Eric Dewar, PhD

Associate Professor, Biology

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Education

  • PhD, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • MS, University of Colorado at Boulder
  • BS, Tufts University

Research Interests

  • Vertebrate Paleontology and Evolution
  • Evolutionary morphology of mammals, especially early Cenozoic ungulates and carnivores
  • Reconstruction of mammalian dietary ecology using dental microwear and craniodental morphology
  • Effectiveness of podcasting student study groups in learning anatomy and physiology

Selected Publications

  • Middleton, M.D. and E.W. Dewar. 2004. New mammals from the early Paleocene Littleton Fauna (Denver Basin, Colorado), pp. 59-80 in S.G. Lucas, K.E. Zeigler, and P.E. Kondrashov (eds.), Paleogene Mammals, New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 26.
  • Dewar, E.W. 2003. Diversity of dental function within the Littleton fauna (early Paleocene), Colorado: evidence from body mass, tooth structure, and tooth wear. PaleoBios 23(1):1-19.

Professional Activities

  • Membership Committee, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology
  • Communications Committee, Society of Vertebrate Paleontology
  • Curriculum and Instruction Committee, Human Anatomy and Physiology Society

Presentations and Posters at Professional Meetings (selected from last 5 years)

  • Boardman, G.S., J.R. Moore, E.W. Dewar, and G.S. Weissmann. 2015. Determining the driver behind large-scale ecological patterns in the latest Eocene-earliest Oligocene White River Group (USA): Climate versus Geomorphology. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology.
  • Dewar, E.W. 2015. Principles of integrated course design applied to college courses on vertebrate paleontology and evolution. Society of Vertebrate Paleontology.
  • Dewar, E.W., E. Kallamata, B.J. Murray, M.M. Hartnett, and A. Sood. 2015. Is Carnivoran Skull Morphology Dependent on Predatory Style? Experimental Biology 2015.
  • Dewar, E.W., O.R. Grocott, and M.C. Leclerc. 2015. Association between the shapes of hindlimb bone articular faces and locomotor behaviors in artiodactyls. Experimental Biology 2015.
  • Dewar, E.W., C.A. Crocker, A.V. Bauchiero, and J.P. Livingstone. 2015. Is skull shape related to aggressive displays in pinnipeds? Experimental Biology 2015.
  • Dewar, E.W. 2015. Evolving hybrids: converting a traditional evolution course to a hybrid delivery format. Annual Meeting of the Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology 2015:81.
  • Dewar, E.W. and H.M. Dodge. 2015. Evolutionary morphology of the shoulder in swimming mammals. Annual Meeting of the Society of Integrative and Comparative Biology 2015:81.
  • Dewar, E.W. and C.A. Crocker. 2013. Is Skull Shape Related to Aggressive Displays in Seals? Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Program and Abstracts, 2013, 113.
  • Dewar, E.W. 2013. Your voice sounds fine: Making podcasts to promote learning. FASEB Journal 27:960.11.
  • Dewar, E.W., C.E. Elder, T. Le, and P. Sharma. 2013. Enamel use wear of small carnivores: effects of magnification and scale. FASEB Journal 27:518.3.
  • Dewar, E.W. and S.M. Hernandez. 2013. Dental microwear and diet of white-tailed deer through its North and Central American Range. FASEB Journal 27:518.4.
  • Dewar, E.W. 2012. Writing about vertebrate paleontology and morphology as a way to improve college students’ scientific writing skills. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 32(3):87.
  • Dewar, E.W., A.R. Maceli, and H.M. Pietrantonio. 2010. Vertebrate paleontology as the cornerstone of a first-year college seminar. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 31(3):98-99.
  • Papazian, J. and E.W. Dewar. 2010. Reconstructing the diets of Eocene ungulates with morphometrics of tooth crest lengths. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 31(3):170.

Regional Presentations with Students (selected from last 5 years)

  • Grocott, O.R., Leclerc, M.C., and Dewar, E.W. 2015. Association between limb bone proportions and locomotor behaviors in artiodactyls. Eastern New England Biology Conference, Boston, MA.
  • Kallamata, E., B.J. Murray, M.M. Hartnett, A. Sood, and Dewar, E.W.. 2015. Is Carnivoran Skull Morphology Dependent on Predatory Style?Is Carnivoran Skull Morphology Dependent on Predatory Style? Eastern New England Biology Conference, Boston, MA.
  • Bauchiero, A.V., Livingstone, J.P., Crocker, C.A., and Dewar, E.W. 2014. Is skull shape related to aggressive displays in pinnipeds? Eastern New England Biology Conference, North Andover, MA.
  • Buckley, M.V., Osimanti, C.E., and Dewar, E.W. 2014. Pelvic morphology and locomotion: How widespread is the obstetric dilemma? Eastern New England Biology Conference, North Andover, MA.
  • Grocott, O.R., Leclerc, M.C., and Dewar, E.W. 2014. Association between limb bone proportions and locomotor behaviors in artiodactyls. Eastern New England Biology Conference, North Andover, MA.
  • Murray, B.J., Kallamata, E., Sood, A., Hartnett, M.M., and Dewar, E.W. 2014. Eye of the Tiger: Is Carnivoran Skull Morphology Dependent on Predatory Style? Eastern New England Biology Conference, North Andover, MA.
  • Farrell, S.S., B.J. Murray, and E.W. Dewar. 2013. The effects of exhibit and troop size on territorial behaviors of Lemur catta in captivity. Eastern New England Biology Conference, Boston, MA.
  • Dodge, H.M., A.T. Falce, and E.W. Dewar. 2013. Evolutionary Morphology of the Scapula and Humerus in Swimming Mammals. Northeast Undergraduate Research and Development Symposium, Biddeford, ME.
  • Hartnett, M.M. and E.W. Dewar. 2013. Orbital Morphometrics of Visually-dependent Carnivorans and Primates. Northeast Undergraduate Research and Development Symposium, Biddeford, ME.
  • Morrow-McLernan, C. and E.W. Dewar. 2010. Regional differences in obesity prevalence and related diseases in Spain. Eastern New England Biology Conference, Bridgewater, MA.
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Courses Taught

  • BIO 105 - Humans and the Evolutionary Perspective
  • BIO 201 - Biology’s Big Questions
  • BIO 203/L203 - Anatomy & Physiology I
  • BIO 204/L204 - Anatomy & Physiology II
  • BIO 273 - Biostatistics
  • BIO 302 - Writing for Research
  • BIO 337 - Evolution