeare's Othello Chekhov's short stories and Joyce's Dubliners.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

From some of the earliest examples of what we call science fiction to today's cutting edge writers artists and videographers the devastation of war and other disasters and their aftermath have loomed large in how the future (and alternative versions of the present) plays out. This course will look at some of the more important issues of future war and post-apocalyptic literature with a dash of television and film and a soupon of art.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is about the basketball hoop dream played out at the high school and college levels. We will study a wide variety of materials - novels films websites reference works - to understand both the construction and destruction of the hoop dream in such diverse places as New York City Seattle rural Indiana suburban Georgia and the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. Issues of race and culture will serve as guiding themes as we develop critical theory explaining why the hoop dream has persisted and adapted over time to fit the needs of its believers and supporters.

Credits:

4

Description:

"How is it that ""comics""\"

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Is there a relationship between accumulated political power and mass media representations? Is news content impacted by existing political power relations? It is the object of this course to critically analyze the role of the mass media within the framework of existing political power relations in the United States. In particular the course will focus on the role the mass media plays in promoting and reinforcing dominant political practices and ideologies. The course will begin by exploring various theories of the press notably its function in a democratic society as well as the concepts of power and propaganda. We will continue with a series of case studies complemented by secondary sources that highlight how media representations affect the contemporary distribution of political power in the US. Topics of discussion will include the current US war on terrorism the ongoing health care debate the public disavowal of "big government" and the concept of a liberal media.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This literature seminar will study and compare the short stories of Edgar Allan Poe Flannery O'Connor and Annie Proulx. Beginning with Poe as the father of the short story genre in America and exploring his critical theory of the "grotesque and arabesque" the class will examine the emergence of the gothic literary idiom as a classic American genre. Critical essays on the gothic aesthetic will be analyzed and film adaptations and documentaries will be viewed.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

With a focus on some selected ethnic groups from Asia "Asia in America" studies the history and current status of Asian Americans in Boston and other parts of the country. We will examine the major reasons why these immigrants chose to leave their home country as well as their expectations and experiences here in America. We will also discuss the issues Asian immigrants have faced in this adopted "home" as well as the connections and conflicts among different ethnic groups or even within the same ethnic group due to political and socio-economic reasons. The course will include some level of community engagement through Chinatown tour and service which may enable us to have a direct contact with the Asian American population and reflect on what is being discussed in class. Through this course we hope to gain a better understanding of the racial and cultural history of the country and arrive at a deep appreciation of the dynamics of cultural interactions in the twenty-first century. The course fulfills the SCGP requirement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

"Why did they change the ending of the book? The novel is so much better!" We will explore the concept and industry of film adaptation. Students will read novels and watch respective film adaptations to explore how the written word is adapted to the screen; both fiction and non-fiction works will be considered. Also field trips to past film locations in Boston will be taken to explore why specific settings were chosen for respective situations. Additionally students will create their own written adaptations of source materials putting into practice the concepts studied in class.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this project and team-based course students study a sustainability problem at Suffolk University and spend the semester developing proposals to address the problem. At the end of the course students will present their proposals to Suffolk University's sustainability committee and will exhibit their websites and visual aids in the Donahue lobby to educate the Suffolk community about sustainability. If their proposals are well-researched and well-communicated students can see their ideas actualized while they are still undergraduates.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

What accounts for the power of music to move us so profoundly? This course explores how our brains and music evolved together: "What music can teach us about the brain what the brain can teach us about music and what both can teach us about ourselves."

Credits:

4

Description:

This class will examine some of the many controversies surrounding the Vietnam and Iraq Wars," two conflicts that have been profoundly polarizing for the American people. There are widely divergent perspectives regarding the fundamental questions surrounding each war. Were the reasons for American involvement ""just""? To what extent were the methods used by the United States military during each war ""just""? To what extent did the media play an appropriate role before\"

Credits:

4.00

Description:

What do we live for? Which beliefs values and experiences sustain meaningful fulfilling existence? Are we authors of our destinies or powerless pawns in an unfathomable cosmic game? Does death render all our efforts superfluous? This award-winning course offers a cross-cultural interdisciplinary exploration of these questions through philosophical and religious texts art fiction autobiography and psychological studies. The course opens with the Old Testament's book of Ecclesiastes followed by three units: 1) A Life Worth Living: Humanity's Ideals focuses on the ancient and modern visions of human flourishing; 2) Threats to Meaning: Humanity's Discontents discusses the disillusionments leading to the loss of meaning; and 3) Recovery of Meaning: Crises and Hopes explores the post-crisis possibilities of self-discovery and growth. Please visit http://meaningoflife.cherkasova.org/

Credits:

4.00

Description:

How is it that the knowledge intelligence wisdom and values of the Greeks and Romans still educate and edify the world by providing venues towards leading fulfilling and dignified lives? The guiding principles of their respective civilizations rested upon eight pillars: -Humanism: It was recognized that humans have the potential to master their world and live life to the fullest. -The Pursuit of Excellence: To imagine the highest good and strive to attain it. -Self Knowledge: It is imperative to know oneself before seeking to know the world. -Rationalism: Always question reason and discern truth from falsehood and never consider any matter superficially. -Restless Curiosity: Often the resolution of one issue leads to the revelations of others mysteries and pursuits which compels further investigation. The wise individual makes this a lifelong endeavor. -Love of Freedom: As long as one brings no harm to others one must be free to live and discover as much as possible. -Individualism: All are unique and therefore must recognize individual strengths and identity. -The Practice of Moderation: The prudence of avoiding extremes in personal and social conduct. In this course students will read two (brief) texts on the Greek and Roman contributions to the world and then will proceed with specific readings which illuminate the eight principles above for achieving the good life.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This section of the Seminar for Freshmen will consider the forms venues and impacts of narrative nonfiction in contemporary culture. From the exploding popularity of personal essays in the digital age to the living evolving essays we create on social media we are constantly narrating and archiving our lives shaping their content for specific audiences. In doing so we shape what our experiences mean and represent. In order to analyze the power of narrative nonfiction we will look at a variety of multimodal texts: essays podcasts Instagram and Twitter feeds stand-up comedy and storytelling slams as well historical texts such as the essays of Michel de Montaigne and historical artifacts at the National Archives in Boston. We will also write our own narrative nonfiction and adapt our first-person stories for listening and viewing audiences such as the MassMouth story slam and podcasts like This American Life. Additionally we will practice narrative nonfiction for professional audiences using storytelling as a way to showcase personal strengths to employers internship coordinators and the like.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course explores the evolution of dogs from wolves and the ways in which dogs have adapted to their niche in human society. The ecology, behavior, genetics, and adaptations of dogs will be explored in relation to both their wolf ancestry and artificial selection by humans. The course includes 2 mandatory field trips to a wolf sanctuary and an animal shelter.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores themes of adventure self-discovery exile and culture shock in classic and contemporary travel writing (including fiction poetry and non-fiction) as well as film. Students will experiment with creative writing of their own develop theories of cosmopolitan world citizenship travel through the city of Boston on field trips and team up to learn about different countries in Suffolk's global network of study abroad programs.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course explores relationships between reproductive health and rights both nationally and internationally. Many of our topics fit into two broad areas: conflicts over the control of childbearing (sterilization abuse, birth control, and abortion) and conflicts over who deserves to be a mother,especially when the mothers in question face social stigma and lack political power. Other topics include safe birth and maternal mortality, breastfeeding, infertility and reproductive technology. We also examine the politics of women's sexual and reproductive autonomy, including the policies that shape women's choices to prevent, achieve, abort, or carry to term a pregnancy. Throughout, we are guided by the following questions: Why is reproduction an important site through which to understand society? How do statuses such as race, class, gender, sexuality and ability influence people's reproductive possibilities? What is the role of the state in shaping these experiences? How have communities supported or resisted efforts at reproductive control? Why is reproductive justice central to these answers?

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This writing and script analysis intensive course will explore plays across a range periods and styles. The scripts of five plays will be studied and we will attend performances of two of those works at professional theatres in Boston. Other activities will range from a backstage tour to conversations with theatre professionals such as producers directors actors designers playwrights and critics in order to lift the script off the page and provide a living experience of theatre. Requires students to be available for evening (usually Wednesday) performances. A fee for tickets at student rates will be assessed.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

It is hard to believe that only 60 years ago our only close-up view of a planetary body was that of Earth. We are truly living in the Golden Age of Space Exploration when a new mission every few years brings us spectacular images from either a neighbor in the solar system or galaxies at the edge of the universe. This course will describe the dozen space missions that changed our view of the universe ranging from our solar system to the most distant galaxies.

Credits:

4

Description:

Since the beginning of time and across cultures, people have been interested in the supernatural, the paranormal, and the otherworldly. Often, these phenomena have appeared in the form of witches, wizards, and spirits, whether good or bad, wicked or wonderful. Women who have not fulfilled traditional gender roles have historically been cast as witches or, to use Shakespeare's phrase," as ""weird sisters""\"

Credits:

4.00

Description:

While newspaper headlines focus on the multiple problems Europe is facing today the evolving adaptation of European nation states and the integration process receive less attention. Brexit and economic crises seem to be synonymous of Europe today but facts such as the European Union accepting five new members in the coming five years or Europe being the most advance environmental actor or the main international provider of official aid are often ignored by public opinion. This Seminar for Freshman examines the dynamic evolution of the integration process in Europe in the context of globalization. Three sections articulate the main debates and tensions in the interplay between national and supranational institutions and policies. The first part analyzes how eight European countries have forged their national preferences to delineate their level of immersion in the integration process; it later proceeds with the examination of the main historical events in the history of the integration process. The second part explores the functioning of the EU institutions in order to grasp the essence of the complex policy-making in the Europe of 28 members. The third and final section presents the analysis of the main areas of the EU policy making such as agriculture monetary and economic issues among others and observes the main developments in the area of EU external relations.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This semester we will explore Boston's history. We will read books visit historical sites and you will learn how to do historical research on your own. This course meets the requirement of Humanities and History.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on French-language films - with subtitles! - that address pressing social issues of the 20th and 21st centuries such as hunger female genital mutilation immigration racism economic inequality genocide gender sexuality colonialism and post-colonialism.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Readers lining up at midnight for the newest Harry Potter book hundreds of thousands of viewers crashing HBO's website in their eagerness to watch Game of Thrones: examples of fantasy's recent popularity are everywhere. This course explores the genre of contemporary fantasy through a historical and critical lens from the work of J.R.R. Tolkien to the 2015 Nebula Award Winner Uprooted. We will begin by reading selections from medieval literary texts including Arthurian legend and Anglo-Saxon epic to understand the roots of the fantasy genre and consider how these early works have inspired and informed the world-building efforts of later authors. We will also explore fantasy's newest manifestations across different kinds of media from big-budget film adaptations to internet fan fictions. Critical questions will include: How do works of fantasy deal with the ethical questions surrounding the categories of "good" and "evil" "monstrosity" and "otherness" How do common fantasy plots such as coming-of-age or quest narratives work to aid in fictional character development and build suspense? How are contemporary anxieties about issues such as gender race and class explored through the genre of fantasy?

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will focus on the concept of authenticity in American culture," from its origins in the early 19th century to the present. When the advertising gurus of Coca-Cola branded it as ""The Real Thing\"

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Most of the world's religious traditions have as a part of their doctrines some notion of immortality rendered both in scriptures as well as iconographically. What precisely is entailed by immortality and why does it constitute such a significant element of so many religious traditions? What can we learn about immortality by investigating various conceptions of the afterlife? Is immortality truly a desirable thing? These questions among others will be examined from the perspectives of philosophy religion psychology anthropology and biology. Besides being cross-disciplinary the course will be multi-media in nature. In addition to reading philosophical and religious texts concerning the nature of immortality students will study various accounts of immortality and the afterlife examine how the afterlife has been dealt with in (visual) art literature and film and investigate current research into life prolongation (biomedical gerontology).

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The thematic focus of this seminar will be friendship. Friendship is one of the most important of human relationships; one that every student in this seminar has already participated in for many years. It shapes who we are and helps determine who we may become. And while it is a universal phenomenon it has been practiced quite differently at various times and places in human history. And while we all have an intimate personal and practical knowledge of friendship through our own experiences sometimes things that are so close and so obvious to us can be hard to see. Over the course of the semester we will inquire into friendship from many different angles trying to gain both a broader and a deeper understanding than our own individual experience allows. We will look at friendship first through the lens of philosophy particularly through the foundational text of Aristotle The Nicomachean Ethics. We will look at other views of friendship from the ancient world starting in the past to help us see that friendship has not always been thought of the way we think of it now. After this initial foundation is laid we will examine other writers and thinkers and take up additional topics like friendship in different cultures friendship and gender friendship in and through the arts and include an examination of friendship through the lenses of many different academic disciplines to see how other systematic thinkers conceive of friendship. All along we will be comparing and contrasting with our own personal experiences and considering what modern technology such as social networking sites has done to influence friendship in the way we practice it and the way we conceive it. It is the aim of this class that students not just study different academic points of view but that that they take up the questions and challenges that these thinkers present to them and fully engage with them on a meaningful personal level.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Hyphenated-Americans of Latino origin come from many places and backgrounds. Often perceived as a divide an either/or that separates and distinguishes one ethnic group from another the hyphen can also be viewed as a link that connects integrates and facilitates the formation of "new" cultural spaces. Through films and written narratives by and about U.S.A. Latino(a)(x)-Americans students will examine how individuals who live on the threshold between two languages and cultures embrace the challenge of preserving their own identity and moving beyond stereotypes. Each of the Latino/a/x authors that we will read in this course will describe his/her own experiences living in the U.S.A. By examining their views through our own filtered lens we shall try to answer questions like the following: 1. What role does language have in our definition/understanding of cultural identity? 2. How do individuals move beyond the hyphen and stop seeing themselves as hybrids? 3. How can an individual who does not belong to a marginalized group (i.e. one considered less powerful and secondary) understand and empathize with those who do? 4. How does globalization affect the dichotomies that arise in bi-cultural and multi-cultural communities?

Credits:

4.00

Description:

One hundred and sixty nine years have passed since the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed. It is only fitting to analyze the profound changes that the gain/loss of these territories caused for the citizens of both sides of the border. This course will explore the literature culture and history of the United States-Mexican Border and the most pressing problems pertaining to the region. Emphasis will be on contemporary border theater and film. The works of Salcedo Galindo Lopez and others will be studied as well as contemporary films and documentaries such as Alambrista Senorita Extraviada The Gatekeeper Sin Nombre Wetback: the Undocumented Documentary Victoria para Chino Which Way Home and much more. There are no prerequisites for this course. Though the course in conducted in English parallel readings in Spanish will be made available to those who wish to read and/or compare the original texts.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is an introduction to both ancient and modern Chinese civilization with a focus on its literature arts and 4000 year cultural history. We will see China at its earliest stages through its archaeology and progress to the heights of literary splendor in the Tang and Song Dynasties. Study of select early plays from the Mongol Yuan period will clearly tie into the development of Ming and Qing period fiction. With the fall of imperial China in 1911 the focus of literature changed drastically and we will study how many modern authors were able to draw from a massive wealth of literary resources to help create a new Chinese literature and culture. We will watch several films that will provide a rich visual portrait of the culture. We will read quite a few representative literary and historical works in English translation that will give a great deal of insight into modern China and how we can both relate to and interact with this complex and amazing country. This course is a good introduction to further study of Chinese history and culture and in particular provides a valuable context for students in all majors that wish to gain a deeper understanding of Asian culture.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

What makes a fact a fact? What makes a fact true? At one time these questions were only asked by epistemologists and postmodernists but with the rise of fake news and the discourses surrounding it these questions are relevant to everyone. Understanding facts is also essential to college students who must learn to use reliable sources in order to create credible work. In this class we will examine works of literature art science history and philosophy that interrogate how facts are created and how we determine their truth value. Texts will include podcasts novels and articles. We will also utilize the resources of Boston and Suffolk University; we will visit a news agency and a local museum and have a guest lecture from a Suffolk faculty member. By analyzing these texts participating in these experiences and completing a series of assignments that ask students to think critically and creatively this class seeks to understand how we create facts and why we need them.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The course will consider major changes in thought that revolutionized the cultures and societies in which they were embedded. Topics include the rise of monotheistic religions; the American Revolution; the recognition of slavery as a moral evil; the idea of women's equality; Freudianism; Darwinism; Marxism; as well as Einstein and the Theory of Relativity. We will enrich the readings and classroom conversations with visits to museums churches historic sites and other locations that reflect some aspect of the revolutionary changes that are our focus.

Credits:

4

Description:

Jazz and blues music of the early twentieth century has been hailed as a potent expression of African American life and as a major contribution to American culture. Albert Murray writes," ""'the blues idiom' is a synthesis of African and European elements\"

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Every story of an individual is also the story of the place the group the larger intersection of identities somehow connected to that person. In this class we'll examine ways in which nonfictional stories use individuals to represent the larger social categories to which they belong; how we use part of something to stand in for the bigger thing. We'll consider the difference between telling one's own story and having another tell it about you including efforts at divisive propaganda in writing image and multimodal texts. We'll consider single-author texts as well as more collaborative efforts like hashtag campaigns on social media. After we've studied the rhetoric others use students will write their own first-person stories situating their individual selves within some larger social context. As part of this students will each design and launch their own hashtag campaign to crowdsource other stories and images to put them in conversation with their own.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The figure of the criminal particularly one driven by madness has captivated our collective imaginations since Robert Louis Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde carrying over into film noir and horror and leading up to our contemporary fascination with serial killers true crime stories and extending even to a superhero film like Venom. Through a range of fictional and non-fictional examples from literature and film this course will explore how the "mad criminal" has been depicted with sympathy revulsion admiration and moral condemnation. On the flipside this course will also examine how the mad criminal opens up opportunities for examining and even questioning the legal and moral frameworks that define crime and criminality. Some of the recurring questions that will be explored in this seminar are: -How do we "authors filmmakers journalists readers/audiences" define "madness" and its relationship to criminality? -Where does the figure of the mad criminal come from and how has it changed over time? -How do we as audiences feel competing and even contradictory emotions toward the mad criminal ranging from fascination to fear? -How does the mad criminal force us to question our moral and legal systems and what the idea of a "civil society" in general is supposed to mean?

Credits:

4.00

Description:

We visit museums to be inspired. Museums have exhibits that face outward for the public but inside curators and exhibit designers work to preserve collections and bring them to different communities. We will go behind the scenes at art history and science/natural history museums in Boston as well as other institutional collections to see how curators preserve artifacts of the natural world and the creations of people. We will also study how patrons experience their exhibits to understand the most compelling ways to present a coherent experience for the public. Each student will curate a collection of their own and present them in an online exhibit.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This section of the Seminar for Freshmen will consider the role that writing plays in examining social justice issues through the storytelling venue of fiction. How does the writing and reading of fiction make us more socially-conscious people? Through an examination of selected readings from historical novels such as Colson Whitehead's The Underground Railroad and "The Shawl" by Cynthia Ozick (both the short story and novella companion) along with various short stories by E.L. Doctorow James Baldwin Toni Morrison and others students will analyze how such literature represents complex social issues through the conventions and techniques of fiction. In addition students will also produce historical fiction pieces of their own as a means of further understanding how fiction can be used as a tool for social change. Topics will include recent concerns related to immigration racism war African-American slavery the Holocaust and intergenerational trauma in America. Students will consider how the storytelling techniques of fiction allow readers to consider these topics both from a historical and contemporary perspective. In addition to course readings presentations and classroom conversations the class will also visit museums such as Museum of African American History and the local nonprofits like MIRA that that connect specifically to these topics and discuss those factors that shape the resulting dialogue and stories around them. From these visits students will be asked to write historical fiction specifically engaged in social justice issues as a way to showcase their understanding of how fiction can be used as a tool for social justice spreading awareness and greater critical thinking of some of today's most pressing and controversial topics.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

We've all heard the cliche that the pen is mightier than the sword. Simple words in all their mundane glory can stoke the fires of revolution topple regimes and bring sweeping change to society. Words and rhetoric (or the art of persuasion) is thus located at the very center of politics culture religion and literary production. Indeed the ability to speak and write persuasively is arguably one of the most-valued skills in our world today. In this course we will investigate the connection between language persuasion power and revolution. Our primary questions will be: How exactly is language a powerful force? How do we wield the power of language? Are there limits to language within our world? And how is rhetoric revolutionary? To fully examine this topic we will read a range of genres from Ancient Greece to the modern day: op-eds essays polemics poetry satire advertisements music and memes. This course will also include field trips to the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston during our week on visual aesthetics a trip around central Boston in search for powerful advertisements and a visit to the Ford Hall Forum the oldest free public lecture series in America.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is a brief study of one critical area with which young students interested in psychology must deeply engage. Nutrition and the psychological aspects of what we ingest for our nourishment physically and mentally is the key to our future and our humanity. We will cover three areas including food and our psychological interaction with food as a historical prelude to our Western cultural development. Next we will examine nutrients and how these help us to understand food as medicine for physical and psychological health and development. Finally we will consider the psychological impact of chemicals we ingest on the one hand because we are deceived by producers of food who seek to gain market share by manipulating what we eat and on the other hand because we are drawn to trying psychedelic chemicals past and present.

Credits:

4

Description:

Attention is a finite resource. The relative scarcity of your attention means, among other things, that it is incredibly valuable to others. The competition is startling in its intensity: there are as many claims to your attention as there are people in your life. Family and friends who love you want to maintain a relationship with you, while professors and spiritual leaders want to help shape you into a better version of yourself. Others, like upstanding politicians, need to explain your role in a wider community of citizens, and still others, like disreputable politicians, need to motivate you enough to grant them power and prestige. Then there are the multinational corporations and media conglomerates who collectively spend billions of dollars on advertising to hold your attention long enough that you might be inspired to hand over your credit card in exchange for a product that will further distract your attention from the meaningful stuff of life on this planet. This course endeavors to explore this fight for your attention. We will seek to better understand the psychological, philosophical, political, and cultural value of attention. In exploring the topic of attention, we will also ask about the role and function of distraction and boredom. We will work from the premise that how you choose to focus your attention has a profound impact on your life: it reaches every corner of your existence from your leisure time and education to your professional and political life. That which captures and holds your attention, in part, dictates your very sense of self.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Unravel the mystery of contemporary art the power of images and the messages they convey. Learn about the context in which art is created. As the French Urban Artist JR asks "Can Art Change the World?" In this course we will look at the purpose of art who is it made for and why? We will look at the intent of the artists the materials they choose and places art is installed. Get an inside look into contemporary art as we visit artist studios exciting exhibitions at the Institute of Contemporary Art the MIT List Gallery MFA SOWA Galleries and public art installations.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

DOCUMENTING THE IMMIGRANT EXPERIENCE explores documentary film photo essays art and podcasts as well as their potential to connect students with the immigrant communities of Boston through hands-on production experiences. Students in groups will connect with local immigrant communities for a series of story-sharing sessions. The story-sharing will not take the form of interviews but rather a reciprocal exchange of personal narratives. Through the process of filming or recording these encounters we will generate the raw material for a final documentary art-project photo essay or a podcast. The class will culminate in an art festival featuring student work and ending with a discussion. The festival aims to raise awareness among students and members of the community about the potential of cultural spaces for social transformation. At the same time the class will experience and discuss the aesthetic power of documentary film art photo essays and podcasts. The class aims to discover and celebrate the shared humanity of the project participants. A premise of the class is that immigrants that rarely have ownership over decisions about how their stories are represented in their own municipality and that by elevating their stories they will become more engaged in the community and less vulnerable. In the words of professor Theater Gates we will "bring in the idea of beauty as a basic service to the community." The connections with the Boston community members will be established through connections with Boston Family School Boston High School and Boston Community Television among others. The first meeting between the students and community member will take place in-class. During this meeting students and community members will get to know each other through story circles reciprocal interviews etc. After this initial meeting the students are expected to be self-motivated in maintaining contact with the Boston resident and arranging a schedule for interviews and filming. All equipment that we will use during the semester will be from the university students don't need their own equipment or any prior training. Key concepts and issues that will be focused on in the class include: raising visibility through art of groups of people (local immigrant communities) whose cultures are often not so visible; the revolutionary power of both listening to and remembering each other's stories; facing the "Other"; how stories can aid in the reconstruction of the self the creation of identity and how they can lead toward reconciliation. Through the art projects we hope to explore people's connections to their roots their families and spirits; open ourselves to the possibility of imagining a different life; and link people's journeys toward better lives with their deepest spiritual impulses.

Students in the CAS Honors Program should choose one First-Year Seminar course from those listed below:

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only

Credits:

4

Description:

Two of the most daunting challenges the world faces (or will face) is how to provide for both its growing energy needs and potable drinking water. Regular news events include climate change, droughts, flooding, and petroleum struggles. Human nature often requires a severe crisis before it responds. This course will investigate the historical science driving the use of energy since the Industrial Revolution to convert energy resources into work, including the steam engine, the electric motor, and the internal combustion engine. It will also consider alternative energy options to fossil fuels, such as solar, wind, geothermal, and ocean power. Along the way we will consider the evidence for Global Warming and Climate Change. We will look into human nature, simple life styles, conspiracy theories, and the influence of those in power to shape human opinion. We will also consider how our water supply is provided and where it goes after being used. What options do developing countries or drought racked areas have to remedy their water needs? Although the course pursues a scientific understanding of these issues, the mathematics used will be gentle, and a larger emphasis will be placed on the intuitive appreciation of these concerns.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Rain or shine the great 18th century Enlightenment philosophers would meet at the famous cafes of Paris to discuss their ideas and to observe and criticize society. From these informal debates emerged ideas that are at the core of our modern understanding of the nature of society marginality human nature civil rights the essence of creativity and genius. Come join us in the quest to understand define observe and analyze the key ideas and concepts of these great thinkers such as Rousseau Diderot and Voltaire still so relevant in our time. We will read key works of these creative thinkers and philosophers. We will enrich our experience and understanding through the use of film theatre performances museum visits as well as the occasional cafe debate.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is about the basketball hoop dream played out at the high school and college levels. We will study a wide variety of materials - novels films websites reference works - to understand both the construction and destruction of the hoop dream in such diverse places as New York City Seattle rural Indiana suburban Georgia and the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. Issues of race and culture will serve as guiding themes as we develop critical theory explaining why the hoop dream has persisted and adapted over time to fit the needs of its believers and supporters.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

How is it that "comics" a genre often viewed as entertainment for children and adolescents has become one of the most exciting forms of narrative and visual art? To answer this question this seminar will examine a range of graphic novels from those that celebrate their origins in superhero comics such as Alan Moore's Watchmen to those that treat subjects not usually considered proper to the comics genre such as Art Spiegelman's Maus about the Holocaust and Alison Bechdel's Fun Home about the complexities of sexual identity. As we read these works we will look at how the combination of words and still images makes the graphic novel a unique storytelling form as well as how artists and writers push the envelope to create new styles and challenge our expectations. In addition to class discussions and writing assignments we will take a field trip to the Museum of Fine Arts and create a collaborative group graphic novel step-by-step over the course of the semester (all abilities welcome).

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This literature seminar will study and compare the short stories of Edgar Allan Poe Flannery O'Connor and Annie Proulx. Beginning with Poe as the father of the short story genre in America and exploring his critical theory of the "grotesque and arabesque" the class will examine the emergence of the gothic literary idiom as a classic American genre. Critical essays on the gothic aesthetic will be analyzed and film adaptations and documentaries will be viewed.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only

Credits:

4

Description:

In this project and team-based course, students study a sustainability problem at Suffolk University and spend the semester developing proposals to address the problem. At the end of the course students will present their proposals to Suffolk University's sustainability committee, and will exhibit their websites and visual aids in the Donahue lobby to educate the Suffolk community about sustainability. If their proposals are well-researched and well-communicated, students can see their ideas actualized while they are still undergraduates.

Prerequisites:

CAS honors students only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

What do we live for? Which beliefs values and experiences sustain meaningful fulfilling existence? Are we authors of our destinies or powerless pawns in an unfathomable cosmic game? Does death render all our efforts superfluous? This award-winning course offers a cross-cultural interdisciplinary exploration of these questions through philosophical and religious texts art fiction autobiography and psychological studies. The course opens with the Old Testament's book of Ecclesiastes followed by three units: 1) A Life Worth Living: Humanity's Ideals focuses on the ancient and modern visions of human flourishing; 2) Threats to Meaning: Humanity's Discontents discusses the disillusionments leading to the loss of meaning; and 3) Recovery of Meaning: Crises and Hopes explores the post-crisis possibilities of self-discovery and growth. Please visit http://meaningoflife.cherkasova.org/

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

How is it that the knowledge intelligence wisdom and values of the Greeks and Romans still educate and edify the world by providing venues towards leading fulfilling and dignified lives? The guiding principles of their respective civilizations rested upon eight pillars: -Humanism: It was recognized that humans have the potential to master their world and live life to the fullest. -The Pursuit of Excellence: To imagine the highest good and strive to attain it. -Self Knowledge: It is imperative to know oneself before seeking to know the world. -Rationalism: Always question reason and discern truth from falsehood and never consider any matter superficially. -Restless Curiosity: Often the resolution of one issue leads to the revelations of others mysteries and pursuits which compels further investigation. The wise individual makes this a lifelong endeavor. -Love of Freedom: As long as one brings no harm to others one must be free to live and discover as much as possible. -Individualism: All are unique and therefore must recognize individual strengths and identity. -The Practice of Moderation: The prudence of avoiding extremes in personal and social conduct. In this course students will read two (brief) texts on the Greek and Roman contributions to the world and then will proceed with specific readings which illuminate the eight principles above for achieving the good life.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course explores the evolution of dogs from wolves and the ways in which dogs have adapted to their niche in human society. The ecology behavior genetics and adaptations of dogs will be explored in relation to both their wolf ancestry and artificial selection by humans. The course includes 2 mandatory field trips to a wolf sanctuary and an animal shelter.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to CAS Honors students

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores themes of adventure, self-discovery, exile, and culture shock in classic and contemporary travel writing (including fiction, poetry, and non-fiction) as well as film. Students will experiment with creative writing of their own, develop theories of cosmopolitan world citizenship, travel through the city of Boston on field trips, and team up to learn about different countries in Suffolk's global network of study abroad programs.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only

Credits:

4

Description:

This writing and script analysis intensive course will explore plays across a range periods and styles. The scripts of five plays will be studied and we will attend performances of two of those works at professional theatres in Boston. Other activities will range from a backstage tour to conversations with theatre professionals such as producers, directors, actors, designers, playwrights and critics, in order to lift the script off the page and provide a living experience of theatre. Requires students to be available for evening (usually Wednesday) performances. A fee for tickets at student rates will be assessed.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Since the beginning of time and across cultures people have been interested in the supernatural the paranormal and the otherworldly. Often these phenomena have appeared in the form of witches wizards and spirits whether good or bad wicked or wonderful. Women who have not fulfilled traditional gender roles have historically been cast as witches or to use Shakespeare's phrase as "weird sisters" or in Donald Trump'S recent election parlance as "nasty women." Men in turn appear as wizards usually more positively than female witches. Men and women alike also can take the form of spirits or ghosts; even houses can be possessed. What lies beneath the great fascination with the supernatural and the paranormal with the haunted the possessed and the spellbinding? What accounts for the different manifestations of spirits? This course takes students on a tour of witches wizards and otherworldly spirits throughout American literary history. Tropes of the witch and the wizard have appeared in literature from the time of Shakespeare (see Macbeth) to the contemporary best-selling Harry Potter series and hits every century in between such as in Anne Hutchinson's Puritan accounts form the 1600s Nathaniel Hawthorne and Edgar Allan Poe's in the 1800s The Wizard of Oz in 1900 and John Updike's The Witches of Eastwick in the 20th century. The course offers readings across genre lines-poetry fiction non-fiction young adult fantasy and drama-and includes excerpts from film and television shows based upon wizards and witches (such as Bewitched Buffy the Vampire Slayer and The Vampire Diaries). The course may include a field trip to Salem MA as well as possibly the opportunity to see Wicked at the Boston Opera House (if it is renewed through the fall season 2017).

Prerequisites:

New CAS honors students only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on French-language films - with subtitles! - that address pressing social issues of the 20th and 21st centuries such as hunger female genital mutilation immigration racism economic inequality genocide gender sexuality colonialism and post-colonialism.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Readers lining up at midnight for the newest Harry Potter book hundreds of thousands of viewers crashing HBO's website in their eagerness to watch Game of Thrones: examples of fantasy's recent popularity are everywhere. This course explores the genre of contemporary fantasy through a historical and critical lens from the work of J.R.R. Tolkien to the 2015 Nebula Award Winner Uprooted. We will begin by reading selections from medieval literary texts including Arthurian legend and Anglo-Saxon epic to understand the roots of the fantasy genre and consider how these early works have inspired and informed the world-building efforts of later authors. We will also explore fantasy's newest manifestations across different kinds of media from big-budget film adaptations to internet fan fictions. Critical questions will include: How do works of fantasy deal with the ethical questions surrounding the categories of "good" and "evil" "monstrosity" and "otherness" How do common fantasy plots such as coming-of-age or quest narratives work to aid in fictional character development and build suspense? How are contemporary anxieties about issues such as gender race and class explored through the genre of fantasy?

Prerequisites:

CAS honors students only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

What makes a fact a fact? What makes a fact true? At one time these questions were only asked by epistemologists and postmodernists but with the rise of fake news and the discourses surrounding it these questions are relevant to everyone. Understanding facts is also essential to college students who must learn to use reliable sources in order to create credible work. In this class we will examine works of literature art science and history that interrogate how facts are created and how we determine their truth value. Texts will include podcasts novels and book-length studies of memory and theory of mind (the study of how we understand what others are thinking). We will also utilize the resources of Boston and Suffolk University; we will visit the WBUR NPR newsroom a local museum and learn about the legal definition of "truth" from a representative of the law school. By analyzing these texts participating in these experiences and completing a series of assignments that ask students to think critically and creatively this class seeks to understand how we create facts and why we need them.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Jazz and blues music of the early twentieth century has been hailed as a potent expression of African American life and as a major contribution to American culture. Albert Murray writes "'the blues idiom' is a synthesis of African and European elements the product of an Afro-American sensibility in an American mainland situation." Since its birth in the early twentieth century and movement from New Orleans throughout the rest of the country following "The Great Migration " the form expanded diversified and explored its artistic potential throughout the twentieth century and into the twenty-first giving way to bop rock and roll electric blues soul disco funk R & B and rap. African American literature evolved simultaneously and in parallel ways. There is such a strong connection between black music and literature that it makes sense to study them together. In this seminar we will explore the history and form of black music and black literature from the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s through contemporary rap. We will study work that spans a hundred years of African American cultural production analyzing trends and developments through a careful interpretation of musical and literary texts and their adjuncts (such as music video and film).

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

We visit museums to be inspired. Museums have exhibits that face outward for the public but inside curators and exhibit designers work to preserve collections and bring them to different communities. We will go behind the scenes at art history and science/natural history museums in Boston as well as other institutional collections to see how curators preserve artifacts of the natural world and the creations of people. We will also study how patrons experience their exhibits to understand the most compelling ways to present a coherent experience for the public. Each student will curate a collection of their own and present them in an online exhibit.

First-Year Writing: 2 courses, 8 credits

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study and practice of the writing process and revision in terms of expository writing modes for an academic audience.

Prerequisites:

WRI-101 or ENG-099 with at least a B and ENG-P099 with a P or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study and practice of argumentative and research writing through further work with writing process and revision and the critical reading of a variety of texts.

A student may be assigned to other writing courses or may be invited to take WRI-H103. Students not eligible for direct entry into WRI-101 will be required to complete one additional pathway course. Depending on eligibility, students who are assigned one additional pathway course must either complete WRI-100 or WRI-100+ prior to enrolling in WRI-101.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course affords students extended practice with persuasive and expository writing in the essay form through frequent writing assignments based on critical readings of class texts and discussions. Students will also compose a research paper and study the process of writing and revising for an academic audience. No standard pre-requisites; offered every semester. Students who are placed into WRI-100 must complete the course with a C in order to continue on to WRI-101.

Prerequisites:

WRI-100T must be taken concurrently

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course affords students extended practice with persuasive and expository writing in the essay form through frequent writing assignments based on critical readings of class texts and discussions. Students will also compose a research paper and study the process of writing and revising for an academic audience. No standard pre-requisites; offered every semester. WRI-100+ sections require students to meet with their instructors once per week for a thirty-minute one-to-one tutorial session to be scheduled by the instructor with each individual student.

Prerequisites:

By Invitation Only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is by invitation only and reserved for incoming Suffolk students with high admission scores. Advanced study and practice of writing process revision and research based on close readings of a variety of texts. Fall semester only.

Creativity & Innovation: 1 course, 3 credits

In this course, students will be introduced to the practice of creativity as a rigorous approach to problem solving requiring research, persistence and grit. Students will work collaboratively to effectively synthesize existing ideas, images, and skill sets in original ways. They will embrace risk and support divergent thinking. In the process, they will become more confident life-long learners.

Note: Students with 30+ transfer credits are exempt from this requirement.

Choose one Creativity & Innovation course from those listed below:

Prerequisites:

Non-majors interesting in taking art and design courses for elective credit should refer to offerings under the ART course listings.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This cross-disciplinary course will integrate the ideas and practices of two-dimensional design color and drawing. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the creative process exploring concepts and developing research skills. Students will undertake individual and collaborative projects in three spaces; the studio classroom the digital world and the city at large.

Prerequisites:

ADF-S101; Non-majors interesting in taking art and design courses for elective credit should refer to offerings under the ART course listings.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course builds on the Integrated Studio I experience: synthesizing fundamental visual ideas. IS II investigates the construction documentation and transformation of volumetric form environmental space and time. Projects will explore narrative strategies and the creation of immersive experiences. Students will develop critical and analytical skills while employing a range of traditional and digital media as they explore the creative boundaries of the classroom studio the city of Boston and virtual space.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to demystify the creative process by introducing students to creative practice as a disciplined approach to problem-solving and innovation. Students will be encouraged to synthesize existing ideas images concepts and skill sets in original way embrace ambiguity and support divergent thinking and risk taking. More than one-third of our global population lives in poverty earning less than two dollars a day. Governments businesses social enterprises and charitable organizations have tried to solve the global poverty issue with mixed results. What is the solution? Is entrepreneurship the solution part of the solution or has no impact whatsoever? In this course you will gain an understanding of the power of entrepreneurship (in the context of creativity and innovation) the definition and depth of global poverty (in the context of constraints such as human financial and physical resources embedded in local regional national and global cultures) and successes and failures of past initiatives to reduce poverty. This is not a course about politics or business but rather finding a solution to a problem that has eluded mankind since the beginning of time.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office. Honors students only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to demystify the creative process by introducing students to creative practice as a disciplined approach to problem-solving and innovation. Students will be encouraged to synthesize existing ideas images concepts and skill sets in original way embrace ambiguity and support divergent thinking and risk taking. More than one-third of our global population lives in poverty earning less than two dollars a day. Governments businesses social enterprises and charitable organizations have tried to solve the global poverty issue with mixed results. What is the solution? Is entrepreneurship the solution part of the solution or has no impact whatsoever? In this course you will gain an understanding of the power of entrepreneurship (in the context of creativity and innovation) the definition and depth of global poverty (in the context of constraints such as human financial and physical resources embedded in local regional national and global cultures) and successes and failures of past initiatives to reduce poverty. This is not a course about politics or business but rather finding a solution to a problem that has eluded mankind since the beginning of time.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines cutting edge technologies the science behind them and their practical application and follow-up success or failure. It also provides the students a chance to consider the relevance of identified "needed" inventions from the 1950s and whether those projections were correct. The history behind some remarkable inventions will be presented. Finally working in small teams students will brainstorm to identify something useful to invent and determine several approaches to implementing it.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to demystify the creative process by introducing students to creative practice as a disciplined approach to problem-solving and innovation. Students will be encouraged to synthesize existing ideas images concepts and skill sets in original way embrace ambiguity and support divergent thinking and risk taking. Did you know Netscape was the internet browser? What about MySpace arguably the Facebook of the last decade? What led Apple from being innovative pioneers of the 70's to the verge of extinction in the 80's to the technological giant they are today? Technologies come and go but what leads to organizations lasting more than 100 years such as IBM General Electric etc.? What role does failure play in successful innovation decision-making and business viability? In this course you will learn about innovation that may have been successful and well-executed. You will also learn about innovation that was a viable business opportunity but poorly executed: one phase of failure. In addition you will learn about innovation that had no real market viability but was launched anyway: another phase of failure. Can failure lead to success? If so how?

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3

Description:

This course is designed to demystify the creative process by introducing students to creative practice as a disciplined approach to problem-solving and innovation. Students will be encouraged to synthesize existing ideas, images, concepts, and skill sets in original way, embrace ambiguity and support divergent thinking and risk taking. Did you know Netscape was the internet browser? What about MySpace, arguably the Facebook of the last decade? What led Apple from being innovative pioneers of the 70's to the verge of extinction in the 80's to the technological giant they are today? Technologies come and go, but what leads to organizations lasting more than 100 years such as IBM, General Electric, etc.? What role does failure play in successful innovation, decision-making, and business viability? In this course, you will learn about innovation that may have been successful and well-executed. You will also learn about innovation that was a viable business opportunity, but poorly executed: one phase of failure. In addition, you will learn about innovation that had no real market viability, but was launched anyway: another phase of failure. Can failure lead to success? If so, how?

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Demystifies the creative process by introducing students to creative practice as a disciplined approach to problem-solving and innovation. Students will be encouraged to synthesize existing ideas images concepts and skill sets in original way embrace ambiguity and support divergent thinking and risk taking.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you and your story drive business? This course takes an innovative look at human creativity and entrepreneurship. As an entrepreneur needs perseverance and high motivation we will explore the importance of values risk taking problem solving and the discovery of the market opportunities. In order for you to be creative and essentially create successful ventures you will discover the nuances between the three factors and explore them further through interactive discussion and debate as well as collaborative group work. You will be encouraged to think in non-conforming ways and apply new concepts and develop your own personal operating principles.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

As the majority of the world population now lives in cities for the first time in human history issues of urban sustainability have become more complex and more important than ever before. Presented with case studies of urban efforts to gain a sustainability foothold students will utilize ideation critical thinking and strategic decision making to both identify root problems and to present solutions. This course will lean heavily on ideation processes teamwork and logical methods of analysis to pursue actionable solutions for significant problems. The methods of problem identification and solution analysis learned in this class will be readily adaptable to many complex problems helping the students to make informed and decisive determinations in their careers.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office. Honors students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

As the majority of the world population now lives in cities for the first time in human history issues of urban sustainability have become more complex and more important than ever before. Presented with case studies of urban efforts to gain a sustainability foothold students will utilize ideation critical thinking and strategic decision making to both identify root problems and to present solutions. This course will lean heavily on ideation processes teamwork and logical methods of analysis to pursue actionable solutions for significant problems. The methods of problem identification and solution analysis learned in this class will be readily adaptable to many complex problems helping the students to make informed and decisive determinations in their careers.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Every successful venture today is based on effective teamwork. Unlike a typical lecture format Creating the Dream Team is a course that utilizes experiential group learning to provide students with pivotal team-building skills. These essential skills are vital for everyone's future success in the business world. As team players students are challenged to think creatively. A collaborative problem-solving process is used to analyze "real life" business situations. Teamwork involves research data collection and information analysis to develop creative solutions to typical business problems. Teams will utilize multi-media tools to present their innovative ideas. Classmates will provide peer feedback and review. Through iterations all students will assume roles as project leaders keynote speakers and collaborators on a series of Team Challenges. Upon successful completion of this course all students will have formed working "dream teams". As reinforcement and final evaluation Dream Teams are required to create a multi-media Capstone Event as a course performance measure. This capstone presentation will "showcase" all of their newly acquired "dream" team-player skills.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students will develop a deep understanding of two seminal books of 20th century poetry and other key 20th century poems as they plan and execute small-group end of semester reading performances. Students will write creative response poems to increase their understanding of the texts and through cooperative decision making strategize effective ways to present their own poems and poems by Bishop or Frost. The class format will foster direct spoken engagement with matters of sound rhythm tone and meaning. Final reading aloud performances will be recorded and added to the Suffolk University Poetry Center Archive.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course students will be introduced to the practice of creativity as a rigorous approach to problem solving requiring research persistence and grit. Students will work collaboratively to effectively synthesize existing ideas images and skill sets in original ways. They will embrace risk and support divergent thinking. In the process they will become more confident life-long learners.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office. Honors students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. Theatre at Work is an introduction to creative practice using live performance as a problem solving tool in an educational environment. Specifically students will create a performance piece in response to an issue they have uncovered in collaboration with select groups of students in a host Boston Public School. There will be a special focus on normalizing risk-taking and the learning that comes from false starts and failed ideas. Students will be responsible for creating every aspect of their performance testing its feasibility on a limited budget ensuring that the content meets established criteria and successfully implementing and evaluating their success both with their peers and their audience.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course students will be introduced to the practice of creativity as a rigorous approach to problem solving requiring research persistence and grit. Students will work collaboratively to effectively synthesize existing ideas images and skill sets in original ways. They will embrace risk and support divergent thinking. In the process they will become more confident life-long learners.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will introduce students to the exciting world of emergency management from the perspective of scientists who are often utilized as experts during both small scale adverse events and large scale catastrophes. Students will actively and creatively explore the psychological economic and medical dimensions of these events and participate in role play in the classroom and site visits. By the end of the course students will have a keen appreciation of emergency planning and management on the local and national levels.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course uses project-based learning and an iterative process helping you build a solid knowledge bank and financial foundation to teach you: How to first navigate through all of the following financial pitfalls and risks; economic cycle liquidity interest rate fluctuation marketplace volatility corporate continuity concerns default and credit issues. Then allows you to partner with your classmates to detect design and deploy a novel and useful financial asset risk/reward graph in your favor thus taking traditional models to task.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The intent of this course is for students to examine and effectively express in writing their ideas on creativity and to inspire undergraduate students to exceed their current levels of learning. Students will learn to meaningfully integrate course content into long term-retained useful skills through applied creative collaborations. This course is based on the idea that exposure and insight development will enable students to better visualize themselves in their desired fields and make informed choices within the variety of options available to them. The focus of the course will help students to assess their personal interests and strengths as they plan for their own educational and professional futures.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3

Description:

Some past political issues were resolved with great success (the Compromise of 1820), and some resulted in great failures (the US Civil War). In this course, students will study noteworthy political dilemmas of the past, identify the major problem solvers and examine the art of compromise. These investigations will provide guidance and inspiration for students to develop innovative and creative solutions to present day political problems such as climate change, immigration, Social Security, income distribution, higher education affordability, and homelessness. Students will work in teams and propose creative and innovative solutions that will convince the affected interest groups favorably, represented by teams of other students in the class, and result in compromises solving tomorrow's problems today.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

What made Benjamin Franklin such a creative force in American history? We will explore the many facets of Franklin's life (printer writer scientist statesman) and learn about Benjamin Franklin's political and diplomatic ventures and will recreate some of his scientific experiments.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office. Honors students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

What made Benjamin Franklin such a creative force in American history? We will explore the many facets of Franklin's life (printer writer scientist statesman) and learn about Benjamin Franklin's political and diplomatic ventures and will recreate some of his scientific experiments.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will explore a selection of the genius personalities and their creative work in 5 distinct areas of human creative endeavor; art science nature technology and the built environment. The course explores the underlying similarities in the process of their discovery invention and creativity across the disciplines. Studying such names as Newton Warhol Hawking Jobs Gaudi and Banksy students will uncover the process of design through research analysis synthesis iteration and error. In class group projects will allow a hands-on opportunity to create.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office. CAS and SBS honors students or GPA of 3.5 or above only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Suffolk University sits within Boston's literary district a hub of academic programs in creative writing publishing houses libraries and independent bookstores. This course will immerse students in the world of literary culture and its many branches: writing editing reviewing and publicity. Students will practice creative writing as a playful yet rigorous discipline and learn how writers find publishers for their work and reach audiences through readings social media book publicity interviews and reviews. Various industry professionals will speak to the class about trends in literary publishing and their own experiences bringing books and journals into the world. Students will apply their knowledge and interests to a variety of projects including book reviews literary events and creative writing workshops. 06 Jan 2020 8:16 AM Amy Yeager CAS DEAN's Office. Admin Services Cord. for CAT.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is focusing on the creative process by introducing students to creative practice as a disciplined approach to problem solving and innovation requiring research persistence and grit. Students will be encouraged to synthesize existing ideas images concepts and skill sets in original ways embrace ambiguity and support divergent thinking and risk taking. The course will have an undertone based on science but it is suitable for non-science majors too!

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

What motivates your creative nature? This course will explore converging themes in Art and Psychology in order to give students the tools they need to unblock their creative potential. Collaborative small team activities assigned readings large group discussions and personal reflection exercises will provide an avenue for students to explore their own creative patterns and how they are influenced by and perceived within the world around them. Dreams mental illness and psychosocial theories of self will also be widely discussed in order to give students context for this inter/intrapersonal exploration.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Always wanted to explore a creative side but never had the opportunity to take an art class? Here's your chance! Sync the power of icons/ images with ideas and making. We will use cellphone and printmaking technologies in a workshop style environment. Rather then a lecture based class this class we will play learn and build new Neurological pathways towards creative thinking. Come to every class excited to learn make and discover. This course will give you the building blocks for innovative thinking beyond the classroom. Power is in the image. As in the way a dream can grip you images carry incredible amount of influence and creative potential when they are "seen." Glimpses of these images circulate in media movies cell phones and so on. Learn to develop your own images and understand the broad world of images of human culture.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course will explore the value of creativity and play in developing reading and writing skills and the habits of lifelong learning both in our own lives and in the lives of young people in Boston. In this course we will work closely with the non-profit literacy organization 826 Boston which works with students ages 6-18 on reading and writing skills through playful creative workshops as well as tutoring and other kinds of support. Students will learn about the work of 826 Boston by volunteering with the organization and by the end of the semester you will conceive plan and run creative writing workshops of your own at 826 Boston.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office. Honors students only.

Credits:

3

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course will explore the value of creativity and play in developing reading and writing skills and the habits of lifelong learning, both in our own lives and in the lives of young people in Boston. In this course, we will work closely with the non-profit literacy organization 826 Boston, which works with students ages 6-18 on reading and writing skills through playful, creative workshops, as well as tutoring and other kinds of support. Students will learn about the work of 826 Boston by volunteering with the organization, and by the end of the semester you will conceive, plan, and run creative writing workshops of your own at 826 Boston.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A brand may be a product service an organization or a person and at the core of every brand is a visual identity. A brand's visual identity is its strategically planned and purposeful presentation of itself. It is manifest in the brand's name logo tagline (slogan) color palette and other sensory elements (visual aural olfactory and tactile) that identity that brand and make it unique. This course will focus on analyzing the success and failure of brand's visual identities as a way of teaching students how to brainstorm and develop a new visual identity from concept through execution. The focus in this course will be on applying creative thinking to create a cohesive and meaningful visual identity.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

To keep a journal is to make an investment often long before we understand the value. A journal is a personal database of snapshots in time good ideas and bad observational doodles and unfiltered emotions. On any given page a journal may appear inconsequential but within the rigor of filling a whole notebook (and another and another) an individual viewpoint emerges. This class will facilitate a student's ability to draw from his or her own lived experience and discover unique springboards into universal issues by making mindful connections. An entire lifetime of images stories and details resides within each of our minds but the ability to explore that richness requires dedication to documentation. Mindful Journal is a process class fostering focus through mindfulness practices content generation and meaning making.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

If any set of problems could use creative and innovative thinking it's the myriad of problems facing the T. The Boston Globe is filled with stories about financial and organizational problems in the system and you only have to spend a few minutes on the green line to feel the effects of those issues. Still millions depend on it every day - it is the circulatory system of our city and it is more than a way to get around: the T increases accessibility and functions as a democratizing force. That is when it's running. In this class we will study the MBTA and other mass transit systems in order to propose creative solutions to the T's most pressing problems. We will read articles about the T and other transit systems we will look at interactive maps that express different kinds of data and we will visit local stations. In addition we will study the process of creative thinking in order to apply those skills to the issues at hand. You will be asked to create both stand-alone short writing assignments and visual representations of your ideas accompanied by short written explanations both alone and in group projects.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

You live in Boston now. At least for a while. Perhaps you've noticed that it has its own ways of remembering things. Consider The Boston Literary District The Freedom Trail and all the many events and festivals devoted to history culture and identity. From guided tours and colonial cosplay to images and written texts to monuments memorials and museums this city tells stories about itself today in the ways it tells stories about its past. In this class you're going to tell more stories about Boston. You're going to help it find other things to remember and other ways of remembering them. You'll likely need to focus on parts of the real events that Boston doesn't prefer to include in its stories emphasizing issues of race socioeconomic class nationality colonialism gender sexuality and other stories of unequal power and how that manifests in real people's lives and in the culture of this city.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office. Honors students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

You live in Boston now. At least for a while. Perhaps you've noticed that it has its own ways of remembering things. Consider The Boston Literary District The Freedom Trail and all the many events and festivals devoted to history culture and identity. From guided tours and colonial cosplay to images and written texts to monuments memorials and museums this city tells stories about itself today in the ways it tells stories about its past. In this class you're going to tell more stories about Boston. You're going to help it find other things to remember and other ways of remembering them. You'll likely need to focus on parts of the real events that Boston doesn't prefer to include in its stories emphasizing issues of race socioeconomic class nationality colonialism gender sexuality and other stories of unequal power and how that manifests in real people's lives and in the culture of this city.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Magician James "The Amazing" Randi reminds us that "No matter how smart or how well educated you are you can be deceived." In an age fraught with deception and misinformation students need tactics and strategies in order to separate truth from falsity. This course encourages its participants to act as skeptics - not cynics necessarily - by requiring evidence and proof before believing or accepting claims. Students are urged to identify the most-likely-to occur opportunities for deception in their major fields and draw from the tenets of classical rhetoric logic and the scientific method in order to develop safeguards. Frequent collaboration with classmates will allow for dynamic solutions to small and large-scale contemporary problems ranging from the personal (e.g. used car prices and avoiding fraud) to the universal(e.g. "fake news" and God).

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

We will be discovering the process of becoming more creative. The emphasis is on understanding the creative process and applying effective teamwork strategies towards a shared goal. Students will use scientific inquiry to explore topics in chemistry that they find interesting. Each team of 3-4 students will choose a project and develop it during the semester with the goal of raising awareness about chemistry or designing innovative and engaging ways of teaching chemistry.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office. Restrict to CAS and SBS honors.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

We will be discovering the process of becoming more creative. The emphasis is on understanding the creative process and applying effective teamwork strategies towards a shared goal. Students will use scientific inquiry to explore topics in chemistry that they find interesting. Each team of 3-4 students will choose a project and develop it during the semester with the goal of raising awareness about chemistry or designing innovative and engaging ways of teaching chemistry.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course seeks to make you an innovative public health thinker by examining past campaigns and making the necessary frameshifts to help promote protect and preserve health of the Suffolk community through the innovative thinking process. Public health activists and designers can have a positive impact on the lives of citizens living in small communities. However the agreed rules and regulations that make up this policy landscape are created by paradigms which can be constricting. The issues the course addresses will include Suffolk's current plans for reducing carbon emission behavioral determinants such as alcohol consumption among college students and improving eating habits on campus. The final project will be peer reviewed and presented to the class. Programs may then be forwarded to university departments for possible integration and implementation.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course we will be exploring the often puzzling question of personal identity from a creative perspective learning about creativity by exploring questions of personal identity. What exactly constitutes our identities? How much control - if any - do we have in determining what our identities are? By wrestling with these among other important questions from a wide-range of perspectives and with creative confidence - the firm belief that each of us can and must explore these questions creatively - we will arrive at a better understanding of ourselves our personal identities as well as acquire a greater appreciation of the identities of others. Our course is a genuinely collaborative one given the significant role others can play in providing us with a perspective on our identities unavailable to us as individuals.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course the idea of embodiment refers to the integration of the expressiveness of our bodies as a vehicle for the art of speaking and communicating. The meaning of embodiment employed here is both a style and philosophy of engagement and will be examined and practiced as an ongoing pedagogy for connecting with stories at various levels of discourse and apperception.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course we will explore how to enter into new ways of thinking and adopt new perspectives by reading discussing and imitating a range of texts (from poems hybrid-genre pieces and song lyrics to photographs dreams and ethnographies). Trying to transcend ordinary modes of interpreting the world trying to imagine what it is like to be someone or something else entirely immersing ourselves and describing/translating the new experiences we will then share the writing (and other texts) we produce workshopping them as a group and producing a final presentation and collective portfolio.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Social change doesn't just happen because something is "in the air" or because of some kind of mystical zeitgeist. Social change happens because engaged citizens find creative and innovative ways to frame social conversations and push on the levers of power. In this course we will examine some of the foundational figures and texts called on by those hoping to enact social change. We will study previous social movements in order to understand how they constructed and supported their arguments in favor of change and how activists used creativity to overcome entrenched thinking and change the social conversation. We will work in small groups to collaboratively develop achievable but ambitious plans to engage the public and enact change in our own communities.

Prerequisites:

Honors students only.Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Social change doesn't just happen because something is "in the air" or because of some kind of mystical zeitgeist. Social change happens because engaged citizens find creative and innovative ways to frame social conversations and push on the levers of power. In this course we will examine some of the foundational figures and texts called on by those hoping to enact social change. We will study previous social movements in order to understand how they constructed and supported their arguments in favor of change and how activists used creativity to overcome entrenched thinking and change the social conversation. We will work in small groups to collaboratively develop achievable but ambitious plans to engage the public and enact change in our own communities.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Curiosity open-heartedness and creativity are essential to historical thinking. Our curiosity about the past motivates us to unearth it and make it "knowable" to modern audiences. Likewise empathy and/or open-heartedness to the ideas and actions of others & enables us to put ourselves in the shoes of earlier peoples and to understand their lives from their perspective. Harnessing our creativity (or ingenuity and playfulness) permits us to think imaginatively about our research topic and question analytical framework research methods research findings and modes of communicating history. Each of these attributes - curiosity open-heartedness and creativity - are essential not just to historical inquiry but also to life-long learning and problem solving.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Honors students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Curiosity open-heartedness and creativity are essential to historical thinking. Our curiosity about the past motivates us to unearth it and make it "knowable" to modern audiences. Likewise empathy and/or open-heartedness to the ideas and actions of others & enables us to put ourselves in the shoes of earlier peoples and to understand their lives from their perspective. Harnessing our creativity (or ingenuity and playfulness) permits us to think imaginatively about our research topic and question analytical framework research methods research findings and modes of communicating history. Each of these attributes - curiosity open-heartedness and creativity - are essential not just to historical inquiry but also to life-long learning and problem solving.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course students examine and engage with one of the major mythological figures of the American imagination: the "self-made man." The idea of the enterprising person who "pulls himself (or herself) up by the bootstraps" is distinctively American. But where and why does it arise? How did it come to prominence in American culture politics and economics? And by gaining understanding of both the limits and the potential of this cultural ideal what can we draw from it in our own careers and lives? Students will practice skills of close reading analysis and argumentation in the first half of the semester prior to moving onto more complex and interpersonal forms of scholarly creativity and problem-solving in teams and in the community. Course content will follow a similar trajectory. In the first half of the semester we will focus on how the myth of the self-made man originates and develops and consider some critiques of it as an ideal. After spring break we will apply the concepts we have studied to a robust analysis of issues in contemporary politics and economics including financial speculation entitlement reform technological disruption and the gig economy. This contemporary focus will culminate in a Group Project & Final Presentation in which students aim for an innovative approach to a current question in light of the works we have studied.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Reality and perception have been debated and discussed for millennia. Humans see and experience their world in different ways. How do humans determine appropriate solutions for challenging social and economic problems? Why do most accept the current structures or status quo in regards to challenging problems? How do we gain a different perspective to find the vision and resources to erect new structures and thus challenge the status quo? Students will creatively explore these big questions through readings and presentations studying examples of individuals and movements that have led to new and divergent perspectives. Students will participate by crafting products creating visual projects and coming into original thought via trial and error. Students will also develop their analytical and critical thinking skills while learning to communicate effectively and honestly.

Prerequisites:

Honors students only. Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Often referred to as "America's walking city " Boston is full of places to explore. How have Bostonians throughout history understood their city through the neighborhoods streets and buildings around them? How can designing walking tours teach us about innovative approaches to telling Boston's diverse and varied history? Why is the act of walking an inherently creative endeavor? Through field trips group projects personal reflections and discussions you'll learn the techniques that historians use to bring historical information and ideas to broader audience's field known as "public history." We'll put those techniques to use developing our own walking tours of Boston. As we learn to understand the city around us on foot we'll also incorporate sensory techniques (smell taste touch and sound) to accompany the content of our tours. We'll focus our research on the unheard stories of Boston's past and the underrepresented perspectives including the stories of different races cultures classes genders sexualities and more that surround us every day.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Nanoscience is becoming the dominant direction for technology in this century and is opening new perspectives on all scientific and technological disciplines. This course is an attempt to introduce the central tenets of nanoscience at an early stage in the curriculum by involving students in designing nanostructures (and nanomachines) with innovative applications in mind using in-house computational and experimental tools. The design elements and intuition that is used by engineers and architects for designing things at the macro-scale does not apply to nanoscale phenomena necessitating creativity in design. This exercise in student creativity will be guided by instruction of the rules of nanodesign that the instructor has formulated through his own experience in the field.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Photographer Edward Curtis sacrificed everything including his prosperous portrait studio and business fame for being the celebrity photographer of his time and even his family his wife divorcing him so that he could pursue a life-long obsession to photograph what he perceived to be the vanishing culture of the remaining Native American tribes of North America. And at the completion of his masterwork The American Indian even his ownership and copyright of the work had to be given to the House of J.P. Morgan and he received no compensation only financial support for the project. What he created though was a visually stunning document and series of folios of a vanishing way of life and the last days of his subject's culture as well as a new way of seeing the other. In addition to the study of the life times and creative struggles and successes of Edward Curtis in his personal mission students will learn of other photographers who like Curtis sacrificed all convention using their creativity and taking personal and intellectual risks with using innovation to bring their ideas to successful completion. Students will learn to use cameras to make fine individual pictures and then series of images to tell important visually impactful stories culminating with an extended photographic essay of their own in portfolio book form. Their own projects subjects will be discussed with and approved by the instructor and a final Power Point presentation will be given to the class for critique. Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Let's play with how you interact with the world around you. Let's explore how we create space away from external influences to sit and experiment within our own thoughts and social interactions. Through a series of independent activities students will learn to challenge the interaction of creativity and society. Guided small and large group reflections will provide a space for students to compare experiences and offer feedback analysis and support. Topics include experiments with ethnographic research random acts of kindness impression management mindfulness flow state creativity in groups dynamics counseling skills and embracing vulnerability. Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course students will be introduced to the practice of creativity as a rigorous approach to problem solving requiring research persistence and grit. Students will work collaboratively to effectively synthesize existing ideas images and skill sets in original ways. They will embrace risk and support divergent thinking. In the process they will become more confident life-long learners.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Language is one mode through which our creative potential as human beings is expressed. We will consider the complex process of becoming bilingual by exploring the experience of moving between different cultures and languages. Students will reflect on important notions about languages through the practice of creative teamwork focused group projects and innovative storytelling techniques. This course will actively encourage students to contemplate the cognitive cultural emotional and social experiences of living in more than one language and inspire them to take a chance on learning a new language.


Math: 1 course, 4 credits

Choose one Math course from those listed below: 

Prerequisites:

MATH level 2, or MATH-000, or MATH-104

Credits:

4.00

Description:

From the ISBN on a book to buying a car from the size of small chips in a cell phone to the size of the national debt or just reading a graph in the daily newspaper mathematics plays an important and vital role in countless areas of life and your future career and courses included. Mathematics is both an art and a tool created by humans. The common bond is a way of thinking and a way of reasoning to describe and solve problems of many types. This course uses the context of modern real life problems to introduce math needed for literacy and problem solving in contemporary life and work. It uses a minimal amount of algebra and focuses on math models concepts and basic math manipulations. It encourages students to move from anxiety about math to using formulas well to thinking critically in the math context to use math to solve problems and pose new problems. Topics include scientific notation basic financial math linear exponential and polynomial models and an introduction to probability. (Formerly Math 132)

Prerequisites:

MATH-104, or MATH-121, or MATH level 3

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Linear Modeling (for example using linear functions to model supply/demand situations) graphing linear programming financial functions (compound interest annuities and amortization of loans) sets Venn diagrams counting and combinatorics discrete probability conditional probability Bernoulli experiments Bayes theorem. Several sections offered each semester. *This course cannot be applied toward a departmental concentration in Mathematics by Sawyer Business School students.

Prerequisites:

MATH-104, MATH-121 or MATH level 4

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A one-semester introduction to differential and integral calculus. Theory is presented informally and topics and techniques are limited to polynomials rational functions logarithmic and exponential functions. Topics include a review of precalculus limits and continuity derivatives differentiation rules applications of derivatives to graphing minima/maxima applications of the derivative marginal analysis differential equations of growth and decay anti-derivatives the definite integral the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and area measurements. This course cannot be used to satisfy core or complementary requirements by students majoring in chemistry computer science engineering mathematics or physics. Several sections offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121 with a minimum grade of C, MATH-075, or MATH level 5

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Functions limits and continuity squeeze theorem limits at infinity; instantaneous rate of change tangent slopes and the definition of the derivative of a function; power product and quotient rules trig derivatives chain rule implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; derivatives of other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions exponential and log functions hyperbolic trig functions); applications of the derivative (implicit differentiation related rates optimization differentials curve sketching L'Hopital's rule); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

MATH-164 or MATH-165 with a minimum grade of C

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Riemann sums and definite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (areas); integration of exponential functions trig functions and inverse trig functions; techniques of integration (substitution by parts trig integrals trig substitution partial fractions); area volume and average value applications; differential equations (separable exponential growth linear); improper integrals; infinite sequences and series; convergence tests; power series; Taylor and Maclaurin series (computation convergence error estimates differentiation and integration of Taylor series). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Social, Cultural, & Global Perspectives: 1 course, 3-4 credits

Choose one SCGP course from those listed below:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the portrayal of homosexuality in political social and cultural discourse. Analyzes the role of media and symbolic construction in the shaping of public values opinions and social movements.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the persuasive strategies of social reform movements with special emphasis on the civil rights' women's rights and gay rights movements in the United States.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys painting sculpture and architecture in Asia from prehistoric times to the modern era including the Middle East India China Korea and Japan. Emphasizes the connection between visual arts belief systems and historical contexts with a focus on Hinduism Buddhism and Islam as well as secular literature.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores issues of sexuality gender race and social class in the ancient and medieval worlds. Examines key artworks from ancient Greece the Roman Empire and medieval Europe within historical social and cultural contexts.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores themes of power privilege and cultural difference by comparing and contrasting works of Western and Non-Western visual culture in relation to different cultural value systems.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys women artists from the sixteenth century to the present and examines new direction in art-historical scholarship developed by feminist art historians during recent decades.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history politics economics philosophy geography arts and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy religious and cultural exchanges international relations Asian experience in America and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Engages in an internship in a business or non-profit organization that deals with Asia or an Asian American community. Students may complete the internship either in Asia or in the U.S. Students will complete appropriate exercises and reports to document their learning. (1 course 4-12 credits; can be taken multiple times in different semesters)

Prerequisites:

BLE-215, PHIL-119, PHIL-120, PHIL-123 or PHIL-127

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Surveys business ethics as they transcend the diverse perspectives of global business. Explores current global ethics standards and values ethical challenges controversies convergence and trends. Students explore famous global business cases through films websites and independent research. Emphasizes identification and resolution of global business ethical issues within the context of ethical decision-making and sustainability. Analyzes corporate social responsibility ; hence transforming global business ethics through business.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course explores the rich intellectual tradition of Haiti Guadeloupe and Martinique by considering historical moments linked to colonialism the abolition of slavery the representation of gender departmentalization and decolonization through essays films poems novels and short stories by critics and writers from the 19th-21st centuries.

Prerequisites:

At least 24 credits earned.

Credits:

3

Description:

"Prague offers students a more recent view into history and will serve as a backdrop to learning ""Design Thinking."" The curriculum will use Czech and Central European cultural features as the inspiration for learning the creative process\"

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of communication variations and cultural viewpoints and their impact on cross-cultural communication. A special emphasis is placed on rituals and message patterns in non-Western cultures.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introductory course in film studies with a focus on foreign films. Movies studied include masterpieces of cinema from Europe Asia the Middle East and other nations (Films have subtitles).

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students critically analyze Asian popular culture since the 1980s using a cultural ethnographic approach. Students apply the lenses of gender identity globalization and business strategies to examine pop phenomena such as Korean Wave Cool Japan and Cantonese popular music.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

By examining the film texts of Hong Kong auteurs such as John Woo Wong Kar-wai Tsui Hark Andrew Lau and Alan Mak the course examines issues such as film genres colonization/decolonization transnational political economy the Greater Chinese media market and the diaspora.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The course focus is on some of the divisions and conflicts within Israeli society. Students analyze and compare mainstream media discourse to alternative representations in documentary film. Analysis also covers media representation of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

What happens if you commit a crime on an Indian reservation? Who will prosecute you and how will they punish you? This course will explore the roots of tribal legal systems and criminal law both the Native and American influences. You will gain an understanding of tribal government legal systems criminal law and the role of tradition in contemporary tribal law. The course will also examine the conflict between Native and Non-Native perspectives on several cases: sovereignty rights to cultural practices women freedom of religion and land.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the complex relationships between women and crime today. This focus will include women as criminal offenders; women as victims of crime; and women as both offenders and victims. Course materials draw from recent feminist scholarship on these issues in the social sciences. Topics include the causes of women's crime women drugs and crime; child abuse and trauma; prostitution and sex trafficking; race gender and victimization; and feminist social movements against violence. Crimes of violence against women are a central focus in the course.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Relying on a simplistic demand or supply explanation of why Americans use/abuse drugs obscures the reality of America's drug problem is ineffective as a guide to public policy and has unforeseen often negative consequences. Drug use is a complex and multi-faceted issue. There are no easy answers. To comprehend the complexity of America's drug problem one needs an understanding of the geography history religion law economics and international politics of the Middle and Far East Eastern Europe Africa Mexico and Central and South America. This class will provide this basic understanding without losing sight that the problem we seek to remedy is our own.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Why do so many countries remain so poor? Why have some (e.g. the Asian "tigers") grown so rapidly? Why have most of the countries of Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union been slow to ignite economic growth? These questions are addressed by looking at domestic factors (government policies resource endowments) as well as the international environment (mobile investors international financial institutions). Asks what economic choices these countries face now. Normally offered yearly. Cultural Diversity B

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The study of how economic and human activity is distributed across space the reasons for these spatial distributions and the processes that change the spatial organization of economic activity over time. Topics include: maps map projections and geographic information systems; population geography; the organization and location of cities towns and villages; transportation and communication policy; industrial location; the geography of world trade; and geographic features of economic development. The course takes a global perspective and draws on cases and examples from all over the world. Cultural Diversity B

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The relationship between cultural diversity and schooling is explored by examining impediments to academic achievement and advancement by minority students non-native English speaking students and other under-represented groups. Topics include: standardized testing identification of inequities legal and ethical responsibilities of teachers and promoting equity. Ten pre-practicum observation hours required for teacher candidates.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the specific needs and challenges of the various language and cultural groups in schools. Topics include: theories of 1st and 2nd language acquisition strategies for teaching academic content modifying instruction in the mainstream classroom creating classroom cultures that invite all students into learning the role of advocacy and professional collaboration in ESL and analysis of policies related to assessment and placement of English Language Learners.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Literary masterpieces from ancient times to the Renaissance including: Homer's Odyssey Sophocles' Oedipus Virgil's Aeneid selections from the Hebrew Bible and the Gospels and Dante's Divine Comedy. List may vary at the discretion of the instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will introduce students to a selection of Great Books from around the world from the 17th century to the 21st such as Don Quixote (Spain) Madame Bovary (France) The Communist Manifesto (Germany) The Origin of Species (England) War and Peace (Russia) On Dreams (Austria) Night (Hungary) Things Fall Apart (Nigeria) "Satyagraha" (India) "I Am Prepared to Die" (South Africa) Saeed the Pessoptomist (Israel) The Rouge of the North (China) and The House of Spirits (Chile). Readings may vary at the discretion of the instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A study of literature written in English from cultures around the world with emphasis on major modern and contemporary writers from countries such as Australia Canada India Ireland Nigeria South Africa and the Caribbean. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear correct and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course offers an opportunity to read and discuss a sampling of contemporary Latinx literature that is fiction poetry nonfiction and comics by writers of Latin American origin who may or may not categorize themselves under the gender neutral/nonbinary term Latinx a variation of Latino or Latina (the history and use of this term will be part of course discussion and readings). Students will learn how to engage with this work and some of the current issues affecting the Latinx community through informal formal and creative assignments. Focus will be placed on using the tools of literary analysis to bear on the intersections of the creative aesthetic personal political and marginalized spaces that inform Latinx literature. Along with supplementary readings clips and discussions about the texts and related issues students will consider reflect upon and conduct inquiry into the narratives and social conversations they feel are part of their own personal journeys.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

African-American writing from the beginning through the present. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to selected Asian-American writers with an emphasis on socio-cultural issues such as race gender and ethnicity. Authors include Bulosan Hwang Jen Kingston Lee Mukherjee Odada and Tan.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Masterpieces of French and Francophone Literature in English Translation. Studies works translated into English by major authors from the Middle Ages to the present. Explores drama fiction and poetry from many regions of the world: Africa Western Europe North America the Caribbean and Vietnam.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The COVID-19 global pandemic has upended everyday life around the globe. Governments around the world have declared states of emergency and made extraordinary changes to our social and political lives. While some have posited the virus as "democratic " statistics tell a different story; it is clear that some groups are more vulnerable to hospitalization and death than others. In the months and years ahead the virus will continue to focus our attention on a range of related structural concerns- public health wealth and income inequality racial justice workers' rights the role of the military climate change the food production system national security education to name but just a few. As ever politics has shaped the nature of this crisis and politics will continue to shape our response and recovery. COVID-19 has the potential to significantly transform political economic and social life in countries around the world. This course will closely follow current events and bring in a range of experts to help us understand this crisis from a variety of perspectives including its global economic cultural and social impact.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history politics economics philosophy geography arts and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy religious and cultural exchanges international relations the Asian experience in America and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Presenting the major trends relevant to social cultural and economic transformations that can be seen in Asia today. Especially students will explore the following trends: the Diaspora of the Chinese and Indian People; the hold of Traditional Religious Beliefs in a Modernizing Asia such as the influences of Buddhism and Islam; the preservation of Martial Values and in Militarism in Asia; Issues related to Gender and Sexuality; Pop Culture among young people in Asia.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Using the documentary series Eyes on the Prize a History of the Civil Rights Movement the class will present the history of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States during the 20th century. Each week of the class will be focused around one of the 14 parts of the series. The presentation of the film segment will be accompanied by readings of texts articles and documents.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the way that African American history is presented through public history in the United States. This exploration will include monuments memorials and historic sites that both focus on the African American experience and examine how they fit into the context of American history. Time will also be given to look at the use of films architecture and archaeology. This will be done through reading texts viewing of films and visiting local historic sites that explore public history and the African American experience from various geographical perspectives.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the key concepts and current practices of public history as an academic discipline and professional field in museums libraries archives historical societies historic houses and preservation organizations. Examines the presentation and interpretation of history to popular audiences through documentaries motion pictures Web sites and other forms of media. Topics covered will include curation conservation fundraising educational and interpretive programming. Students will gain practical experience by participating in substantive directed projects with partnering organizations.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to the use of information technologies to narrate preserve access analyze research and publish interpretations of the past. Students will learn how historical content is produced presented and published in digital form; how to find and evaluate digital primary and secondary sources; and how to use basic computational techniques to work with digital resources. No programming experience is required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Outlines the history of Chinese martial arts in five movies highlighting Chinese views of violence personal loyalty government and justice.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

China Japan and Korea - East Asia's critical players - share many historical influences but each has a distinct culture and they competed with each other for much of the twentieth century proud of their achievements but feeling threatened by their neighbors. Lectures interspersed with movies and documentaries to show how East Asia has developed in the past one-hundred-plus years.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Discusses the rise of China as the world's largest economy and its impact on our life through films media and history.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the history of the Mediterranean from the ancient times to the 20th century with emphasis on the extraordinary interaction between the rich cultural ethnic and religious backgrounds of the peoples of Europe Middle East and North Africa.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the condition of European women from 1800 to 1914. Readings focus primarily on women's experiences in France and Great Britain. Topics include: the effects of industrialization on the lives of working-class women; working and middle-class women's negotiation of marriage work and family life; the rise of feminism women's greater participation in the public sphere and conservative reaction to these changes in women's place in society; women and crime; Victorian ideas about female sexuality; the politics of class and gender in nineteenth-century European society.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the changing place of women in European society since 1900. Topics include: women's suffrage and the political advances of the 1920s and 1930s; the revolution in sexual mores birth control and the rise of companionate marriage; women and the consumer economy; the anti-woman policies of Fascist Italy and Germany under National Socialism; liberation of women and retrenchment in the Soviet Union; World War II; feminism sexual liberation and women's political engagement since the 1960s; and throughout the twentieth century women's continuing negotiation of work and family responsibilities.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

From the ancient cliff dwellings of the Pueblo people to the iconic nineteenth-century street grid of Manhattan Americans throughout history have built cities distinguished by architectural creativity. This course explores the design history of the buildings and landscapes of America's early cities from the pre-contact period through the 1850s. Each week students will study a different early-American city to learn about the environmental architectural social and political forces that shaped these places. They will also practice the techniques used by historians preservationists and urban planners to examine the built environment and to find traces of this history in today's cities.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Using music as a window this class explores the history of Black America as well as the history of all America. Through a combination of texts videos and recordings this class examines the music of Black America from it's African roots to hip hop in the 21st century. This will be done in the context and communities in which black music was created and performed and also in relationship to the wider world.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Presents a coherent account of the origin and history of Islam since its foundation in Arabia in the seventh century A.D. to the present. Analyzes the terms events characteristics developments movements and institutions that have been part of the shaping of Islam. Ideological challenges and impact of Islam in the world today from both spiritual and political perspectives are examined.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines politics culture and society with a focus on the power of social inequality national identity war and the politics of violence to shape the 20th-century European experience. Texts will include films memoirs novels political speeches caricature and other writings as well as historical scholarship to explore topics such as: Europe in 1900; World War I; social and economic dislocation in the 1920s and 1930s; modern sexuality and gender relations; the rise of Fascism and National Socialism; World War II and the Holocaust; colonialism race and the end of empire; the Cold War; modernization and Americanization since the 1960s; European Union; the collapse of Communism; the Balkan Wars; and since the 1990s Europe's continuing engagement with the meaning of its past.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Traces the roles images and experiences of women in America from colonial times to 1865. Topics include the family work religion education health care motherhood sexuality social and political activism legal status labor activism and popular culture. With attention to ethnicity race class age region of residence disability and sexual orientation the course focuses primarily on the everyday lives of ordinary women.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Though the American colonies could claim victory in the Revolution the war's end did not guarantee a unified national identity. People struggled to reconcile the promise of Revolution with the realities of daily life and politics in the new republic. This class explores the various voices competing to be heard on the national and international stage from the political leaders who drafted founding documents to the women who learned to "stand and speak" despite repeated demands for their silence. We will encounter stories of African-American men and women who called attention to the Revolution's unfulfilled commitment to freedom and we will examine the struggles of the thousands of displaced Native peoples whose efforts for coexistence were marred by conflict and violence inflicted by an expansionist republic. We will also discuss the techniques and practices that historians of many stripes (educators curators preservationists podcasters journalists etc.) use to tell these stories to an array of audiences today.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines the global dispersion of African people outside of the African continent. The history and culture of African descendant people and their communities in the Americas, Europe, and Asia will be included.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the social and political development of European society between the two world wars primarily through the literature art and films of the period. Topics include: the dissolution of pre-1914 middle class society; deviance and sexuality in the 1920s; the role of decadence in art and the Fascist response to deviance in life and art; women workers and the new technology; the rise of Fascism; political engagement and polarization throughout European society in the face of economic and social crisis.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Of the estimated 5 575 statues depicting historic figures in the United States only 559 of them commemorate women and this disparity is echoed around the world. What are we to make of the gap between the historical "monumental woman" and the physical structures that celebrate them? This class examines global efforts to memorialize important women through monuments museums and other public spaces. It will focus on how acts of memorialization produce public and collective memories about the past and how these bring up issues of patriarchy subjugation inclusivity and representation. We will explore the contradictions between women's empowerment and historical exploitation expressed in things like pussy hats and other feminist gear in artistic representations of the female form in exploration of cultural difference and in grass-roots and official forms of activism.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores ideas about emotional life from the fields of history anthropology sociology and psychology as well as the evolution of emotion rules and prescriptions focusing on western Europe and the United States since 1700. In the eighteenth century emotions were seen as a positive influence on politics and public life especially during the French Revolution. After the fall of Robespierre the emotions were banished to the private sphere - so we will read both primary sources and recent scholarship on 19th- and 20th- century ideas about masculinity and femininity romantic love and marriage childrearing and about what parents and children are supposed feel toward each other how ideas about these subjects have changed over time and whether our feelings change with them.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores German history since 1945 through film newsreels and other archival footage war memorials and museums novels published diaries memoirs and recent historical scholarship. Topics include the representation in film and other texts of: post-war rebuilding; the German Economic Miracle; divided Berlin; 1960s and 70s radical politics; coming to terms since 1945 with Germany's Nazi past and the Holocaust; coming to terms since 1990 with the Stasi and East German past; "Ostalgie" (nostalgia in the 21st century for some aspects of East German socialism); the multi-cultural society that is Germany today with new Turkish Greek Russian Arab and even Israeli communities.

Prerequisites:

Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An opportunity to learn the history of domestic violence including battering child abuse and child neglect and the legal response to it. Focus will be on Massachusetts Law and its response especially the Abuse Prevention Act its application and enforcement and on laws protecting children from abuse and neglect. Filings law office issues and special issues in dealing with battered women and abused and neglected children will be included with the psychological issues cultural issues and advocacy possibilities. Normally offered yearly. Sophomore status required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Covers topics in folk traditional and modern music of Africa the Middle East Asia and Europe in the context of the cultures and lives of the indigenous peoples of those regions; examines how music interacts with the issues of race gender class religion politics and social movements. Normally offered every other year.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will examine social change in the U.S. and abroad. The course will also examine the role of business nonprofits and the public sector in addressing social problems. Topics studied may include the Industrial Revolution the civil rights movement the women's movement environmentalism and the gay and lesbian movement.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will examine social change in the U.S. and abroad. The course will also examine the role of business nonprofits and the public sector in addressing social problems. Topics studied may include the Industrial Revolution the civil rights movement the women's movement environmentalism and the gay and lesbian movement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this class you will be introduced to the perspectives and methods of politics philosophy and economics and see how these three disciplines present distinct but interconnected dimensions of current social and political issues.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is an introduction to the philosophy of feminist thought. Feminist theories of epistemology metaphysics and morality will be examined as critiques of traditional philosophy . Feminist perspectives and methodologies include radical liberal postmodern as well as more recent trends in ecofeminism. Special emphasis will be placed on explicit and implicit practices of alienation and exclusion as they have unfolded in the "gendering" of thought truth and reality. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every third year. C b

Prerequisites:

PHIL-119, or PHIL-123, or PHIL-127

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the political social and ecological problems facing us as a global community. Having its roots in feminist theory and deep-ecology eco-feminism provides a critical framework for ecological responsibility and accountability. Writings from eco-feminist thinkers and environmental activists around the world will be used to highlight the philosophical and political conflicts and challenges including globalization and loss of biodiversity global warming international human rights the relationship of gender and nature and modes of redress for eco-justice and sustainable development.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Prejudice of many kinds such as racism and sexism is so embedded in our social institutions and is so "traditional" and pervasive that we often fail to notice it. In this course we will deal with the history and nature of racism and sexism as well as with possible solutions to these problems including affirmative action and busing. Also to be discussed will be homosexuality pornography and sex roles. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C a

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The exposition and critical evaluation of Hinduism Buddhism Confucianism Taoism and Islam. Special attention is given to foundation principles as well as to the similarities and differences of each of these philosophies to basic ideas in Western philosophy. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An historical survey of Buddhist philosophy. We will explore Buddhist origins central teachings devotional and meditational practices ritual and institutions as developed from classical to modern times. Special attention given to the philosophical diversity of the Buddhist world view. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An exploration into the various dimensions and ideologies concerning the role of the feminine in relation to the Divine. Belief systems myths and archetypes from ancient Goddess worship to 20th century feminist theology will be examined in terms of the philosophical content and psychological consequences. Special emphasis will be placed on feminist metaphysical structures for understanding consciousness and Reality. Classes will be conducted by means of lectures primary and secondary texts and class discussions. Normally offered alternate years. Cultural Diversity A

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A survey of the main developments in Chinese Philosophy. The course begins with the early dynastic concept of humanism and then turns to Confucius and Mencius. Having developed the central Confucian doctrines students next examine the Taoist response to Confucianism in the writings of Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu. The course then considers Zen Buddhism which is called Ch'an Buddhism in China where it originated. In particular students study the concept of sudden enlightenment before turning to the Neo-Confucian scholars.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the main actors ideas institutions and processes that shape the international system. Analyzes key international developments including imperialism nationalism the causes of wars and peace and globalization. Integrates international relations concepts with history to explain the unprecedented levels of prosperity and violence in Europe particularly in light of its dominant role in recent centuries. Emphasizes contemporary developments taking place in other regions such as Asia Africa and Latin America. Helps students understand the global arena as a space of complex interconnections and sets the foundations for other courses in international relations and regional studies. Normally offered every semester. This course sets the foundations for other courses in International Relations and Regional Studies

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course explores the relationship between politics & religion in the United States. How and why does religion influence politics in the U.S? What does freedom of religion mean in the U.S.? Why do some groups today erroneously claim that the U.S. was founded as a "Christian nation"? This course also examines what major world religions say about the status and responsibilities of the state and the roles that minority religious groups (Buddhism Islam etc.) play in U.S. politics.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This class examines the way in which national identity global and regional economics and international development intersect. It uses the professionalization of the sport of hockey and its subsequent spread around the globe as its case. It will look at the rise of the pro game the way in which it shapes national identity in the Canadian case the way in which the pro business model has changed in response to broad socio-economic changes in North America and geo-political shifts around the globe especially in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union.

Prerequisites:

Junior status

Credits:

4.00

Description:

How do we explain the appearance or absence of social movements? What social or individual factors explain their development and decline? Who joins social movements? Who does not? Why? What ideas or ideals animate those who do participate? What is it like to be part of a social movement? What effect do they or have they had on politics power and efforts at social change? These are some of the questions that have traditionally shaped debates over social movements both domestically and internationally. They will form the analytical core of the work in this course. By critically evaluating several competing schools of thought in social movement theory and history we will attempt to highlight the social forces that have at varying points in times facilitated maintained as well as blocked the development of social movements in the US and beyond.

Prerequisites:

PSYCH-114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the application of psychological theories and principles to organizations and the workplace with attention to the role of culture and context. Topics includes job analysis recruitment selection evaluation training retention and termination. Employee morale well-being stress and hardiness are considered.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines theoretical and empirical approaches that provide insight into Asian viewpoints on socialization practices family systems health/well-being cultural traditions/values and spiritual philosophy/literature. Explores the diversity among Asian cultures in terms of language history religion/spiritual faith and healthcare practices all of which play a significant role in shaping the psychological characteristics interpersonal relationships and work dynamics of Asians and Asian immigrants.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will explore the comparative history and structure of Western religious traditions broadly understood and their impact on other world religions while attempting to recognize the similarities and the differences among them. Traditions to be studied include Greek and Roman religion the monotheistic faiths (Judaism Christianity and Islam as well as Zoroastrianism Sikhism and Bahaism). We will also explore the impact of the Western religions on indigenous traditions such as African religion Native American religion and Pacific Island religion. Attention will be given to the reading of original texts when available. Requiring students to observe religious ceremonies will enhance practical understanding of many of the above traditions. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will examine a variety of Eastern religions including Hinduism Buddhism Jainism Confucianism Taoism and Shintoism. Possible connections to be explored will be the impact of these traditions on others such as Pacific Islands and African religion as well as the growing place of Eastern religion in the West. This course will explore the history and structure of each tradition while attempting to recognize the similarities and the differences among them. Attention will be given to the reading of original texts when available. Requiring students to observe religious ceremonies will enhance practical understanding of many of the above traditions. Normally offered every year. Cultural Diversity B

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of timely special issues in international business. Specific topics are announced when the course is scheduled.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is about the basketball hoop dream played out at the high school and college levels. We will study a wide variety of materials - novels films websites reference works - to understand both the construction and destruction of the hoop dream in such diverse places as New York City Seattle rural Indiana suburban Georgia and the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming. Issues of race and culture will serve as guiding themes as we develop critical theory explaining why the hoop dream has persisted and adapted over time to fit the needs of its believers and supporters.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

With a focus on some selected ethnic groups from Asia "Asia in America" studies the history and current status of Asian Americans in Boston and other parts of the country. We will examine the major reasons why these immigrants chose to leave their home country as well as their expectations and experiences here in America. We will also discuss the issues Asian immigrants have faced in this adopted "home" as well as the connections and conflicts among different ethnic groups or even within the same ethnic group due to political and socio-economic reasons. The course will include some level of community engagement through Chinatown tour and service which may enable us to have a direct contact with the Asian American population and reflect on what is being discussed in class. Through this course we hope to gain a better understanding of the racial and cultural history of the country and arrive at a deep appreciation of the dynamics of cultural interactions in the twenty-first century. The course fulfills the SCGP requirement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on French-language films - with subtitles! - that address pressing social issues of the 20th and 21st centuries such as hunger female genital mutilation immigration racism economic inequality genocide gender sexuality colonialism and post-colonialism.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the role of race in United States society and the efforts to achieve racial justice in the United States. It introduces students to the formation and transformation of racial systems throughout American history and examines the ways race impacts our lived experiences today. Students will assess the social significance of race by examining the realities of white supremacy and the experience of race.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this class we will discuss racial ethnic and cultural groups and use sociology as a way to understand some of the larger patterns of immigration identity intergroup relations privilege discrimination and oppression. Students will increase their awareness and appreciation of diversity and examine cultural difference from a sociological perspective. The course will help students understand how culture impacts our world and thus help them prepare personally and professionally to succeed in a global context.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of changing definitions of life and death social factors affecting causes and rates of death care of the dying and their families institutionalization the funeral industry suicide crisis intervention and the impact of technology on the dying process.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of how different cultures understand health and illness. Healing approaches from Asia Africa and the Americas will be explored.

Prerequisites:

SOC-113 or SOC-116

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Globalization is shrinking the world. How and why did this happen? This course will explore global change and the global processes which effect key social institutions: culture the economy and politics. Students will study the processes of globalization and its impact on our lives and people around the globe.

Prerequisites:

SPAN-201 or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Continues skills development from 201. Students read a collection of short stories write compositions develop cultural insights through comparative and contrastive assignments and practice listening and speaking skills in weekly conversation sessions.

Prerequisites:

SPAN-202, SPAN-203 or SPAN-250 or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Develops written and oral skills in various contexts and registers. Emphasis on strengthening written skills and learning to speak clearly and persuasively in Spanish. Short texts and audio-visual materials provide the basis for classroom activities which include regularly assigned essays group discussions and debates.

Prerequisites:

SPAN-202, SPAN-203, SPAN-250 or Instructor's consent. SPAN-290 or SPAN-300 strongly recommended.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores a selection of Peninsular and Latin American cultural materials. Primarily examines texts from different literary genres (narrative drama essay and poetry). Develops critical skills required in more advanced Spanish courses through close readings and textual analysis. Activities include regularly assigned essays group discussions and short scene work.

Prerequisites:

SPAN-202, SPAN-203 or SPAN-250. SPAN-290 or SPAN-300 are strongly recommended

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the civilization and culture of Spain highlighting its historical development and cultural manifestations from pre-historic times to the nineteenth century. Students improve their four skills through activities that include discussions oral presentations and writing assignments based on reading and films.

Prerequisites:

SPAN-202, SPAN-203 or SPAN-250 or Instructor's consent. SPAN-290 or SPAN-300 strongly recommended.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces students to the complexity Latin America by examining its roots in pre-Columbian America and the impact of Spanish exploration and colonization. Places emphasis on cultural economic historical philosophical political and religious patterns that define the region. Includes class discussions oral presentations and writing assignments based on reading and audio-visual material.

Prerequisites:

SPAN-290 or SPAN-300 or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Integrates language learning with culture via business context of the Hispanic world. Spanish for banking and finance marketing and advertising and international commerce are highlighted. Students increase their cross-cultural understanding and written and oral proficiency in business Spanish through a wide range of assignments.

Prerequisites:

SPAN-300 and SPAN-302 is strongly recommended

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines authors from Latin America and the Caribbean in their historical and cultural contexts. Reading and class discussions consider the relationship between the writer and society by covering such topics as colonialism the oral tradition modernism and the emergence of new narratives in the twentieth century. The Inca Garcilaso Sor Juana Carlos Fuentes Rigoberta Menchu and Pablo Neruda are among some writers studied.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This is a survey of American musical theatre from its roots in the mid-19th century to the present. It provides students with the analytical tools historical insight and cultural context to increase their appreciation of Broadway's most influential musicals and the artists who created them. The course also provides a critical examination of the ways musicals both reflected the racial ethnic and gender stereotyping of its day while trailblazing a more progressive and enlightened view of these identities.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course introduces the theories and practices strategically used by American theatre artists after the Second World War. Special emphasis is placed on theatre artists exploring issues of cultural identity including works by LGBTQ African-American Asian-American and Latinx playwrights. The course will also introduce trends in post-modern theatre practices related to the emerging work of auteur directors solo performers and interdisciplinary collectives. Satisfies a core requirement for Theatre majors. Normally offered alternate years. This satisfies the "global perspectives" requirement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the roles and images of women in Western culture and the realities of women's everyday lives through literature film history art psychology and recent feminist scholarship. Analyzes gender inequalities and the influence of gender on social structure human behavior and artistic expression. Topics include: the social construction of gender and identity; domestic prescriptions for women; women and work; intersections of gender class and race in American society; sexualities and identity; the politics of motherhood and reproductive rights; educating girls; negotiating male privilege and structural inequalities; representations of women in Western art and film; and women as artists and gendered models of creativity in art film fiction and science.

Prerequisites:

At least a 3.3 GPA required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the roles and images of women in Western culture and the realities of women's everyday lives through literature film history art psychology and recent feminist scholarship. Analyzes gender inequalities and the influence of gender on social structure human behavior and artistic expression. Topics include: the social construction of gender and identity; domestic prescriptions for women; women and work; intersections of gender class and race in American society; sexualities and identity; the politics of motherhood and reproductive rights; educating girls; negotiating male privilege and structural inequalities; representations of women in Western art and film; and women as artists and gendered models of creativity in art film fiction and science.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores women's lives from the perspective of the social and natural sciences including examination of recent biological psychological and sociological theories about gender and gender roles as well as the influence of feminist scholarship in these areas. Topics include: the social construction of gender; the psychology and biology of sex and gender; women and work; media representations of women; the female body and eating disorders; women's health and lifecycle; women and sexuality; reproduction abortion and motherhood; and sexual violence against women.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the key topics and debates that have shaped the field of gender studies including queer studies masculinity studies and women's studies. Through lecture and class discussion of texts from literature film history psychology and sociology explores the pervasive influence of gender on the structure of society and our everyday experiences and the role that gender plays in our understanding of love friendship sexuality and even violence. Topics include: biological arguments about gender and sexuality; the social construction of gender and identity; intersections of gender race class and sexuality; masculinity and femininity; and theories of sexual difference and the construction of sexuality.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores how gender and sexuality are depicted constructed and interrogated across a variety of visual mediums including film television and photography. We will pair foundational readings in queer and feminist thought with representations in order to consider how theory and popular culture engage in a constant dialogue. Topics include: the maintenance of norms regarding gender and sexuality; how race class and ability complicate our understanding of gender and sexuality; the ways in which sexuality intertwines with other social and political formations; imagining alternative theories and practices in representing gender and sexuality in contemporary media culture. Possible texts include theoretical work by Sigmund Freud Judith Butler Rosemarie Garland-Thomson and David Halperin and media such as The Shape of Water (2017) Blade Runner (1982) Queer Eye for the Straight Guy (2003-2007) and Jess Dugan's To Survive on This Shore (2018).

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Investigates the complex intersections between feminism and popular culture through several different lenses: by exploring how feminists make arguments about popular culture; by looking at the complexities of public femininity in today's popular culture including figures such as Lady Gaga and Katy Perry and television shows like The Bachelor and Grey's Anatomy; by focusing on a variety of articulations of feminism within mass media blogs social media and popular books such as Ariel Levy's Female Chauvinist Pigs and Caitlin Moran's How to Be a Woman. Along the way we will ask questions about: what makes a work of art feminist; how modern media contributes to or distracts us from a variety of political debates in the realm of female equality and how can we as individuals use modern media to create and advance smart feminist arguments.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Investigates how feminists both today and in history have understood inequality and difference and looked for the best ways to address these issues and bring about social justice. Examines how feminist theorists help us to understand how gender and other social categories such as race class sexuality disability age and nationality are constructed within and through each other; and analyzes feminist engagements with liberalism socialism psychoanalysis existentialism post-colonialism critical race theory and queer theory as well as consider anti-feminist arguments. Readings include classic critical texts by authors including Mary Wollstonecraft Emma Goldman Virginia Woolf Chandra Mohanty Gloria Anzaldua and Judith Butler.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores of various cultural worldviews in order to reveal and assess the voices of women from around the world as they respond to important global issues such as sexual violence and gendered oppression. Topics include: national citizenship sexual politics legal discourse aesthetic representation literary movements genre constructions of femininity sexual identities and representations of gender in relation to race and class and international cultures and the relationship of self-image to the body politic.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the stories that help us to understand communities identities and bodies that could be considered queer and the ways that film music memoir and fiction have discussed queer as different unusual or other. Texts include the documentary "Paris Is Burning" Frank Ocean's 2012 album "Channel Orange" and Janet Mock's recent memoir "Redefining Realness" as well as foundational queer theory from Judith Butler Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick and Lee Edelman among others to help build a framework for approaching and interpreting both fictional and non-fictional accounts of queer lives.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the history of female portrayal on the Western stage including women in Shakespeare and other early modern plays (when female characters were played by men); in Restoration comedy; the works of Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw; and 20th and 21st century depictions of women on stage including in the works of authors such as Lillian Hellman Lorraine Hansberry Caryl Churchill Paula Vogel Suzan-Lori Parks Rebecca Gilman and Sarah Ruhl. Students develop familiarity with key concepts in performance theory including catharsis Brecht's alienation effect and the distinction between performance and the performative.

Courses that fulfill the Creativity and Innovation, First-Year Seminar, Humanities/History, Language, Literature, Quantitative Reasoning, Social Science, or VPATH requirements may double count to fulfill the Social, Cultural, and Global Perspectives (SCGP) requirement.

Science, Technology, & Engineering (STE): 2 courses, at least one with a laboratory, 8 credits

Choose two STE (Science, Technology, and Engineering) courses, at least one with a corresponding laboratory, from those listed below. Courses do not need to be in a sequence. In the case of a course that is a lecture plus a lab, the student must complete both components to earn credit for the STE requirement.

Biology:

Prerequisites:

BIO-101 and BIO-L101, can also be taken concurrently BIO-L104 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An introduction to basic evolutionary behavioral and ecological principles. Readings and discussions emphasize the ways that humans are affected by ecological processes and principles as well as how humans and their technology affect ecosystems. May not be taken by Biology majors or minors. This course will not fulfill requirements for a major or a minor in Biology. It is intended for non-biology majors as a follow-up to Biology 101. 3 hours lecture. Days Only. Madrid Campus only.

Prerequisites:

BIO-104 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Exercises and field trips designed to complement and demonstrate the ecological principles developed in the lecture section. The lab emphasizes the scientific method and employs long term group projects. Madrid Campus only.

Prerequisites:

Non Science Majors Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Major topics include the scientific basis of evolution the fossil history of vertebrates evidence of evolution in the human body and applying an evolutionary perspective to the social interactions and possible futures of humanity. Meets one of the non laboratory science requirements for the non-science major. This reading and writing intensive course is a non-laboratory science option for non-science majors. This course will not fulfill requirement for a major or a minor in Biology.

Prerequisites:

Non Science Majors Only

Credits:

4

Description:

This course explores the evolution, ecology, behavior, genetics, and adaptations of cats (Felis silvestris catus) and dogs (Canis lupus familiaris). We will discuss what is known about these species, current research, and what is still unknown. The course will focus on comparing and contrasting the biology of cats and dogs and how biological differences have led to the way they are perceived as companion animals. We will also discuss how these species can be used as model organisms for exploring patterns of human heredity and disease transmission.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L111 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explanation of key biological structures and reactions of the cell. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 (concurrently)

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Sessions are designed to familiarize the student with biological molecules and the techniques used in their study. The techniques covered include basic solution preparation separation and quantification of molecules enzyme catalysis and cell isolation.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L114 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Rigorous introduction to organismal biology emphasizing evolution phylogenetics form and function. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A series of laboratory experiences in evolution diversity anatomy and physiology.

Prerequisites:

Non Science Majors Only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course seeks to answer five current questions from all levels of biology from the subcellular to the ecosystem level. Topics will be discussed in the context of genetics evolution and ecology. We will focus on the process of doing science including how scientists evaluate ideas and communicate their findings. Emphasis will be placed on topics in biology that impact daily life.

Chemistry:

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH-104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH-104 must take MATH-104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-L111.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces atomic structure the periodic table the nature of chemical bonds chemical reactions and stoichiometry. This course is recommended for science majors or those considering careers in the health sciences.

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH-104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH-104 must take MATH-104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-111.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course introduces the basic principles of chemistry through hands-on laboratory experiments. Students learn safe laboratory practices and fundamental technical skills. These include the determination of mass and volume making solutions and synthesizing a product. Emphasis is also placed on understanding and writing scientific literature.

Computer Science:

Prerequisites:

Math placement level of 2 or above or any MATH course at the level 100 or above

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Do viruses and rumors spread like forest fires? How do ants cooperate? Do spoken languages and biological species evolve in a similar way? "Ants Rumors and Gridlocks" exposes students to introductory aspects of computational science by addressing and answering these and many other questions. Students use and modify virtual experiments preprogrammed in the NetLogo programming language to investigate these topics and others in Social Sciences Biology and Environmental Science. No prior knowledge of computer programming or NetLogo is required.

Electrical Engineering:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The world is addicted to quantifying the essence of everything from personal IQ to the speed of a baseball to our healthiness or our chances of winning the lottery. Behind most of these numeric values exists a science of measurement. Some of this is referenced to international standards such as for length time weight or temperature. Others are more arbitrary and subjective such as ranking Olympic performance in gymnastics beauty pageants or popular responses as found in the game show "Family Feud." A third category includes controversial areas such as measuring whether a person is lying when interrogated or using hype rather than reality to market products. Sometimes statistics are used to predict sports outcomes such as in the annual March Madness NCAA basketball brackets. Finally in a world subject to fraud and deception it can be essential to distinguish legitimate from counterfeit items such as in money art collectibles and historical documents. Don't get hoodwinked! This course examines all of these starting with how measurements have been made throughout history along with a full deck of entertaining terms used during the ages. This may help you sort out your weight whether given in pounds kilos or stones. Often these terms will provide insights into how people lived in different eras. We will also look at some of the technologies currently available to provide these measurements and unravel the complexities of various sensors that are used. As we consider the meaning of "accuracy" we may become less naive about how much confidence to ascribe to the results given us. Hovering around all of these measurements should be the question of validity - are they meaningful useful or misleading? And the impact they have on society - whether they steer behavior more powerfully than one might originally suspect. Each student will also be given an opportunity to become an "expert" in an area of measurement of personal interest. By the end of the course all students should have gained greater insight into how the world around them is quantified and whether numbers can provide accurate predictors for our future. Algebra helpful. Basic science background helpful. Curiosity essential!

Environmental Science:

Prerequisites:

UES-L107 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Unmanned autonomous systems (UAS) or Drones are high-tech intelligent machines capable of traveling by air land or sea via a remote connection. This course presents concepts and practical methods of using Unmanned Vehicles in a professional context particularly for environmental projects. UAVs are increasingly being used in a professional capacity such as cinematography and filming real estate construction surveying mapping agriculture industrial inspections utilities inspections and many more. The course covers mission planning operations field data collection data processing legal implications data analysis and data deliverables. The course and laboratory will include learning flying micro-drones and preparing to pass the Federal Aviation Administration's Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Airmen (Part 107) exam. The course will have an associated Laboratory component in which students will learn how to properly plan effective flight missions fly safely and legally develop risk management strategies analyze the data captured and convert it into a useful data deliverable.

Prerequisites:

UES-107 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Unmanned autonomous systems (UAS) or Drones are high-tech intelligent machines capable of traveling by air land or sea via a remote connection. This course presents concepts and practical methods of using Unmanned Vehicles in a professional context particularly for environmental projects. UAVs are increasingly being used in a professional capacity such as cinematography and filming real estate construction surveying mapping agriculture industrial inspections utilities inspections and many more. The course covers mission planning operations field data collection data processing legal implications data analysis and data deliverables. The course and laboratory will include learning flying micro-drones and preparing to pass the Federal Aviation Administration's Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Airmen (Part 107) exam. The course will have an associated Laboratory component in which students will learn how to properly plan effective flight missions fly safely and legally develop risk management strategies analyze the data captured and convert it into a useful data deliverable.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-L111 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Applies the fundamentals of science to environmental issues. Topics include population dynamics and resources environmental degradation ecosystems geologic processes deforestation biodiversity climate change air soil and water resource management and pollution and risks to health.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-111 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory exercises are used to illustrate topics covered in UES 111. Field testing and analysis of environmental samples. Field trips may be required.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-L121 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines art and cultural objects through the lens of the biological chemical and physical principles of the materials and processes we use to make them. Includes consideration of factors important in art conservation. Provides an environmental context for the manufacture and use of art materials and the preservation of cultural objects.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-121 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides hands-on work with pigments dyes and other art materials using the basic principles of science and technology. Students will conduct laboratory experiments that produce art objects and other consumer products. Instruction in safe laboratory practices and basic techniques such as determining mass and volume representing data in the form of tables graphs and graphics. Practice in synthesizing compounds like paints and finishes and in evaluating methods of art conservation.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-L225 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides the fundamentals of geographic information science (GIS) including the history of automated mapping. A review of the necessary hardware and software elements used in GIS is presented. Hands-on exercises with computerized mapping software are required.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-225 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Required companion computer laboratory to be taken concurrently with UES 225.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. Develops students' awareness and understanding of wetlands including inland and salt marshes mangroves and swamps. The beginning of the semester is devoted to understanding of how these vital ecosystems function with topics including wetland hydrology biogeochemistry management and restoration. The latter portion of the semester is focused on developing a testable citizen science project (e.g. a sampling protocol) for a local salt marsh in conjunction with a local community partner.

Prerequisites:

Honors student or at least 3.3 GPA

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. Students' awareness and understanding of wetlands including inland and salt marshes mangroves and swamps will be developed through exploration of these vital ecosystems (topics include wetland biology management and restoration). The latter portion of the semester is focused on developing a testable citizen science project (e.g. a sampling protocol) for a local salt marsh in conjunction with a local community partner where students will be going into the field three times over the course of the semester via pre-arranged private transportation.

Forensic Science:

Prerequisites:

FS-L103 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Application of the principles of forensic science in evaluating physical evidence with emphasis on its role in criminal investigation. Class experiences may include guest lectures and field trips. 3-hour lecture. Normally offered Fall

Prerequisites:

FS-103 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory experiences related to the collection and analysis of physical evidence as performed by forensic science professionals. Experiments may include forensic microscopy drug analysis forensic serology physical patterns fingerprint and firearm evidence analysis techniques. 3-hour laboratory. Normally offered Fall

Neuroscience:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the field of neuroscience the study of the organization and function of the nervous system of humans and other animals. Topics include the neuron and neural transmission the overall function and organization of the nervous system the development of the brain neural plasticity sleep memory and other higher cognitive functions.

Physics:

Prerequisites:

Take MATH-121 or MATH-134 or MATH-165 or permission of Physics department chair; PHYS-L111 taken concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics. Study of kinematics vectors Newton's laws rotations rigid body statics and dynamics energy and work momentum heat and thermodynamics kinetic theory.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-111 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This laboratory course consists of experiments and exercises to illustrate the basic concepts studied in PHYS 111. Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics. Study of kinematics vectors Newton's laws rotations rigid body statics and dynamics energy and work momentum heat and thermodynamics kinetic theory. Error propagation use of Excel laboratory notebooks and formal reports required.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121 or MATH-134 with a grade of C or better. MATH-165 can replace these prerequisites if taken concurrently with PHYS-151.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

PHYS 151 is the first of three courses (PHYS 151 152 153) that comprise the calculus-based introductory physics sequence intended for students majoring in the physical sciences engineering and mathematics. This course covers basic techniques in physics that fall under the topic of classical mechanics and their application in understanding the natural world. Specific topics include the study of vectors Newton's laws rotations kinetic and potential energy momentum and collisions rigid body statics and dynamics fluid mechanics gravitation simple harmonic motion mechanical waves sound and hearing. The student will learn how to analyze physical situations by using simple models and also how to solve those models and derive useful conclusions from them. This course will show students how experimental results and mathematical representations are combined to create testable scientific theories.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121, MATH-165, MATH-166 or MATH-134(with a minimum grade of C). PHYS-151 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This laboratory course consists of experiments and exercises to illustrate the basic concepts studied in PHYS 151: measurements propagation of errors vectors Newton's laws work and energy momentum rotations oscillations simple harmonic motion fluid. Knowledge of algebra trigonometry differentiation and integration required.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-151 and PHYS-L151. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS-L152.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This calculus-based course continues the topics in physics covered in Physics 151 and begins with temperature and heat the thermal properties of matter and the lasw of thermodynamics. It then switches to electromagnetism and covers electric charge and field Gauss' law electrical potential and capacitance electric currents and DC circuits. Next magnetism electromagnetic induction Faraday's law and AC circuits are discussed. This is followed by Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-152 (concurrently) and PHYS-151 and PHYS-L151

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This laboratory course consists of experiments and exercises to illustrate the basic concepts studied in PHYS 152: heat gas laws electric forces field and potential DC and AC circuits magnetic field electromagnetic induction Faraday's law optics. Calculus algebra trigonometry are required. Error propagation use of Excel laboratory notebooks and formal reports required.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121, MATH-164, or MATH-165; PHYS-151; PHYS-L153 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This calculus-based course is the third in the series of introductory physics courses. It begins with optics and includes the nature and propogation of light geometric optics interference and diffraction. The focus then changes to modern physics and begins with special relativity the Lorentz transformation relativistic momentum and energy addition of relativistic velocities early quantum theory blackbody radiation photoelectric effect the Compton Effect photon interactions pair production and Bohr's theory of the atom. Schrodinger's equation is introduced with use of wave functions solutions to a particle in a box barrier penetration quantum mechanical tunneling the Pauli Exclusion principle the development of the periodic table and the X-ray spectra. The final topics cover nuclear physics radioactivity half-life nuclear fission and fusion medical uses of radiation and elementary particle physics.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-153 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This laboratory course consists of experiments to and exercises to illustrate the basic concepts studied in PHYS 153. Includes experiments and computations to illustrate the basic concepts of special relativity the Lorentz transformation relativistic momentum and energy addition of relativistic velocities early quantum theory blackbody radiation photoelectric effect the Compton Effect photon interactions pair production and the Bohr theory of the atom.

Science:

Prerequisites:

SCI-L103 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Case study approach to the fundamentals of science applied to environmental degradation ecosystems geological processes population dynamics deforestation and biodiversity climate change ozone depletion air soil and water resource management pollution and risks to health economics and the environment politics and the environment and ethics and the environment.

Prerequisites:

Must take SCI-103 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory exercises to illustrate the topics covered in Science 103. Field-testing and analysis of environmental samples. Field trip required.

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces the latest discoveries and applications of biotechnology. Topics include genetically modified food, stem cells, genetic testing, cloning, and forensics. A combination of lectures, discussions, short documentaries, mock congressional hearings, and hands-on activities will provide insight into the numerous medical, social, legal, and ethical issues surrounding this technology.

Prerequisites:

Honor student stats or GPA of 3.3 required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the latest discoveries and applications of biotechnology. Topics include genetically modified food stem cells genetic testing cloning and forensics. A combination of lectures discussions short documentaries mock congressional hearings and hands-on activities will provide insight into the numerous medical social legal and ethical issues surrounding this technology.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes detection and prevention. Psychosocial aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy surgery chemotherapy and bone marrow transplants.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors Students Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes detection and prevention. Psycho-social aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy surgery chemotherapy and bone marrow transplants.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes detection and prevention. Psychosocial aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy surgery chemotherapy and bone marrow transplants. Service-learning is a pedagogy integrating academically relevant service activities that address human and community needs into a course. Students connect knowledge and theory to practice by combining service with reflection in a structured learning environment. Students will engage in service-learning with an underserved community partner in regards to cancer by working directly with cancer patients or by assisting on a project that supports cancer patients.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course introduces the top ten U.S. adult cancers as well as the most common pediatric cancers. Topics to be covered include cancer causes detection and prevention. Psychosocial aspects of being diagnosed with cancer and the role nutrition plays for cancer patients will be integrated. The course will also discuss the major treatment modalities for each cancer including radiation therapy surgery chemotherapy and bone marrow transplants. Service-learning is a pedagogy integrating academically relevant service activities that address human and community needs into a course. Students connect knowledge and theory to practice by combining service with reflection in a structured learning environment. Students will engage in service-learning with an underserved community partner in regards to cancer by working directly with cancer patients or by assisting on a project that supports cancer patients.

Prerequisites:

MATH-128 or higher and SCI-L111 or SCI-LV111 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

History of astronomy from the ancients to Newton; light; telescopes detectors; the sun earth moon planets comets asteroids meteors; space programs science and technology in society. Accompanying lab course includes a field trip to an observatory in the greater Boston area where students will be able to make first hand observations. Designed for non-science majors.

Prerequisites:

Take SCI-111 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory experiments and exercises to illustrate the principles discussed in SCI- 111. Observational exercises using computer simulations astrophotography and stellar spectroscopy. Includes a field trip to an observatory in the greater Boston area where students will be able to make first hand observations. Designed for non-science majors.

Prerequisites:

MATH-128 or higher and SCI-L112 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Astronomy of the cosmos; sun stars interstellar materials galaxies pulsars quasars black holes; nature of time relativity cosmology. Course culminates with a visit to the Clay Center Observatory where students will be able to make first hand observations. For non-science majors.

Prerequisites:

Take SCI-112 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory experiments and exercises to illustrate the principles discussed in SCI-112. Observational exercises using the computer simulations astrophotography and stellar spectroscopy. Includes a field trip to an observatory in the greater Boston area where students will be able to make first hand observations. Designed for non-science majors.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces non-science majors to concepts that are central to making our planet habitable. It presents the Earth in context of the solar system with a broad view of global climate change and energy resources in a quest to better understand the workings of our planet. Students will gain a flavor of how researchers think investigate and develop conclusions that directly affect our political and economic future. Topics include the solar system the search for other habitable Earth-like planets the search for extraterrestrial life and evolution of life on Earth. This course makes heavy use of audio-visual materials often including computer animations and simulations in-class experiment demonstration and intensive use of internet-based resources.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

About 15 billion years ago (data indicate) the big bang occurred and the universe was born. With it came physical laws and a spectacular array of consequences that lead to the universe as we know it. This non-lab 4 credit course explores the inner workings of the physical universe in terms of the scientific inquiry which lead to Newton's laws an understanding of energy waves light electricity atomic structure chemical reactions nuclear physics particle physics relativity and the big bang theory. During the course students will learn to make use of modern resources to access scientific and technical literature to research a scientific topic. They will learn to distinguish between science and technology (e.g. quantum mechanics and nanotechnology the discovery of the Higgs boson and the large hadron collider that made it possible etc.) and to understand how the science technology and engineering disciplines play a crucial role in recognizing and solving problems of society and the world that we share.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The most basic needs of humans have not changed - water food and shelter - but the means of meeting these needs has. In this course we will examine how technology-driven societies operate by studying how cities are built and how they function. Topics will include water supply and distribution systems; transportation systems (including road and bridge design and construction); building design construction and operation (including skyscraper and sustainable building design) and waste removal systems (municipal and industrial wastewater removal and treatment solid waste removal and treatment). This is not a course about little gadgets and widgets; this is a course about big engineering marvels; and it emphasizes applications of science - how things work - rather than scientific theory.

Prerequisites:

Honors students only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The most basic needs of humans have not changed - water food and shelter - but the means of meeting these needs has. In this course we will examine how technology-driven societies operate by studying how cities are built and how they function. Topics will include water supply and distribution systems; transportation systems (including road and bridge design and construction); building design construction and operation (including skyscraper and sustainable building design) and waste removal systems (municipal and industrial wastewater removal and treatment solid waste removal and treatment). This is not a course about little gadgets and widgets; this is a course about big engineering marvels; and it emphasizes applications of science - how things work - rather than scientific theory.

Prerequisites:

SCI-L173 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Geographic Information Science (GIS) link information (number of fire hydrants on a block) to features on a map (e.g. a point representing street address) that has a designated geographic location (as designated by global coordinates). Unlike paper maps GIS software allows the production of interactive maps that allows the user to layer data to indicate spatial patterns to analyze trends and to combine different features of the mapped area in novel ways. For example a business person may wish to use GIS to determine the optimum location of retail outlet (based on the mapped demographics of a neighborhood) while an environmental engineer may use GIS to describe the location of outfalls to see how they correlate to areas of stream pollution. In this course students will be introduced to maps map vocabulary and attributes and GIS mapping through a series of mapping exercises. A knowledge of Windows-type applications is presumed.

Prerequisites:

SCI-173 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This laboratory illustrates concepts and methods taught in SCI 173. In this lab students will be introduced to maps map vocabulary and attributes and GIS mapping through a series of mapping exercises. A knowledge of Windows-type applications is presumed.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

No longer offered on Boston campus This is a four credit non-lab science course that examines the central scientific problems confronting the 21st century. The course studies particular topics and teaches the necessary science around these topics to provide a good understanding of the issues. The topics currently are: Energy Science and Economic Decisions Sustainability of Life on Earth Health and Science.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This is a 4 credit project based science course that examines the central scientific problems confronting the 21st century. The course consists of lectures class discussions field trips and in-class hands-on activities designed to familiarize the student with different concepts of the lectures. The current focus is on sustainable energy production. A final team project related to the course topics will be given. This is the version of SCI 183 without a separate lab component. Students who have taken SCI 183 L183 are not allowed to take this course.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course presents a topical introduction to the key principles and concepts of physics in the context of the world events and natural phenomena that confront world leaders and that require informed decisions and responses. Energy health counter-terrorism remote sensing space programs nuclear proliferation and a host of other modern challenges have technological and scientific dimensions the understanding of which is essential to avoiding disastrous policy decisions. This course considers the application of physics to these societal challenges. The material is covered at a level and pace that a future world leader should be able to handle; the emphasis is on the development of physical reasoning skills and not on detailed mathematical problem solving.

Prerequisites:

Take SCI-L210 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will provide undergraduate students of various disciplines with an introduction to gems and crystals using interactive evidence-based teaching approaches. Crystalline forms of matter are critical to our existence. Using innovative teaching strategies of in-class hands-on demonstration supplemented with visuals of crystal details the course provides students insights into the formation alteration and unique properties that make crystals invaluable. Topics range from the study of proteins and nucleic acids to the interior of planets. The in-class lectures will provide a basic guide that will serve as a platform for individually catered in-depth study. Therefore the course is open to advanced students as well who can pick up higher level of information for discussion and class projects.

Prerequisites:

Take SCI-210 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course introduces concepts that are central to understanding crystals gemstones and other natural materials abundant throughout the solar system. It includes an introduction to carbon-based crystals (diamonds proteins viruses and ices) in context with origins of life geopolitical significance and their applications This laboratory-based course is an introduction to modern tools and techniques for crystal analysis with a historical context of some of the greatest discoveries in science (DNA and other nanomaterials). It presents crystals and gems from their visually appealing point of view to their sometimes-dramatic physical characteristics with a broad view of their formation occurrence physics chemistry and resources perspective.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The world is addicted to quantifying the essence of everything from personal IQ to the speed of a baseball to our health or our chances of winning the lottery. Behind most of these numeric values exists a science of measurement. Some of this is referenced to international standards such as length time weight or temperature. Others are more arbitrary and subjective such as ranking Olympic performance in gymnastics beauty pageants or popular responses as found in the game show "Family Feud." A third category includes controversial areas such as measuring whether a person is lying when interrogated or using hype rather than reality to market products. Sometimes statistics are used to predict sports outcomes such as in the annual March Madness NCAA basketball brackets. Finally in a world subject to fraud and deception it can be essential to distinguish legitimate from counterfeit items such as in money art collectibles and historical documents. Don't get hoodwinked! This course examines all of these starting with how measurements have been made throughout history along with a full deck of entertaining terms used during the ages. This may help you sort out your weight whether given in pounds kilos or stones. Often these terms will provide insights into how people lived in different eras. We will also look at some of the technologies currently available to provide these measurements and unravel the complexities of various sensors that are used. As we consider the meaning of "accuracy" we may become less naive about how much confidence to ascribe to the results given us. Hovering around all of these measurements should be the question of validity- are they meaningful useful or misleading? And the impact they have on society- whether they steer behavior more powerfully than one might originally suspect. Each student will also be given an opportunity to become an "expert" in an area of measurement of personal interest. By the end of the course all students should have gained greater insight into how the world around them is quantified and whether numbers can provide accurate predictors for our future. Algebra helpful. Basic science background helpful. Curiosity essential!

Some Science division courses may have Math or Computer Science prerequisites; many have other Science prerequisites.

Studies in Literature: 1 course, 4 credits

Choose one Studies in Literature course from those listed below:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course explores the rich intellectual tradition of Haiti Guadeloupe and Martinique by considering historical moments linked to colonialism the abolition of slavery the representation of gender departmentalization and decolonization through essays films poems novels and short stories by critics and writers from the 19th-21st centuries.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Survey of drama and theatre as part of world culture from classical Greece through 18th-century China. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Survey of drama and theatre as part of world culture from the 19th century to the present.

Prerequisites:

Course requires a study abroad component and an additional fee to cover airfare and accommodations in Ireland during spring break.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course through an examination of Irish and Irish American literature we will connect the historical and cultural forces that have led to emigration and exile from Ireland to the literature that has developed on both sides of the Atlantic. We will read some of the classic works of Irish literature that address national identity exile cultural unity and cultural division and we will also read literary works by Irish Americans that trace the ripple effects of these topics on the Irish diaspora. During Spring Break we will travel to Ireland to witness first-hand the sites associated with the Irish literature we study paying particular attention to the politics of language the influence of the Roman Catholic church on culture and the formation and revision of literary traditions.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of poetry prose and drama with emphasis on close reading and literary analysis. Students will compose formal essays discussing the meanings and relationship between texts as well as the author's craft and relationship to the reader. Offered every semester.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A study of literature written in English from cultures around the world with emphasis on major modern and contemporary writers from countries such as Australia Canada India Ireland Nigeria South Africa and the Caribbean. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear correct and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of poetry prose and drama from the British literary tradition with emphasis on close reading and literary analysis. Students will compose formal essays discussing the meanings and relationship between texts as well as the author's craft and relationship to the reader. Offered every semester.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of poetry prose and drama from the American literary tradition with emphasis on close reading and literary analysis. Students will compose formal essays discussing the meanings and relationship between texts as well as the author's craft and relationship to the reader. Offered every semester.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Mysteries are sometimes dismissed as "pulp" but they are often highly reflective of the era in which they were written. This class will use mystery stories novels and plays as a lens through which to view the major social cultural and literary movements of the 19th 20th and 21st centuries. With an emphasis on close reading and analysis students will compose essays that explore the relationships between texts and the relationship between literary production and history. Additional assessments will include exams a written response to a play we attend as a class and a creative group project and presentation.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Literature has the capacity to record and interrogate history in an imaginative and artistic context. African-American literature is a rich varied and complex body of literature that faces our tainted history directly. The authors we will read in this class examine slavery's long-term psychological and social effects while forging a literary history that is at once a part of and apart from American literary history more generally.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on the reading and analysis of horror literature and the ways in which horror reflects and represents personal and cultural anxieties. Readings will include both classic and contemporary authors for example Edgar Allan Poe H.P. Lovecraft Shirley Jackson Stephen King and others. Assignments will include analytical essays as well as creative writing.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will examine a wide range of writers and film makers who have sought to bridge the gap that exists between those who have experienced war and those who have not. Some stories we will examine are told from an American perspective; some are told from the perspective of soldiers who fought against Americans; and some are told from those who experienced life under U.S. military occupation.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A study of literary works by the so-called "Beat Generation " the American literary underworld of the late 1950s and 1960s including major works by the three central figures (Ginsburg Kerouac Burroughs) and less central figures (Corso Snyder DiPrima Jones/Baraka) as well as the influence of the Beats on the work of Bob Dylan the only musician to win the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Young Adult Literature's recent explosion in popularity raises important questions about the stories it tells the values it promotes and the audiences it seeks. This course approaches the YA phenomenon as one with deep historical roots as well as contemporary cultural relevance. From nineteenth century classics to current series favorites literary works focused on young people reframe perennially fresh narratives about coming of age negotiating personal identity and navigating a complex moral universe. This course also considers YA literature as part of an evolving network of writers readers publishers critics and filmmakers.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the stories of individuals and groups who have traveled to the United States - a country that the poet Walt Whitman celebrated as a "nation of nations" - in search of greater freedom and opportunity. While some discover their version of the American Dream others find themselves lost in exile caught in between identities and in danger due to their undocumented status. Moving from 19th-century visions of the U.S. as a crucible or melting pot of cultures to today's political tensions about borders and law enforcement our readings reflect on the promise and peril of being new to America. Students will analyze fiction nonfiction and film and visit an immigrant advocacy coalition in Boston.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will use close readings to examine poetry as a heightened form of language seeking to make contact with divine sources of faith. We will consider poems that provide examples of the struggle to attain belief as well as poems that deny belief. Language as both the grammar of ascent and the locus of descent. The position of human beings in relation to God or the gods or the absence of the divine.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course takes students on a tour of witches "nasty women " and other "unruly tongues" or "bitter spirits" throughout American literary history. Regularly assigned essays on the reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear correct and persuasive writing. Fulfills the Literature Requirement of the CAS Core Curriculum.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

For more than a thousand years the city of London has been a cultural center the home of playwrights and poets novelists and critics theaters and libraries. In this class we will read a wide range of literary works in different genres that take the city of London and the experience of living or writing there as central themes. The class will emphasize close reading and literary analysis of London texts and will also explore contextualizing materials from newspaper articles to music and art. Designed to be taken in tandem with an optional one-credit study abroad trip to London UK.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines a variety of literature and films that highlight the point of view of students (and sometimes teachers) as they negotiate the power dynamics of educational institutions. Through reading and viewing such diverse texts as Gus van Sant's film Good Will Hunting Booker T. Washington's autobiography Up from Slavery and J.K. Rowling's classic fantasy Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone we will analyze how the politics of race social class gender and colonialism inform classroom practices structures and ideologies while also considering how students work to resist oppressive educational systems. This course uses literature as a vehicle to explore and problematize the promise of education to facilitate equality modernization or the American Dream.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of 20th century writing on the American West by American women and men in the form of novels memoirs and short stories. Regularly assigned reading responses and essays on the readings as well as discussion questions and quizzes provide the basis for the study of "frontier" or western literature by American authors. Fulfills the Literature Requirement of the CAS Core Curriculum.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines Shakespeare as a playwright and cultural icon in both the modern and early modern worlds. Students will develop analytical and creative writing after reading selected plays and criticism and after watching selected modern film and media adaptations.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course offers an opportunity to read and discuss a sampling of contemporary Latinx literature that is fiction poetry nonfiction and comics by writers of Latin American origin who may or may not categorize themselves under the gender neutral/nonbinary term Latinx a variation of Latino or Latina (the history and use of this term will be part of course discussion and readings). Students will learn how to engage with this work and some of the current issues affecting the Latinx community through informal formal and creative assignments. Focus will be placed on using the tools of literary analysis to bear on the intersections of the creative aesthetic personal political and marginalized spaces that inform Latinx literature. Along with supplementary readings clips and discussions about the texts and related issues students will consider reflect upon and conduct inquiry into the narratives and social conversations they feel are part of their own personal journeys.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will provide an introduction to the literature written about medicine and medical research. We will study the ways in which narrative complexly represents illness disability doctor-patient relationships health insurance and other medical issues including the end of life. The nonfiction books short stories and poems we read this semester are written from the viewpoints of patients doctors researchers and literary critics and provide us with nuanced often ethically-challenging examples of how literary techniques-plot character point of view image and metaphor-work to reveal the subjective experiences of diagnosis treatment healing and paying in the world of medicine and how these experiences ultimately ask questions about what makes life and the body worth valuing. Our readings will explore the intersections between storytelling and science in an effort to better understand the relationship between self and society.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course studies different genres of sports literature such as fiction non-fiction and poetry as well as the literary elements and writer's craft used to create these literary works. As an object of literary study sporting contests spectacles and athletes themselves provide authors rich characters and complex scenes to explore themes about cultural values social roles and also personal struggle and success. Throughout the semester students will examine literature connected to such sports as ice hockey baseball basketball tennis wrestling and rodeo to look deeply into not only human nature but also how stories about sports may transcend the sport itself.

Prerequisites:

English Majors and Minors or Instructor Permission

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of major writers of England from the beginning to the mid-18th century. Regularly assigned essays on the reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear correct and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

English Majors and Minors or Instructor Permission

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of major English writers from the mid-18th century to the present. Regularly assigned essays on the reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear correct and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

English Majors and Minors or Instructor Permission

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of major American writing from its origins through 1865. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear correct and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

English Majors and Minors or Instructor Permission

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of major American writing from 1865 through the present. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear correct and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Ancient Greek and Roman myths their motifs themes and interpretations. Normally offered every third year.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A thematic study of Shakespeare's plays from the major genres- comedies tragedies histories and romances. The course will examine playtexts original source-texts modern adaptations and a range of Shakespearean criticism. The theme for this course will change yearly.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course we will read widely in the poetry and prose of the Romantic Period (1780-1830) including the work of well-known Romantic poets such as Wordsworth Byron and Keats as well as other important authors including Mary Wollstonecraft Mary Shelley Charlotte Smith and Olaudah Equiano. We will place the influential works of these authors in the context of their turbulent historical period and their often-dramatic lives considering what Romantic literature has to tell us about the individual scientific advancement the environment social justice and the act of authorship itself.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on Gothic literature by women writers from its origins in the 18th century to the present focusing primarily on 20th century writers. The novels short stories and films we will discuss involve haunted houses secret chambers madness and other Gothic tropes. Writers to be studied will include Charlotte Bronte Daphne du Maurier Shirley Jackson Jean Rhys Angela Carter and others.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An investigation of the lives and works of two of nineteenth-century America's greatest and most original poets. Topics will include types of poetic language and formal structure the work of the poetic imagination in transforming observations of the world into art and the ways in which poets process the idea of death and the reality of war. Finally this course examines Whitman and Dickinson's impact on American popular culture as well as on the writings of modern poets and literary critics.

Prerequisites:

Take WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4

Description:

"Study of 19th and 20th century writing on the American West by American women in the form of novels, memoirs, and short stories. Regularly assigned reading responses and essays on the readings as well as discussion questions and quizzes provide the basis for the study of the gendering of the ""frontier"" and literature of the West by American women authors."

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The course will cover major works of American fiction from the period between the end of the American war in Vietnam and the present. The course will emphasize fiction reflecting America's cultural diversity and current trends in fiction.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to selected Asian-American writers with an emphasis on socio-cultural issues such as race gender and ethnicity. Authors include Bulosan Hwang Jen Kingston Lee Mukherjee Odada and Tan.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course follows the spirit of utopian experimentation as it travels through the linguistic patterns and imaginative conditions of brave new worlds in literature. We will consider how utopian thinking allows writers to take creative license with political systems social relations gender roles and racial identities and to blur dividing lines between nature technology and culture as well as between Earth and the cosmos. Our readings will balance such foundational texts as Plato's Republic and More's Utopia with revolutionary works from the nineteenth through the twenty-first centuries and conjure utopian dreams as well as dystopian worlds gone wrong. Selected works of literary criticism and films will also be included.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the rhetoric of memoirs written primarily by international figures who seek to use personal stories to shape readers' perspectives on political issues. After a brief introduction to rhetorical theory and to the genre of memoir this course will examine contemporary memoirs that address such issues as racism sexism religious extremism war and genocide.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A survey of major works of literature and thought crucial to the transformation of pagan models of reason to Christian systems of belief including works by Plato and Plotinus St. Augustine and Dante. Of central concern is the changing conception of love from Eros to Agape. Note: This course is cross-listed with HST 339.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Masterpieces of French and Francophone Literature in English Translation. Studies works translated into English by major authors from the Middle Ages to the present. Explores drama fiction and poetry from many regions of the world: Africa Western Europe North America the Caribbean and Vietnam.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A study of the nineteenth-century Russian novelist Feodor Dostoevsky and his contribution to world philosophy and literature. Dostoevsky's stories which weave together philosophical reflections unique personalities and gripping plots earned the author numerous superlative titles. Dostoevsky has been praised as a literary genius a prophetic political thinker a keen psychologist and an expert on human condition. His work inspired generations of intellectuals among them prominent European thinkers: Nietzsche Freud Heidegger Sartre Camus Hesse and many others. In addition to a detailed study of Dostoevsky's writings the course explores the socio-political literary and intellectual contexts in which he developed as a thinker introducing students to both his opponents and admirers.

Prerequisites:

SPAN-290 or SPAN-300 or Instructor's consent. SPAN-302 is strongly recommended

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces students to the most important movements and playwrights of Latin American Theater in the 20th and 21st Centuries. Students examine the history of Latin American Theatre since its inception and become familiar with the most important performing centers.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores what we can learn from the books that teenage girls read. In addition to a wide array of interesting and complex Young Adult novels targeted to young female readers students will be exposed to theories of adolescent development literary criticism and social theory. Topics include how the dilemmas of girlhood have changed or stayed constant and the urge so common in books for children and teens to teach kids how to think and behave.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines through both classic and contemporary science fiction a variety of possibilities for world-reimagining in the realms of gender sexuality race and other forms of difference. Draws on theories of utopian and dystopian discourse engages with questions of biology and reproduction and explores colonialism through first-contact and space empire narratives.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines a broad range of feminist-themed literature with a focus on 20th- and 21st-century literature in a range of genres including fiction non-fiction and poetry. Texts considered in this course are not merely those that centralize women's experiences; they also challenge systems of gender oppression and intervene in cultural conversations about women and gender minorities. How is feminism discussed and questioned across historical representations and diverse experiences? What can literature teach us about how gender impacts our lives? Possible texts include: Alice Walker's The Color Purple Toni Morrison's Beloved Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale poetry by Adrienne Rich and Michelle Obama's Becoming.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores of various cultural worldviews in order to reveal and assess the voices of women from around the world as they respond to important global issues such as sexual violence and gendered oppression. Topics include: national citizenship sexual politics legal discourse aesthetic representation literary movements genre constructions of femininity sexual identities and representations of gender in relation to race and class and international cultures and the relationship of self-image to the body politic.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the history of female portrayal on the Western stage including women in Shakespeare and other early modern plays (when female characters were played by men); in Restoration comedy; the works of Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw; and 20th and 21st century depictions of women on stage including in the works of authors such as Lillian Hellman Lorraine Hansberry Caryl Churchill Paula Vogel Suzan-Lori Parks Rebecca Gilman and Sarah Ruhl. Students develop familiarity with key concepts in performance theory including catharsis Brecht's alienation effect and the distinction between performance and the performative.

Ethical & Philosophical Inquiry: 1 course, 4 credits

Choose one Ethics course from those listed below:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A systematic introduction to the major thinkers and their positions on the main issues of ethics such as: What is morality? What are moral values? How should we live our lives? Are there objective universal absolute moral standards? If so what are they and what is their basis? 1 term - credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this class you will be introduced to the perspectives and methods of politics philosophy and economics and see how these three disciplines present distinct but interconnected dimensions of current social and political issues.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of contemporary Western society particularly in the United States in relation to philosophical attempts to define the "good life." Current books that exhibit a philosophical approach towards important contemporary social issues will be discussed as well as classics in philosophy. Topics may include: civic virtue consumerism current events economic justice popular culture (film music television) religion and secularism etc. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A critical examination of a number of contemporary moral issues such as: abortion affirmative action animal rights capital punishment cloning drug legalization environmental ethics euthanasia genetic engineering gun control pornography same-sex marriage suicide war and terrorism etc. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Human Behavior and Societies: 1 course, 4 credits

Choose one Human Behavior and Societies course from those listed below:

Advertising and Public Relations:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the interactions of media and popular culture in the United States from a social science perspective. The influence of media as well as the emergence and development of "Rock N Roll" is discussed in relationship to the social movements of the 1960's that formed the foundation of our current culture.

Communication

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to the role of media in contemporary society focusing on media's influence on cultural political and ideological processes. An examination of the historical contexts within which newspapers radio television and new media technologies develop and how audiences interact with and influence the use of media.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Historical development of the theory of organizations examination of information flow network analysis communication overload and underload corporate culture superior-subordinate communications organizational effectiveness and change processes.

CUES:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Focuses on the natural environment through the lens of social science and humanities. Students will study texts from those disciplines to acquire a deeper understanding of the values and beliefs that underlie environmental issues. Students will investigate the policy-making processes and institutions through which those issues are decided and the social inequalities in the distribution of environmental problems. Texts to be studied will range from literature philosophy and film to policy statements impact reports community advocacy materials and investigative journalism.

Economics:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The study of how economic and human activity is distributed across space the reasons for these spatial distributions and the processes that change the spatial organization of economic activity over time. Topics include: maps map projections and geographic information systems; population geography; the organization and location of cities towns and villages; transportation and communication policy; industrial location; the geography of world trade; and geographic features of economic development. The course takes a global perspective and draws on cases and examples from all over the world. Cultural Diversity B

Political Science:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to the American political system and constitutional framework. Focus will be on the interplay of various institutions (the Presidency Congress and the Judiciary) in creating public policies. Contemporary public issues will be discussed as will the role of political theory in shaping American democracy. Attention will be given to the role of the news media public opinion political ideology political parties and interest groups in the American system.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the main actors ideas institutions and processes that shape the international system. Analyzes key international developments including imperialism nationalism the causes of wars and peace and globalization. Integrates international relations concepts with history to explain the unprecedented levels of prosperity and violence in Europe particularly in light of its dominant role in recent centuries. Emphasizes contemporary developments taking place in other regions such as Asia Africa and Latin America. Helps students understand the global arena as a space of complex interconnections and sets the foundations for other courses in international relations and regional studies. Normally offered every semester. This course sets the foundations for other courses in International Relations and Regional Studies

Psychology:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys core theoretical concepts and contemporary empirical research from the major sub-fields of psychology: physiology; perception; cognition; learning; emotion; motivation; development; personality; psychopathology; psychotherapy; and social behavior. Offered every semester.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines biological cognitive social and emotional development across the lifespan with attention to the role of culture and context. Explores how various major theories of development can be used to adaptive and maladaptive behaviors and trajectories and considers. Implications for treatment prevention and positive development across the lifespan. Normally offered yearly.

Sociology:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to the sociological understanding of human interaction group process and social structures. Students are introduced to basic concepts theories and methods of sociological investigation. Majors and minors must pass with a grade of "C" or better.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of traditional and contemporary problems associated with major social institutions such as the family economics government and education. Social forces related to ethnicity social class health and welfare and urbanization are also included. Alternative remedial measures based on behavioral science theories are discussed. Majors and minors must pass with a grade of "C" or better.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will explore our natural environment and human interacations with it. We will connect a critical study of society power and inequality to the study of our natural environment and the ways it is altered by human behaviors. We will also consider ways to change our society's relationship with the natural environment to keep our earth clean and safe for human society.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An exploration of the diversity of contemporary families. Comparisons are made between the cultural myths of the "ideal family" and the lived realities. Challenges confronting contemporary families and their implications for social policy are examined in such areas as work/family conflicts gay and lesbian families welfare family violence.

Credits:

4

Description:

Spain has experienced major socio-demographic changes since the mid 1970s. These transformations mainly arise from the new role of women in society and, in particular, women's higher levels of education, work experience, and labor market attachment. The changes in women's labor force participation have occurred in conjunction with a progressive postponement of main family events, such as leaving the parental home, forming a partnership and having children, as well as with a reduction in the family size. Spain is, indeed," characterized as having one of the ""lowest low fertility levels"" within Western industrialized countries\"

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the role of race in United States society and the efforts to achieve racial justice in the United States. It introduces students to the formation and transformation of racial systems throughout American history and examines the ways race impacts our lived experiences today. Students will assess the social significance of race by examining the realities of white supremacy and the experience of race.

Women's & Gender Studies:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores women's lives from the perspective of the social and natural sciences including examination of recent biological psychological and sociological theories about gender and gender roles as well as the influence of feminist scholarship in these areas. Topics include: the social construction of gender; the psychology and biology of sex and gender; women and work; media representations of women; the female body and eating disorders; women's health and lifecycle; women and sexuality; reproduction abortion and motherhood; and sexual violence against women.

Social and Intellectual History: 1 course, 4 credits

Choose one course from those listed below:

American Studies:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course offers a basic introduction to American culture and society through the study of American History. The city of Boston and its extraordinary history and institutions will be at the heart of the class and students will frequently visit sites close to the campus. Topics will focus on areas such as the way people from different cultures have understood and misunderstood each other; the evolution of American politics and political institutions; the American Revolution and the founding documents and institutions of the United States; the distinct forms of American religion American literature and the American economy; slavery and race in American society; the rise of America to world power; the changing role of women; the New Deal and the rise of the modern welfare state; immigration; the development of popular culture; and the meaning of Donald Trump. This course fulfills te core requirement for the American Studies Minor. Enrollees in the Minor program may not register for AMST-111 Defining America and Americans.

Art & Design:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The first part of the course will focus on the history of graphic design from prehistoric times to the Industrial Revolution including the origins of graphic communications in the ancient world the development of the alphabet and early printing and typography. The second portion will concentrate on the period from the late 19th century to the present and will include the Arts and Crafts Movement the various-isms and their influence on modern art the Bauhaus and International Style and contemporary visual systems and image making.

Asian Studies:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history politics economics philosophy geography arts and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy religious and cultural exchanges international relations Asian experience in America and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

Communication:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of important contributions to the literature of journalism through an analysis of major writers and news coverage of significant events from a journalistic perspective.

English:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Literary masterpieces from ancient times to the Renaissance including: Homer's Odyssey Sophocles' Oedipus Virgil's Aeneid selections from the Hebrew Bible and the Gospels and Dante's Divine Comedy. List may vary at the discretion of the instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will introduce students to a selection of Great Books from around the world from the 17th century to the 21st such as Don Quixote (Spain) Madame Bovary (France) The Communist Manifesto (Germany) The Origin of Species (England) War and Peace (Russia) On Dreams (Austria) Night (Hungary) Things Fall Apart (Nigeria) "Satyagraha" (India) "I Am Prepared to Die" (South Africa) Saeed the Pessoptomist (Israel) The Rouge of the North (China) and The House of Spirits (Chile). Readings may vary at the discretion of the instructor.

Environmental Science:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores how Americans have understood the environment and their relationship to it through analysis of classic environmental texts historical contexts and societal perspectives. Analyzes how the environment has changed from pre-colonial times to the present and how these changes have been described through the lens of environmental history. Themes include differing viewpoints of European and indigenous peoples toward the natural environment the impacts of the Western expansion on native species and landscapes the rise of industrialism and its impacts on natural resources and ecosystems and the rise of 20th century environmentalism.

History:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys European culture politics and society from antiquity to the seventeenth century. Topics include: the Greek Judaic and Roman heritage; the rise of Christianity; feudal society in the Middle Ages; Renaissance and Reformation; the Scientific Revolution; and the development of absolutist and constitutional governments.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys European culture politics and society from the Scientific Revolution to the present. Topics include: the development of absolutist and constitutional governments; the Enlightenment; the French Revolution; Industrialization and urbanization; nationalism and imperialism; World War I World War II and the Cold War; the decline of Europe as a world power.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Presenting the major trends relevant to social cultural and economic transformations that can be seen in Asia today. Especially students will explore the following trends: the Diaspora of the Chinese and Indian People; the hold of Traditional Religious Beliefs in a Modernizing Asia such as the influences of Buddhism and Islam; the preservation of Martial Values and in Militarism in Asia; Issues related to Gender and Sexuality; Pop Culture among young people in Asia.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the major themes of human history to 1500. Topics include: hunter-gathering the migration of humans across the globe transitions to food production and the development of complex societies based on agriculture. Major early Eurasian civilizations (China India the Middle East and Europe) are examined (alongside their interactions with Inner Asia and the Arabian Peninsula). So too are Sub-Saharan Africa and the Americas.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the major themes of human history since 1500. Topics include: the outward expansion of Europe the Scientific Revolution the Enlightenment the Age of Revolutions the Industrial Revolution the creation of a great-power dominated global system the two world wars the Cold War the Third World globalization climate change and modern social and political movements.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This is the first of the two-course series of Empires and Globalization in World History. Course discusses the origins and development of globalization and capitalism from the perspective of economic history. Major issues include the formation of the medieval trade system the development of finance and capitalism in the early modern ages and economic changes prior to the Industrial Revolution. The specific topics may change every year due to new academic developments and publications.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This is the second of the two-course series of Empires and Globalization in World History. Course discusses the origins and development of globalization and capitalism from the perspective of economic history. Major issues include state-making wars and the rivalry among early modern empires economic development the Industrial Revolution and the formation of the global trade system. The specific topics may change every year due to new academic developments and publications.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys American history from European colonization up through the era of the Civil War. Topics include interactions with Native Americans; slavery; the American Revolution; the founding of a new republic; social and economic developments in the early nineteenth century; expansion; party politics; sectional conflict; the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys American history from the 1870s to the present. Topics include the new industrial order; farmer and worker protests; progressivism; America's emergence as a world power; the two World Wars; the Great Depression; the New Deal; the Cold War; post-World War II American society; the Civil rights movement; Vietnam; dissent and counterculture in the 1960s; the women's movement; economic social and political changes in the late-twentieth century; America's relationship to a globalized world.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom.Immigration is one of the crucial topics of the 21st century. This course provides historical context for migration flows in Spain in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The syllabus follows a chronological overview of immigration history in Spain. Traditionally a country of emigrants Spain became the EU country receiving the largest numbers of immigrants in 2018. Topics to be covered in class include Spain's unprecedented modernization in 40 years of democracy; immigration Islamophobia and xenophobia; immigration and citizenship; family gender and sexuality; refugees and asylum policy; globalization and migration; illegal immigrant rights; border walls policing and illegal trafficking; deportation; integration and assimilation; the 2015 refugee crisis and its impact; emigration in Spain during the Great Recession; and the future of immigration in Spain. Immigration to Spain : Past Present and Future includes an array primary and secondary sources together with documentary material relevant to these topics.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the key concepts and current practices of public history as an academic discipline and professional field in museums libraries archives historical societies historic houses and preservation organizations. Examines the presentation and interpretation of history to popular audiences through documentaries motion pictures Web sites and other forms of media. Topics covered will include curation conservation fundraising educational and interpretive programming. Students will gain practical experience by participating in substantive directed projects with partnering organizations.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to the use of information technologies to narrate preserve access analyze research and publish interpretations of the past. Students will learn how historical content is produced presented and published in digital form; how to find and evaluate digital primary and secondary sources; and how to use basic computational techniques to work with digital resources. No programming experience is required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

China Japan and Korea - East Asia's critical players - share many historical influences but each has a distinct culture and they competed with each other for much of the twentieth century proud of their achievements but feeling threatened by their neighbors. Lectures interspersed with movies and documentaries to show how East Asia has developed in the past one-hundred-plus years.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course each student will select a topic about Asia that they wish to study. Virtually any topic to be approved by the professor is acceptable. The goal will be to write a five to seven page paper about that topic by the end of the course. As a class we will work together through each step of the process of defining a topic gathering materials about it and organizing and reporting the final paper.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the peoples of Asia and the cultures they have created. Particular attention is paid to the lives of the common people in both historical and contemporary times. By understanding the richness and complexities of daily life in Asia we will understand the continuities and discontinuities brought on by social cultural and economic changes. We will gain an appreciation of our fellow human beings in Asia.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the history of the Mediterranean from the ancient times to the 20th century with emphasis on the extraordinary interaction between the rich cultural ethnic and religious backgrounds of the peoples of Europe Middle East and North Africa.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the age of the Enlightenment from the 1700s on leading to and including the decline and fall of ancient regime France to the eruption of the French Revolution with its various phases and aftermath. Napoleon's rise to power in 1799 and then dramatic fall in 1815 will provide an insightful study of this crucial stage in European history and its influence on the world. Social and intellectual history of the period reflected in literature and the arts is significant in this course. Consideration will be given to the impact of Enlightenment and revolutionary ideals in other parts of the world such as in the American British and French Atlantic colonies.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the condition of European women from 1800 to 1914. Readings focus primarily on women's experiences in France and Great Britain. Topics include: the effects of industrialization on the lives of working-class women; working and middle-class women's negotiation of marriage work and family life; the rise of feminism women's greater participation in the public sphere and conservative reaction to these changes in women's place in society; women and crime; Victorian ideas about female sexuality; the politics of class and gender in nineteenth-century European society.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the changing place of women in European society since 1900. Topics include: women's suffrage and the political advances of the 1920s and 1930s; the revolution in sexual mores birth control and the rise of companionate marriage; women and the consumer economy; the anti-woman policies of Fascist Italy and Germany under National Socialism; liberation of women and retrenchment in the Soviet Union; World War II; feminism sexual liberation and women's political engagement since the 1960s; and throughout the twentieth century women's continuing negotiation of work and family responsibilities.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Some are born great some achieve greatness and some are complete disasters. Find out why some Presidents have been consistently ranked as great been enshrined on Mount Rushmore and why others have not. Even the greatest have been subject to criticism and ridicule and even the worst have had their triumphs. Explore the reasons for this and come to understand the historical context in which different chief executives have acted.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The life and times of Alexander Hamilton--soldier politician financier husband father philanderer writer--through primary documents and biographical materials. We will uncover the world of the American founding and discover how we know what we know about the world that once was.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys the history of the U.S. as a world power. Examines officials' motives and methods as well as influences on policy in the form of social and economic forces interest groups and foreign challenges. Explores public debates over America's role (as well as debates among historians and international relations theorists) and discusses the domestic and foreign impact of America's world role. Major events addressed include the two world wars the Cold War Vietnam and the U.S. recent history of involvement in the Middle East.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

From the ancient cliff dwellings of the Pueblo people to the iconic nineteenth-century street grid of Manhattan Americans throughout history have built cities distinguished by architectural creativity. This course explores the design history of the buildings and landscapes of America's early cities from the pre-contact period through the 1850s. Each week students will study a different early-American city to learn about the environmental architectural social and political forces that shaped these places. They will also practice the techniques used by historians preservationists and urban planners to examine the built environment and to find traces of this history in today's cities.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the intellectual and cultural developments of the Renaissance and of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations in their social and political contexts. Topics include: Humanism the rise of the city-state; art and science; changes in family and social life; the causes of the Reformation (intellectual social technological); Calvinists Lutherans and Radical Reformers; Counter-Reformation and its political consequences; the Wars of Religion.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the political economic social and cultural development of the urban experience in Europe in the 14-1700s. The history of the most important cities of the continent and Mediterranean and their common path in business urbanism society and imperialism.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Addresses social intellectual and cultural developments as well as politics and economics; foreign relations (and their connection to the domestic scene) are also discussed. Topics include: the labor movement civil rights woman suffrage progressivism the rise of the U.S. as a world power the First World War the cultural and social crosscurrents of the nineteen-twenties Fordism new developments in advertising and industrial engineering the Great Depression the New Deal and World War II.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the transformation of America in the decades since the early nineteen-seventies taking up social intellectual and cultural developments as well as politics and economics; foreign relations (and their connection to the domestic scene) are also emphasized. Topics include: Watergate the aftermath of the Vietnam War the end of the post-World War II economic boom the culture wars the rise of the New Right and decline of the New Deal order the end of the cold War America's growing involvement in the Middle East globalization the impact and aftermath of 9/11 and the Great Recession of the early twenty-first century.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines German and European preconditions; the VersaillesTreaty and the failure of the Weimar Republic; Hitler's ideas collaborators and institutions; Nazi foreign and domestic policy; World War II and the concentration camps.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys the most transcendental social cultural economic and political developments in the history of Spain from the Neolithic to the Early Modern Period. Examines the broad history of the nation and its peoples and placing emphasis on three central themes: diversity within the Iberian Peninsula the region's social and geo-political structures and the transformation of the Old Order of the ancient kingdoms into a modern nation-state. Topics include: the Pre-historical period Roman Hispania the Medieval Kingdoms Islamic Civilization the Christian Reconquest the Catholic Monarchy Imperial Spain under the Habsburgs and the Crisis of the Spanish Empire in the 17th century.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the political economic and social history of Spain from 1700 to the present. Topics include: the War of Spanish Succession; the Bourbon state; the Enlightenment in Spain; the impact of the French Revolution; Spain in the Napoleonic Wars; the rise of liberalism socialism and anarchism; the crisis of 1898; the problems of modernization; the Spanish Civil War and the Franco regime; the transition from dictatorship to democracy; Spain's international position today.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) rose from relative poverty and obscurity to become one of the most powerful and successful men of his century. This course will examine the political scientific literary and diplomatic cultures of the eighteenth century by focusing on Franklin's life reading Franklin's Autobiography and selections from his political scientific and satirical writings. Concentrations I II.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics will include the Plains Indian Wars; ethnological aspects of Indian tribes; the pitfalls of Indian reform movements; Indian resistance to U.S. assimilation and reservation policies; the Indian New Deal; activism and the American Indian Movement; Indians' future prospects. Cultural Diversity A

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Though the American colonies could claim victory in the Revolution the war's end did not guarantee a unified national identity. People struggled to reconcile the promise of Revolution with the realities of daily life and politics in the new republic. This class explores the various voices competing to be heard on the national and international stage from the political leaders who drafted founding documents to the women who learned to "stand and speak" despite repeated demands for their silence. We will encounter stories of African-American men and women who called attention to the Revolution's unfulfilled commitment to freedom and we will examine the struggles of the thousands of displaced Native peoples whose efforts for coexistence were marred by conflict and violence inflicted by an expansionist republic. We will also discuss the techniques and practices that historians of many stripes (educators curators preservationists podcasters journalists etc.) use to tell these stories to an array of audiences today.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the founding and settlement of North America; the social economic and political development of European colonies and their interactions with Native People; the social religious and cultural world of early America; witchcraft slavery and warfare; the British-French struggle for control of the North American continent; and the background and causes of the American Revolution.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Analyzes of the background progress and results of the American Revolution. Emphasis on military aspects of the War for Independence and on post-war efforts to establish a workable American government; to secure a union and not restrict individual liberty.

Prerequisites:

One History course

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Boston from its foundation in 1630 to its development as a 21st century metropolis. From the Massachusetts Bay Colony to cradle of the American Revolution to a Yankee merchant capital Brahmin cultural center and immigrant melting pot. When offered in the hybrid format this course will meet at the regularly-scheduled time but lectures and other course materials will be available on the course Blackboard site in case you cannot attend.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the social and political development of European society between the two world wars primarily through the literature art and films of the period. Topics include: the dissolution of pre-1914 middle class society; deviance and sexuality in the 1920s; the role of decadence in art and the Fascist response to deviance in life and art; women workers and the new technology; the rise of Fascism; political engagement and polarization throughout European society in the face of economic and social crisis.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Of the estimated 5 575 statues depicting historic figures in the United States only 559 of them commemorate women and this disparity is echoed around the world. What are we to make of the gap between the historical "monumental woman" and the physical structures that celebrate them? This class examines global efforts to memorialize important women through monuments museums and other public spaces. It will focus on how acts of memorialization produce public and collective memories about the past and how these bring up issues of patriarchy subjugation inclusivity and representation. We will explore the contradictions between women's empowerment and historical exploitation expressed in things like pussy hats and other feminist gear in artistic representations of the female form in exploration of cultural difference and in grass-roots and official forms of activism.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Investigates how Americans have understood and responded to health illness and death from the eighteenth century to the present. Examine interactions among patients healers (orthodox and heterodox) the medical and scientific professions business and government. Explore the effects of scientific and technological advancements industrialization urbanization immigration war and social movements on the nation's moral and political economies of health and on evolving ideas about bodily integrity and autonomy linked to historical relations of gender race class and sexuality.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores German history since 1945 through film newsreels and other archival footage war memorials and museums novels published diaries memoirs and recent historical scholarship. Topics include the representation in film and other texts of: post-war rebuilding; the German Economic Miracle; divided Berlin; 1960s and 70s radical politics; coming to terms since 1945 with Germany's Nazi past and the Holocaust; coming to terms since 1990 with the Stasi and East German past; "Ostalgie" (nostalgia in the 21st century for some aspects of East German socialism); the multi-cultural society that is Germany today with new Turkish Greek Russian Arab and even Israeli communities.

Philosophy:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A general introduction to the nature of philosophical analysis. Lectures readings and discussions will focus on representative issues and thinkers from the main areas of philosophy (such the nature of truth reality morality politics and religion). 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The study of philosophical thought from the period of the ancient Greek philosophers through the Medieval thinkers including such philosophers as Socrates Plato Aristotle Epicurus Zeno Parmenides Pythagoras Protagoras Augustine Aquinas Anselm and Abelard. An introductory course designed to equip the student with a well grounded understanding and appreciation of Philosophy. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A study of the prominent modern thinkers such as Descartes Leibniz Spinoza Locke Berkeley Hume and Kant. The course is an historical survey of the key concepts problems and developments in modern philosophy including rationalism empiricism and skepticism. The following themes central to Modern philosophy will be addressed: the nature of reality; the limits of human knowledge; self and self-identity; mind and body; freedom in theory and practice; reason vs. sentiment in ethics. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of persistent debates in political and social philosophy. Topics covered can include the meaning of property and welfare the tensions between liberty and equality censorship and freedom of expression the relation of church and state human rights and the common good the possibility of political education and civic virtue legitimacy of the state revolution and counter-revolution war and problems of ends and means addressing historic injustices such as racism genocide or sexism among other topics. Students will read both classic and contemporary writings to address both the historical roots and the contemporary treatment of these questions. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Women’s & Gender Studies:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the roles and images of women in Western culture and the realities of women's everyday lives through literature film history art psychology and recent feminist scholarship. Analyzes gender inequalities and the influence of gender on social structure human behavior and artistic expression. Topics include: the social construction of gender and identity; domestic prescriptions for women; women and work; intersections of gender class and race in American society; sexualities and identity; the politics of motherhood and reproductive rights; educating girls; negotiating male privilege and structural inequalities; representations of women in Western art and film; and women as artists and gendered models of creativity in art film fiction and science.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the key topics and debates that have shaped the field of gender studies including queer studies masculinity studies and women's studies. Through lecture and class discussion of texts from literature film history psychology and sociology explores the pervasive influence of gender on the structure of society and our everyday experiences and the role that gender plays in our understanding of love friendship sexuality and even violence. Topics include: biological arguments about gender and sexuality; the social construction of gender and identity; intersections of gender race class and sexuality; masculinity and femininity; and theories of sexual difference and the construction of sexuality.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Investigates the complex intersections between feminism and popular culture through several different lenses: by exploring how feminists make arguments about popular culture; by looking at the complexities of public femininity in today's popular culture including figures such as Lady Gaga and Katy Perry and television shows like The Bachelor and Grey's Anatomy; by focusing on a variety of articulations of feminism within mass media blogs social media and popular books such as Ariel Levy's Female Chauvinist Pigs and Caitlin Moran's How to Be a Woman. Along the way we will ask questions about: what makes a work of art feminist; how modern media contributes to or distracts us from a variety of political debates in the realm of female equality and how can we as individuals use modern media to create and advance smart feminist arguments.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Investigates how feminists both today and in history have understood inequality and difference and looked for the best ways to address these issues and bring about social justice. Examines how feminist theorists help us to understand how gender and other social categories such as race class sexuality disability age and nationality are constructed within and through each other; and analyzes feminist engagements with liberalism socialism psychoanalysis existentialism post-colonialism critical race theory and queer theory as well as consider anti-feminist arguments. Readings include classic critical texts by authors including Mary Wollstonecraft Emma Goldman Virginia Woolf Chandra Mohanty Gloria Anzaldua and Judith Butler.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explore the deep antipathy women have faced at nearly every turn in their struggles for civic and social inclusion. Anti-feminist denials of women's rights have taken the form of attacks on women's nature bodies and fitness for public life tagging them with labels of otherness: opponents of women's rights deem them irrational unnatural traitors to society even sexual deviants. This course will examine the dangers that women allegedly represent to social stability from the Enlightenment to the present day as well as how women have fought back to assert their rights and independence.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the stories that help us to understand communities identities and bodies that could be considered queer and the ways that film music memoir and fiction have discussed queer as different unusual or other. Texts include the documentary "Paris Is Burning" Frank Ocean's 2012 album "Channel Orange" and Janet Mock's recent memoir "Redefining Realness" as well as foundational queer theory from Judith Butler Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick and Lee Edelman among others to help build a framework for approaching and interpreting both fictional and non-fictional accounts of queer lives.

Visual & Performing Arts Theory and History: 1 course, 3-4 credits

Choose one course from those listed below:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The first part of the course will focus on the history of graphic design from prehistoric times to the Industrial Revolution including the origins of graphic communications in the ancient world the development of the alphabet and early printing and typography. The second portion will concentrate on the period from the late 19th century to the present and will include the Arts and Crafts Movement the various-isms and their influence on modern art the Bauhaus and International Style and contemporary visual systems and image making.

Prerequisites:

ADI-S201 (Concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the important individuals ideas and issues that have shaped the direction of contemporary interior design practice in the twentieth century building upon the historical foundation established by the Ideas of Art History and History of Furniture and Architecture classes. Intermixing lectures and readings with visits to important local buildings it discusses the influences of culture technology fashion and media upon the work and thinking of the first generation of modern designers as well as emerging social moral and environmental imperatives that will form the basis of future practice; cultural identity interdisciplinary collaboration sustainability and universal design.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys the art of Western civilization from prehistoric caves to medieval cathedrals. Considers works from the Ancient Near East Ancient Egypt Ancient Greece and Rome the Byzantine Era the Romanesque Period and the Gothic Period in their historical contexts. Introduces students to formal analysis iconography and critical thinking.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys the art of Europe and America from the Renaissance to the present. Considers works of painting and sculpture from periods and movements such as the Renaissance the Baroque the Rococo Neoclassicism Romanticism Impressionism Abstract Expressionism and Feminism in their historical contexts. Introduces students to formal analysis iconography and critical thinking.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys painting sculpture and architecture in Asia from prehistoric times to the modern era including the Middle East India China Korea and Japan. Emphasizes the connection between visual arts belief systems and historical contexts with a focus on Hinduism Buddhism and Islam as well as secular literature.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores issues of sexuality gender race and social class in the ancient and medieval worlds. Examines key artworks from ancient Greece the Roman Empire and medieval Europe within historical social and cultural contexts.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores themes of power privilege and cultural difference by comparing and contrasting works of Western and Non-Western visual culture in relation to different cultural value systems.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course explores important works of art from Early Renaissance Italy (including architecture painting fresco sculpture and decorative objects) from c. 1300 through c. 1500. Artists covered include Giotto Masaccio Brunelleschi Donatello Botticelli and Leonardo da Vinci.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The aim of this four-credit course is to survey important artistic monuments of High and Late Renaissance Italy (including architecture painting fresco sculpture and decorative objects) from the late 1400s through the late 1500s.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores painting sculpture and architecture in Italy Spain and Northern Europe during the 17th and 18th century. Works by Rembrandt Rubens Caravaggio Bernini Poussin Velasquez Watteau Boucher Fragonard Chardin Hogarth and others considered within their historical contexts.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines Neoclassicism Romanticism Realism and Impressionism in European painting. Considers works by artists such as David Ingres Friedrich Constable Delacroix Goya Courbet Millet Daumier Manet Monet Renoir Degas and Cassatt within their historical contexts.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines European painting and sculpture from around 1880 to 1940 including Symbolism Post-Impressionism Fauvism Expressionism Cubism Futurism The Bauhaus Dada and Surrealism. Considers works by artists such as Gauguin Cezanne Van Gogh Matisse Kandinsky Picasso Braque Mondrian Duchamp Magritte Dali and Ernst within their historical contexts.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys American painting sculpture photography and architecture from the colonial period through WWII. Considers works by artists such as Smibert Copley West Stuart Whistler Sargent Eakins Homer Ryder Bierstadt Cole Inness Sloan Sullivan Wright Hopper O'Keeffe Dove Hartley Bellows Stieglitz Weston and Steichen.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines painting sculpture and architecture of the 14th 15th and 16th centuries in Northern Europe within their historical context. Topics include the rise of oil painting the development of woodcut and engraving the effect of the Reformation on art. Artists include van Eyck Bosch Durer Holbein and Brueghel.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores European and American art since WWII including Abstract Expressionism Colorfield Painting Pop Art Minimalism Neo-Dada Performance Art Feminism Neo-Expressionism and Post-Modernism. Artists include Bacon Giacometti Pollock De Kooning Frankenthaler Rothko Stella Judd Calder David Smith Serra Johns Rauschenberg Warhol Lichtenstein Smithson Christo Nevelson Kosuth Kruger Sherman Basquiat Kiefer and Haring.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides an introduction to a humanities approach to a range of media including but not limited to film and television. The course helps students develop visual literacies enriching their understanding of multiple forms of media. The class also explores how media texts are constructed for specific cultural entertainment informative and propaganda purposes.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introductory film studies course that covers the history of the film medium from its birth until the 1970s. It provides an introduction to major film theory concepts such as genre and/or auteur studies as well as key films and stars in movie history.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The class will consider various theoretical approaches to the TV Series Mad Men beginning with ideas gleaned from the discourse of visual literacy and proceed by applying textual analysis adapted from more traditional modes of literary studies and film analysis. A combination of critical and evaluative critiques will be examined including book-length studies of the series and essays based on the series' appeal to style American popular culture advertising gender roles race and 60s nostalgia. The recent phenomenon of the series recap will serve as a touchstone to the class's collective viewing of the first two seasons of the series.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Discusses and deepens understanding of French and Francophone cinema from its origins in the late nineteenth century to the early twenty-first century. Explores early works from France by the Lumiere Brothers and Georges Melies as well as contemporary films from France Algeria Burkina Faso Canada Haiti and Senegal.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys Western music from CE800-1800 from Gregorian to Beethoven; selected major composers representative masterworks and the musical styles of the Medieval Renaissance Baroque and Classical periods; links the music to some of the major historical cultural artistic and intellectual trends of these periods. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys Western art music from 1800-present from Schubert to Jennifer Higdon; selected major composers representative masterworks and the musical styles of Romantic Contemporary and post-Modern periods; links the music to some of the major historical cultural artistic and intellectual trends of these periods. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A survey of art music in the 20th century: genres covered will be orchestral popular jazz film and musical theatre. We will concentrate on individual works composers and techniques in their social-cultural context. Music from ragtime to rap and musicians from John Adams to Ariana Grande are included.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys American music from Colonial times to the present; various attempts to create an indigenous musical style; vernacular and art music genres including folk concert and religious music jazz and musical theatre; includes music of Billings Amy Beach Ives Copland Bernstein and Libby Larsen. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Covers various popular music styles that emerged in America from 1850 to the present including minstrelsy art song piano music band music blues jazz country rock and rap; includes representative musical selections emphasis the social and cultural factors that foster the emergence and developed of these genres. Normally offered every other year.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys music in the lives of women including composers performers producers mothers and educators from the Middle Ages to the present; examines issues of gender and control perspective in historical narrative and religious and secular traditions that impact the cross-cultural reception of women's music. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Follows the evolution of jazz from blues and ragtime through Dixieland Swing Bebop Cool Latin Modern Free Fusion and Avant-Garde to Post-modern expressions of the present; the contributions of major soloists arrangers composers leaders and bands. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

"What counts as art?" "What is beauty?" "Are there objective standards of beauty?" This course examines the nature of aesthetic experience art beauty and creativity. Through the classic and contemporary readings the students will be introduced to philosophical issues concerning the meaning of art artistic representation perceptions of art interpretation and criticism. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their own experience of art and explore the relationships among the artist the audience the artwork and the world. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every third year.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This is a survey of American musical theatre from its roots in the mid-19th century to the present. It provides students with the analytical tools historical insight and cultural context to increase their appreciation of Broadway's most influential musicals and the artists who created them. The course also provides a critical examination of the ways musicals both reflected the racial ethnic and gender stereotyping of its day while trailblazing a more progressive and enlightened view of these identities.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Picking up chronologically where THETR 265 leaves off this survey course is designed to provide students with an understanding of modern Western theatre. Beginning with a melodrama plays will include representative works of realism naturalism expressionism epic theatre theatre of the absurd and metatheatricality. Lectures and class discussions will explore how these concepts translate to acting and production techniques as well as what they imply as artistic responses to a modern and post-modern world. Satisfies a core requirement for Theatre Majors and the VPATH requirement.

Quantitative Analysis: 1 course, 4 credits

Choose one course from those listed below:

Biology

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduction to the statistical methods used to evaluate biological problems. Sampling probability confidence intervals hypothesis tests experimental design analysis of variance regression and correlation are some of the topics offered. Software for data handling graphics and analysis will be used.

Communication

Credits:

4

Description:

The course develops an understanding of how statistics are used in the presentation of information and arguments in Communication and Journalism. Emphasizing a conceptual approach to learning statistics, the course focuses on data collection and summarization, correlation, regression, sampling, estimation, and tests of significance. Students perform basic statistical calculations using SPSS software.

Computer Science

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This is a hands-on course aimed at non-CS students who want to learn how to build interesting and interactive web pages. We do not use any drag- and-drop software for this purpose. Instead we cover the basics of HTML and PHP and if time permits we look at some ways of building web pages that interact with databases. Each student will have for the duration of the course an account on a server that permits individuals to have web pages that are visible on the World Wide Web.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course introduces students to computer game development including but not limited to game programming. We use Game Maker a framework for personal computers that runs equally well on Mac and PC. We learn about the foundational concepts of two-dimensional (flat) games: graphics sound objects actions rooms scores levels multiplayer support artificial intelligence and more. Game Maker has an intuitive interface that makes game development approachable for everyone including those who have never written a single game or a single computer program. All games created by Game Maker can be saved as standalone applications and can be shared freely with classmates friends and family. This is not a course in graphics design audio editing or scriptwriting. Students are encouraged to use their creativity and imagination to design games and the correctness of game implementation is stressed throughout the course. Normally offered in Fall.

Prerequisites:

CMPSC-F132 and 1 of the following: STATS-240, STATS-250, MATH-134, MATH-165, MATH-164 or MATH-255.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The field of data science is emerging at the intersection of the fields of social science and statistics information and computer science and design. Data science involves using automated methods to analyze massive amounts of data and to extract knowledge from them. This course serves as a project-based introduction to data science in Python language covering data organization and retrieval statistical data processing and data visualization.

Mathematics

Prerequisites:

MATH-165 or MATH-164 with a grade of C or better

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics include: random variable and distribution; expectation and variance; special discrete/continuous distributions (uniform binomial negative binomial geometric hypergeometric Poisson normal and exponential distributions); joint distribution marginal distribution and conditional distribution; covariance; limit theorems (law of large numbers and central limit theorem); and (when time permits) introduction to confidence interval and hypothesis testing; regression analysis. Offered in each fall.

Philosophy

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to formal (or semi-formal) study of the basic types of deductive arguments (propositional and syllogistic logic). 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Political Science

Prerequisites:

Sophomore Standing, POLS-110 and POLS-120 and MATH-128 or higher or instructor's consent

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Quantitative analysis is quickly changing the way we understand and engage in politics how we implement policy and how organizations across the world make decisions. In this course we will learn the fundamental principles of statistical inference and develop the necessary programming skills to answer a wide range of political and policy oriented questions with data analysis. Who is most likely to win the upcoming presidential election? Do countries become less democratic when leaders are assassinated? Is there racial discrimination in the labor market? These are just a few of the questions we will work on in the course.

Psychology

Prerequisites:

PSYCH-114; Restricted to majors only unless with permission of instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the use of statistics as tools for description and decision-making including hypothesis testing. Prepares students for the analysis interpretation and evaluation of psychological research. Offered every semester. Weekly laboratory sessions are required.

Sociology

Prerequisites:

SOC-113 OR SOC-116 and MATH-128 or higher

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students will be introduced to descriptive and basic inferential statistical techniques. The course will provide information on the following topics: Description - measures of central tendency (mean median mode) and measures of dispersion (range standard deviation); logic of statistical inference including normal curve and sampling distribution; hypothesis testing with one sample and two samples; measures of association between two variables (bivariate analysis) including chi-square regression and correlation; and introduction to multivariate regression. Students will utilize SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) software to input and analyze data. The goals of the course are for students to appreciate the need for statistical methods in the broad field of sociology and to gain basic statistical literacy.

Statistics

Prerequisites:

MATH-128 or higher

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduction to statistics and application to statistical analysis by using real-world data. Topics include: data presentation measures of central locations and dispersion probability discrete and continuous probability distributions sampling and sampling distribution estimation hypothesis testing with applications simple and multiple regression models. The use of Excel and SPSS will be emphasized throughout the lab class. Normally offered each semester this course meets 4 hours each week. STATS 240 satisfies the same requirements as STATS 250

Prerequisites:

MATH-128 or higher

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Application of statistical analysis to real-world business and economic problems. Topics include data presentation descriptive statistics including measures of location and dispersion introduction to probability discrete and continuous random variables probability distributions including binomial and normal distributions sampling and sampling distributions statistical inference including estimation and hypothesis testing simple and multiple regression analysis. The use of computers is emphasized throughout the course. Normally offered each semester.