Micky Lee, PhD

Associate Professor, Communication & Journalism

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Program Director, Asian Studies
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Biography

Micky Lee is a feminist, a Hong Kong citizen, a British national, and a US resident.

Education

  • PhD, University of Oregon
  • MPhil, City University of Hong Kong
  • BSSC, Hong Kong Baptist University

Research Interests

My research focus intersects the following three areas:

  • International communication
  • Telecommunications, information, new information and communication technologies
  • Feminist political economy

Some research questions that I am currently interested in:

  • The intersection between finance, information, and media.
  • How to understand gendered and racialized images from a feminist political economic perspective

Employment History

  • Summer 2016
    Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • 2005-present
    Suffolk University
  • 2004-2005
    Ithaca College

Selected Publications

Books

  • Lee, M. Alphabet: The Becoming of Google. New York: Routledge (under contract)
  • Lee, M. (2019). Bubbles and Machines: Gender, Information, and Financial Crises. London: University of Westminster Press.
  • Lee, M., & Jin. D. Y. (2018). Understanding the Business of Global Media in the Digital Age. New York: Routledge. (expected to be published in October, 2017)
  • Lee, S. & Lee, M. (2017). (Eds.). Wong Kar-wai: Interviews. Jackson, MS: University of Mississippi Press.
  • Lee, M. (2010). Free Information? The Case Against Google. Champaign, IL: Common Ground.

Refereed Journal Articles

  • Raesch, M., Lee, M., & Cooper, F. (2015). From lonesome cowboys to geek masculinities: A study of documentary films produced during the financial crisis. Interactions: Studies in Communication and Culture, 6(3), 287-301
  • Lee, M. (2014). On becoming an exchange: Translating Michel Callon into a political economy of communication. Triple C: Communication, Capitalism, and Critique, 12(2), 891-908.
  • Lee, M. (2014). What can political economists learn from economic sociologists? A case study of NASDAQ. Communication, Culture, and Critique, 7(2), 246-263.
  • Lee, M. (2014). A review of communication scholarship on the financial markets and the financial media. International Journal of Communication, 8, 715-736.
  • Lee, M. (2014). A feminist political economic critique of women and investment in the popular media. Feminist Media Studies, 14(4), 270-285.
  • Lee, M. (2013). Information and finance capital. Information, Communication, and Society, 16(7), 1139-1156.
  • Lee, M., & Smith, C. (2012). The bodies of Chinese women gymnasts in the Beijing Olympics. China Media Research, 8(3), 72-80.
  • Lee, M. (2012). Time and the political economy of financial television. Journal of Communication Inquiry, 36(4), 322-339.
  • Lee, M. (2011). A feminist political economic critique of the human development approach to new ICTs. International Communication Gazette, 73(6), 524-538.
  • Lee, M. (2011). Google ads and the Blindspot Debate. Media, Culture, Society, 33(3), 433-447.
  • Lee, M. (2010). A political economic critique of Google Maps and Google Earth. Information, Communication, and Society, 13(6), 909-928.
  • Lee, M. (2010). Revisiting the “Google in China” question from a political economic perspective. China Media Research, 6(2), 15-24.
  • Translated into Lee, M. (2010). 从政治经济学视角再次探讨“谷歌在中国问题. China Media Report Overseas, 6(1), 44-53.
  • Lee, M. (2010). How to think about intellectual property of open source software from a feminist political economic perspective? The International Journal of Technology, Knowledge, and Society, 6(1), 107-119.
  • Lee, M. (2009). Constructed global space, constructed citizenship. Javnost – The Public, 16(3), 21-38.
  • Fung, A., & Lee, M. (2009) Localizing a global amusement park: Hong Kong’s Disneyland. Continuum: Journal of Media and Cultural Studies 23(2), 195-206.
  • Lee, M. (2008). A feminist political economic understanding of the relations between state, market and civil society from Beijing to Tunis. International Journal of Media and Cultural Politics, 4(2), 221-240.
  • Lee, M. (2007). On the relationship between international telecommunications development and global women's poverty. International Communication Gazette, 69(2), 193-213.
  • Lee, M. (2006). What's missing in feminist research in new information and communication technologies? Feminist Media Studies, 6(2), 191-210.
  • Lee, M. (2004). UNESCO's conceptualization of women and telecommunications 1970-2000. Gazette: The International Journal for Communication Studies, 66(6), 533-552.

Essays

  • Lee, M. (2012). Mediating women workers in fair trade and sweatfree production. Feminist Media Studies, 12(2), 307-310.
  • Lee, M. (2011). A feminist political economy to communication. Feminist Media Studies Tenth Anniversary edition, 11(1), 83-87.
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Contact Me

Office Hours

  • 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Monday
  • 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Wednesday
  • 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Friday
  • Also by appointment
  • Schedule an Appointment

Courses Taught

Undergraduate
  • Archer Fellow Challenge Seminar: Reading Popular Culture
  • Asian Studies Honors Thesis Seminar
  • Asian Studies Internship
  • Asian Studies Professional Development
  • Business of Media
  • Communication Research Methods
  • Communication Theory
  • Freshman Seminar: Women, Gender and the Media
  • Globalization of Telecommunications and Media
  • Intercultural Communication
  • Introduction to Mass Communication / Introduction to Media
  • Media and Popular Culture II (1970s to Present)
  • Media Criticism
  • Media Effects and Uses
  • Media History
  • Media Seminar: Adaptation and Parody
  • Media Seminar: Teaching Media Theories Through Praxis
  • Media Seminar: Learning Portfolio, Resume and Cover Letter Writing (Online)
  • Media Writing
  • New Hong Kong Cinema
  • Research Methods in Communication
  • Social Media
  • Visual Aesthetics
Graduate
  • Communication Research Methods
  • Gender Communication
  • Issues in Communication: Feminist Theories and Communication
  • Issues in Communication: The Information Society
  • Special Topic: Women, Gender, and New Information and Communication Technologies