College of Arts & Sciences Courses Archive 2020-2021

Alphabetical List Archive 2020-2021

Prerequisites:

Non-majors interesting in taking art and design courses for elective credit should refer to offerings under the ART course listings

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Observational drawing is a fundamental way of understanding and communicating visual experience. This course stresses the development and mastery of traditional drawing skills, concepts, and vocabulary, and employs a variety of techniques and materials. Fundamental principles are introduced in structured lessons and exercises, which are supplemented by related outside assignments. Subject matter may include still life, portraiture, and the clothed and unclothed human figure.

Prerequisites:

ADF-S101 or Instructor approval; Non-majors interesting in taking art and design courses for elective credit should refer to offerings under the ART course listings.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will refine the basic visual skills developed in Foundation Drawing I (ADF S101). The elements of color and mixed media are introduced to expand technical possibilities, while more intensive work with the clothed and unclothed human figure provides exposure to gesture, structure and complex form. As students begin to develop a more sophisticated and personal approach, issues of expression and interpretation and varied subject matter will be explored, focusing on personal style and expression.

Credits:

2.00

Description:

Explore, investigate and savor Boston's rich variety of visual art and design with Professor Brown, New England School of Art & Design Program Director and practicing multi-media artist, as your guide. Visit museums, galleries and artists' studios and meet professional designers in their work spaces. Exercise your own creativity too, with fun cell phone photo tours of the Boston waterfront and the Italian North End and Beacon Hill neighborhoods. Throughout the course, you will create a visual journal in collage to record your own unique experiences in Boston's world of art and design. A studio fee of $40 applies. This course does not fulfill core requirements.

Prerequisites:

ADF-S101 and ADF-S166

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this introductory course, students will learn to accurately perceive relationships of shape, form, color and value, and to translate that information through the medium of paint. In a series of in-class and outside projects on canvas, prepared paper and panel, students will explore various approaches to the use of acrylic and oil paint. Emphasis will be placed on the development of disciplined technical skills as well as the exploration of painting's potential as a medium of communication and creative visual expression.

Prerequisites:

ADF-S166; Non-majors interesting in taking art and design courses for elective credit should refer to offerings under the ART course listings.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An understanding of form is critical to the development of the professional artist or designer. This course focuses on the use of line, plane, and volume in space. The role of scale, proportion, structure, surface, light, and display are addressed as students create and document objects that activate and convey a sense of space and engage the viewer. The course proceeds from work with simple forms and techniques to more challenging and comprehensive problems that employ a variety of media and approaches. Prerequisite: ADF S166 (2D/Color).

Prerequisites:

ADF-S166; Non-majors interesting in taking art and design courses for elective credit should refer to offerings under the ART course listings.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Digital visual image generation and modification, especially when combined with traditional hand techniques, are essential skills for artists and designers of the 21st century. This course introduces techniques of image capture, manipulation and output. Weekly and longer-length assignments will address creative and innovative idea generation using these approaches.

Prerequisites:

Non-majors interesting in taking art and design courses for elective credit should refer to offerings under the ART course listings.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The study of color and design is supportive of every studio discipline and is vital to the understanding of all visual media. This course emphasizes the basic concepts and practices of two-dimensional design and color theory. Students employ an intensive, hands-on approach as they explore and master the elements of design (including line, shape, and value) and the three fundamental properties of color (hue, value, and strength). These skills are used in the construction of formally cohesive compositions, the development of arresting images, and the communication of visual ideas.

Prerequisites:

Non-majors interesting in taking art and design courses for elective credit should refer to offerings under the ART course listings.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This cross-disciplinary course will integrate the ideas and practices of two-dimensional design, color and drawing. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the creative process, exploring concepts and developing research skills. Students will undertake individual and collaborative projects in three spaces; the studio classroom, the digital world and the city at large.

Prerequisites:

ADF-S101; Non-majors interesting in taking art and design courses for elective credit should refer to offerings under the ART course listings.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course builds on the Integrated Studio I experience: synthesizing fundamental visual ideas. IS II investigates the construction, documentation, and transformation of volumetric form, environmental space, and time. Projects will explore narrative strategies and the creation of immersive experiences. Students will develop critical and analytical skills while employing a range of traditional and digital media as they explore the creative boundaries of the classroom studio, the city of Boston, and virtual space.

Prerequisites:

ADF-S102

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores how light can enhance, reveal and sometimes determine our understanding and appreciation of art. Topics include a historical overview of artists from Caravaggio to the present day who use theatrical and natural light and the human form to represent the human condition. The figure, clothed and unclothed, in isolation and in an environmental context, is the primary subject.

Prerequisites:

Take ADF-S152

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Art is not just visual. Artists also "think with their hands", understanding that engagement with the physical world is vital to the creative process, and often gives rise to unexpected and fruitful ideas. In this course, students will explore traditional and experimental sculptural processes in a spirit of "directed play", focusing on both intuitive and critical responses to materials.

Prerequisites:

ADF-S102

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Investigates how shifts in scale alter our perception of space. We live in a world of great contrasts in scale: hand held screens can download Google Earth and nanotechnologies can change the lives of entire continents. Since evolving technologies have altered our understanding of our environment, artists need to incorporate this new knowledge to the art of Drawing. This figure-based course uses descriptive observation as the starting point for addressing visual invention. Working from a model, traditional techniques are combined with digital imaging and sequential genres such as graphic novels to develop an expanded experimental palette.

Prerequisites:

ADF-S166

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Surveys the medium of painting as a mode of expression that embraces representation, abstraction and collage. Engages concepts and techniques of 20th and 21st century artistic practice. Students develop an individual approach to non-objective and objective painted space. Open-ended assignments, lectures, critiques and discussions will clarify and refine work. Substantial independent studio time allows students to focus on work that responds to contemporary issues in painting.

Prerequisites:

ADF-S152

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A focused study on the language of dimensionality in sculpture, students will explore traditional and non-traditional materials. Issues of craft, concept and context will aid students in developing work that responds to currents in contemporary sculpture. This class will also provide students with a substantial grounding in 20th and 21st century sculptural theory and practice.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Surveys the techniques and studio practice of contemporary printmaking techniques. Etching, Linocut, Transfers, Lithography and Screen Printing are incorporated in a fast-moving course focused on personal expression. Studio work utilizes non-toxic materials and a studio practice centered on creativity and sustainability. Topics include Portfolio development, experimentation and printed editions.

Prerequisites:

ADF-S102

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Fine Arts Seminar is designed as a vehicle for students to develop a personal relationship to contemporary art theory and practice. Questions are posed as a point of departure for the students to generate work. Visiting artists and weekly gallery and museum visits aid in examining aspects of current art making in order to assist students in creating a strong vision for their work. Restricted to Fine Arts Majors only.

Prerequisites:

ADFA-S271

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A continuation of the first semester, this course aids students in recognizing the patterns and questions posed in their own studio practices. A large number of technical approaches to content will be explored.

Prerequisites:

Take ADF-S152; Intended for Majors only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Moves art theory into the studio and the studio out into the world. Students will look at the most significant artists and movements of the past 50 years while examining their social, cultural and political context. Canonized contemporary art categories (postmodernism, appropriation, anti-art and performance art are some examples) are assigned as group projects. Movements, strategy or style of art making is discussed as an expressive problem-solving experience, blurring the lines between media. This course conflates contemporary art history with contemporary art practices.

Prerequisites:

Take ADFA-S272;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An exploration of contemporary drawing with an emphasis on experimentation and personal growth. Traditional and non-traditional materials are employed in a rigorous studio environment. Topics include radical scale, drawing and installation and the ongoing conversation between ephemera and permanence in drawing.

Prerequisites:

ADFA S251 or instructor permission

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An advanced exploration of technique, scale and multiple press runs. Students focus on a chosen area of traditional or contemporary print media, ranging from etching, digital imaging, lithography, relief and screen printing. Through the use of theory and developed skill, print-based works of an increasingly professional standard are developed in both two and three dimensions. Projects focus on discrete objects and multi-layered collaborative exercises. Encourages an individual, creative and professional approach to printmaking in the context of contemporary art practice.

Prerequisites:

ADF-S102

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Designed to provide an in-depth study and practice of two-dimensional contemporary figuration. An in-depth exploration of the methodology and techniques of figurative painters from late-twentieth century through the present. Personal adaptation of traditional and contemporary modes of expression are seen as key elements in the development of each student's personal voice.

Prerequisites:

Take ADF-S152

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This sculpture course considers the figure in its importance both as a historical element and as a reflection and definition of self. Establish an understanding of the figurative form in the space by relating gesture and structure through manipulated form. Weight, mass, plane and volume are considered while working directly from the model.

Prerequisites:

ADFA S272

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Third semester of the Seminar sequence. Students are responsible for integrating their visual culture influences and references within an expanded body of work.

Prerequisites:

ADFA-S371

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The final Seminar semester is focused on the studio practices of its members. All work is channeled into the development of the final senior thesis exhibition.

Prerequisites:

ADFA-S271 and ADFA-S272 and ADFA-S371. CAS Honors students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The final Seminar semester is focused on the studio practices of its members. All work is channeled into the development of the final senior thesis exhibition.

Prerequisites:

Take ADFA-S272;

Credits:

3.00- 6.00

Description:

Functions as a bridge between the undergraduate processes of Fine Arts Seminar and the postgraduate environment of the visual arts. Particular attention will be paid to the contexts used by students to define their work in relation to feed back of professional outside reviewers. Individual contracts between faculty and student will be developed at the beginning of each semester. Contracts will assess the priorities for the work and adapt studio practices for the creation of new work. A research component will be attached when awarding 4-6 credits.

Prerequisites:

Take ADFA-S272. Instructor consent required.

Credits:

3.00- 6.00

Description:

Functions as a bridge between the undergraduate processes of Fine Arts Seminar and the postgraduate environment of the visual arts. Particular attention will be paid to the contexts used by students to define their work in relation to feed back of professional outside reviewers. Individual contracts between faculty and student will be developed at the beginning of each semester. Contracts will assess the priorities for the work and adapt studio practices for the creation of new work. A research component will be attached when awarding 4-6 credits.

Prerequisites:

Take ADFA-S272. Instructor consent required.

Credits:

4.00- 6.00

Description:

Functions as a bridge between the undergraduate processes of Fine Arts Seminar and the postgraduate environment of the visual arts. Particular attention will be paid to the contexts used by students to define their work in relation to feed back of professional outside reviewers. Individual contracts between faculty and student will be developed at the beginning of each semester. Contracts will assess the priorities for the work and adapt studio practices for the creation of new work. A research component will be attached when awarding 4-6 credits.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Juniors and Seniors

Credits:

3.00- 6.00

Description:

Fine Arts majors are required to complete an internship where they will apply their studio and academic skills in a professional setting. Students enrich their perspective by sampling the career paths available in the art and culture economy. Work directly with established professional artists or with arts and cultural organizations such as museums, galleries, and arts councils, this experiential learning is critical for career preparation. Topics include personal growth, professional skill development, and networking opportunities. The internship experience is paired with a faculty-led seminar that will reinforce new skills and provide a venue for inquiry, sharing, and reflection.

Prerequisites:

Fine Arts Senior status required, or Instructor Approval.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Readies the student for the furtherance of their career as a creative artist. Course participants will begin to place themselves within the context of the contemporary art world. Through the development of a written artist's statement, presentations, electronic documentation and an exhibition which meets professional standards, senior students are prepared for post-graduate life. Normally offered Spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Fine Art Program Director Approval needed

Credits:

1.00- 6.00

Description:

A project, either studio or non-studio under the supervision of a fine arts faculty member. Independent study forms are available from the Office of the Academic Dean and Registrar. All independent study projects must be approved by the individual faculty member, the Fine Arts Program Director and the Chair of the Department of Art and Design.

Prerequisites:

Fine Art Program Director Approval needed

Credits:

1.00- 6.00

Description:

A project, either studio or non-studio under the supervision of a fine arts faculty member. Independent study forms are available from the Office of the Academic Dean and Registrar. All independent study projects must be approved by the individual faculty member, the Fine Arts Program Director and the Chair of the Department of Art and Design.

Prerequisites:

ADF-S166

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will introduce students to the creative use of typography in the design process and will provide them with the skills, knowledge & terminology necessary to design with type.

Prerequisites:

Take ADG-S201 and ADG-S219 or ADPR-247

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This advanced course focuses on the translation of the historical knowledge and hand skills learned in Typography I into a digital format. Students will learn how to produce quality typography, as well as experiment with and explore letterform design and manipulation.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course focuses on the multi-disciplinary nature of the graphic design profession and the designer as a visual communicator, critical thinker and problem solver. Students will be exposed to a series of outside topics to which they will apply design solutions, mirroring the range of fields in which designers today are employed.

Prerequisites:

ADF-S166

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Emphasizing the creative process from thumbnail to comprehensive, the course will also introduce the student to the language, tools, and techniques of the professional graphic designer. Attention will be paid to conceptualization, production and presentation in solving design problems. This course will expose students to a series of assignments designed to show step-by-step problem solving from observation and research, to the incorporation of these findings into the design of communication vehicles.

Prerequisites:

ADG-S206, and ADG-S219 or ADPR-247

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A continuation of the skills learned in Graphic Design I, involving projects that are broader in scope, more in-depth, and address societal issues.

Prerequisites:

ADG-S219

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will introduce basic digital communication design skills to students in order to prepare them for more advanced study. The class will use a variety of industry standard software to structure digital content and understand how to communicate digitally. Information architecture, wire frames, interface design, user experience and web page layouts will be explored. The history, societal context and future of emerging media will be discussed.

Prerequisites:

ADF-S102

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces the skills necessary for meeting client's illustration needs in a variety of media appropriate to their context. Emphasis will be placed on developing the ability to draw real objects and real people while advancing a personal style. Students will be challenged to engage in visual research, thumbnailing and rendering, in order to present their ideas and concepts for their illustrations.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course students will learn the industry-standard software applications used by graphic designers. Through a series of technical and design problems, students will learn how and when to use specific software to produce their solutions and prepare portfolio-quality design.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The first part of the course will focus on the history of graphic design from prehistoric times to the Industrial Revolution, including the origins of graphic communications in the ancient world, the development of the alphabet and early printing and typography. The second portion will concentrate on the period from the late 19th century to the present, and will include the Arts and Crafts Movement, the various-isms and their influence on modern art, the Bauhaus and International Style, and contemporary visual systems and image making.

Prerequisites:

ADG-S206 and ADG-S219

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Integrated Advertising will provide instruction towards creatively translating marketing needs into innovative and effective advertising solutions through a series of challenging projects. Students will learn skills applicable to the advertising industry by focusing on creative executions across multiple-media applications including print, direct mail, collateral, outdoor, online and social media. There will be emphases on idea generation and campaign development with the goal of message communication through the balance of various elements including page design, copywriting, typography, illustration, photography and visual effects. The history of advertising from the early 20th century to the ever-changing complexity of today's digital landscape will be studied.

Prerequisites:

ADG-S219 or Instructor Permission

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Enter the world of motion graphics and learn how to make movies that incorporate image, type and video. This class will focus on learning to create moving graphics that are geared toward being broadcast on television, web, film, etc. Students will create time-based works such as title sequences, ads, and videos that they art direct. In the very near future, motion design will be a necessary skill for designers to compete in the marketplace. Motion design can be applied to many areas of graphic design from on-screen presentation to environmental design to augmented and virtual reality AR/VR. During the class, students will build their motion design portfolio.

Prerequisites:

ADG-S202 and ADG-S207 and ADG-S219 or Instructor's Consent.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will focus on the skills necessary to create text-heavy designs. The goals of this course are three-fold: to further enhance the understanding of typography, to provide the skills and knowledge necessary to design publications for either a digital or print environment, and to integrate the students' own art and/or photography in their work.

Prerequisites:

Senior BFA status

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This senior-year course is designed to provide final preparation for employment in the field of graphic design. In addition to helping each student develop a professional digital portfolio, the course will provide students with practical knowledge of the business aspects of graphic design, interviewing skills, resume preparation, personal branding and help students target internship opportunities for the following semester.

Prerequisites:

ADG-S213 or Instructors Permission

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will cover the basics of web design and development technologies including the most up-to-date standards in coding and best practices. The objective is the development of advanced conceptual skills such as wire-framing, prototyping, usability testing, interactive philosophy, accessibility, project and content management. Students will learn industry-standard tools/frameworks and design practices for both online and mobile technologies. In addition students will end the course with enough knowledge to build a site, upload it and connect it to a domain of their choosing.

Prerequisites:

ADG-S202, ADG-S207, and ADG-S219

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This continuation of Graphic Design I and II (ADG S206, 207) will concentrate on increasing sophistication in creative problem-solving abilities. Students will also develop an understanding of prepress terms and operations and the impact of technology on those operations. It will also provide the knowledge and skills necessary to enable students to make appropriate prepress decisions regarding more complex projects. Senior status preferred.

Prerequisites:

ADG-S344

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A continuation of the concepts and skills developed in Graphic Design III and their application to more complex, multi-pieced, in-depth projects including a final capstone project.

Prerequisites:

Take ADG-S344. Honors students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A continuation of the concepts and skills developed in Graphic Design III and their application to more complex, multi-pieced, in-depth projects including a final capstone project.

Prerequisites:

ADG-S201, ADG-S206, and ADG-S219

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course, students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course is designed to further explore software applications for specific and experimental effects. It aims to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to choose the appropriate software application and to execute the desired design, focusing on the design itself rather than on the limitations of computer programs. The course also focuses on solving the technical and production problems when preparing artwork electronically for printing. Students will use industry-standard software.

Prerequisites:

ADG-S202 and ADG-S207

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course explores the issues of customer experience and contemporary branding used to identify, establish and promote the business community. Specific emphasis will be placed on the analysis and development of corporate identity systems including the development of logotypes, signage systems, environmental graphics, websites, advertising and appropriate collateral materials.

Prerequisites:

ADG-S213 or Instructor Permission. Laptop with software Adobe Xd &/or Sketch installed required.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

UX, User Experience explores the process of enhanced customer satisfaction and loyalty through user-centered interactive design. Data research, prototyping, testing and project implementation are covered. Design-field best practices are employed including typography, composition, and color theory to prepare students for their professional futures.

Prerequisites:

Senior BFA status.

Credits:

3.00- 4.00

Description:

Seniors are required to pursue an internship with a local graphic design firm, whose work is directly related to that student's intended area of professional concentration. Interns will observe and participate in all office procedures permitted by their place of internship and will be required to maintain a notebook of their observations. Required classroom seminars will reinforce new skills, share learning experiences and answer questions or concerns.

Prerequisites:

Independent Study Forms must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00- 6.00

Description:

An Independent Study provides the student with the opportunity to examine an issue of interest that falls outside the parameters of the existing curricula. The student will work on a one-on-one basis with a full-time faculty member to realize a particular and well-defined goal. All proposals for Independent Study must be approved by the Deans Office in advance of the semester during which the work will be completed.

Prerequisites:

Independent Study Forms must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office for approval in addition to the Department Chair for approval.

Credits:

1.00- 6.00

Description:

In an Independent Studio/Study, the student works in an independent fashion, pursuing an area of study that is outside the scope of existing curricula. Independent Study Forms must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office for approval in addition to the Department Chair for approval.

Credits:

2.00

Description:

This elective course is designed to aid students in determining whether to pursue a career in interior design and decorating. Through both lectures and studio work, students will be shown basic drafting and graphic communication techniques used in presentation of visual ideas, as well as various elements of interior composition, such as space planning, color, furniture, finish and material selection. The final project will be suitable for inclusion in a portfolio. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

ADI-S101 and ADI-S110

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Interior Design Communications teaches students how drawing media, observational drawing, perspective theory, color and design graphics can be integrated into the designer's process. In addition to exploring contrast, accent, reflection, shade and shadow, the course underscores the importance of freehand sketching as a tool to foster intellectual inquiry and convey design concepts to a wider audience. The course introduces students to manual and digital methods for composing work for conceptual expression, technical drawing presentation and portfolio purposes. Design comprises of a series of iterative steps where ideas, of increasing complexity, are conveyed with an increasing variety of visual tools. This course therefore introduces students to the techniques that designers employ in the process of creating interior spaces. Rather than merely illustrative devices, the course reveals how designers use drawings as tools. Like any tool, design communication requires practice and frequent application. The goal therefore, is to introduce a series of techniques that may be exercised in subsequent courses in order to convey ideas in studio and in design presentations.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students will employ a range of computer programs used in the design industry. Exercises will introduce students to Building Information Modeling, vector graphics and raster file formats. 2D and 3D compositional and graphic principles will also be explored in order that students better understand the importance of file hierarchies and the efficient organization of digital workflow. Import and Export functions will to enable students to work between applications in order to integrate images, drawings and vector graphics into their design presentations. Vector graphics will also be employed to generate 3D artifacts using digital fabrication tools. Prior drafting, Raster and Vector graphic experience recommended.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will provide students with an understanding of orthographic principles and their importance to spatial thinking and design communication. Students will produce manual drawings in order to manipulate scale. Students will employ Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) software to create measured architectural plans, elevations and sections. The course will introduce students to file management skills and develop proficiency in using cloud based resources. Students will employ virtual workspaces to conduct work in, and out of class. Vector graphic software will also be used to compose work, manipulate technical drawings and illustrate plans and sections for portfolio use.

Prerequisites:

ADF-S152, ADI-S110 and ADI-S106

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This studio introduces students to basic design principles, design theory and concept development. Emphasis will be placed on design process, problem solving, spatial organization, anthropometrics, universal design awareness, and presentation techniques. Students will be given a series of projects of increasing complexity, utilizing and building upon the skills developed in the Foundation courses. Students will be expected to produce process diagrams, plans, elevations, models, and finish boards.

Prerequisites:

ADI-S201 and ADF-S102

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course addresses residential interior environments on a large scale. Students will develop client contact and programming skills. Emphasis will be placed on residential precedents, design process, human factors, accessibility, building codes, diagramming, spatial organization, detailing, presentation techniques, furnishings, finishes and lighting.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course, students will explore how physiological and psychological factors inform the design of space. Students participate in a series of design challenges that explore topics such as anthropometrics, ergonomics, and proxemics. The seven principles of universal design will be examined through a sequence of "charrette" exercises. Students will solicit input from User-Experts and employ a more inclusive design process to develop equitable design solutions. In doing so, culture, gender, age, and physical ability will be identified as catalysts for creativity and innovation.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides students with the skills to critically analyze historic styles and examine the impact they have had on design. Emphasis will be placed on chronological periods, from antiquity to the 21st century. By examining visual characteristics of each time period, the course reveals how geography, culture and societal values have shaped furniture and architecture for centuries. The course also introduces terminology germane to a study of contemporary furniture and architecture styles. Using the city of Boston as a reference point, students will explore issues of preservation, restoration, rehabilitation, and adaptive re-use in order to identify how the region's design landscape is adapting to environmental and social demands.

Prerequisites:

ADI-S201 (Concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the important individuals, ideas and issues that have shaped the direction of contemporary interior design practice in the twentieth century, building upon the historical foundation established by the Ideas of Art History and History of Furniture and Architecture classes. Intermixing lectures and readings with visits to important local buildings, it discusses the influences of culture, technology, fashion and media upon the work and thinking of the first generation of modern designers, as well as emerging social, moral and environmental imperatives that will form the basis of future practice; cultural identity, interdisciplinary collaboration, sustainability and universal design.

Prerequisites:

ADI-S110

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines various interior construction assemblies of non-load-bearing walls, load-bearing walls, floors, stairs, elevators, fireplaces, ceilings, doors, interior windows, frames, millwork and fire-related construction. Emphasis will be placed on building codes including state, BOCA, Underwriters Laboratory, ASTM, state and federal accessibility codes and construction materials. Students will also be introduced to basic structural concepts and characteristics of structural materials.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students will study the visual qualities, technical characteristics and applications of the common materials and finishes used in interior installations. These materials include floor coverings, wall coverings, textiles, ceiling and sustainable materials. Related fire, health and safety codes, as well as maintenance and life cycle costs, will be discussed. Class material will be presented in the form of lectures, guest speakers and a tour of the Boston Design Center. Students will learn to analyze, select and specify materials and finishes for the appropriate applications, write specifications, and prepare a resource notebook.

Prerequisites:

ADI-S110. Prior drafting or CAD experience recommended.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the art and technology of lighting and explores the use of lighting as a design element in the interior environment. Class material will be presented as a series of lectures, readings and demonstrations. Students will learn to analyze interior lighting installations, calculate lighting levels for interiors, select appropriate light fixtures and prepare a lighting plan based on one of their studio projects.

Prerequisites:

Take ADI-S106 and ADI-S110 (Required) Take ADF-S101 (Recommended)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

As a continuation of the Interior Design Communication course, students will develop proficiency in communicating aspects of the design process. These "process" skills include digital wireframe modeling and manual drawings enhanced by digital tools. Students will employ three-dimensional rendering software to enhance perspectives and create walk-through visualizations of their digital models. Movie editing software will be used to create multimedia presentations and students will learn to employ a variety of media formats for presenting their work.

Prerequisites:

ADI-S202 and ADI-S264

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This commercial design studio focuses on the design of work environments. Students will develop programming and space planning skills unique to these environments through a series of small- to medium-sized projects. Emphasis will be placed on commercial precedents, programming, design process, human factors, building codes, ADA, spatial organization, detailing, presentation techniques, office furniture systems, equipment, finishes, and lighting.

Prerequisites:

ADI-S201 and ADI-S264

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the design process as it applies to furniture, addressing furniture ergonomics, materials, construction techniques, manufacturing and design. Students will research selected topics, and design seating, work/service pieces and cabinetry. Emphasis will be placed on furniture precedents, research, design process, human factors, accessibility, detailing, documentation and presentation techniques.

Prerequisites:

ADI-S372, ADI-S303 and ADI-223

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This studio focuses on adaptive re-use and renovation of commercial interiors with attention given to historical buildings in the Boston area. Emphasis is on creative problem-solving methods and a philosophical approach to medium- and large-scale hospitality and retail design projects. Students will be required to incorporate the skills and knowledge gained throughout their studies to create a comprehensive project, including presentation drawings, models, material and furniture boards, and a set of construction documents and specifications.

Prerequisites:

Senior Status

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course employs manual and digital skills to develop a professional portfolio. Students will investigate key components of portfolio content and consider how existing graphic skills can be employed to demonstrate ideas creatively and substantively. Through hands-on mock up and layout techniques students compare and contrast different presentation formats in advance of digital composition. Students will also explore methods for documenting and archiving their own work. In addition to presenting final work, students will also explore ways to present research, schematic analysis and precedent investigations.

Prerequisites:

ADI-242

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course studies mechanical, electrical, and plumbing technology and systems commonly employed in residential and commercial interiors. It will introduce students to the vocabulary, concepts and basic components of these fields of engineering. This will enable students to integrate these building systems in their design work and communicate ideas effectively with project engineers and contractors. The course will include commonly used heating, ventilating, air conditioning, plumbing piping and fixtures, fire sprinklers, electrical supply and distribution, smoke detection and fire alarm systems. Related mechanical, electrical and plumbing codes will also be discussed.

Prerequisites:

ADI-S110 and ADI-S201

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Building on the curriculum of Orthogonal Drawing, this course will explore in more detail the features of CAD and BIM software. Programs will be used as tools to draft, organize, and produce a set of construction documents. Students will complete a full set of contract documents.

Prerequisites:

Take ADI-S201

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course covers the business aspects of interior design, including firm management, client, and contractor relationships, project management, proposal writing, and market resourcing. In addition, students will be exposed to career planning practices, such as portfolio development, resume preparation and interviewing techniques. Tours of architectural and interior design firms will also be included. Students may complete the required internship hours during or prior to taking this course. In the final stage of the class each participant will systematically analyze their experience of practice. They will compare and contrast the business models within which they have worked and present these to their peers.

Prerequisites:

Take ADI-S201, ADI-S202, ADI-S303, ADI-S304, ADI-S372. Senior Interior Design majors only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to be the first part of the BFA Senior Studio in Interior Design. The senior ID project is intended as the culmination of the interior design studio sequence. It is an individual effort, supported by the studio faculty, that is inclusive of the entire design process from the programming phase through final design and documentation. The objective of part one, Senior Programming & Pre-Design, is for individual students to research, develop, and draft a program document which will guide their design work in part two, Senior Studio. Students will explore the possible project types and precedents, select and develop a client profile and program, and research and analyze an architectural site. Written and graphic analysis tools will be employed. The preliminary conceptual (pre-design) phase of work is also introduced.

Prerequisites:

ADI-S201, ADI-S202, ADI-S303, ADI-S304, ADI-S305, ADI-S372 and ADI-398

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This studio course completes the undergraduate studio sequence in Interior Design. This final design studio emphasizes individual competence with respect to the total design process. Students will utilize the research and programming document produced in ADI 398, Senior Programming & Pre-Design, to develop a comprehensive design solution for their individual studio problem through schematics, design development, presentation drawings and specifications.

Prerequisites:

ADI-S201, ADI-S202, ADI-S303, ADI-S304, ADI-S305, ADI-S372, and ADI-398. CAS Honors students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This studio course completes the undergraduate studio sequence in Interior Design. This final design studio emphasizes individual competence with respect to the total design process. Students will utilize the research and programming document produced in ADI 398, Senior Programming & Pre-Design, to develop a comprehensive design solution for their individual studio problem through schematics, design development, presentation drawings and specifications.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An Independent Study provides the student with the opportunity to examine an issue of interest that falls outside the parameters of the existing curricula. The student will work on a one-on-one basis with a full time faculty member to realize a particular and well-defined goal. All proposals for Independent Study must be approved by the Dean's Office in advance of the beginning of the semester during which the work will be completed.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An Independent Study provides the student with the opportunity to examine an issue of interest that falls outside the parameters of the existing curricula. The student will work on a one-on-one basis with a full time faculty member to realize a particular and well-defined goal. All proposals for Independent Study must be approved by the Dean's Office in advance of the beginning of the semester during which the work will be completed.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to the discipline addressing social science, humanities and practical approaches to the study of Advertising, Public Relations & Social Media. Students investigate the broad themes and foundational concepts which unify these diverse fields.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

In this hands-on experiential course, students examine potential career paths in Advertising, Public Relations, and Social Media, become oriented to the university and the surrounding Boston area, and identify professional resources in Boston that foster career development.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The development and delivery of oral presentations. Students acquire skills in oral and physical delivery, organization, persuasion, critical thinking, and use of support media.

Prerequisites:

Boston Debate League students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The basic principles, techniques and processes of argumentation and debate research are examined. The ability to create, analyze, research, and produce complex arguments is the central focus of the course. Students will learn to examine argumentation as a tool for both inquiry and advocacy. Students will develop an experiential focus upon critical examination of issues and ideas and the use of argumentation to support and defend a position. Open to Boston Debate League students only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to the processes of professional communication, with emphasis on oral presentations, report writing, effective listening, and interpersonal communication in the business environment.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The course develops an understanding of how statistics are used in the presentation of information and arguments in Advertising, Public Relations & Social Media. Emphasizing a conceptual approach to learning statistics, the course focuses on data collection and summarization, correlation, regression, sampling, estimation, and tests of significance. Students perform basic statistical calculations using SPSS software.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the portrayal of homosexuality in political, social, and cultural discourse. Analyzes the role of media and symbolic construction in the shaping of public values, opinions, and social movements.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the persuasive strategies of social reform movements with special emphasis on the civil rights', women's rights, and gay rights movements in the United States.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Utilizing the Netflix series, "Black Mirror", students analyze the ethical dilemmas faced with operating and using social media and examine the impact social media has on culture. Students will draw upon historical and contemporary theories of communication to analyze these cultural impacts.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to rap music and hip hop culture and examine it as a cultural, critical and historic phenomena. This course explores the connection of rap music to social movements/social justice as well as understand it in the context of its place in pop culture. The objective is to be able to critically and historically understand rap music in the context of the social, political, economic and cultural environment of the time during its rise.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Modern applications of argument in political, social, and legal situations. Emphasis on development of arguments, analysis, use of evidence, and delivery of oral and written assignments.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This online course is provides students with an understanding of the role creativity plays in the development and management of a company's brands. Specifically, the class will delve deeply into creative strategy in advertising and marketing with a particular focus on award-winning creative strategy. The course will integrate international travel to France for the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity.

Credits:

1.00- 8.00

Description:

Intensive research on topics in debate and active participation in the University forensics program. ECR

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Computer applications for advertising and communication design. Using various graphical editing and design programs, students learn the theory and practice of design for layout, logos, and graphic elements in communication.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A survey course that introduces students to advertising concepts and practices from the perspective of agencies, clients, the media, and consumers. Students learn to think critically about advertising messages and learn practical techniques for developing effective advertising in various media.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The application of public relations strategies and techniques to college and professional sports.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Brands and social responsibility examines current issues such as health care, climate change, women's empowerment, and minority rights. The impact of advertising, public relation and social media communication are reviewed for global and national brands.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the interactions of media and popular culture in the United States from a social science perspective. The influence of media as well as the emergence and development of "Rock N Roll" is discussed in relationship to the social movements of the 1960's that formed the foundation of our current culture.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Social media sites such as Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter are examined from a cultural and critical perspective. Students learn to use social media for community formation, social presence, identity building, and social activism. The roles of advertising, public relations, and branding are examined.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students learn HTML, CSS and Widgets for the construction, design and posting of web sites. In addition, we examine the use of websites, mobile sites for advertising, public relations, search engine optimization, and marketing.

Credits:

2.00

Description:

Introduces students to the elements of professional blogs and blogging, including blog structures, use of images, creation of podcasts, and appropriate writing. Examines the social influence of blogs and the ethical responsibilities of bloggers. Students create their own blogs as part of the course.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Effective public relations involve an understanding of the history, theory, and practice of public relations including public relations concepts, the role of the practitioner, and the foundations of public relations. This course seeks to provide that foundation as an introduction to the field of public relations. Issues surrounding the history, legality, process, and principles of public relations are explored.

Credits:

2.00

Description:

Examines advocacy campaigns that use digital strategies and techniques. Students explore the use of social media to raise awareness for causes, issues, and fundraising, and consider the impact of technology on grassroots advocacy.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-257

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the success and failure of the visual identities of brands as well developing a new visual identity and launching a campaign for an existing brand. Includes an analysis of the strategically planned and purposeful presentation of a brand's visual identity as well as a brand's name, logo, tagline (slogan), color palette and other sensory elements that make a brand unique.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the techniques of negotiation. Focuses on the processes of negotiation across a variety of contexts. Offers students the opportunity to explore methods of applying these skills to professional and other real world settings.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-289

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of the use of social media by new and mature social movements. Includes analysis of the use of social media for mobilization, dissemination of information and as an interface with traditional media.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the important functions performed by human and mediated communication for health care consumers and providers. The course focus is on the use of communication strategies to inform and influence individual and community decisions regarding health.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-257

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The planning and purchasing of advertising space and time. Examines media costs, budgets, and media strategy for different audiences and markets.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-257

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the contemporary public relations practice of Native Advertising and sponsored content. Explores different forms of native advertising, methods and mechanisms for creating sponsored content, ethical and regulatory issues, and industry trends. Students learn how to blend content with news site partners, to use the different types of paid syndication, and to set up native ads.

Prerequisites:

Take ADPR-257 or ADPR-2277

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the skills and functions required in order to manage a successful Advertising or Public Relations agency. Students learn how agency leaders win new business and generate income by offering an evolving mix of new services and how they manage client relationships and diverse internal teams, including creative, research, and media professionals. Examines a variety of agency structures, including new agency models, full service and speciality boutiques, and the transformation of agencies initiated by social media and the digital age.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-257

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Continuation of basic advertising, with an emphasis on developing effective advertising messages and advertising campaigns.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-2277 and ADPR-3377 and Senior Standing.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the entertainment industry and explore strategies for creating, executing and evaluating public relations campaigns for entertainment products. The course explores techniques and strategies employed in all areas of entertainment publicity, including television, film, music, and theater. Topics covered include the development of a publicity campaign; reputation management; digital media; social media; working relationships with the media; and writing effective press releases and other promotional content.

Prerequisites:

Take ADPR-2277

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the role of public relations practitioners in building fashion brands. Includes an exploration of fashion brands and trends, the role of manufacturers, wholesalers, importers, and retailers, and the media channels and tactics used to promote fashion. Students examine the use of market research, social media, blogs, and events to engage fashion-minded consumers based on their lifestyle.

Prerequisites:

Take ADPR-2277

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students acquire the public relations knowledge and skills to build brands and enhance the public image of companies, organizations, and government bodies that are stakeholders in the travel and tourism industry. Based on an established PR process, students conduct market research, set objectives, develop strategy, and design a hypothetical public relations campaign for a "class client" to help it promote travel and tourism products and services.

Prerequisites:

Take ADPR-2277

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The application of the public relations process to build brands and enhance the public image of companies and organizations engaged in the hospitality industry. Based on an established PR process, students conduct market research, set objectives, develop strategy, and design a hypothetical public relations campaign for a "class client" to help it promote food and beverage products or services.

Prerequisites:

Take ADPR-2277

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students examine effective processes, tools, and techniques for promoting nonprofit organizations. Based on established PR process, students conduct market research, analysis, and strategic planning, then design promotional plans for leveraging organizational identity to foster a positive public image for charities, cultural organizations, educational institutions, and government.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-289

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The art and science of organizing and labeling websites, online communities, and social media to support usability and improve the user's online experience.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-289

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The process of gathering data from Social Media users and processing it into structures insights for brands, businesses, and communicators. Students will learn to identify relevant data as well as data analysis and interpretation with the goal of producing more effective social media messaging and content.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-2277

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines how events are built, promoted, managed, and assessed, with an emphasis on conventions, trade shows, and nonprofit events. Issues analyzed include facilities planning and contracts, legal issues, volunteer management, budgeting, marketing, and planner/staff communication.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-257

Credits:

4.00

Description:

All forms of online advertising are explored, including paid search, with a focus on building a brand online.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-289

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Focus is on the importance of a social media strategy in building a brand. Examines how to optimize a social presence through the production of appropriate content and the engagement on platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. In addition, students learn the benefits of each platform to a brand, which platforms to invest in, and the specific trends and features to utilize. Advertising and analytical features are included.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-2277

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines how research aids the public relations practice. Students learn research methods that address public relations planning and problem-solving. Assignments provide students with hands-on practice using research for a PR project.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-2277

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Focuses on writing principles for public relations including the formulation of clear PR objectives, determining the knowledge of the target audience, and the development of key messages. Students apply these principles to common PR formats, including news releases, pitch letters, biographies, speeches, emails, digital content, and social media posts.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-2277

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines best practices for web publishing, including creating, editing and maintaining content for online and social media platforms. Students analyze the content of websites and then produce their own content in a variety of forms. Covers content creation and maintenance techniques, as well as customer and client relationship skills, with an emphasis on effective writing. Includes practical experience creating, editing and maintaining content for online and social media platforms.

Prerequisites:

Take ADPR-2277 or ADPR-257, or faculty consent.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Many technological developments have a significant impact on advertising and public relations. Artificial Intelligence, Big Data, Cybersecurity, Geo-Fencing, Automation tools, Mobile 5G, and Augmented Reality and other technologies are examined for their effect on these fields.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-289

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Covers the development of a social media campaign for a target audience using a variety of platforms. Students will use social media and design tools to create a campaign for a client, moving it from concept through execution.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines persuasion strategies and tactics for advancing public policy proposals and concerns. Students will learn how to apply the principles of Public Relations, Advertising, Negotiations and Persuasion to influence the public and government decision-makers.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-359 and ADPR-257

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Principles of advertising campaigns. Students design, plan, and produce a national advertising campaign for a client as members of a simulated agency team.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-2277

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Provides students with insight into effective risk and crisis management within organizations, including health organizations. Focuses on the application of theories, strategies, and tactics from a public relations perspective. Students understand how communication can prevent, cause, accelerate, and assist in recovery from a crisis.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course we examine the current presidential election in real time. We'll examine the role of both traditional and social media including news coverage and campaign strategies and tactics such as advertising priming trolling debates and messaging for different constituencies. We'll also investigate political science literature to understand voter behavior campaign tactics political parties and the structure of the presidential election system including the nomination process and the Electoral College. This course will be co-taught by faculty members from the Government Department and the Advertising Public Relations and Social Media Department. Students will understand the role of the media in presidential elections understand the interaction among journalists politicians and citizens and understand how to be savvy consumers of political news.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-2277

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the integration of advertising, promotion, public relations and marketing communication in the strategic communication process. By learning the fundamentals of interpersonal and persuasive communication, students have an opportunity to develop an effective communication plan for a brand that includes creative copy.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-2277 Senior majors in ADPR who qualify for honors in the major and/or honors in CAS. Eligible students are invited to register for this course by the department.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the integration of advertising, promotion, public relations and marketing communication in the strategic communication process. By learning the fundamentals of interpersonal and persuasive communication, students have an opportunity to develop an effective communication plan for a brand that includes creative copy.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines public issues involving the environment. Focuses on public relations strategies for government agencies, corporations, and other organizations concerned with the environment.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examination of special circumstances created by politics and their impact on attempts at persuasion. Case studies of famous politicians' political campaigns are combined with discussions of current trends in media and politics.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-2277 and ADPR-3377 and Senior Standing.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines typical public relations problems experienced by profit and not-for-profit organizations. Provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of the skills, techniques, and knowledge of public relations by creating a comprehensive campaign plan for a community client.

Prerequisites:

ADPR-2277, ADPR-3376, and ADPR-3377 and Senior Standing.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course, students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. Examines typical public relations problems experienced by profit and not-for-profit organizations. Provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of the skills, techniques, and knowledge of public relations by creating a comprehensive campaign plan for a community client. This course requires a Service Learning experience.

Prerequisites:

16 Hrs of ADPR coursework or ADPR advisor consent

Credits:

1.00-13.00

Description:

Internships and practicum in Advertising, Public Relations & Social Media are available prior to the start of each semester.

Prerequisites:

Senior ADPR majors with an overall cumulative grade point average of 3.0, and a major GPA of 3.4

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Senior CJN majors meeting requirements for Departmental Honors are invited to participate in this seminar, which entails research and presentation of an approved topic.

Prerequisites:

By invitation only. ADPR majors with Senior standing, a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.3, and a minimum major GPA of 3.5 in at least 7 ADPR courses.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Senior ADPR majors meeting the requirements for Department Honors are invited to participate in this Seminar. The course involves advanced research to produce a project and/or research paper. Students are also required to create a presentation of their work.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00-12.00

Description:

An independent study experience in Advertising, Public Relations & Social Media is available prior to the start of each semester.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office. ADPR majors in the CAS honors program only.

Credits:

1.00-12.00

Description:

An independent study experience in Advertising, Public Relations & Social Media is available prior to the start of each semester.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Ethical issues are central in law for lawyers, paralegals, judges, jurors and anyone working within or touched by the legal system. This course examines philosophical questions, practical issues, and social theories of law, primarily through the use of legal materials, to analyze legal ethical theory. The course considers how major theories are characterized within the American legal system, including the presumption of innocence, due process guarantees, the right to counsel, and other fundamental legal concepts. Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines criminal law in the United States from a broad perspective. It will present the general principles and doctrines that affect the whole criminal law, such as elements of criminal offenses, defenses to crime, and perspectives on crime and criminal law. In addition, students will learn the elements of specific crimes, such as homicide, criminal sexual conduct, terrorism and related crimes, crimes against public morals, and crimes against property. Discussions of the direction of the criminal law and constitutional limitations on government will be presented as preparation for future study.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The Rules of Civil Procedure dictate the steps taken in state and federal lawsuits. This course will acquaint students with rules and the practical requirements of the rules, from filing a complaint to clarifying a judgment and to the duties of paralegals in a litigation office. Normally offered each semester.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The existence and validity of a contract is determined by specific rules. Students will learn about formation through offer and acceptance, contract enforceability, the necessity of consideration, and breach of contract and will draft contract provisions as a paralegal might in a law office. Normally offered each semester. Sophomore status required.

Prerequisites:

Take ALS-264 or ALS-360 or instructor's permission

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Corporations are unique business entities and specialized citizens"" of the state. This course will examine the special rules for establishing and maintaining a corporation\"

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will present common law real estate principles and the effect of federal agencies on the buying and selling of real property. Sample forms including leases, purchase and sale agreements, and closing forms are reviewed and drafted. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

Take ALS-264 or ALS-360;

Credits:

4

Description:

Family law includes marriage, divorce, support, custody, property division, and abuse prevention petitions. Essentially an area of state law, it is often the backbone of general practice law firms. The role of paralegals in a family law office will be studied. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the student to the responsibilities of paralegals and to the culture of the legal profession. Topics include the development of paralegalism as a profession, the definition of the practice of law, ethical considerations, interviewing techniques, legal research, law office management, and client relationships. Normally offered each semester.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

How to use the law library, perform legal research, write legal analysis in memorandum form, and use computers as a research tool. Initial focus is on learning how to find legal materials, including federal and state case law, statutory law, and administrative law. Use of finding tools such as digests, encyclopedias, and CALR will be studied, as will Shepardizing. Focus also on legal writing, from letters through case analysis. Normally offered fall semester. Sophomore Status Required

Prerequisites:

Take ALS-360 or ALS-362

Credits:

4

Description:

Federal and state administrative agencies such as FTC, NLRB, and EEOC are extensive sources of law. Familiarity with these agencies is useful in many areas where a paralegal might work. Additionally, Worker's Compensation law is uniquely suited to assist the student in acquiring a practical understanding of the administrative law area, and its legal, administrative, economic, and social foundations will be studied. Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course provides a basic overview of key issues in contemporary education law and policy. Relevant local, state, and federal laws will be reviewed as well as education policy issues, including civil rights, student safety and discipline. This course will also cover the core educational entitlements granted to all students with disabilities in the public education system. It will focus on the substantive legal protections designed to ensure that students with disabilities receive a Free and Appropriate Public Education, and on the various procedural protections for students and parents. The course will cover major federal legislation such as the IDEA, ADA and Section 504, as well as major Supreme Court and other important cases. The course will cover fundamental legal issues balancing the interests of the public, schools, students, and parents. Additionally, since paralegals have become an important part of education law enforcement and practice, several assignments will focus on practical paralegal work.

Credits:

4

Description:

Many civil suits arise when the negligence of an individual creates injury to another. Elements of negligence law and specific types of cases such as automobile accidents and medical malpractice will be studied, with an emphasis on practical aspects of drafting and research for the prospective paralegal. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

ALS 362, or permission of instructor

Credits:

4

Description:

Building on the skills introduced in ALS 362, Civil Litigation, this course will provide a thorough study of the rules of evidence, the process of discovery, and the preparation of a case for a trial, as well as the roles of arbitration, mediation, and negotiation in litigation and other legal disputes. Theory will be combined with practical applications for prospective paralegals, such as deposition abstracting, gathering and preserving evidence, and techniques on how to prepare a case for ADR. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Senior standing and at least 15 hours of paralegal courses, or instructor's permission.

Credits:

4

Description:

A one-semester internship in either a law office, a governmental agency, insurance company, or a for-profit or non-profit corporation, depending on the positions available during each semester. Once a week seminars will discuss such topics as ethical considerations in a law office, experiences gained as a paralegal interns, and seeking paralegal employment. For specific placements/information, students must contact the Director of Paralegal Studies prior to the start of each semester. Prerequisites: Senior status and at least 15 hours of Paralegal Studies or permission of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered spring and summer. ECR

Prerequisites:

Take ALS-264 or ALS-360;

Credits:

4

Description:

Study of the immigration and nationality laws of the United States focusing on the interplay of the administrative agencies which administer those laws: Justice Department, Labor Department, and State Department. Topics include the immigrant selection system; the issuance of non-immigrant visas; grounds for excluding aliens and waiver of excludability; grounds for removal; change of status, and refugee and asylum status. Special emphasis on the paralegal's role in representing and communicating sensitively with aliens. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Take ALS-264 or ALS-360;

Credits:

4

Description:

A survey of the law of the protection of ideas, trade secrets, inventions, artistic creations, and reputation. The course will briefly review the bases for patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret protection, the distinction among the various forms of intellectual property, and the statutory and common law methods of enforcing rights. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Take ALS-361;

Credits:

4

Description:

Building on the skills in ALS 361 - Legal Research & Writing I, this course continues the focus on learning how to find legal materials and how to summarize research results. Writing skills will be strengthened through various exercises and revisions. Skill development in legal analysis, writing legal memoranda, and using computer assisted legal research with Westlaw and Lexis will be emphasized. Normally offered spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Take ALS-264 or ALS-360; or instructor's permission

Credits:

4

Description:

The nature of the employment relationship and and overview of constitutional and federal statutory provisions that affect the employment relationship will be studied. Particular emphasis on the Civil Rights Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Statutory provisions regarding benefits and employment-related entitlements will also be studied. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Take ALS-264 or ALS-360; or instructor's permission

Credits:

4

Description:

An opportunity to learn the history of domestic violence including battering, child abuse and child neglect, and the legal response to it. Focus will be on Massachusetts Law and its response, especially the Abuse Prevention Act, its application and enforcement, and on laws protecting children from abuse and neglect. Filings, law office issues and special issues in dealing with battered women and abused and neglected children will be included with the psychological issues, cultural issues, and advocacy possibilities. Normally offered yearly. Sophomore status required. Cultural Diversity A

Prerequisites:

Instructor's consent required

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Individual program of reading and research on an approved topic under the supervision of a member of the department. Only for qualified juniors or seniors. Offered every semester.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course offers a basic introduction to American culture and society through the study of American History. The city of Boston and its extraordinary history and institutions will be at the heart of the class and students will frequently visit sites close to the campus. Topics will focus on areas such as the way people from different cultures have understood and misunderstood each other; the evolution of American politics and political institutions; the American Revolution and the founding documents and institutions of the United States; the distinct forms of American religion, American literature and the American economy; slavery and race in American society; the rise of America to world power; the changing role of women; the New Deal and the rise of the modern welfare state; immigration; the development of popular culture; and the meaning of Donald Trump. This course fulfills te core requirement for the American Studies Minor. Enrollees in the Minor program may not register for AMST-111 Defining America and Americans.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Masters Arabic alphabet, learn elementary formal grammar and develop reading, speaking, and writing skills.

Prerequisites:

ARAB 101 or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

Continues to master Arabic alphabet, learn elementary formal grammar and develop reading, speaking, and writing skills.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys the art of Western civilization from prehistoric caves to medieval cathedrals. Considers works from the Ancient Near East, Ancient Egypt, Ancient Greece and Rome, the Byzantine Era, the Romanesque Period, and the Gothic Period in their historical contexts. Introduces students to formal analysis, iconography, and critical thinking.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys the art of Europe and America from the Renaissance to the present. Considers works of painting and sculpture, from periods and movements such as the Renaissance, the Baroque, the Rococo, Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Abstract Expressionism, and Feminism in their historical contexts. Introduces students to formal analysis, iconography, and critical thinking.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys painting, sculpture, and architecture in Asia from prehistoric times to the modern era, including the Middle East, India, China, Korea, and Japan. Emphasizes the connection between visual arts, belief systems, and historical contexts with a focus on Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam as well as secular literature.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores issues of sexuality, gender, race, and social class in the ancient and medieval worlds. Examines key artworks from ancient Greece, the Roman Empire and medieval Europe within historical, social and cultural contexts.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores themes of power, privilege, and cultural difference by comparing and contrasting works of Western and Non-Western visual culture in relation to different cultural value systems.

Prerequisites:

ARH-101 and ARH-102 and Instructor consent

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Designed to accompany an internship at a local museum, gallery, archive, or other art institution, this independent study course will carry variable credit depending on the number of hours devoted to the internship and the related academic work done by the student. Interested students should consult the instructor as they are applying for internships.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course explores important works of art from Early Renaissance Italy (including architecture, painting, fresco, sculpture, and decorative objects) from c. 1300 through c. 1500. Artists covered include Giotto, Masaccio, Brunelleschi, Donatello, Botticelli, and Leonardo da Vinci.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The aim of this four-credit course is to survey important artistic monuments of High and Late Renaissance Italy (including architecture, painting, fresco, sculpture, and decorative objects) from the late 1400s through the late 1500s.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores painting,sculpture and architecture in Italy, Spain and Northern Europe during the 17th and 18th century. Works by Rembrandt, Rubens, Caravaggio, Bernini, Poussin, Velasquez, Watteau, Boucher, Fragonard, Chardin, Hogarth and others considered within their historical contexts.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism and Impressionism in European painting. Considers works by artists such as David, Ingres, Friedrich, Constable, Delacroix, Goya, Courbet, Millet, Daumier, Manet, Monet, Renoir, Degas, and Cassatt within their historical contexts.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines European painting and sculpture from around 1880 to 1940, including Symbolism, Post-Impressionism, Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Futurism, The Bauhaus, Dada, and Surrealism. Considers works by artists such as Gauguin, Cezanne, Van Gogh, Matisse, Kandinsky, Picasso, Braque, Mondrian, Duchamp, Magritte, Dali, and Ernst within their historical contexts.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys American painting, sculpture, photography and architecture from the colonial period through WWII. Considers works by artists such as Smibert, Copley, West, Stuart, Whistler, Sargent, Eakins, Homer, Ryder, Bierstadt, Cole, Inness, Sloan, Sullivan, Wright, Hopper, O'Keeffe, Dove, Hartley, Bellows, Stieglitz, Weston, and Steichen.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines painting, sculpture, and architecture of the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries in Northern Europe, within their historical context. Topics include the rise of oil painting, the development of woodcut and engraving, the effect of the Reformation on art. Artists include van Eyck, Bosch, Durer, Holbein and Brueghel.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores European and American art since WWII, including Abstract Expressionism, Colorfield Painting, Pop Art, Minimalism, Neo-Dada, Performance Art, Feminism, Neo-Expressionism and Post-Modernism. Artists include Bacon, Giacometti, Pollock, De Kooning, Frankenthaler, Rothko, Stella, Judd, Calder, David Smith, Serra, Johns, Rauschenberg, Warhol, Lichtenstein, Smithson, Christo, Nevelson, Kosuth, Kruger, Sherman, Basquiat, Kiefer, and Haring.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the art world of the past few decades with special attention to the roles and exhibition practices of contemporary art museums and galleries. Considers the major artists and trends in today's art world, the history of museums, and the effect of museums on art produced today. Students will visit local museums, including the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) individually and in groups.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Surveys women artists from the sixteenth century to the present and examines new direction in art-historical scholarship developed by feminist art historians during recent decades.

Prerequisites:

Permission of instructor required

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the art of Caravaggio within the historical context of the Early Baroque period in Italy. The course emphasizes research skills and the methodology of art history. Designed as a foundation for students intending to pursue a career in the world of art and/or museums.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's consent required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the art of Gian Lorenzo Bernini, arguably the most important and influential figure in the world of 17th-century art. Designed for art history majors & minors, the seminar explores Bernini's career within the context of the religious, political, and artistic upheavals of his time; it also helps students develop research skills and provides a foundation that will be valuable for anyone pursuing a career in the world of art and museums.

Prerequisites:

Permission of instructor required

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the Impressionist movement of the late nineteenth-century, including Monet, Renoir, and Pissaro, within its historical context. The course emphasizes research skills and the methodology of art history. Designed as a foundation for students intending to pursue a career in the world of art and/or museums.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Students meet with a departmental faculty member to pursue advanced studies in areas of particular interest to them.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Students meet with a departmental faculty member to pursue advanced studies in areas of particular interest to them.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students with minimum of 3.3 GPA or higher. Instructor consent required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A major research project completed under the supervision of a regular faculty member.

Credits:

0.00

Description:

Intended for high school students and recent high school graduates. Normally offered summer semester.

Credits:

0.00

Description:

In this workshop, participants will get a flavor for the types of tools, techniques and assignments utilized in studio-based instruction. Students will have an opportunity to practice traditional hand skills, gain exposure to digital tools and learn how material and lighting selection influences design solutions. Through a variety of spatial and analytical investigations as well as guest lectures, students will better understand the many design considerations and decisions involved in creating spaces.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of drawing using both traditional and experimental techniques. Media includes pencil, charcoal, white chalk, ink and collage. Subject matter includes still-lives, landscapes/cityscapes, portraiture and live clothed models. This course is appropriate for beginners as well as more advanced students. Individual attention is given to students at various levels of ability, allowing students to progress at their own pace.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This introductory course is designed to encourage students with little or no knowledge of the use of various painting processes. The basic elements of painting are introduced in exercises enhanced by demonstrations. Students work with acrylic paint and various painting mediums. Creative work is encouraged in a relaxed atmosphere where individual attention is given to students at various levels of ability.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history, politics, economics, philosophy, geography, arts, and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy, religious and cultural exchanges, international relations, Asian experience in America, and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

Credits:

4

Description:

There are more Chinese restaurants in the U.S. than MacDonald's, Burger Kings and KFC'S combined. This course examines the unique American phenomenon of Chinese food from a historical and anthropological viewpoint. Students will gain a better appreciation and understanding of the subject through the course and will probably never look at local Chinese takeout the same way afterwards

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Engages in an internship in a business or non-profit organization that deals with Asia or an Asian American community. Students may complete the internship either in Asia or in the U.S. Students will complete appropriate exercises and reports to document their learning. (1 course, 4-12 credits; can be taken multiple times in different semesters)

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Works directly with a faculty member on an agreed topic related to Asia or an Asian language. Past topics include: intermediate Chinese and Japanese; Asian popular culture.

Prerequisites:

Instructor consent required

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Students will reflect on their college career and develop a personal strategy for attaining professional goals. They will understand ethical guidelines and professional conventions by examining the differences between American work culture and Asian work culture; by applying this understanding to a transnational/diverse professional world. Students will understand what the job market and graduate school opportunities are like for Asian Studies graduates.

Prerequisites:

Students must be in the CAS Honors Program, have a 3.5 overall grade point average, and a 3.7 grade point average in the major. Registration must be approved by the Asian Studies Director.

Credits:

1.00- 8.00

Description:

Students will work with an Asian Studies advisor to undertake a research project that will produce a 25-page paper that is suitable for an undergraduate academic conference in Asian Studies or relevant disciplines. Students must be in the CAS Honors Program, have a 3.5 overall grade point average, and a 3.7 grade point average in the major. Registration must be approved by the Asian Studies Director. May be taken in the fall and/or spring in the senior year.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introductory course for nonnative signers. Emphasis on receptive skills, vocabulary, and grammar. Introduction to issues important to the Deaf community. One language laboratory session per week.

Prerequisites:

ASL-101 or Instructor's consent.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Continues to develop receptive skills, vocabulary and grammar. Explores patterns of lexical and grammatical structure. Fosters awareness of issues important to the Deaf community.

Prerequisites:

BIO-101 and BIO-L101, can also be taken concurrently BIO-L104 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An introduction to basic evolutionary, behavioral and ecological principles. Readings and discussions emphasize the ways that humans are affected by ecological processes and principles as well as how humans and their technology affect ecosystems. May not be taken by Biology majors or minors. This course will not fulfill requirements for a major or a minor in Biology. It is intended for non-biology majors as a follow-up to Biology 101. 3 hours lecture. Days Only. Madrid Campus only.

Prerequisites:

BIO-104 must be taken concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Exercises and field trips designed to complement and demonstrate the ecological principles developed in the lecture section. The lab emphasizes the scientific method and employs long term group projects. Madrid Campus only.

Prerequisites:

Non Science Majors Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Major topics include the scientific basis of evolution, the fossil history of vertebrates, evidence of evolution in the human body, and applying an evolutionary perspective to the social interactions and possible futures of humanity. Meets one of the non laboratory science requirements for the non-science major. This reading and writing intensive course is a non-laboratory science option for non-science majors. This course will not fulfill requirement for a major or a minor in Biology.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Major topics include the scientific basis of evolution, the fossil history of vertebrates, evidence of evolution in the human body, and applying an evolutionary perspective to the social interactions and possible futures of humanity. Meets one of the non laboratory science requirements for the non-science major. This reading and writing intensive course is a non-laboratory science option for non-science majors. This course will not fulfill requirement for a major or a minor in Biology.

Prerequisites:

Non Science Majors Only

Credits:

4

Description:

This course explores the evolution, ecology, behavior, genetics, and adaptations of cats (Felis silvestris catus) and dogs (Canis lupus familiaris). We will discuss what is known about these species, current research, and what is still unknown. The course will focus on comparing and contrasting the biology of cats and dogs and how biological differences have led to the way they are perceived as companion animals. We will also discuss how these species can be used as model organisms for exploring patterns of human heredity and disease transmission.

Prerequisites:

CAS and SBS Honors Students Only or 3.3 GPA. Non science majors only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course explores the evolution, ecology, behavior, genetics, and adaptations of cats (Felis silvestris catus) and dogs (Canis lupus familiaris). We will discuss what is known about these species, current research, and what is still unknown. The course will focus on comparing and contrasting the biology of cats and dogs and how biological differences have led to the way they are perceived as companion animals. We will also discuss how these species can be used as model organisms for exploring patterns of human heredity and disease transmission.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L111 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explanation of key biological structures and reactions of the cell. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L111 concurrently. Restricted to Honors Biology Majors.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explanation of key biological structures and reactions of the cell. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 (concurrently)

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Sessions are designed to familiarize the student with biological molecules, and the techniques used in their study. The techniques covered include basic solution preparation, separation and quantification of molecules, enzyme catalysis,and cell isolation.

Prerequisites:

Honor student status or GPA of 3.3 required. Must take concurrently with BIO-111.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Sessions are designed to familiarize the student with biological molecules, and the techniques used in their study. The techniques covered include basic solution preparation, separation and quantification of molecules, enzyme catalysis,and cell isolation.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Online lab sessions designed to familiarize the student with biological molecules, their importance and the techniques used in their study through online lab simulations and virtual illustrations of scientific experiments. The techniques covered include solution preparation, separation and quantification of molecules, enzyme kinetics, cell isolation and data analysis.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L114 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Rigorous introduction to organismal biology emphasizing evolution, phylogenetics, form, and function. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A series of laboratory experiences in evolution, diversity, anatomy and physiology.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 (concurrently) and Honor student status or GPA of 3.3

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A series of laboratory experiences in evolution, diversity, anatomy and physiology.

Prerequisites:

Non Science Majors Only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course seeks to answer five current questions from all levels of biology, from the subcellular to the ecosystem level. Topics will be discussed in the context of genetics, evolution, and ecology. We will focus on the process of doing science, including how scientists evaluate ideas and communicate their findings. Emphasis will be placed on topics in biology that impact daily life.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L203 (concurrently), BIO-111 and BIO-L11

Credits:

3.00

Description:

First part of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course emphasizes histology and physiology in the understanding of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Medical terminology will be used.

Prerequisites:

BIO-203 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A study of the human skeletal system and a comparative look at other organ systems involving observation of anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes microscopy and computer simulations of physiological processes.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L204 (concurrently), BIO-203, and BIO-L203

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Conclusion of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course investigates the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems as well as the physiology of immune responses, nutrition, and acid-base balance. Medical terminology will be used.

Prerequisites:

BIO-203 and BIO-L203. BIO-L204 must be taken concurrently. Restricted to CAS Honors students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Conclusion of a systematic survey of the structural and functional interrelations of the organ systems of the human body. This course investigates the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems as well as the physiology of immune responses, nutrition, and acid-base balance. Medical terminology will be used.

Prerequisites:

BIO-204 (concurrently) and BIO-203 and BIO-L203

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A study of the human viscera using anatomical models and dissection of mammalian specimens. Also includes microscopy of tissues and physiological experiments.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will examine major trends, issues, and policy that are impacting the world's coastal and ocean resources. Scientific, economic, social and political aspects of each issue will be discussed, and case studies will be used to illustrate the challenge of linking good scientific data with regulatory and management decisions. Topics include (but are not limited to) relevant coastal and ocean processes, international and national governance, coastal and marine spatial planning, marine protected areas, fishery management zones, coastal development, climate change, and marine mammals.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111 or UES-111 and UES-L111

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This seminar course is designed to stimulate students' interests in the field of water resources from an environmentally sustainable perspective. Five water resource areas will be highlighted: (1) rivers and watersheds, (2) groundwater and aquifers, (3) estuaries, (4) coastal floodplains, and (5) marine resources. The focus will be on the resources themselves and their functions, values, and impacts from human uses as well as policy issues and management techniques.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L225 (concurrently) and BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Course introduces students to the anatomy, physiology, systematics, ecology, and economic uses of all major groups of plants. Aspects of the biology of nonvascular, non-seed, gymnosperm, and angiosperm plants are explored. An overview of Kingdom Fungi is also covered. Each student is required to do a 10-15 minute presentation to the class highlighting the economic use of a group of plants assigned by the instructor. Normally offered Spring semester.

Prerequisites:

BIO-225 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111 and BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Lab exercises focus on plant anatomy, physiology, and systematics. Instruction in the identification of major plant families and fungal types is covered. Trips to a Boston area herbarium and botanical garden are required.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This interactive introduction to nutrition explores the science of human nutrition and further reviews concepts of how nutrition can promote health and well being. The course will review specific nutrient needs and functions, nutrient digestion, and the role of diet in well being and in the presence of chronic disease. Weekly course work encourages scientific literacy and fosters critical evaluation of nutrition in the news and in social media.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course explores the biology and natural history of marine mammals, including cetaceans, pinnipeds, and sirenians, with a particular focus on species endemic to the North Atlantic. Topics include evolution, anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology, field identification, the history of whaling and sealing, and contemporary management and conservation issues. Hands-on activities may include the dissection of a small marine mammal and a whale watch in Massachusetts Bay.

Prerequisites:

BIO-254 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111 or BIO-114 and BIO-L114 or Instructor's consent

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduction to the marine environment, its organisms and their specific adaptations. Emphasis on marine and estuarine ecology, intertidal habits, trophic relations, and physiology. Human impacts on the sea: fisheries, mariculture, pollution, introduced species, climate change and seawater acidification, and law of the sea. Taught yearly each fall.

Prerequisites:

BIO-254 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111 or BIO-114 and BIO-L114 or Instructor's consent

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Field trips to local marine environments, museums, and aquaria; field and laboratory study and observations of live, preserved, and models of marine organisms.

Prerequisites:

BIO 111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, BIO-L114, CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The course is designed as an application base educational experience that will allow students to learn the standard techniques associated with successful cell culture. As such, students are responsible for the maintenance, propagation, isolation, and preservation of their cells. A number of cell types and experimental manipulations of the cultures are investigated throughout the semester.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduction to the statistical methods used to evaluate biological problems. Sampling, probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, experimental design, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation are some of the topics offered. Software for data handling, graphics, and analysis will be used.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111. Restricted to CAS Honor Students.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduction to the statistical methods used to evaluate biological problems. Sampling, probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, experimental design, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation are some of the topics offered. Software for data handling, graphics, and analysis will be used.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L274 (concurrently), BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An examination of the basic principles of genetics in eukaryotes and prokaryotes at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. Topics include Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, structure and function of chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, and population genetics.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111 and BIO-114 and BIO-L114. BIO-L274 concurrently. CAS Honors students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An examination of the basic principles of genetics in eukaryotes and prokaryotes at the level of molecules, cells, and multicellular organisms, including humans. Topics include Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, structure and function of chromosomes and genomes, biological variation resulting from recombination, mutation, and selection, and population genetics.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114. Must be taken concurrently with BIO 274.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Experiments designed to demonstrate principles presented in lecture, using a range of genetic model organisms that include E. coli, B. subtilis, S. cerevisiae, D. melanogaster, S. fimicola, and C. elegans.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114. Must be taken concurrently with BIO-274.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Online laboratory course that reinforces concepts presented in lecture and teaches basic principles associated with genetics research. Students will learn about lab practices and techniques using simulations, videos, and group activities. There will also be a focus on learning how to extract meaningful information from scientific papers and becoming proficient in scientific writing.

Prerequisites:

BIO-L285 (concurrently), BIO-111 and BIO-L111

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Viruses and bacteria are surveyed in terms of their ecology, biochemistry, taxonomy, molecular biology and control.

Prerequisites:

BIO-285 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Introduction to microbiological techniques and their applications to health, research and industry.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111 and WRI-101, WRI-102, or WRI-H103. BIO and Radiation Therapy majors with junior standing only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Development of skills for writing clearly, concisely, and creatively in the style of scientific journals. This course emphasizes the formulation of a research project of the student's choice and leads to a formal manuscript on the topic. Instruction includes literature search methods and software for the graphical presentation of data. Professional development, including the preparation of job application materials and in-person interview skills, is also an integral part of this course. Required of all biology and radiation science majors. Junior standing required.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114. Must take BIO-L304 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Mechanisms of physiological adaptations to environmental challenges are studied. Examples of gas exchange, osmoregulation, fluid transport, temperature regulation, nervous control, and movement are examined in various animal forms through class lecture and discussion, required readings, and external lectures. Spring semester.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114. Must take BIO-304 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Selected physiological processes and mechanisms or adaptation in invertebrate and vertebrate animals are examined by observation and controlled experiments.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114 or UES-111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces geological processes leading to fossilization and sedimentary analysis of past environments. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of extinct lifeforms and their interaction with the environment starting with the formation of the planet through the present day.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114 and BIO-L333 (concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Areas of study include but are not limited to basic principles of population biology, community ecology, trophic dynamics, ecosystem structure and function and evolutionary theory.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114 and BIO-L333 (concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Areas of study include but are not limited to basic principles of population biology, community ecology, trophic dynamics, ecosystem structure and function and evolutionary theory.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114, BIO-L114, and BIO-333 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Field and laboratory experiences in techniques and concepts relevant to ecological theory, data collection, statistical analysis, visual representation and report preparation.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, and BIO-L114. BIO-274 (recommended).

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A survey of evolutionary theory, exploring processes such as the genetic sources of variation, natural and sexual selection, and evolutionary developmental biology. Using phylogenetic systematics and other tools, we will demonstrate how these mechanisms result in the visible patterns of evolution. This is a reading-and-writing intensive course centered on close reading of Origin of the Species and discussion of recent peer-reviewed literature about evolution.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course covers a broad spectrum of aspects of biodiversity and conservation by examining key elements ranging from global patterns in the distribution of life on our planet to the effects our human population is causing on those patterns. Examples from marine and terrestrial animals and plants are used to convey current ideas with a focus on the importance of global biodiversity, and the design of management programs for the conservation of species and ecosystems. 4-credit

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A survey of the occurrence, life history and pathogenicity of the most important arthropod-borne, human diseases both internationally (malaria, dengue, plague, trypanosomiasis, yellow fever, etc.) and within the United States (Lyme disease, EEE, West Nile Virus, and others). Demographic and environmental factors leading to the re-emergence and spread of these diseases will be considered.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The evolution, systematics, anatomy, physiology and behavior of freshwater, marine and anadromous fishes from temperate to tropical environments. The interactions of fish in their environments, including predator-prey relationships, host-symbiont interactions, and fish as herbivores. Taken with permission from the Marine Science Consortium Coordinator. [This is a Marine Science Consortium Course and enrollment is limited] Evenings only: off campus

Prerequisites:

Take BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides a comprehensive review of the biology, ecology, and management of cetaceans. A thorough grounding in cetacean mammalogy and population biology will prepare students to understand conservation problems presented as case histories. Students will also complete an independent research paper on a topic related to cetacean biology. Hands-on activities may include a whale watch in Massachusetts Bay.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, BIO-114, BIO-L114, BIO-274, and BIO-L274

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to the development of cancer. Factors contributing to tumorgenesis, angiogenesis, and metastasis will be discussed; these factors, oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and signal transduction networks. In addition, an investigation of current strategies for cancer prevention and treatment will be considered.

Prerequisites:

BIO-274

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The concept of immunity, response to infection, structure of the immune system, biochemistry of immunoglobins, antigen-antibody interactions, allergy, immunological injury, lymphocyte subpopulations and cellular immunity, tolerance suppression and enhancement. Taught alternate/even years.

Prerequisites:

BIO-274 and BIO-L274 or BIO-285 and BIO-L285;

Credits:

4

Description:

The molecular mechanisms of host-microbe interactions and the epidemiology and public health aspects of microorganisms are stressed. Also covered are current topics in microbiology including antimicrobial therapy and resistance, emerging pathogens and novel applications of microbiology. Experimental design and troubleshooting skills are developed, using contemporary microbiology and molecular biology laboratory techniques. Taught alternate/odd years.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111, BIO-L111, CHEM-211, CHEM-L211 and BIO-L403 (concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The study of cells, approached through examinations of biochemical mechanisms, the relation between the structure and function of biological molecules and organelles, and the regulation of normal and diseased cells.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L11 and CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211. Must take BIO-403 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Examination of biological molecules and their role in cell function. Techniques used in these examinations will include enzymatic analyses, gel electrophoresis, immunologic identification, chromatography, and spectroscopy. Students are expected to develop their proficiency in the laboratory techniques used, to analyze their results in a quantitative manner, and to present their findings.

Prerequisites:

Senior standing

Credits:

1.00

Description:

The purpose of this class is to provide senior biology majors with the skills to land a job in the biological sciences, including locating open positions, preparing an application, and performing well in an interview. Students will be guided through the preparation of application materials, participate in mock interviews, and develop skills to navigate a professional workplace environment. Students will also participate in a mandatory senior assessment exam to assist departmental curricular development.

Prerequisites:

Senior standing. CAS Honors students only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

The purpose of this class is to provide senior biology majors with the skills to land a job in the biological sciences, including locating open positions, preparing an application, and performing well in an interview. Students will be guided through the preparation of application materials, participate in mock interviews, and develop skills to navigate a professional workplace environment. Students will also participate in a mandatory senior assessment exam to assist departmental curricular development.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-311 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274 and BIO-L474 (concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An examination of concepts and techniques of modern molecular biology. Topics include the structure and function of DNA, RNA, and proteins, the regulation of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, genetic modification of organisms, and genome analysis. This course will incorporate readings and discussions of primary scientific literature. Spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Take CHEM-331 or BIO-274 and BIO-L274. BIO-474 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This upper level laboratory course will consist of a semester-long project in the form of a series of consecutive experiments involving the generation of a genetically modified organism and its subsequent molecular analysis. Techniques employed will include genetic screens, DNA isolation, restriction endonuclease analysis, transformation of bacteria,gel electrophoresis, gene reported assays, RNA isolation, reverse transcription, and quantitative PCR.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on embryonic development in vertebrates. The conceptual focus on evolutionary developmental biology includes comparative developmental mechanisms and Epigenetic processes.

Credits:

0.00

Description:

This course requires students to complete a minimum of 15 engagement hours per semester. Students gain exposure to a variety of activities related to biology course preparation and/or research in a laboratory or field setting with faculty oversight. Permission of instructor required. May be taken more than once.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111 and BIO-114 BIO-L114. Instructor consent required.

Credits:

0.00

Description:

This course requires that students complete at least 40 engagement hours a semester at an off campus internship. The internship must involve participation in research and/or patient care. Students will receive a Pass/Fail grade for the course. Permission of instructor required. May be taken more than once.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111, BIO-114 and BIO-L114, and BIO-274 and BIO-L274 (may be taken conccurently)

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Biology Internship: This course provides students with credit for an unpaid internship completed during the semester when credit is earned. Students must secure an approved internship and provide documentation from the internship's overseer to a full time faculty member sponsor in order to register for the course. The internship must involve participation in research and / or patient care. Students or their overseers will be required to submit monthly records of internship hours and provide the faculty sponsor with a written summary of internship experiences and accomplishments by the last week of classes. Only one internship may be used as a biology elective. This course is available for variable credit. Prerequisites: An Internship for Credit form must be submitted to the department chair Credits: 1-4

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111, and BIO-114 and BIO-L114, and BIO-274 and BIO-L274 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Biology Internship: This course provides students with credit for an unpaid internship completed during the semester when credit is earned. Students must secure an approved internship and provide documentation from the internship's overseer to a full time faculty member sponsor in order to register for the course. The internship must involve participation in research and / or patient care. Students or their overseers will be required to submit monthly records of internship hours and provide the faculty sponsor with a written summary of internship experiences and accomplishments by the last week of classes. Only one internship may be used as a biology elective. This course is available for variable credit. Prerequisites: An Internship for Credit form must be submitted to the department chair Credits: 1-4

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00- 5.00

Description:

Student projects may be initiated by a student or faculty member with the approval of the Chairperson. A paper and oral report are required. Only ONE independent study may be used toward biology electives.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Student projects may be initiated by a student or faculty member with the approval of the Chairperson. A paper and oral report are required. Thesis work is required to involve original research or an in-depth analysis.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Student projects may be initiated by a student or faculty member with the approval of the Chairperson. A paper and oral report are required. Thesis work is required to involve original research or an in-depth analysis.

Prerequisites:

Biology Majors Only; GPA 3.5 or Higher; Instructor Permission Required

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Students will write an honors thesis based on their own discovery research or experience at an internship. Students will learn to write the sections of a scientific paper and review the writing of others. A public presentation is required.

Prerequisites:

Biology Majors Only; GPA 3.5 or Higher; Instructor Permission Required

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Students will complete a senior capstone project. This project may include an honors thesis based on their own discovery research or experience at an internship or a poster based upon a previously completed literature review. A public presentation is required.

Credits:

0.00

Description:

Suffolk University is introducing the Academic Improvement Program (AIM) a new initiative to assist students who have experienced academic difficulty. Because your cumulative grade point average has fallen below the University's standard of 2.0 and as a condition of your probation status at the University you will be required to participate in AIM. AIM provides support strategies and resources to help students take control of their academic life and succeed. AIM participants meet individually and in a small group format with trained instructors to target common areas in which students have difficulty. In addition the instructors work with students to identify what areas they need to improve and to develop an individualized plan for success.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces students to the basic concepts, literature and interdisciplinary nature of Black Studies. Provides a conceptual framework for the investigation and analysis of black history and culture as well.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces students to basic research techniques and methods in Black Studies including library use, identifying resources, project development, documenting sources, and writing research papers.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the history and culture of West Africa through its portrayal in literature and film. The specific countries that will be focused on are Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana and Nigeria. This class will also recognize the fact that borders are a modern, man-made element of the West African landscape serving to both separate people who have historically and traditionally seen themselves as connected, and to bring together people into a nation who have historically and traditionally seen themselves as distinct from one another.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Using literature and film to present aspects of the African American experience in the United States. By using film and literature it is possible to present the broad range of cultural styles, regional variations, class differences, gender issues, family structures and multiple viewpoints that make up the African American experience. Through lectures and in-class presentations a historical context will be provided for each of the films or texts that are used during the semester.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course explores the rich intellectual tradition of Haiti, Guadeloupe, and Martinique by considering historical moments linked to colonialism, the abolition of slavery, the representation of gender, departmentalization, and decolonization through essays, films, poems, novels, and short stories by critics and writers from the 19th-21st centuries.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces students to the Reconstruction era in American history, and uses Reconstruction as a bridge to look at enslavement, which preceded the era, and the issue of freedom during, and after the era. In the first half of the class students read from texts that will provide them with an understanding of slavery, emancipation and reconstruction. The second half of the class will utilize on-line collections of the Freedman's Bureau Papers to allow students to use documents to deepen their understanding of the Reconstruction era. The class will also provide a comparative approach by considering questions of citizenship in the 19th century for people of African descent in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean. This course is identical to HST 469.

Credits:

3.00- 4.00

Description:

Used to Fulfill Ethics

Credits:

3.00- 4.00

Description:

Credits:

3.00- 4.00

Description:

Credits:

3.00- 4.00

Description:

Credits:

3.00- 4.00

Description:

Prerequisites:

CAS students only. SBS students by special permission.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

CAS 101 is a one-credit course that meets once a week and is designed to help you have a successful transition to Suffolk University and our unique urban community. It is also designed to introduce you to the principles and concepts of Oral Communication and Presentation Skills. Through interactive exercises and engaging assignments, you will explore the campus environment and learn about strategies for success as a student. You will present speeches about your research and activities to improve your abilities as a speaker.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only. SBS students by special permission.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

CAS H101 is a one-credit course with no prerequisites that meets once a week and is designed to help you have a successful transition to Suffolk University and our unique urban community. This course will also give you opportunities to connect with the honors community, both on and off-campus. CAS H101 is also designed to introduce you to the principles and concepts of Oral Communication and Presentation Skills. Through interactive exercises and engaging assignments, you will explore the campus environment and learn about strategies for success as an honors student. You will improve your self-presentation and oral communications skills by presenting speeches and experiencing poster presentations.

Prerequisites:

CAS-101 and Instructor consent

Credits:

1

Description:

Students will continue to learn about career options and interests through additional research and exploration. They will learn about the different types of interviews (screening/telephone, informational, personal, panel, etc.). They will learn how to prepare for and participate in a one-on-one interview. They will continue to refine and develop their oral and written communication through class presentations and research projects. They will prepare a resume and cover letter.

Prerequisites:

CAS-101. CAS students only. SBS students by special permission. Restricted to the following majors: Art History, Asian Studies, Biology, Criminal Justice, Economics, English, French, Global Cultural Studies, History, Humanities, International Economics, Music History, Philosophy, Physics, Radiation Science, Sociology, Spanish, and Undeclared. Instructor consent required for all other majors.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course engages students in the early stages of career planning. Students will explore their interests, skills, values, and strengths, which will allow them to begin setting appropriate goals for professional development. Once students understand themselves in relation to the world of work, they will learn how to research careers and employment paths that fit with their goals.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Students will learn how to use social media for career networking and job search. In this hands-on course, students will develop personal content for professional platforms and network through job search engines.

Prerequisites:

CAS honors students only

Credits:

0

Description:

To engage with the world beyond the Suffolk campus, students take on service or experiential roles in a local, regional, or global setting. Students archive and reflect upon their experience. Completion of this course is equivalent to one Honors Option Point.

Prerequisites:

CAS honors students only

Credits:

0

Description:

To engage with the world beyond the Suffolk campus, students take on service or experiential roles in a local, regional, or global setting. Students archive and reflect upon their experience. Completion of this course is equivalent to two Honors Option Point.

Prerequisites:

CAS honors students only

Credits:

0

Description:

Students complete or contribute to a research or creative project. Projects may involve independent work or collaboration with peers or faculty advisors. Students archive and reflect upon their experience and share results with the Suffolk community. Completion of this course is equivalent to one Honors Option Point.

Prerequisites:

CAS honors students only

Credits:

0

Description:

Students complete or contribute to a research or creative project. Projects may involve independent work or collaboration with peers or faculty advisors. Students archive and reflect upon their experience and share results with the Suffolk community. Completion of this course is equivalent to two Honors Option Point.

Prerequisites:

CAS honors students only

Credits:

0

Description:

Students contribute to the university by mentoring, leading, or serving the Suffolk community. Contributions may include teaching or tutoring, administering student organizations, or promoting arts and culture. Students will archive and reflect on their experience. Completion of this course is equivalent to one Honors Option Point.

Prerequisites:

CAS honors students only

Credits:

0

Description:

Students contribute to the university by mentoring, leading, or serving the Suffolk community. Contributions may include teaching or tutoring, administering student organizations, or promoting arts and culture. Students will archive and reflect on their experience. Completion of this course is equivalent to two Honors Option Point.

Credits:

1

Description:

"Where does ""human nature"" come from? We will talk about our nature by comparing ourselves with our living and extinct ancestors to understand how our bodies are built and why we behave the way we do. We'll talk about skin\"

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This is a class designed for students who want to learn the art of Watercolor Painting. Basic artistic concepts pertaining to the medium will be covered. A fundamental, hands-on working knowledge of the medium and equipment will be addressed. Emphasis will be on-hands on problem-solving, skill building, and helping students develop a personal style. Specific techniques will be addressed to help students make decisions and work through and complete paintings. Projects will include painting from the still life, the environment and images. Paint, watercolor paper, water and a brush - that's all you need to start painting with watercolor. The materials list will be supplied by the instructor and materials may be purchased at a discount price from a preferred art store.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Acclimates students to the Art & Design Woodshop to provide knowledge of the safe and confident operation of the tools and equipment within similar makers' spaces. Through planning, designing and executing projects, this class will build student's understanding of tools, materials, and three-dimensional thinking.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Cell phone cameras have developed to the point where we have the opportunity to capture candid or unexpected moments with great definition in still or motion form. While having fun experimenting with hand held devises students will use their cell phones as just one tool in a box of many. The projects in this course will use photo captured images as a kick off point to understand characteristics of strong design. Students will learn to develop dynamic approaches to effective visual communication, and to organize and activate the two-dimensional surface with emphasis on essential visual elements such as line, shape, value, texture and word to image relationship. The goal of this course is to be creative, develop proficiency in the logic and structure of two-dimensional organization and visual communication by combining divergent elements into a unified whole. There are supplies/costs connected to this course. The instructor will email you a list before the class begins.

Prerequisites:

Students must be at least 21 years old by the start of the course

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This is a survey course of wines globally, designed to introduce the student to multiple aspects of wine. The student will be able to learn about the safe consumption and responsible service of wine, the history of wine making and commerce, its cultural and social importance, processes of grape cultivation (viticulture) and wine making (vinification or enology), the international wine economy, the variety of wine styles, and, wine degustation (tasting) and pairing with food.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This class is your passport to political participation. In this hands-on class you will get the tools you need to navigate and get information from and about local, state, and national governments. You will learn how to engage elected officials and government agencies, join groups doing work on issues you care about, and learn how to effectively consume news coverage. Designed to be fun, interactive, and useful, this class will teach the skills of effective democratic participation and citizenship.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Group theory provides a powerful way to understand symmetry in the world around us. This course presents methods of group theory which can be used to devise an algorithm for solving Rubik's cube. After successfully completing this course, students will understand symmetry in new ways and will be able to solve Rubik's cube using the Human Thistlethwaite Algorithm.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Craft Beer Concepts will examine topics involved with the growing industry of Craft Beer. Topics will include the history of beer, the 4 main ingredients of beer (water, hops, yeast and grains), the science of brewing (fermentation, temperature, flocculation, etc.), all the various styles of beer around the world, how to brew in small, medium and large scales, and the business of craft beer production. This course will be taught in an online and hybrid format. Lectures will be asynchronous. Depending on the format and time taught, the course will include tours of medium and large scale breweries in the Boston area. Focus will be on the art and science of brewing and the commercial aspects of beer production. No alcohol will be consumed as part of this course.

Prerequisites:

CAS honors students only.

Credits:

0

Description:

Students partner with a faculty mentor to make any course into an honors-level course. Education is enriched by enhanced or additional projects, activities, or assignments agreed upon by professor and student. Students will present their contracted honors work to the Suffolk community.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Mentoring adds value to our lives. In this class, you get an opportunity to learn more about what it means to be a mentor. The purpose of the class is to help you identify the roles and responsibilities connected with peer mentoring, establish effective ways to communicate with mentees, and develop an understanding of expectations in the mentoring relationship. In this hands-on class, you will continue to build connections with the students you've met in your role as a TA, OL or RA. You will also be expected to participate in outside classroom activities with your mentees. Experience as a TA, OL, or RA preferred for enrollment.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

The purpose of this socially responsible leadership course is to provide the theory, method and tools you will need to serve as a Service-Learning Assistant Mentor (SLAM). You will learn about best practices for leadership, team-building and service-learning. Your service will include working with a faculty member to support undergraduate students who are taking a service-learning focused course. This course will provide focused leadership, teambuilding and service-learning mentoring training for students serving as SLAMs. Your leadership and SLAM responsibilities will be three-fold: 1) mentor undergraduate in their service-learning experience; 2) serve as a liaison between the faculty member and the undergraduate students; and 3) serve as a coordinator and liaison between the community partner and the service-learning course.

Prerequisites:

Junior standing or higher

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A hands-on experience for seniors (and particularly keen juniors) to learn how to write a resume and cover letter for the job market. Students will begin by summarizing their college experiences; writing five-year career goals; fine-tuning resumes for different kinds of jobs; researching three types of organization (structure, work culture) and career paths; understanding job advertisements; and writing three sample cover letters.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with at least 54 credits

Credits:

1.00

Description:

In this course, students will develop skills and strategies to design and produce an online portfolio for their work. These will be useful tools for students to brand themselves and showcase their abilities to potential graduate schools and employers, and otherwise provide an initial platform from which to begin building a career and a professional identity. We will design live websites to present each type of work and develop a professional persona to represent this early stage of each student's career. We will consider the individual student, their particular projects and the conventions associated with them, their multiple potential audiences, and the goals they could set for their professional online presence. Then students will use web software in creative ways to present themselves and their work to those audiences. This class will mostly be conducted online, with two Saturday workshops in person on Suffolk's campus in downtown Boston, MA.

Prerequisites:

Instructor consent required.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

By special arrangement, a student who has declared the CAS Self-Designed Major may pursue an independent course of study and/or a research or creative project under the supervision of a faculty member. Credits completed in CAS 510 count toward the total of 8 independent study credits permitted for the CAS Self-Designed Major. Consent of major advisor and instructor required. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only; instructor approval required.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

By special arrangement, a student who has declared the CAS Self-Designed Major may pursue an independent course of study and/or research or creative project under the supervision of a faculty member. The course should adhere to the guidelines for honors courses established by the honors program. Credits completed in CAS 510 count toward the total of 8 independent study credits permitted for the CAS Self-Designed Major. Consent of major advisor and instructor required. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

Instructor approval required.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Individualized guidance in a professional development experience that relates to the student's self-designed major. Applications to participate must be approved by the instructor and major advisor. It is the responsibility of students to arrange internship placements in advance of the start of the course. Consent of major advisor and instructor required. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

CAS honors students only

Credits:

0

Description:

In this option for an honors senior capstone experience, the student creates and publishes a portfolio of academic and co-curricular development and achievements. Students will draw upon past archives and reflections to explore how their experiences have helped them to meet honors learning goals.

Prerequisites:

Application must be made to the CAS Honors Program.

Credits:

12.00

Description:

Immerse yourself in an intensive educational experience at the Start Up Institute, a Suffolk University educational partner in downtown Boston. Students in their final year of undergraduate study enhance their professional development and networking strategies as well as acquire skills and knowledge in one of four programs: coding, web design, digital marketing, or sales. Application must be made to the CAS Honors Program.

Prerequisites:

Department approval required.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

This course explores topics that require students to synthesize and analyze their accumulated interdisciplinary learning in the CAS Self-Designed Major. The course is designed as an individualized program of study under the supervision of a faculty member and culminates in a capstone interdisciplinary project. May be taken in the fall and/or spring of the senior year for a total of no more than 8 credits. Credits completed in CAS 555 count toward the total of 8 independent study credits permitted for the CAS Self-Designed Major.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only; department approval required.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

The senior honors experience in the CAS Self-Designed Major is an individual program of interdisciplinary research and/or creative work on an approved topic, under the supervision of a faculty member. Required elements of the capstone include development of a final project, report, or thesis, as well as public presentation to the Suffolk community at an honors event. The plan for the honors capstone must be approved by the honors program in advance of the semester in which the work will be completed. Must be taken for at least 3 credits and may be taken in the fall and/or spring of the senior year for a total of no more than 8 credits. Credits completed in CAS H555 count toward the total of 8 independent study credits permitted for the CAS Self-Designed Major.

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH-104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH-104 must take MATH-104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-L111.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces atomic structure, the periodic table, the nature of chemical bonds, chemical reactions, and stoichiometry. This course is recommended for science majors or those considering careers in the health sciences.

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH-104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH-104 must take MATH-104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-111.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course introduces the basic principles of chemistry through hands-on laboratory experiments. Students learn safe laboratory practices and fundamental technical skills. These include the determination of mass and volume, making solutions, and synthesizing a product. Emphasis is also placed on understanding and writing scientific literature.

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH-104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH-104 must take MATH-104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-111.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This online laboratory course introduces the basic principles of chemistry through the use of a variety of virtual tools such as simulations and videos. Students learn about safe laboratory practices and fundamental technical skills. These include the determination of mass and volume, making solutions, and conducting a chemical reaction. Emphasis is also placed on understanding and writing scientific literature.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-L112 (concurrently), CHEM-111, CHEM-L111 and MATH-104 or higher

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I. Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces thermochemistry, gases, solution chemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base systems, and thermodynamics.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-L112 (concurrently), CHEM-111, CHEM-L111 and MATH-104 or higher. CAS Honors students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I. Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces thermochemistry, gases, solution chemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base systems, and thermodynamics.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-112 (concurrently) and CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111 and MATH-104 placement or higher.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I Laboratory. Apply the basic principles of chemistry through discovery laboratory experiments with an emphasis on quantitative analysis. Apply Beer's Law and acid-base titrations. This laboratory is designed around the foundational laboratory skills practiced by science students in a wide variety of majors.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-111/L111; CHEM-112 must be take concurrently. MATH-104 placement or higher.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of the General Chemistry I Laboratory. Students apply the principles of chemistry through virtual experiments with an emphasis on quantitative analysis. Analytical techniques such as calorimetry and acid-base titrations are introduced. This laboratory is designed around the foundational laboratory skills practiced by science students in a wide variety of majors.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112. CHEM-L211 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces basic theories of structure, bonding, and chemical reactivity as specifically applied to modern organic chemistry. Includes functional groups, acid/base chemistry, nomenclature, resonance, spectroscopy, and stereochemistry.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-211.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Introduces synthetic organic chemistry techniques. Includes melting point determination, distillation, crystallization, extraction, chromatographic separations, and infrared spectroscopy. Discusses experimental design within the context of green organic chemistry.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-211.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Online laboratory course that introduces organic chemistry concepts and techniques through the use of a variety of virtual tools including simulations, videos, class discussion and data analysis. Students will become familiar with a variety of techniques such as melting point determination, distillation, crystallization, extraction, chromatographic separations, and characterization using infrared spectroscopy. Discusses experimental design within the context of green organic chemistry principles.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211. Must take CHEM-L212 concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Builds on the core competencies acquired in Organic Chemistry I. Includes detailed mechanistic discussions of substitution elimination and addition reactions. Emphasizes organic synthesis structure determination and spectroscopy.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211. Must be take CHEM-212 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This hybrid laboratory course builds on the core competencies acquired in Organic Chemistry Laboratory I and has two mandatory face to face laboratory sessions to develop essential laboratory skill. The remaining lab sessions use a variety of virtual tools including simulations, videos, class discussions and data analysis. Emphasizes the characterization of organic molecules via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Discusses experimental design within the context of green organic chemistry.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-212 (concurrently) and CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Online laboratory course that builds on the core competencies acquired in Organic Chemistry Laboratory I, using a variety of virtual tools including simulations, videos, class discussions and data analysis. Emphasizes the characterization of organic molecules via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Discusses experimental design within the context of green organic chemistry principles.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-211 and CHEM-L314 (concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the basic techniques of collecting and analyzing data from different types of instrumentation, including: ultraviolet, visible, fluorescence, atomic and emission spectroscopy; chromatographic methods; electrochemical measurements. Students will apply these techniques to problems in chemistry, forensics, and environmental science.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-314 (concurrently) and CHEM-L211

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This hybrid laboratory will be offered with three mandatory face to face sessions to develop essential skills. The rest of the curriculum will be offered in an online format. Explores the basic techniques of collecting and analyzing data from different types of instrumentation, including: ultraviolet, visible, fluorescence, atomic and emission spectroscopy; chromatographic methods; electrochemical measurements. Students will apply these techniques to problems in chemistry, forensics, and environmental science.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-L331 (concurrently) CHEM-212 and CHEM-L212 or permission of instructor

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the foundations of biochemistry, including the structure, organization and behavior of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Topics include enzyme catalysis, kinetics, and inhibition as well as protein regulation and membrane structure. Introduces the use of biochemical literature and bioinformatics techniques.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-331 (concurrently) and CHEM-212 and CHEM-L212 or permission of instructor

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory course introducing biochemical techniques. Includes buffer preparation, PCR, purification of DNA and proteins, agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, protein quantitation and detection, and enzyme kinetic assays.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-L332 (concurrently) and CHEM-331

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the principles of bioenergetics and metabolism of biomolecules. Includes intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and oxidative phosphorylation. Additional topics include signal transduction and the regulation and integration of metabolism.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-332 (concurrently) and CHEM-331 and CHEM-L331

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Hybrid biochemistry laboratory course where students learn experimental design and critical analysis of the scientific literature while conducting novel research. Projects vary from year to year but may include recombinant DNA techniques, purification and quantitation of DNA and proteins, enzyme kinetics, and bioinformatics. Includes at least three mandatory face-to-face laboratory sessions to develop essential biochemistry lab skills.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-211 or permission of instructor

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A study of the chemical processes (including biologically mediated ones) that affect the cycling and ultimate fate of chemicals in the environment. Topics include air, water, and soil chemistry as well as energy and climate change. The effects of pollutant loads on natural systems and the remediation and treatment methods used to minimize pollutant loads are investigated. 3 hour lecture. Normally offered spring, odd numbered years.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 355 must be taken concurrently. Take CHEM-L211;

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate principles covered by topics in CHEM 355. Prerequisites: CHEM L211, concurrent enrollment in CHEM 355 required. 4-hour laboratory. Normally offered spring, odd numbered years.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-314 and CHEM-L314

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Topics in inorganic chemistry including bonding theories, chemical structures, symmetry and group theory, kinetics and mechanisms of reactions, and spectroscopy. Advanced topics may include bioinorganic chemistry, or organometallics.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-375 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate principles covered by topics in CHEM 375. Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 375 required.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-112 and MATH-166

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores quantum chemistry through simple model systems such as particle in a box, harmonic oscillator, rigid rotor, and hydrogen atom. Applications to electronic, vibrational, and rotational spectroscopy and elements of atomic and molecular structure.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-411 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Experiments in molecular spectroscopy, quantum chemistry, nanomaterials, and introduction to computational chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on experimental design and data analysis skills in addition to technical writing skills as demonstrated through reports prepared in the professional style.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-411

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the laws of thermodynamics and their molecular basis through the kinetic theory of gases and statistical mechanics. Includes chemical kinetics and theories of reaction rates.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-412 (concurrently) and CHEM-L411

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Experiments in thermodynamics, materials, chemical kinetics, and computational chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on experimental design and data analysis skills in addition to technical writing skills as demonstrated by laboratory reports prepared in the professional style.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 212; CHEM L212; Instructor's Consent required

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

First of a senior level, two-semester sequence of independent study under the supervision of faculty. Students may opt to conduct experimental research or grant proposal development. Students desiring departmental honors and/or an ACS-accredited degree must conduct authentic research; consult with the course instructor. Development of a research report and poster presentation to the department are required elements.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-212 and CHEM-L212 and instructor's consent. CAS Honors Students only.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

First of a senior level, two-semester sequence of independent study under the supervision of faculty. Students desiring departmental honors must conduct authentic research; consult with the course instructor. Development of a research report and poster presentation to the department are required elements.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-212 and CHEM-L212 and instructor's consent required

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Second of a senior level, two-semester sequence of independent study under the supervision of faculty. Students may opt to conduct experimental research or grant proposal development. Students desiring departmental honors and/or an ACS-accredited degree must conduct authentic research; consult with the course instructor. Development of a final research report and oral presentation to the department and the SU community are required elements.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-212 and CHEM-L212 and instructor's consent required. CAS Honors students only.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Second of a senior level, two-semester sequence of independent study under the supervision of faculty. Students desiring departmental honors must conduct authentic research; consult with the course instructor. Development of a final research report and oral presentation to the department and the SU community are required elements.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-331 or instructor's consent

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces basic principles of pharmacology (dose-response curves, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) and toxicology. The biochemical mechanisms of several toxicants (pain-killers, ethanol, pesticides, etc.) will be discussed.

Prerequisites:

Take CHEM-212 previously, CHEM-453 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory course where students learn to use biochemistry, cheminformatics and bioinformatics tools to predict the effect that various xenobiotics will have on various receptors, transporters and enzymes in the human body. Lab techniques may include: enzyme kinetics, binding affinity, and ELISA.

Credits:

0.00

Description:

This course requires students to complete a minimum of 15 engagement hours per semester. Students gain exposure to a variety of activities related to research in a laboratory or field setting with faculty oversight. Permission of instructor required. May be taken more than once.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111 and CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112. CAS students only. Instructor consent required.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

This course provides students with credit for an unpaid off-campus chemistry or biochemistry internship completed during the semester when credit is earned. Students must secure an approved internship and provide documentation from the internship's overseer to a full time faculty member sponsor in the department in order to register for the course. The internship must involve participation in research and/or relevant professional training. Students or their overseers will be required to submit records of internship hours and provide the faculty sponsor with a written summary of internship experiences and accomplishments. Does not satisfy any requirements or electives of either the chemistry or biochemistry major or of the chemistry minor. This course is available for variable credit. A CHEM 503 Internship for Credit form must be submitted to the department chair.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111 and CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112. Honors CAS students only. Instructor consent required.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

This course provides honors students with credit for an unpaid off-campus chemistry or biochemistry internship completed during the semester when credit is earned. Students must secure an approved internship and provide documentation from the internship's overseer to a full time faculty member sponsor in the department in order to register for the course. The internship must involve participation in research and/or relevant professional training. Students or their overseers will be required to submit records of internship hours and provide the faculty sponsor with a written summary of internship experiences and accomplishments. Does not satisfy any requirements or electives of either the chemistry or biochemistry major, or of the chemistry minor. This course is available for variable credit to honors students only. A CHEM H503 Internship for Credit form must be submitted to the department chair.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Advanced study of a special topic in chemistry, by arrangement with the chemistry faculty.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office. CAS Honors students only.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Advanced study of a special topic in chemistry or biochemistry, by arrangement with the faculty.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin) with an emphasis on developing conversational skills by using authentic materials such as video, audio, and various print media that teach fundamental grammatical patterns and vocabulary in functional contexts. Basic reading and writing (in Simplified Characters) are also taught.

Prerequisites:

CHIN-101 or Instructor's consent.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Continues to develop proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin). Helps to develop listening comprehension skills with the use of authentic materials, such as print media, audio, and video materials. Advanced beginning level of reading and writing of Simplified Chinese characters is taught.

Choose one Creativity & Innovation course from those listed below:

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to demystify the creative process by introducing students to creative practice as a disciplined approach to problem-solving and innovation. Students will be encouraged to synthesize existing ideas, images, concepts, and skill sets in original way, embrace ambiguity and support divergent thinking and risk taking. More than one-third of our global population lives in poverty, earning less than two dollars a day. Governments, businesses, social enterprises, and charitable organizations have tried to solve the global poverty issue with mixed results. What is the solution? Is entrepreneurship the solution, part of the solution, or has no impact whatsoever? In this course, you will gain an understanding of the power of entrepreneurship (in the context of creativity and innovation), the definition and depth of global poverty (in the context of constraints, such as human, financial and physical resources embedded in local, regional, national and global cultures), and successes and failures of past initiatives to reduce poverty. This is not a course about politics or business, but rather finding a solution to a problem that has eluded mankind since the beginning of time.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office. Honors students only

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to demystify the creative process by introducing students to creative practice as a disciplined approach to problem-solving and innovation. Students will be encouraged to synthesize existing ideas, images, concepts, and skill sets in original way, embrace ambiguity and support divergent thinking and risk taking. More than one-third of our global population lives in poverty, earning less than two dollars a day. Governments, businesses, social enterprises, and charitable organizations have tried to solve the global poverty issue with mixed results. What is the solution? Is entrepreneurship the solution, part of the solution, or has no impact whatsoever? In this course, you will gain an understanding of the power of entrepreneurship (in the context of creativity and innovation), the definition and depth of global poverty (in the context of constraints, such as human, financial and physical resources embedded in local, regional, national and global cultures), and successes and failures of past initiatives to reduce poverty. This is not a course about politics or business, but rather finding a solution to a problem that has eluded mankind since the beginning of time.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines cutting edge technologies, the science behind them, and their practical application and follow-up success or failure. It also provides the students a chance to consider the relevance of identified "needed" inventions from the 1950s, and whether those projections were correct. The history behind some remarkable inventions will be presented. Finally, working in small teams, students will brainstorm to identify something useful to invent and determine several approaches to implementing it.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to demystify the creative process by introducing students to creative practice as a disciplined approach to problem-solving and innovation. Students will be encouraged to synthesize existing ideas, images, concepts, and skill sets in original way, embrace ambiguity and support divergent thinking and risk taking. Did you know Netscape was the internet browser? What about MySpace, arguably the Facebook of the last decade? What led Apple from being innovative pioneers of the 70's to the verge of extinction in the 80's to the technological giant they are today? Technologies come and go, but what leads to organizations lasting more than 100 years such as IBM, General Electric, etc.? What role does failure play in successful innovation, decision-making, and business viability? In this course, you will learn about innovation that may have been successful and well-executed. You will also learn about innovation that was a viable business opportunity, but poorly executed: one phase of failure. In addition, you will learn about innovation that had no real market viability, but was launched anyway: another phase of failure. Can failure lead to success? If so, how?

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3

Description:

This course is designed to demystify the creative process by introducing students to creative practice as a disciplined approach to problem-solving and innovation. Students will be encouraged to synthesize existing ideas, images, concepts, and skill sets in original way, embrace ambiguity and support divergent thinking and risk taking. Did you know Netscape was the internet browser? What about MySpace, arguably the Facebook of the last decade? What led Apple from being innovative pioneers of the 70's to the verge of extinction in the 80's to the technological giant they are today? Technologies come and go, but what leads to organizations lasting more than 100 years such as IBM, General Electric, etc.? What role does failure play in successful innovation, decision-making, and business viability? In this course, you will learn about innovation that may have been successful and well-executed. You will also learn about innovation that was a viable business opportunity, but poorly executed: one phase of failure. In addition, you will learn about innovation that had no real market viability, but was launched anyway: another phase of failure. Can failure lead to success? If so, how?

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Demystifies the creative process by introducing students to creative practice as a disciplined approach to problem-solving and innovation. Students will be encouraged to synthesize existing ideas, images, concepts, and skill sets in original way, embrace ambiguity and support divergent thinking and risk taking.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

How do you and your story drive business? This course takes an innovative look at human creativity and entrepreneurship. As an entrepreneur needs perseverance and high motivation, we will explore the importance of values, risk taking, problem solving, and the discovery of the market opportunities. In order for you to be creative and essentially create successful ventures, you will discover the nuances between the three factors and explore them further through interactive discussion and debate as well as collaborative group work. You will be encouraged to think in non-conforming ways and apply new concepts and develop your own personal operating principles.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

As the majority of the world population now lives in cities, for the first time in human history, issues of urban sustainability have become more complex and more important than ever before. Presented with case studies of urban efforts to gain a sustainability foothold, students will utilize ideation, critical thinking, and strategic decision making to both identify root problems and to present solutions. This course will lean heavily on ideation processes, teamwork, and logical methods of analysis to pursue actionable solutions for significant problems. The methods of problem identification and solution analysis learned in this class will be readily adaptable to many complex problems, helping the students to make informed and decisive determinations in their careers.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office. Honors students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

As the majority of the world population now lives in cities, for the first time in human history, issues of urban sustainability have become more complex and more important than ever before. Presented with case studies of urban efforts to gain a sustainability foothold, students will utilize ideation, critical thinking, and strategic decision making to both identify root problems and to present solutions. This course will lean heavily on ideation processes, teamwork, and logical methods of analysis to pursue actionable solutions for significant problems. The methods of problem identification and solution analysis learned in this class will be readily adaptable to many complex problems, helping the students to make informed and decisive determinations in their careers.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Every successful venture today is based on effective teamwork. Unlike a typical lecture format, Creating the Dream Team is a course that utilizes experiential group learning to provide students with pivotal team-building skills. These essential skills are vital for everyone's future success in the business world. As team players, students are challenged to think creatively. A collaborative problem-solving process is used to analyze "real life" business situations. Teamwork involves research, data collection and information analysis to develop creative solutions to typical business problems. Teams will utilize multi-media tools to present their innovative ideas. Classmates will provide peer feedback and review. Through iterations, all students will assume roles as project leaders, keynote speakers and collaborators on a series of Team Challenges. Upon successful completion of this course, all students will have formed working "dream teams". As reinforcement and final evaluation, Dream Teams are required to create a multi-media Capstone Event as a course performance measure. This capstone presentation will "showcase" all of their newly acquired "dream" team-player skills.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students will develop a deep understanding of two seminal books of 20th century poetry and other key 20th century poems as they plan and execute small-group, end of semester reading performances. Students will write creative response poems to increase their understanding of the texts, and through cooperative decision making strategize effective ways to present their own poems and poems by Bishop or Frost. The class format will foster direct spoken engagement with matters of sound, rhythm, tone, and meaning. Final reading aloud performances will be recorded and added to the Suffolk University Poetry Center Archive.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course students will be introduced to the practice of creativity as a rigorous approach to problem solving requiring research, persistence and grit. Students will work collaboratively to effectively synthesize existing ideas, images, and skill sets in original ways. They will embrace risk, and support divergent thinking. In the process, they will become more confident life-long learners.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office. Honors students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course, students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. Theatre at Work is an introduction to creative practice using live performance as a problem solving tool in an educational environment. Specifically, students will create a performance piece in response to an issue they have uncovered in collaboration with select groups of students in a host Boston Public School. There will be a special focus on normalizing risk-taking and the learning that comes from false starts and failed ideas. Students will be responsible for creating every aspect of their performance testing its feasibility on a limited budget, ensuring that the content meets established criteria, and successfully implementing and evaluating their success both with their peers and their audience.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course students will be introduced to the practice of creativity as a rigorous approach to problem solving requiring research, persistence and grit. Students will work collaboratively to effectively synthesize existing ideas, images, and skill sets in original ways. They will embrace risk and support divergent thinking. In the process, they will become more confident life-long learners.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will introduce students to the exciting world of emergency management from the perspective of scientists who are often utilized as experts during both small scale adverse events and large scale catastrophes. Students will actively and creatively explore the psychological, economic, and medical dimensions of these events and participate in role play in the classroom and site visits. By the end of the course, students will have a keen appreciation of emergency planning and management on the local and national levels.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course uses project-based learning and an iterative process helping you build a solid knowledge bank and financial foundation to teach you: How to first navigate through all of the following financial pitfalls and risks; economic cycle, liquidity, interest rate fluctuation, marketplace volatility, corporate continuity concerns, default and credit issues. Then allows you to partner with your classmates to detect, design and deploy a novel and useful financial asset risk/reward graph in your favor, thus taking traditional models to task.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The intent of this course is for students to examine and effectively express in writing their ideas on creativity and to inspire undergraduate students to exceed their current levels of learning. Students will learn to meaningfully integrate course content into long term-retained useful skills through applied creative collaborations. This course is based on the idea that exposure and insight development will enable students to better visualize themselves in their desired fields and make informed choices within the variety of options available to them. The focus of the course will help students to assess their personal interests and strengths as they plan for their own educational and professional futures.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3

Description:

Some past political issues were resolved with great success (the Compromise of 1820), and some resulted in great failures (the US Civil War). In this course, students will study noteworthy political dilemmas of the past, identify the major problem solvers and examine the art of compromise. These investigations will provide guidance and inspiration for students to develop innovative and creative solutions to present day political problems such as climate change, immigration, Social Security, income distribution, higher education affordability, and homelessness. Students will work in teams and propose creative and innovative solutions that will convince the affected interest groups favorably, represented by teams of other students in the class, and result in compromises solving tomorrow's problems today.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

What made Benjamin Franklin such a creative force in American history? We will explore the many facets of Franklin's life (printer, writer, scientist, statesman) and learn about Benjamin Franklin's political and diplomatic ventures, and will recreate some of his scientific experiments.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office. Honors students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

What made Benjamin Franklin such a creative force in American history? We will explore the many facets of Franklin's life (printer, writer, scientist, statesman) and learn about Benjamin Franklin's political and diplomatic ventures, and will recreate some of his scientific experiments.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will explore a selection of the genius personalities and their creative work in 5 distinct areas of human creative endeavor; art, science, nature, technology and the built environment. The course explores the underlying similarities in the process of their discovery, invention and creativity across the disciplines. Studying such names as Newton, Warhol, Hawking, Jobs, Gaudi and Banksy, students will uncover the process of design through research, analysis, synthesis, iteration and error. In class group projects will allow a hands-on opportunity to create.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office. CAS and SBS honors students or GPA of 3.5 or above only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Suffolk University sits within Boston's literary district, a hub of academic programs in creative writing, publishing houses, libraries, and independent bookstores. This course will immerse students in the world of literary culture and its many branches: writing, editing, reviewing, and publicity. Students will practice creative writing as a playful, yet rigorous discipline, and learn how writers find publishers for their work and reach audiences through readings, social media, book publicity, interviews, and reviews. Various industry professionals will speak to the class about trends in literary publishing and their own experiences bringing books and journals into the world. Students will apply their knowledge and interests to a variety of projects, including book reviews, literary events, and creative writing workshops. 06 Jan 2020 8:16 AM Amy Yeager, CAS DEAN's Office. Admin Services Cord. for CAT.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is focusing on the creative process by introducing students to creative practice as a disciplined approach to problem solving and innovation requiring research, persistence and grit. Students will be encouraged to synthesize existing ideas, images, concepts, and skill sets in original ways, embrace ambiguity and support divergent thinking and risk taking. The course will have an undertone based on science, but it is suitable for non-science majors too!

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

What motivates your creative nature? This course will explore converging themes in Art and Psychology in order to give students the tools they need to unblock their creative potential. Collaborative small team activities, assigned readings, large group discussions, and personal reflection exercises will provide an avenue for students to explore their own creative patterns and how they are influenced by, and perceived within, the world around them. Dreams, mental illness and psychosocial theories of self will also be widely discussed in order to give students context for this inter/intrapersonal exploration.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Always wanted to explore a creative side but never had the opportunity to take an art class? Here's your chance! Sync the power of icons/ images with ideas and making. We will use cellphone and printmaking technologies in a workshop style environment. Rather then a lecture based class, this class we will play, learn and build new Neurological pathways towards creative thinking. Come to every class excited to learn, make and discover. This course will give you the building blocks for innovative thinking beyond the classroom. Power is in the image. As in the way a dream can grip you, images carry incredible amount of influence and creative potential, when they are "seen." Glimpses of these images circulate in media, movies, cell phones, and so on. Learn to develop your own images and understand the broad world of images of human culture.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course, students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course will explore the value of creativity and play in developing reading and writing skills and the habits of lifelong learning, both in our own lives and in the lives of young people in Boston. In this course, we will work closely with the non-profit literacy organization 826 Boston, which works with students ages 6-18 on reading and writing skills through playful, creative workshops, as well as tutoring and other kinds of support. Students will learn about the work of 826 Boston by volunteering with the organization, and by the end of the semester you will conceive, plan, and run creative writing workshops of your own at 826 Boston.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office. Honors students only.

Credits:

3

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course will explore the value of creativity and play in developing reading and writing skills and the habits of lifelong learning, both in our own lives and in the lives of young people in Boston. In this course, we will work closely with the non-profit literacy organization 826 Boston, which works with students ages 6-18 on reading and writing skills through playful, creative workshops, as well as tutoring and other kinds of support. Students will learn about the work of 826 Boston by volunteering with the organization, and by the end of the semester you will conceive, plan, and run creative writing workshops of your own at 826 Boston.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A brand may be a product, service, an organization, or a person, and at the core of every brand is a visual identity. A brand's visual identity is its strategically planned and purposeful presentation of itself. It is manifest in the brand's name, logo, tagline (slogan), color palette and other sensory elements (visual, aural, olfactory and tactile) that identity that brand and make it unique. This course will focus on analyzing the success and failure of brand's visual identities as a way of teaching students how to brainstorm and develop a new visual identity from concept through execution. The focus in this course will be on applying creative thinking to create a cohesive and meaningful visual identity.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

To keep a journal is to make an investment, often long before we understand the value. A journal is a personal database of snapshots in time, good ideas and bad, observational doodles and unfiltered emotions. On any given page a journal may appear inconsequential but within the rigor of filling a whole notebook (and another, and another) an individual viewpoint emerges. This class will facilitate a student's ability to draw from his or her own lived experience and discover unique springboards into universal issues by making mindful connections. An entire lifetime of images, stories and details resides within each of our minds but the ability to explore that richness requires dedication to documentation. Mindful Journal is a process class fostering focus through mindfulness practices, content generation and meaning making.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

If any set of problems could use creative and innovative thinking, it's the myriad of problems facing the T. The Boston Globe is filled with stories about financial and organizational problems in the system, and you only have to spend a few minutes on the green line to feel the effects of those issues. Still, millions depend on it every day - it is the circulatory system of our city, and it is more than a way to get around: the T increases accessibility and functions as a democratizing force. That is, when it's running. In this class we will study the MBTA and other mass transit systems in order to propose creative solutions to the T's most pressing problems. We will read articles about the T and other transit systems, we will look at interactive maps that express different kinds of data, and we will visit local stations. In addition, we will study the process of creative thinking, in order to apply those skills to the issues at hand. You will be asked to create both stand-alone short writing assignments and visual representations of your ideas, accompanied by short, written explanations, both alone and in group projects.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

You live in Boston now. At least for a while. Perhaps you've noticed that it has its own ways of remembering things. Consider The Boston Literary District, The Freedom Trail, and all the many events and festivals devoted to history, culture, and identity. From guided tours and colonial cosplay to images and written texts to monuments, memorials, and museums, this city tells stories about itself today in the ways it tells stories about its past. In this class, you're going to tell more stories about Boston. You're going to help it find other things to remember, and other ways of remembering them. You'll likely need to focus on parts of the real events that Boston doesn't prefer to include in its stories, emphasizing issues of race, socioeconomic class, nationality, colonialism, gender, sexuality, and other stories of unequal power and how that manifests in real people's lives and in the culture of this city.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office. Honors students only.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

You live in Boston now. At least for a while. Perhaps you've noticed that it has its own ways of remembering things. Consider The Boston Literary District, The Freedom Trail, and all the many events and festivals devoted to history, culture, and identity. From guided tours and colonial cosplay to images and written texts to monuments, memorials, and museums, this city tells stories about itself today in the ways it tells stories about its past. In this class, you're going to tell more stories about Boston. You're going to help it find other things to remember, and other ways of remembering them. You'll likely need to focus on parts of the real events that Boston doesn't prefer to include in its stories, emphasizing issues of race, socioeconomic class, nationality, colonialism, gender, sexuality, and other stories of unequal power and how that manifests in real people's lives and in the culture of this city.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Magician James "The Amazing" Randi reminds us that "No matter how smart or how well educated you are, you can be deceived." In an age fraught with deception and misinformation, students need tactics and strategies in order to separate truth from falsity. This course encourages its participants to act as skeptics - not cynics, necessarily - by requiring evidence and proof before believing or accepting claims. Students are urged to identify the most-likely-to occur opportunities for deception in their major fields and draw from the tenets of classical rhetoric, logic, and the scientific method in order to develop safeguards. Frequent collaboration with classmates will allow for dynamic solutions to small and large-scale contemporary problems ranging from the personal (e.g. used car prices and avoiding fraud) to the universal(e.g. "fake news" and God).

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

We will be discovering the process of becoming more creative. The emphasis is on understanding the creative process and applying effective teamwork strategies towards a shared goal. Students will use scientific inquiry to explore topics in chemistry that they find interesting. Each team of 3-4 students will choose a project and develop it during the semester with the goal of raising awareness about chemistry or designing innovative and engaging ways of teaching chemistry.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office. Restrict to CAS and SBS honors.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

We will be discovering the process of becoming more creative. The emphasis is on understanding the creative process and applying effective teamwork strategies towards a shared goal. Students will use scientific inquiry to explore topics in chemistry that they find interesting. Each team of 3-4 students will choose a project and develop it during the semester with the goal of raising awareness about chemistry or designing innovative and engaging ways of teaching chemistry.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course seeks to make you an innovative public health thinker by examining past campaigns and making the necessary frameshifts to help promote, protect and preserve health of the Suffolk community through the innovative thinking process. Public health activists and designers can have a positive impact on the lives of citizens living in small communities. However, the agreed rules and regulations that make up this policy landscape are created by paradigms which can be constricting. The issues the course addresses will include Suffolk's current plans for reducing carbon emission, behavioral determinants such as alcohol consumption among college students, and improving eating habits on campus. The final project will be peer reviewed and presented to the class. Programs may then be forwarded to university departments for possible integration and implementation.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course, we will be exploring the often puzzling question of personal identity from a creative perspective, learning about creativity by exploring questions of personal identity. What exactly constitutes our identities? How much control - if any - do we have in determining what our identities are? By wrestling with these among other important questions from a wide-range of perspectives and with creative confidence - the firm belief that each of us can and must explore these questions creatively - we will arrive at a better understanding of ourselves, our personal identities, as well as acquire a greater appreciation of the identities of others. Our course is a genuinely collaborative one, given the significant role others can play in providing us with a perspective on our identities unavailable to us as individuals.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course, the idea of embodiment refers to the integration of the expressiveness of our bodies as a vehicle for the art of speaking and communicating. The meaning of embodiment employed here is both a style and philosophy of engagement and will be examined and practiced as an ongoing pedagogy for connecting with stories at various levels of discourse and apperception.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course we will explore how to enter into new ways of thinking and adopt new perspectives, by reading, discussing and imitating a range of texts (from poems, hybrid-genre pieces, and song lyrics, to photographs, dreams, and ethnographies). Trying to transcend ordinary modes of interpreting the world, trying to imagine what it is like to be someone or something else entirely, immersing ourselves and describing/translating the new experiences, we will then share the writing (and other texts) we produce, workshopping them as a group, and producing a final presentation and collective portfolio.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Social change doesn't just happen because something is "in the air" or because of some kind of mystical zeitgeist. Social change happens because engaged citizens find creative and innovative ways to frame social conversations and push on the levers of power. In this course we will examine some of the foundational figures and texts called on by those hoping to enact social change. We will study previous social movements in order to understand how they constructed and supported their arguments in favor of change, and how activists used creativity to overcome entrenched thinking and change the social conversation. We will work in small groups to collaboratively develop achievable but ambitious plans to engage the public and enact change in our own communities.

Prerequisites:

Honors students only.Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Social change doesn't just happen because something is "in the air" or because of some kind of mystical zeitgeist. Social change happens because engaged citizens find creative and innovative ways to frame social conversations and push on the levers of power. In this course we will examine some of the foundational figures and texts called on by those hoping to enact social change. We will study previous social movements in order to understand how they constructed and supported their arguments in favor of change, and how activists used creativity to overcome entrenched thinking and change the social conversation. We will work in small groups to collaboratively develop achievable but ambitious plans to engage the public and enact change in our own communities.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Curiosity, open-heartedness, and creativity are essential to historical thinking. Our curiosity about the past motivates us to unearth it and make it "knowable" to modern audiences. Likewise, empathy and/or open-heartedness to the ideas and actions of others & enables us to put ourselves in the shoes of earlier peoples and to understand their lives from their perspective. Harnessing our creativity (or ingenuity and playfulness) permits us to think imaginatively about our research topic and question, analytical framework, research methods, research findings, and modes of communicating history. Each of these attributes - curiosity, open-heartedness, and creativity - are essential not just to historical inquiry, but also to life-long learning and problem solving.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Honors students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Curiosity, open-heartedness, and creativity are essential to historical thinking. Our curiosity about the past motivates us to unearth it and make it "knowable" to modern audiences. Likewise, empathy and/or open-heartedness to the ideas and actions of others & enables us to put ourselves in the shoes of earlier peoples and to understand their lives from their perspective. Harnessing our creativity (or ingenuity and playfulness) permits us to think imaginatively about our research topic and question, analytical framework, research methods, research findings, and modes of communicating history. Each of these attributes - curiosity, open-heartedness, and creativity - are essential not just to historical inquiry, but also to life-long learning and problem solving.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course, students examine and engage with one of the major mythological figures of the American imagination: the "self-made man." The idea of the enterprising person who "pulls himself (or herself) up by the bootstraps" is distinctively American. But where and why does it arise? How did it come to prominence in American culture, politics, and economics? And, by gaining understanding of both the limits and the potential of this cultural ideal, what can we draw from it in our own careers and lives? Students will practice skills of close reading, analysis, and argumentation in the first half of the semester, prior to moving onto more complex and interpersonal forms of scholarly creativity and problem-solving in teams and in the community. Course content will follow a similar trajectory. In the first half of the semester, we will focus on how the myth of the self-made man originates and develops, and consider some critiques of it as an ideal. After spring break, we will apply the concepts we have studied to a robust analysis of issues in contemporary politics and economics including financial speculation, entitlement reform, technological disruption, and the gig economy. This contemporary focus will culminate in a Group Project & Final Presentation in which students aim for an innovative approach to a current question in light of the works we have studied.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Reality and perception have been debated and discussed for millennia. Humans see and experience their world in different ways. How do humans determine appropriate solutions for challenging social and economic problems? Why do most accept the current structures or status quo in regards to challenging problems? How do we gain a different perspective to find the vision and resources to erect new structures and thus challenge the status quo? Students will creatively explore these big questions through readings and presentations, studying examples of individuals and movements that have led to new and divergent perspectives. Students will participate by crafting products, creating visual projects, and coming into original thought via trial and error. Students will also develop their analytical and critical thinking skills, while learning to communicate effectively and honestly.

Prerequisites:

Honors students only. Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Often referred to as "America's walking city," Boston is full of places to explore. How have Bostonians throughout history understood their city through the neighborhoods, streets, and buildings around them? How can designing walking tours teach us about innovative approaches to telling Boston's diverse and varied history? Why is the act of walking an inherently creative endeavor? Through field trips, group projects, personal reflections, and discussions, you'll learn the techniques that historians use to bring historical information and ideas to broader audience's field known as "public history." We'll put those techniques to use developing our own walking tours of Boston. As we learn to understand the city around us on foot, we'll also incorporate sensory techniques (smell, taste, touch, and sound) to accompany the content of our tours. We'll focus our research on the unheard stories of Boston's past and the underrepresented perspectives, including the stories of different races, cultures, classes, genders, sexualities, and more that surround us every day.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Nanoscience is becoming the dominant direction for technology in this century and is opening new perspectives on all scientific and technological disciplines. This course is an attempt to introduce the central tenets of nanoscience at an early stage in the curriculum by involving students in designing nanostructures (and nanomachines) with innovative applications in mind, using in-house computational and experimental tools. The design elements, and intuition, that is used by engineers and architects for designing things at the macro-scale does not apply to nanoscale phenomena, necessitating creativity in design. This exercise in student creativity will be guided by instruction of the rules of nanodesign that the instructor has formulated through his own experience in the field.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Photographer Edward Curtis sacrificed everything including his prosperous portrait studio and business, fame for being the celebrity photographer of his time, and even his family, his wife divorcing him, so that he could pursue a life-long obsession to photograph what he perceived to be the vanishing culture of the remaining Native American tribes of North America. And at the completion of his masterwork, The American Indian, even his ownership and copyright of the work had to be given to the House of J.P. Morgan and he received no compensation, only financial support for the project. What he created though was a visually stunning document and series of folios of a vanishing way of life and the last days of his subject's culture as well as a new way of seeing the other. In addition to the study of the life, times and creative struggles and successes of Edward Curtis in his personal mission, students will learn of other photographers who like Curtis sacrificed all convention using their creativity and taking personal and intellectual risks with using innovation to bring their ideas to successful completion. Students will learn to use cameras to make fine individual pictures and then series of images to tell important visually impactful stories culminating with an extended photographic essay of their own in portfolio book form. Their own projects subjects will be discussed with and approved by the instructor and a final Power Point presentation will be given to the class for critique. Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Let's play with how you interact with the world around you. Let's explore how we create space, away from external influences, to sit and experiment within our own thoughts and social interactions. Through a series of independent activities, students will learn to challenge the interaction of creativity and society. Guided small and large group reflections will provide a space for students to compare experiences and offer feedback, analysis and support. Topics include experiments with ethnographic research, random acts of kindness, impression management, mindfulness, flow state, creativity in groups dynamics, counseling skills and embracing vulnerability. Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course students will be introduced to the practice of creativity as a rigorous approach to problem solving requiring research, persistence and grit. Students will work collaboratively to effectively synthesize existing ideas, images, and skill sets in original ways. They will embrace risk and support divergent thinking. In the process, they will become more confident life-long learners.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students with less than 54 credits. Students with more than 54 credits needing to fulfill their CI requirement should seek approval from the Undergraduate Advising Office.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Language is one mode through which our creative potential as human beings is expressed. We will consider the complex process of becoming bilingual by exploring the experience of moving between different cultures and languages. Students will reflect on important notions about languages through the practice of creative teamwork, focused group projects and innovative storytelling techniques. This course will actively encourage students to contemplate the cognitive, cultural, emotional and social experiences of living in more than one language, and inspire them to take a chance on learning a new language.


Prerequisites:

CJN majors only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

As an introduction to the communication discipline, this course examines the significance of communication to the symbolic construction of meaning. Students receive an overview of multiple forms of communication, including face-to-face, verbal/non-verbal, small group, intercultural, organizational, and mediated communication. The class devotes attention to the influence of culture on communication and to ethical complexities relating to communication.

Prerequisites:

CJN majors only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Oral communication skills have been rated as vital to today's professional world. Students will learn these skills focusing on the three principal types of oral communication (interpersonal, team and public address). Sample assignments include creating a webinar, interviewing and team presentation. Specific attention will be given to communicating in diverse contexts, in an online environment, and for a diverse audience.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introductory news writing course designed to teach both the writing style used by journalists and basic techniques used for gathering and presenting information for general publication. The course emphasizes fundamental writing and reporting skills such as interviews, finding sources, and choosing essential facts. Students also introduced to feature news writing and are assigned to develop and write basic stories drawn from real-life situations.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of important contributions to the literature of journalism through an analysis of major writers and news coverage of significant events from a journalistic perspective.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides an introduction to a humanities approach to a range of media, including but not limited to film and television. The course helps students develop visual literacies, enriching their understanding of multiple forms of media. The class also explores how media texts are constructed for specific cultural, entertainment, informative and propaganda purposes.

Prerequisites:

CJN-112

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Modern reporting techniques are examined and applied to writing full-length news and feature news stories, with an emphasis on investigative journalism. The course includes an introduction to and an analysis of alternative or "new journalism," combined with the survey of journalistic styles and standards as they evolved in the U.S. and international press over the last century.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of communication variations and cultural viewpoints and their impact on cross-cultural communication. A special emphasis is placed on rituals and message patterns in non-Western cultures.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to the role of photography in the journalistic process. A discussion of photography as communication and a survey of the history of photography.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Analysis and critique of movies, theater, music, art, and food.

Credits:

2.00

Description:

This course explores different definitions, perspectives, and strategies of leadership, with the goals of developing a better understanding of the concept as well as the students' own styles of leadership. The course examines the components of leadership including power, credibility, motivation, styles, situations, and followership.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introductory course in film studies with a focus on foreign films. Movies studied include masterpieces of cinema from Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and other nations (Films have subtitles).

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the legal rights, responsibilities, and constraints on the media and on media professionals. Focus on defamation, copyright, obscenity, broadcast regulation, and media-related tort law.

Prerequisites:

Take CJN-112;

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces students to newswriting, production, and performance techniques for radio and television. Students write, produce, and perform new packages as part of the course.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to the role of media in contemporary society, focusing on media's influence on cultural, political, and ideological processes. An examination of the historical contexts within which newspapers, radio, television, and new media technologies develop, and how audiences interact with and influence the use of media.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course helps students learn to communicate with and speak to culturally diverse audiences. Audience analysis, organizational patterns, speech creation, research skills, and delivery skills are all critical to understanding when interacting with diverse audiences. Students are provided with opportunities for oral presentations and interactions in different contexts.

Prerequisites:

Take CJN-2355.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students explore relevant business skills in non-fiction production linked to the evolving nature of the television and film industries. Topics may include accounting/budgeting, producing, and pitching ideas for potential documentaries.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students critically analyze Asian popular culture since the 1980s using a cultural ethnographic approach. Students apply the lenses of gender, identity, globalization, and business strategies to examine pop phenomena such as Korean Wave, Cool Japan, and Cantonese popular music.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introductory film studies course that covers the history of the film medium from its birth until the 1970s. It provides an introduction to major film theory concepts, such as genre and/or auteur studies, as well as key films and stars in movie history.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

By examining the film texts of Hong Kong auteurs such as John Woo, Wong Kar-wai, Tsui Hark, Andrew Lau, and Alan Mak, the course examines issues such as film genres, colonization/decolonization, transnational political economy, the Greater Chinese media market, and the diaspora.

Prerequisites:

By Instructor Permission Only. UES 107/L107, UES L108. CJN L2080(concurrently). Must have a valid FAA license.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course studies and practices the usage of unmanned aerial systems from the perspective of the filmmaker. Students will study existing drone footage to explore how it is incorporated into professional video productions, primarily focusing on non-fiction. They will also learn to create appropriate pre-production industry-standard paperwork and produce footage for various contexts themselves, again primarily focusing on non-fiction work, such as 'house hunting programs'.

Prerequisites:

Must be taken concurrently with CJN-2080. Students must have vaild FAA license to take this course.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course studies and practices the usage of unmanned aerial systems from the perspective of the filmmaker. Students will study existing drone footage and how it is incorporated into professional video productions, both non-fiction and fiction. They will also learn to create appropriate pre-production paperwork standard in the industry and learn to produce footage for various contexts, such as 'house hunting programs' and a battle scene"" in an action adventure film. "

Prerequisites:

Take CJN-152; CJN majors only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Practical exposure to methods of production and production equipment of the media. Students are introduced to basic theoretical concepts, such as three-point lighting and white balancing, and apply those to their productions. Students create a variety of non-fiction videos in teams and/or by themselves.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The course focus is on some of the divisions and conflicts within Israeli society. Students analyze and compare mainstream media discourse to alternative representations in documentary film. Analysis also covers media representation of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors Students only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The course focus is on some of the divisions and conflicts within Israeli society. Students analyze and compare mainstream media discourse to alternative representations in documentary film. Analysis also covers media representation of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Prerequisites:

Take CJN-152 and Sophomore standing required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Each time this course is offered it examines different current issues in documentary, such as social justice documentary production or ethical issues in documentary.

Prerequisites:

CJN-216;

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Conflict is universal. Effective leadership is essential at any and all levels to ensure that the potential for social change and positive resolution inherent in conflict is realized. This course explores the phenomenon of conflict at various levels including interpersonal, organizational, and cultural contexts.

Prerequisites:

CJN-112

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A study of the fundamentals of copy editing, newspaper typography, and makeup.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students learn the research traditions in communication grounded in the humanities and social sciences. They are exposed to an array of qualitative methods, with in-depth study of select methodologies. Students learn how to read scholarly articles, write in an academic style, and design a research project.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Analysis of persuasive techniques particularly those used by communicators in their attempt to gain public acceptance.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on understanding visual communication in a global context, such as photojournalism and photo essays. The student will be able to review and reflect on visual communication and their roles in everyday life. As part of the course students will create their own visual work focused on historical and/or contemporary and global perspectives.

Prerequisites:

Take CJN-2355 and CJN-253

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Advanced work in newswriting, production, and performance techniques for television. Students report, write, and produce news packages, with emphasis on increasing the depth, breadth, and frequency of reporting. Work also includes gathering, organizing, and evaluating the newsworthiness of information, evaluating the credibility of sources, writing the story, and producing broadcast quality work. Cannot be taken concurrently with CJN 483.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Provides students with a hands-on introduction to the process of planning, preparing, producing, and evaluating studio productions. Students are exposed to the elements and terminology of a multi-camera studio with live switching, audio mixing, and studio lighting. Students produce interviews, public service announcements, and a live variety/talk show.

Prerequisites:

Take CJN-2355

Credits:

4.00

Description:

To enhance their understanding of the post production process, students will learn additional software to enhance the quality of their news and documentary productions. Topics covered include video compression and motion graphics for news features. Professional software used include Avid and Adobe Suite.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Looks at different family structures using communication concepts and theories as a focus to glance at family life. Communication issues include the creation of meaning and identity through storytelling, rules and roles, conflict, power, intimacy, and challenges to the family unit. Examines both fictional and real families portrayed in television, movies, documentaries, as well as in fiction and non-fiction writing. Final projects include a paper and presentation about a family communication concept as applied to a family unit.

Prerequisites:

CJN-2355 and CJN-253

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students produce news segments, series, and/or specials leading to broadcast quality products. Emphasis is on the pacing, timing, and flow of newscasts, as well as pre-production, tease (script and on-camera) and the issues of an audience and professional ethics. Cannot be taken concurrently with CJN 483.

Prerequisites:

CJN-253

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The development and implementation of news stories for web media. Emphasis is on the narrative form in the integration of writing, video, sound, and photography in producing news content for the web.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Historical development of the theory of organizations, examination of information flow, network analysis, communication overload and underload, corporate culture, superior-subordinate communications, organizational effectiveness, and change processes.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students will hone interdisciplinary thinking to learn about Big Data analytics and the media industry. They will explore how media organizations use big data analytics to make decisions, practice basic methods and techniques of big data analytics and apply them to case simulation, as well as understand the structure of the media industry. Topics include audience measurement and aggregates, social media analytics and campaigns, audience taste prediction.

Prerequisites:

CJN-152

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examination of media including film, television, radio, music, newspapers, and magazines. Theories of media criticism are discussed and applied to specific media or media products. Students are introduced to criticisms such as genre, formalist, narrative, cultural, critical cultural, and feminist.

Prerequisites:

CJN-2355, CJN Majors only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Building on skills acquired in CJN 2355, students use advanced equipment and production techniques to produce complex video projects, including fiction filmmaking. Projects cover various styles and genres, such as music video and film noir.

Prerequisites:

CJN-255

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the social influence of the media on U.S. society. Attention is given to the theoretical perspectives that inform media research. By the end of the semester, students will develop a critical understanding of the role and influence of the media in U.S. society.

Prerequisites:

Junior status or above required, or instructor permission.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the influence of media convergence, digital technologies, and networked culture on the production, distribution, and consumption of media texts. Through theory, analysis and practice, students learn broad conceptual frameworks and develop models about the emergence and evolution of digital and mobile communication technologies that have shaped the contemporary media landscape. Case studies are drawn from media industries including journalism, advertising, public relations, film and television, music, video games, and the arts.

Prerequisites:

CJN-112

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Each time this course is offered it examines a different issue in Journalism, such as social justice journalism, electronic journalism, ethics, political journalism, or international journalism.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Analysis and critique of movies, theater, music, art, and food.

Prerequisites:

Senior status or instructor permission

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Principles and techniques of advanced news, features, and investigative reporting are studied and applied, with a focus on enterprise reporting. Students develop, organize and write detailed news and news-feature stories based on original research.

Prerequisites:

Take CJN-2355, Junior status or above required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Functions as a capstone media/film course and merges theoretical and practical knowledge from previous classes. Students revisit concepts and apply them to advanced courses and/or create their own advanced work.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Rhetoric is the strategic use of symbols to create meaning. Films, television, music, and new media communicate these meanings. This course explores how rhetorical messages in popular culture shape our personal and cultural identities. Current communication trends in areas such as gender, social networking, food, politics, religion, and fashion are explored.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This advanced production course has a dual focus. First, it examines the role of documentary over time in contributing to investigative journalism. Second, it provides students with an opportunity to produce documentaries that are examples of investigative journalism.

Prerequisites:

CJN-2355 or instructor consent

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This advanced class works together as a crew to create of a short narrative film shot in HD video. Students learn the process of making professional-quality work, and each student is responsible for various crew positions during pre-production and the shooting of the film.

Prerequisites:

CJN-216

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In a world of globalization and multiculturalism, communication is critical to understanding. This course explores theoretical approaches to intercultural communication and apply them to specific contexts. Emerging trends in global, ethical, legal, political communication, and social justice issues are studied.

Prerequisites:

Take CJN-253, CJN-353, and CJN-2355

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students write, direct, crew, edit, and serve as talent in producing the CJN Department's weekly news program aired on Boston Cable Access. Cannot be taken concurrently with CJN 361 or CJN 353.

Prerequisites:

CJN-253 and CJN-2355

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students produce, write, direct, crew and edit a News Magazine program. A minimum of three 'live news magazine' programs need to be produced over the course of a semester.

Prerequisites:

CJN-3455

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Builds on the theories and techniques developed in CJN 3455, focusing on the advanced concepts and skills needed to design and produce professional-level media content for digital distribution. Provides the opportunity to produce high-quality material for student media portfolios in various genres.

Prerequisites:

Requires 12 hours of CJN coursework and internship supervisor permission

Credits:

1.00-12.00

Description:

Practicum and internship projects are available prior to the start of each semester. Prerequisites: Any CJN major with a minimum of 12 credits of coursework or permission of the Department Chairperson. 1-3 terms : 1-12 credits.

Prerequisites:

Senior CJN majors with an overall cumulative grade point average of 3.0, and a major GPA of 3.4; or instructor consent

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Senior CJN majors meeting requirements for Departmental Honors are invited to participate in this seminar, which entails research and presentation of an approved topic.

Prerequisites:

Any Media/Film or Broadcast major with a minimum of 12 credits of coursework or permission of the Internship supervisor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Practicum and internship projects are available prior to the start of each semester.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00-12.00

Description:

An independent study experience in Communication and Journalism is available prior to the start of each semester.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office. CJN majors only who have previously completed 16 credits of CJN courses.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

An independent study experience in Communication and Journalism is available prior to the start of each semester.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students, overall GPA 3.5 or higher, CJN GPA 3.6 or higher, and instructor consent.

Credits:

1.00- 8.00

Description:

An independent study experience for CJN majors seeking to either complete their CAS Honors program and/or to be considered for CJN departmental honors. The independent study experience is available for a topic not offered in one of the existing courses. The work can be theoretical (i.e. research paper) or practical (i.e. producing a video) or a combination of the two. Registration must be approved by the full-time CJN faculty member who agreed to supervise the study, and the student must fulfill the other prerequisite requirements. May be taken in fall and/or spring of senior year, for 4-8 credits.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides students with a foundational understanding of how the American criminal justice system operates. Students will examine the types of behavior widely deemed appropriate for criminal justices responses, while exploring the range of responses used today. Specific topics include policing, the courts, corrections, and community supervision. Students will be challenged to situate the contemporary criminal justice system within a broader historical and institutional context. Inequalities on the basis of race, class, and gender will be explored. Upon completion, students will have developed a criminal justice knowledge base necessary to succeed in more advanced coursework.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students will explore factors that attract, repel, and displace crime that explain why community crime levels vary. The course will also examine the influential role that neighborhood characteristics have on the behavior of individuals.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An investigation of the emergence, organization, and structure of police systems. The course focuses on the conditions surrounding the relationship between the police and policed in different historical, cultural, political, and economic contexts.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Considers the problems surrounding the legal definition and handling of juveniles who confront the law as offenders, clients and victims. Attention is devoted to the study of the special legal categories and procedures established for juveniles, the problems facing professionals providing juvenile services and the most significant directions of legal and social change affecting youth in our society. Normally offered every year. Fulfills the Sociology Department's Social Policy requirement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A sociological exploration of coercive and incapacitative responses to crime. Attention is given to the origins and patterning of segregative controls, the correctional claims of prison systems, alternatives to incarceration and relationships between types of crime, and criminals and varieties of punitive response.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

What happens if you commit a crime on an Indian reservation? Who will prosecute you and how will they punish you? This course will explore the roots of tribal legal systems and criminal law, both the Native and American influences. You will gain an understanding of tribal government, legal systems, criminal law, and the role of tradition in contemporary tribal law. The course will also examine the conflict between Native and Non-Native perspectives on several cases: sovereignty, rights to cultural practices, women, freedom of religion, and land.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This class explores the images of the traditional "bad" girl in films. The course examines the idea of moving beyond merely the delinquent, many images in film suggest that girls and women who break with the socially condoned role of femininity are somehow bad. Girls and women who have power or challenge authority are often portrayed in films as deviant and therefore "bad". Girls and women who are "frigid" are just as "bad" as their sexually promiscuous silver-screen opposites. This course further focuses on the impact of these images on real life social roles for girls and women as well as the symbiotic relationship between fact and fiction.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In recent years, public attention to victims of crime has grown enormously. The reasons for this are complex. They include the effects of political organizing by crime victims; increased media attention to crime (often driven by crime stories as entertainment and advertising vehicles); the exploitation of crime victims by the politicians; and long-standing community frustrations with the criminal justice system. This course will examine the rise of public attention to crime, the response of the criminal justice system to victims, and the problems and possibilities regarding new responses to victims of crime. New developments in "restorative justice" will be presented as an emerging alternative to problems victims have reported with the criminal justice system.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides an overview of youth gangs and their sociological underpinnings, which are rooted in poverty and racism. Topical areas are discussed in relation to these key factors. Study topics include the history of gangs, theories about gang formation and individual membership, gangs and criminal behavior, socio-cultural importance of gangs, and strategies to control gang behavior. The course will utilize current gang issues in the US generally and in Massachusetts in particular as a basis to better understand the nuances of youth gangs.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

What happens to people who are processed through the criminal justice system? This course covers common pathways through the justice system and its major decision-making points, starting with investigation and arrest and moving through pre-trial processing, pre-trial diversion opportunities, court procedures and sentencing, including alternative sanctions. A primary goal of the course is to explore how social inequities are created or exacerbated by criminal justice procedures, as well as how the current system may be reformed or replaced to advance social justice.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Who and what is deviant? How shall the society respond? The course examines a range of deviance theories and associated social policies. A number of case studies will be used to evaluate these theories, such as body piercing, witchcraft, gay and lesbian sexuality, corporate crime, disability, prostitution, violence against women, racism, anti-Semitism, and gangs.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will examine the mechanisms through which U.S. social institutions, particularly schools, facilitate youth involvement in the juvenile and criminal justice systems. These mechanisms include: inequity, disability tracking, zero-tolerance policies, push-out, and the criminalization of adolescent behavior. Students will engage in activities aimed at analyzing these processes and developing methods to disrupt them at the social, political, educational, and instructional levels.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the complex relationships between women and crime today. This focus will include women as criminal offenders; women as victims of crime; and women as both offenders and victims. Course materials draw from recent feminist scholarship on these issues in the social sciences. Topics include the causes of women's crime women, drugs, and crime; child abuse and trauma; prostitution and sex trafficking; race, gender and victimization; and feminist social movements against violence. Crimes of violence against women are a central focus in the course.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is designed to give students an overview of Terrorism and its impact on American society. It will examine various aspects of terrorism for a local, national and international perspective. It will examine the consequences of terrorism focusing on social responses and public policy issues.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides an overview of several different types of justice systems around the world, including the U.S. The overall goals of the course are for students to understand that the manifestations of a 'justice system' exist in multiple forms and that there are strengths and weaknesses to each type of system. Students will better understand that through the cultural context including social, political, historical, and economic factors that shape crime and criminal justice responses. Course may include a study abroad component.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines racial disparities throughout the American criminal justice system, including those created through policing, courts, prisons, and community supervision systems. Students will analyze racial disparities from historical, political, legal, and sociological perspectives. This course will also challenge students to re-imagine racial justice through the lens of policy change and civil rights focused social movement activism.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Incarcerated and criminalized Americans suffer from extraordinarily high rates of physical and mental illnesses ranging from Hepatitis C, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS to bipolar disorder, PTSD, substance abuse, and schizophrenia. This course explores connections between illness and involvement with the correctional system from the perspective of the individual offender as well as in terms of broader American cultural and political patterns.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A course with special interest topics in sociology which changes depending on the professor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on the many forms of violence against women, with particular attention to child sexual abuse, rape, and violence and abuse in intimate relationships. These crimes have been the subject of intense political organizing, cultural controversy, and criminal-legal reform over the past 40 years. Together these issues account for a significant portion of the work of the police and the courts. They are also major issues in women's health over the life span. This course will address these issues from psychological, sociological, political, and criminal-legal perspectives.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the principles of restorative justice and to examine the programs, practices and policies within schools, juvenile justice and the adult criminal justice system which implement a restorative practices. Restorative justice is a different philosophy of responding to harm which provides new roles for the victim, offender, community and professionals . We will compare a restorative approach to crime with the traditional system of discipline and crime control and critique the shortcomings of an adversarial or retributive response to criminal behavior. We will explore the theoretical and historical origins of traditional justice systems and restorative approaches. We will also examine how these ideas are being applied in practical partnerships between the justice system and the community here in the United States and around the world.

Prerequisites:

Take CJU-134 and CJU-233, OR take SOC-113 and SOC-116 (with a grade of C or better). Take one additional SOC or CJU course; cannot be taken concurrently with SOC-214.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The question "Why is there crime?" lies at the heart of this course. This class will address what we mean by crime, who gets to define what crime is, how crime can be explained and how it can be reduced. Making sense of crime is essential if we are to respond effectively to victims and offenders. This course offers an in-depth examination of the many different theories of crime. These include biological, psychological, and sociological theories of victimization and offending. The course will study these theories in the context of many different kinds of criminal offending. By the end of the course, students will have a deep understanding of where these theories came from; what their strengths and weaknesses are; whether they are supported by research findings; and what implications these theories have for stopping crime.

Prerequisites:

SOC-214

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines crime and place. Students will use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology to look at crime patterns and develop crime prevention and reduction strategies. Although this will be a hands on course design, no prior knowledge of GIS or mapping techniques will be required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of the relationship between crime, business activity, and technology with special attention to the crimes of the powerful and the changing relationship between economic development and criminal activity.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Most Americans think of prohibited substances such as marijuana, cocaine or heroin when they hear the word drug. This course will provide an in-depth examination of legal drug use in American society. A broad conceptual framework will be presented that illustrates how history, politics, society and economics all have played a key role in defining certain substances as permissible in America. Fulfills the Sociology Department Social Policy and Globalization requirements.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Relying on a simplistic demand or supply explanation of why Americans use/abuse drugs obscures the reality of America's drug problem, is ineffective as a guide to public policy and has unforeseen, often negative consequences. Drug use is a complex and multi-faceted issue. There are no easy answers. To comprehend the complexity of America's drug problem one needs an understanding of the geography, history, religion, law, economics and international politics of the Middle and Far East, Eastern Europe, Africa, Mexico, and Central and South America. This class will provide this basic understanding without losing sight that the problem we seek to remedy is our own.

Prerequisites:

SOC-113 or SOC-116 (with a grade of "C" or better) SOC-214, and SOC-315 or SOC-333. Seniors only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students in this capstone criminal justice course will synthesize knowledge garnered in this class as well as previous criminal justice courses to creatively address "justice" in the U.S. criminal justice system. Students will engage in a substantial project to demonstrate mastery. Students also will add to their professional tool kit by exhibiting leadership, networking with professionals, and exploring post-graduate employment opportunities. Required for all students in the criminal justice major.

Prerequisites:

Students must be Criminal Justice majors with at least a 3.0 GPA; must at least be Sophomore status at the time of application; students must spend at least 8 hours per week working at their internship. Applications for the Internship in Criminal Justice course must be approved by the Instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students are provided with the opportunity to apply academic learning in a supervised internship consistent with their personal career goals or academic interest. The course covers such topics as career exploration and development, resume and cover letter writing, job fairs, and networking, and graduate school applications. In addition to the course assignments, students are required to complete a minimum full day internship each per week during the entire semester.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only; Instructor approval required.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Members of the department hold special meetings with students and direct them in investigating topics of interest in sociology. Arrangements for independent study must be approved by the supervising instructor and the Department Chairperson.

Prerequisites:

Instructor consent required.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Each honors student will engage in an independent reading, research, and writing project that can take the form of a traditional research paper of 20-25 pages or an equivalent volunteer and writing experience. The Honors Project must be supervised by a full-time Sociology faculty member. A poster presentation of the project must be presented at the CAS Honors symposium in the fall or the spring of the senior year as well as at the Sociology Honors Award ceremony at the end of the spring semester, for students graduating in the spring or summer. This course is required for all Sociology Honor Students.

Prerequisites:

Math placement level of 2 or above or any MATH course at the level 100 or above

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Do viruses and rumors spread like forest fires? How do ants cooperate? Do spoken languages and biological species evolve in a similar way? "Ants, Rumors, and Gridlocks" exposes students to introductory aspects of computational science by addressing and answering these and many other questions. Students use and modify virtual experiments preprogrammed in the NetLogo programming language to investigate these topics and others in Social Sciences, Biology, and Environmental Science. No prior knowledge of computer programming or NetLogo is required.

Prerequisites:

Math placement level of 2 or above, or any MATH course at the level 100 or above; GPA of at least 3.3 or Honors student

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Do viruses and rumors spread like forest fires? How do ants cooperate? Do spoken languages and biological species evolve in a similar way? "Ants, Rumors, and Gridlocks" exposes students to introductory aspects of computational science by addressing and answering these and many other questions. Students use and modify virtual experiments preprogrammed in the NetLogo programming language to investigate these topics and others in Social Sciences, Biology, and Environmental Science. No prior knowledge of computer programming or NetLogo is required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This is a hands-on course aimed at non-CS students who want to learn how to build interesting and interactive web pages. We do not use any drag- and-drop software for this purpose. Instead we cover the basics of HTML and PHP and, if time permits, we look at some ways of building web pages that interact with databases. Each student will have, for the duration of the course, an account on a server that permits individuals to have web pages that are visible on the World Wide Web.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course introduces students to computer game development, including, but not limited to, game programming. We use Game Maker, a framework for personal computers that runs equally well on Mac and PC. We learn about the foundational concepts of two-dimensional (flat) games: graphics, sound, objects, actions, rooms, scores, levels, multiplayer support, artificial intelligence, and more. Game Maker has an intuitive interface that makes game development approachable for everyone, including those who have never written a single game or a single computer program. All games created by Game Maker can be saved as standalone applications and can be shared freely with classmates, friends, and family. This is not a course in graphics design, audio editing, or scriptwriting. Students are encouraged to use their creativity and imagination to design games and the correctness of game implementation is stressed throughout the course. Normally offered in Fall.

Prerequisites:

MATH placement 3 or higher, MATH-121, MATH-164, or MATH-165 (previous or concurrent)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This is a rigorous introduction to computer science in Python with an emphasis on problem solving, structured programming, object-oriented programming, and graphical user interfaces. Topics include expressions, input/output, control structures, intrinsic data types, classes and methods, iteration, top-down programming, arrays, graphical user interfaces, and elements of UML. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

CMPSC-F131 with a minimum grade of C.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Computer Science II (CSII) is the continuation of Computer Science I. The purpose of CSII is to expand students' understanding of Computer Science and computer programming, assuming that they have the basic knowledge of the Python language. The course introduce another programming language - Java - and also focuses on the pure Object-Oriented features of Java, such as inheritance, polymorphism, and exceptions, as well as on simple data structures (lists, stacks, and queues) and algorithms (searching and sorting). By the end of the semester students will be able to develop sizable computer programs in Java.

Prerequisites:

Freshman or Sophomore Standing

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Computer Science is a dynamic discipline and students are not typically exposed to its many facets during their first years in college while important foundation work is done. This module aims to change that by presenting several areas of recent interest. In this way, students can form an idea of the scope of the vast and rapidly growing subject and career options, and begin to map out steps toward a potential career path. In this team-taught seminar-style course, two or three different professors will introduce students to their research areas and related topics. Some of the areas represented among the faculty include data science, machine learning, social networks, and parallel computing and others. The course is intended to be taken freshman or sophomore year.

Prerequisites:

Take CMPSC-F132

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces students to the system programming in C. It covers memory allocation, working with text and binary files, interprocess communications, multithreading, and networking. Students will learn how to work with build tools, profilers, debuggers, and standard and custom libraries.

Prerequisites:

CMPSC-F132 with a minimum grade of C.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Includes topics such as strings, stacks, queues, lists, trees, graphs, sorting, searching, hashing, dynamic storage allocation, and analysis of algorithms. Most programming will be done in the Java language. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

CMPSC-F132 and 1 of the following: STATS-240, STATS-250, MATH-134, MATH-165, MATH-164 or MATH-255.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The field of data science is emerging at the intersection of the fields of social science and statistics, information and computer science and design. Data science involves using automated methods to analyze massive amounts of data and to extract knowledge from them. This course serves as a project-based introduction to data science in Python language, covering data organization and retrieval, statistical data processing and data visualization.

Prerequisites:

CMPSC-F265

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Object-Oriented Programming in C++ is taught using Trolltech's multi-platform Qt library and other open-source libraries and tools. Emphasis is placed on program design and code re-use. Topics include: encapsulation, inheritance and polymorphism, UML, refactoring, parent-child relationships, properties, event-driven programming, test cases, regular expressions, constraints, XML, design patterns, and graphical user interfaces. We deal with some operating system and programming environment issues and also with code packaging. C++ is a very large language, so we do not attempt to cover it all. Instead we work with a carefully selected subset of language elements that permits students to exploit the powerful Qt libraries and write robust, idiomatic, and interesting code. By the end of the course, the student should have a good command of C++, facility using and building libraries, an understanding and appreciation of the design patterns that we covered, and a well-established discipline of refactoring and code reuse. Prerequisite: CMPSC F265 (which may be taken concurrently). Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

Take CMPSC-F265

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is an overview of modern software engineering technics, tools, and practices. It covers the software life cycle, requirements engineering, software architecture, software design, including OO design with UML, and testing. Students will work in teams on a medium-size project.

Prerequisites:

CMPSC-F265

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course deals with the structure and operation of the major hardware components of a computer. Topics include basic logic design, basic datapath construction, basic pipelining, I/O system design, issues in memory hierarchy and network interface design. Normally offered each fall semester.

Prerequisites:

CMPSC-F353 and CMPSC-F265 and Working knowledge of C++.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course presents an overview of modern operating systems, from the points of view of an application developer and of a system developer. It covers process management, scheduling, concurrency management, multi-threading, memory management, and file system organization. Intensive programming assignments in the C language help students learn the POSIX application programming interface (API) and the low-level organization of a general-purpose operating system. Normally offered each spring.

Prerequisites:

CMPSC-265 and MATH-285

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This is an introduction to the design and use of database systems --- systems that manage very large amounts of data. Topics covered include Entity-Relationship (E/R) data model, Relational data model, object-oriented model, and the conversion of E/R and relational models. We shall also learn some database languages, both concrete and abstract, including Structured Query Language (SQL), Object Query Language (OQL), relational algebra, etc. We will introduce the semistructured data, such as the popular Extensible Markup Language (XML), and their usage in database systems as well. The course is intended for computer science students who need to have an in-depth understanding of modern database systems. Normally offered each fall semester.

Prerequisites:

CMPSC-F331 and CMPSC-F353

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course explores the fundamentals of computer networks, protocols and layering, applications and their implications to everyday networking life. Normally offered in spring.

Prerequisites:

Instructor permission required;

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students specify, design and implement a software system.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Students will be exposed to one or more topics in programming languages, software development, machine learning or other areas of computer science.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Guided study on a topic at an advanced level.

Prerequisites:

Junior or Senior standing

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This team-taught course is designed to explore career opportunities in Computer Science in depth. This course focuses on career search, the application process, entry, transition and networking for career success. Alternative options such as graduate school will also be explored. Students articulate and reflect on academic work, and co-curricular experiences from the perspective of professionals entering or advancing their careers. The goal of this course is to help students reach their fullest professional potential following graduation.

Prerequisites:

CMPSC-F131, CMPSC-F132, 1 CMPSC course at 200, 300 or 400 level, and a major GPA of 3.0 or above. Prior to registration, student must submit credit approval form and gain faculty approval.

Credits:

2.00- 4.00

Description:

Student works in a qualified software development setting to gain practical experience in modern industrial software development. Student will apply lessons learned in the classroom within a supervised, professional development while developing a greater understanding of the job expectations and organizational culture. Internship may be taken for 2-4 academic credit hours, at 4 hours of company work per week per each credit. Additional academic reports will be required. Students may not take more than one internship. CPT internships follow the same policies.

Prerequisites:

Instructor consent required.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Guided study on a topic at an advanced level.

Prerequisites:

Instructor consent required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students specify, design and implement a software system.

Prerequisites:

Non CAS majors need to have completed at least 15 credits.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to foundational principles of microeconomic theory, with an emphasis on applications of concepts to management decision-making in specific industry and market settings. It describes and analyzes the interaction of supply and demand and the behavior of the prices of goods, services. It explains the determinations of costs, output, strategic pricing, and governance by firms under conditions of perfect and imperfect competition in a global economy. In addition, it describes the supply demand for factors of production and the impact of taxes and government regulation and intervention on firms and consumers.

Prerequisites:

Honors student status or 3.3 GPA required.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduction to the organization and operation of a market economy with a focus on how it allocates scarce resources; the analysis of consumer demand and profit maximizing behavior of business; examination of pricing and output decisions under conditions of competition, monopoly and imperfect competition. Analysis of markets for labor and capital. Policy issues include price ceilings and floors, competition and monopoly. Normally offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

Non-CAS majors need to have completed at least 15 credits

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines the workings of the national and the global economy. It will describe the determination of Gross Domestic Product, the problems of unemployment, inflation, and the determination of economic growth. It will also describe and analyze the determination of the country's exchange rate, the balance of payments, and international borrowing and lending. A particular focus will be on understanding economic fluctuations (booms, busts, and recessions) in the domestic economy and its effects on other economies. It will analyze the role of the government and the effects of government spending and taxation on the economy. Furthermore, it will describe and analyze the determination of the quantity of money and interest rates in the economy and the role of the country's central bank. It examines the basis and pattern of international trade and the effects of a country's trade policy on the economy.

Prerequisites:

GPA of 3.3 or higher. Non-CAS majors need to have completed at least 15 credits.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The measurement of economic growth; introduction to the theory of determination of national income and the price level; unemployment and inflation; theories on economic growth and the role of labor and capital in economic growth; functioning and impact of the monetary system; analysis of monetary and fiscal policies for economic stabilization; international transactions and their influence on the domestic economy. Prerequisites: GPA of 3.2 or higher. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Identifies the environmental effects of economic activity, including polluted water and air, noise, and radiation, and values their costs and benefits. Analyzes mechanisms, including taxes and permits, for achieving a socially preferable level of pollution. Traces role played by institutions, including common ownership, in affecting environmental decay. Resource depletion (of oil, forests, and fisheries) and appropriate policy responses.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Why do so many countries remain so poor? Why have some (e.g. the Asian "tigers") grown so rapidly? Why have most of the countries of Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union been slow to ignite economic growth? These questions are addressed by looking at domestic factors (government policies, resource endowments) as well as the international environment (mobile investors, international financial institutions). Asks what economic choices these countries face now. Normally offered yearly. Cultural Diversity B

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The study of how economic and human activity is distributed across space, the reasons for these spatial distributions, and the processes that change the spatial organization of economic activity over time. Topics include: maps, map projections, and geographic information systems; population geography; the organization and location of cities, towns and villages; transportation and communication policy; industrial location; the geography of world trade; and geographic features of economic development. The course takes a global perspective, and draws on cases and examples from all over the world. Cultural Diversity B

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Behavioral Economics combines economics, psychology and the cognitive sciences to study human decision making. This course introduces students to the standard economic model of human behavior, and then uses real-world examples to see where the standard model falls short. More broadly, this class introduces students to building models of human behavior. And since behavioral economics relies on experiments to test models, the class discusses the basics of experimental design and causal inference. We apply the lessons to a broad range of fields, including finance, business, and public policy.

Prerequisites:

EC 101 and EC 102

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Theory of consumer behavior and demand. Theory of production and costs of production. Theory of the firm, and price and output decisions in different market structures, i.e., under perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly. Decisions relating to pricing and employment of various inputs (labor and capital) under perfectly competitive, and less than perfectly competitive, resource markets. Required of all majors in Economics. Normally offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

EC-101 and EC-102

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course covers the neoclassical and Keynesian models of aggregate economic activity. Coverage of the measurement of economic variables, such as aggregate income, the inflation rate, and the unemployment rate. Examines the behavior of the economy under conditions of price flexibility in the long run and price rigidity in the short run under rational and adaptive expectations. Analysis of the effect of changes in taxes and government expenditures, monetary policy and deficits on the economy. Coverage of the sources of economic growth. Required of all majors in Economics. Normally offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

EC-101 and MATH-134, MATH-164 or MATH-165

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course introduces the mathematical basis of economic theory. Emphasis is placed on the mathematical tools that have been developed for various applications, with a focus on applied microeconomic analysis. The techniques of comparative-statics analysis are developed. Univariate and multivariate calculus are then presented in the context of unconstrained and constrained optimization. The course concludes by introducing the foundations of discrete-time and continuous-time dynamic optimization.

Prerequisites:

Take EC-101

Credits:

4.00

Description:

More than half of the world population lives in urban areas. This course sets out to explain the existence, growth, geographic patterns, and impact of cities, and the effects of public policy on urban form, structure, and activity. It addresses the urban issues of transportation, congestion, housing, crime, poverty and inequality, governance, and the environment, and asks how planning and policy can tackle these. The context of these discussions is the megacities of Asia: 24 of the world's 37 megacities (those with ten million or more inhabitants) are in Asia, where they are home to almost 500 million people. The choices made by these cities will be considered in comparative perspective, including with Boston, New York, Paris, and London.

Prerequisites:

EC-101 and EC-102

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The theory of tax policy and tax structure. The effects on economic behavior (including labor supply, saving, risk-taking and investment, charitable giving, and growth) of different taxes (income, sales, value-added, inheritance, wealth, property). Tax equity, efficiency and incidence, in the United States and in comparative perspective. Additional topics include modeling state taxes; social security and pensions; and tax compensation. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

EC-101 and EC-102

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines theories of international trade. The policy implications of each theory are explored and the effect of trade on the welfare of the nation is examined. Also the development of trade blocs and the the political economy of trade are studied. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

EC-101 and EC-102

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Managerial economics applies microeconomic and quantitative analysis to the formulation of rational managerial decisions. These tools shape decisions about output and pricing, about the choice of product quality, the type of production process used, the mix of inputs employed, the suitability of mergers and acquisitions, the management of risk, and the design of incentives in a world of imperfect information. This course explains the tools of managerial economics, puts them into context using numerous case studies, and applies them to significant real business situations.

Prerequisites:

Take EC-101 and EC-102, and take STATS-240 or STATS-250; Junior standing or higher

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on the use and interpretation of real world economic and financial data. Emphasis is on hands-on experience of retrieving data from various databases and applications of statistical methods for analytical purposes. Main topics include the behavior of developed and emerging equity markets, the analysis of foreign exchange rate movements, sovereign risk, foreign capital flows, the characteristics of foreign direct investment by multinational companies, and international trade patterns. The course trains students to further communication skills by requiring presentations of the data analysis and writing reports on various global economic and financial topics. Excel is extensively used in data analysis. Students with limited Excel experience are expected to complete Excel training modules at the beginning of the course.

Prerequisites:

EC-101 and EC-102

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The balance of payments and foreign exchange markets and instruments, and the determination of exchange rates. Balance-of-payments adjustments under alternative exchange-rate systems, international liquidity, international economics policy and open economy macroeconomics.

Prerequisites:

EC-101 and EC-102

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An economic analysis of the European Union, the history of European monetary and economic integration. and the creation of the Euro. A survey of the development and evolution of key European policies, such competition, industry, agriculture, environment, regional, etc. A discussion of economic implications of the enlargement of the European Union, as well as its trade relations with the U.S. and other countries within the context of the World Trade Organization.

Prerequisites:

STATS-250 or STATS-240 or MATH-255 or permission of instructor

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course begins with a brief review of statistical methods, including probability theory, estimation, and hypothesis testing. This background is used in the construction, estimation, and testing of econometric models. The consequences of a misspecified model, where the assumptions of a classical regression model are violated, are studied and the appropriate remedial measures are suggested. Other topics include dummy variables, binary choice models, and autoregressive models. Emphasis is on applied aspects of econometric modeling. There is extensive use of statistical software for data analyses. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

STATS-250 or STATS-240 or MATH-255 or permission of instructor. GPA of 3.3 or higher required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course begins with a brief review of statistical methods, including probability theory, estimation, and hypothesis testing. This background is used in the construction, estimation, and testing of econometric models. The consequences of a misspecified model, where the assumptions of a classical regression model are violated, are studied and the appropriate remedial measures are suggested. Other topics include dummy variables, binary choice models, and autoregressive models. Emphasis is on applied aspects of econometric modeling. There is extensive use of statistical software for data analyses. Prerequisites: GPA of 3.2 or higher, STATS-250 or STATS-240 or MATH-255 or permission of instructor.

Prerequisites:

Take STATS-240 or STATS-250

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course introduces the student to forecasting methods using time-series data, with economic and financial data. Time-series models commonly used in forecasting include the autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model for stationary series and the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model for nonstationary series. These models will be presented together with the estimation methods, then used in applications. Statistical methods designed to evaluate, compare, and improve forecasting performance by combining different types of forecasts will be also discussed and illustrated using one or more widely-used programs such as EViews, Gretl, and R.

Prerequisites:

EC-101 and EC-102

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the foundations of game theory using applications from economics and everyday decision-making. The course examines the common strategic elements of interactions between consumers and producers, governments and citizens, politicians and their constituencies, countries and their trading partners, and various other participants in social relationships. The course provides a theoretical framework for modeling strategic interaction, beginning with the development of the concept of a Nash equilibrium, reputation, signaling, collective-action problems, and voting procedures and strategies. Normally offered every other year.

Prerequisites:

EC-102; STATS-250 or equivalent; EC-311 or EC-432 (or EC-101 with a B grade or higher)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides a solid foundation in financial economics. The course begins by setting out the nature of financial decision-making by households and firms in a risk-free world, and then introduces risk in the context of financial markets. It considers portfolio management, including mean-variance, utility-maximizing, and behavioral approaches. Attention next turns to asset valuation - of equities and fixed income securities, as well as financial derivatives. The final section evaluates the applicability of the ideas of financial economics to the real world.

Prerequisites:

EC-101 and EC-102

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the role of depository institutions and the Federal Reserve system in determining the supply of money. The course also explains the financial environment and the role of monetary policy decisions on changes in price, interest rates, money, and economic activity. The course provides the student with both theoretical and applied analysis. Prerequisites: EC 101, EC 102.

Prerequisites:

EC-450 or STATS-350 and Senior Standing; Or permission of instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This is a required course for all students majoring in economics, to be taken in the spring semester of their senior year. Students are required to develop an economic thesis project in consultation with the professor for the course and to present it to the class.

Prerequisites:

EC-450, Senior standing required. Honors students only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This is a required course for all students wishing to graduate with honors in economics, to be taken in the spring semester of their senior year. Students are required to develop an economic thesis project in consultation with the professor for the course and to present it to the class.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's consent required

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

This course is designed to complement work experience, in a position where economics plays a substantial role, with an opportunity for writing, reflection, analysis, and skills and career development. Individual learning goals and objectives will be formulated for each student, based on their placement, interest and career goals, but students will normally be expected to write regular reflective journals, and at least one substantial paper or essay that is undertaken either as part of the job, or links the job experience with economic analysis, or equivalent. Internships must be a minimum of 30 hours in total per credit, and must be approved by the instructor in advance.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00- 5.00

Description:

Independent study in economics

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00- 5.00

Description:

Independent study in Economics.

Prerequisites:

CAS-201 and at least 54 credits

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This one-credit course is designed to explore career opportunities in economics in depth. Classroom discussions, writing assignments, and site visits will help prepare students to identify and secure internship and post-graduate employment opportunities. Additional career paths, such as pursuing graduate studies in economics or related fields, and the application process, will also be addressed. The goal of this course is to help students reach their fullest professional potential following graduation.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Working with children and adolescents is a facet of many professions. This course will introduce students to the study of education occurring in formal and informal settings. This course focuses on the relationships among, and between, teachers, discourse, and community. Students will glean insight into the relationship of school and society as well as power and control in American Education. Required of all education minors. Five hours of field work required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines the nature and development of human abilities and the teaching-learning process. Considers the facts and generalizations of child and adolescent growth and development, working with diverse cultures, and special needs children in school settings. Ten hours of field work.

Prerequisites:

This class fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

Credits:

4.00- 8.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. Students complete 35 hours per semester of educational tutoring in a local school (K-5), in conjunction with a weekly seminar on campus. Open to all majors. No previous experience required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students complete a minimum of 35 hours of tutoring and coaching in an educational setting, or a community organization in conjunction with a weekly seminar on campus. Programs include COACH, Connections to College, and others. Open to all majors. No previous experience required.

Prerequisites:

Open to all majors,Instructor's signature required

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students complete all research, travel, and reporting requirements in conjunction with Suffolk University's Alternative Spring Break. Open to all majors. No previous experience required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. This course introduces students to the basic competencies of school teaching. Topics include: lesson planning, classroom management, grouping for instruction, effective pedagogical practices, assessment methods, requirements for licensure in Massachusetts, and discipline specific curriculum development using the curriculum frameworks/common core state standards. Field observations (25 hours) required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is designed for Jumpstart Corps members to develop competencies in teaching strategies for reading and writing. The course introduces theoretical and instructional issues in the development of literacy skills. Students will be engaged in reflective, critical consideration of students' diverse needs in the acquisition of literacy.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The relationship between cultural diversity and schooling is explored by examining impediments to academic achievement and advancement by minority students, non-native English speaking students, and other under-represented groups. Topics include: standardized testing, identification of inequities, legal and ethical responsibilities of teachers, and promoting equity. Ten pre-practicum observation hours required for teacher candidates.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the specific needs and challenges of the various language and cultural groups in schools. Topics include: theories of 1st and 2nd language acquisition, strategies for teaching academic content, modifying instruction in the mainstream classroom, creating classroom cultures that invite all students into learning, the role of advocacy and professional collaboration in ESL, and analysis of policies related to assessment and placement of English Language Learners.

Prerequisites:

Take EDUC-315

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students will have opportunities to put the theories and techniques learned in EDUC 315- Strategies for Working with English Learners into practice. Students will be placed in various Suffolk University sites or classrooms where they will work to meet the specific needs and challenges of educating various language and cultural groups. Students will be required to spend 30 hours working in their placements. Students will attend a weekly seminar where connections between theory and practice are explored, experiences are shared, and Teaching & Service Portfolios will be created.

Credits:

0.00

Description:

Students will travel to Costa Rica for a unique cultural and educational experience. Students will spend an intensive week of teaching English in a language program. This faculty-led trip will provide students with opportunities to put the theories and techniques learned in previous Education courses into practice, while being supported by Professor Robinson. Students will work to meet the specific needs and challenges of educating young Costa Ricans. Students will also travel to different parts of the country and learn about the natural and cultural wonders of Costa Rica. This trip is open to all students but will fulfill the required 30 practicum hours for those students enrolled in or considering the TESOL Certificate.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the evolution of schooling in the United States from The English High School to present. Theorists include: Mann, Franklin, Dewey, Sizer, and others.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on the exploration and understanding of issues, strategies and frameworks related to developing and implementing youth programs. Students will be exposed to developmental theories, and various components of effective youth programmatic planning. Topics include: conducting needs assessments, developing goals and objectives, logistics planning, recruitment and training, and program evaluation.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth investigation of policies effecting urban schools; topics include: demographic influence on education, influences of national and state regulations on urban schools, sociological factors unique to urban schools, and in-depth analysis of equity and achievement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines major current issues of educational policy against the background of demographic trends, technological innovations, standardized testing, and curricular shifts.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Members of the Department will meet with students to direct their research in areas of special interest to them. Projects of this sort will be authorized only in unusual circumstances upon the recommendations of the Department Chairperson and with the approval of the Dean. Offered by arrangement only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Survey of drama and theatre as part of world culture from classical Greece through 18th-century China. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Survey of drama and theatre as part of world culture from the 19th century to the present.

Prerequisites:

Course requires a study abroad component and an additional fee to cover airfare and accommodations in Ireland during spring break.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course, through an examination of Irish and Irish American literature, we will connect the historical and cultural forces that have led to emigration and exile from Ireland to the literature that has developed on both sides of the Atlantic. We will read some of the classic works of Irish literature that address national identity, exile, cultural unity, and cultural division, and we will also read literary works by Irish Americans that trace the ripple effects of these topics on the Irish diaspora. During Spring Break we will travel to Ireland to witness first-hand the sites associated with the Irish literature we study, paying particular attention to the politics of language, the influence of the Roman Catholic church on culture, and the formation and revision of literary traditions.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Literary masterpieces from ancient times to the Renaissance, including: Homer's Odyssey, Sophocles' Oedipus, Virgil's Aeneid, selections from the Hebrew Bible and the Gospels, and Dante's Divine Comedy. List may vary at the discretion of the instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will introduce students to a selection of Great Books from around the world from the 17th century to the 21st, such as Don Quixote (Spain), Madame Bovary (France), The Communist Manifesto (Germany), The Origin of Species (England), War and Peace (Russia), On Dreams (Austria), Night (Hungary), Things Fall Apart (Nigeria), "Satyagraha" (India), "I Am Prepared to Die" (South Africa), Saeed the Pessoptomist (Israel), The Rouge of the North (China), and The House of Spirits (Chile). Readings may vary at the discretion of the instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of poetry, prose, and drama, with emphasis on close reading and literary analysis. Students will compose formal essays discussing the meanings and relationship between texts as well as the author's craft and relationship to the reader. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of poetry, prose, and drama, with emphasis on close reading and literary analysis. Students will compose formal essays discussing the meanings and relationship between texts as well as the author's craft and relationship to the reader.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A study of literature written in English from cultures around the world, with emphasis on major modern and contemporary writers from countries such as Australia, Canada, India, Ireland, Nigeria, South Africa and the Caribbean. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

3.3 GPA or Honors student

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A study of literature written in English from cultures around the world, with emphasis on major modern and contemporary writers from countries such as Australia, Canada, India, Ireland, Nigeria, South Africa and the Caribbean. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct and persuasive writing. Offered every semester. Cultural Diversity B

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of poetry, prose, and drama from the British literary tradition, with emphasis on close reading and literary analysis. Students will compose formal essays discussing the meanings and relationship between texts as well as the author's craft and relationship to the reader. Offered every semester.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of poetry, prose, and drama from the American literary tradition, with emphasis on close reading and literary analysis. Students will compose formal essays discussing the meanings and relationship between texts as well as the author's craft and relationship to the reader. Offered every semester.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Mysteries are sometimes dismissed as "pulp" but they are often highly reflective of the era in which they were written. This class will use mystery stories, novels and plays as a lens through which to view the major social, cultural and literary movements of the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries. With an emphasis on close reading and analysis, students will compose essays that explore the relationships between texts and the relationship between literary production and history. Additional assessments will include exams, a written response to a play we attend as a class, and a creative group project and presentation.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Literature has the capacity to record and interrogate history in an imaginative and artistic context. African-American literature is a rich, varied, and complex body of literature that faces our tainted history directly. The authors we will read in this class examine slavery's long-term psychological and social effects while forging a literary history that is at once a part of and apart from American literary history more generally.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on the reading and analysis of horror literature and the ways in which horror reflects and represents personal and cultural anxieties. Readings will include both classic and contemporary authors, for example, Edgar Allan Poe, H.P. Lovecraft, Shirley Jackson, Stephen King, and others. Assignments will include analytical essays as well as creative writing.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will examine a wide range of writers and film makers who have sought to bridge the gap that exists between those who have experienced war and those who have not. Some stories we will examine are told from an American perspective; some are told from the perspective of soldiers who fought against Americans; and some are told from those who experienced life under U.S. military occupation.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A study of literary works by the so-called "Beat Generation," the American literary underworld of the late 1950s and 1960s, including major works by the three central figures (Ginsburg, Kerouac, Burroughs) and less central figures (Corso, Snyder, DiPrima, Jones/Baraka) as well as the influence of the Beats on the work of Bob Dylan, the only musician to win the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A study of literary works by the so-called "Beat Generation," the American literary underworld of the late 1950s and 1960s, including major works by the three central figures (Ginsburg, Kerouac, Burroughs) and less central figures (Corso, Snyder, DiPrima, Jones/Baraka) as well as the influence of the Beats on the work of Bob Dylan, the only musician to win the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Young Adult Literature's recent explosion in popularity raises important questions about the stories it tells, the values it promotes, and the audiences it seeks. This course approaches the YA phenomenon as one with deep historical roots as well as contemporary cultural relevance. From nineteenth century classics to current series favorites, literary works focused on young people reframe perennially fresh narratives about coming of age, negotiating personal identity, and navigating a complex moral universe. This course also considers YA literature as part of an evolving network of writers, readers, publishers, critics and filmmakers.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Young Adult Literature's recent explosion in popularity raises important questions about the stories it tells, the values it promotes, and the audiences it seeks. This course approaches the YA phenomenon as one with deep historical roots as well as contemporary cultural relevance. From nineteenth century classics to current series favorites, literary works focused on young people reframe perennially fresh narratives about coming of age, negotiating personal identity, and navigating a complex moral universe. This course also considers YA literature as part of an evolving network of writers, readers, publishers, critics and filmmakers.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the stories of individuals and groups who have traveled to the United States - a country that the poet Walt Whitman celebrated as a "nation of nations" - in search of greater freedom and opportunity. While some discover their version of the American Dream, others find themselves lost in exile, caught in between identities, and in danger due to their undocumented status. Moving from 19th-century visions of the U.S. as a crucible, or melting pot, of cultures to today's political tensions about borders and law enforcement, our readings reflect on the promise and peril of being new to America. Students will analyze fiction, nonfiction, and film and visit an immigrant advocacy coalition in Boston.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will use close readings to examine poetry as a heightened form of language seeking to make contact with divine sources of faith. We will consider poems that provide examples of the struggle to attain belief, as well as poems that deny belief. Language as both the grammar of ascent and the locus of descent. The position of human beings in relation to God, or the gods, or the absence of the divine.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course takes students on a tour of witches, "nasty women," and other "unruly tongues" or "bitter spirits" throughout American literary history. Regularly assigned essays on the reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct, and persuasive writing. Fulfills the Literature Requirement of the CAS Core Curriculum.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course takes students on a tour of witches, "nasty women," and other "unruly tongues" or "bitter spirits" throughout American literary history. Regularly assigned essays on the reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct, and persuasive writing. Fulfills the Literature Requirement of the CAS Core Curriculum.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

For more than a thousand years, the city of London has been a cultural center, the home of playwrights and poets, novelists and critics, theaters and libraries. In this class we will read a wide range of literary works in different genres that take the city of London, and the experience of living or writing there, as central themes. The class will emphasize close reading and literary analysis of London texts, and will also explore contextualizing materials from newspaper articles to music and art. Designed to be taken in tandem with an optional one-credit study abroad trip to London, UK.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines a variety of literature and films that highlight the point of view of students (and sometimes teachers) as they negotiate the power dynamics of educational institutions. Through reading and viewing such diverse texts as Gus van Sant's film Good Will Hunting, Booker T. Washington's autobiography Up from Slavery, and J.K. Rowling's classic fantasy Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, we will analyze how the politics of race, social class, gender, and colonialism inform classroom practices, structures, and ideologies while also considering how students work to resist oppressive educational systems. This course uses literature as a vehicle to explore and problematize the promise of education to facilitate equality, modernization, or the American Dream.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of 20th century writing on the American West by American women and men in the form of novels, memoirs, and short stories. Regularly assigned reading responses and essays on the readings as well as discussion questions and quizzes provide the basis for the study of "frontier" or western literature by American authors. Fulfills the Literature Requirement of the CAS Core Curriculum.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines Shakespeare as a playwright and cultural icon in both the modern and early modern worlds. Students will develop analytical and creative writing after reading selected plays and criticism, and after watching selected modern film and media adaptations.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course offers an opportunity to read and discuss a sampling of contemporary Latinx literature, that is, fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and comics by writers of Latin American origin who may or may not categorize themselves under the gender neutral/nonbinary term Latinx, a variation of Latino or Latina (the history and use of this term will be part of course discussion and readings). Students will learn how to engage with this work and some of the current issues affecting the Latinx community through informal, formal, and creative assignments. Focus will be placed on using the tools of literary analysis to bear on the intersections of the creative, aesthetic, personal, political, and marginalized spaces that inform Latinx literature. Along with supplementary readings, clips, and discussions about the texts and related issues, students will consider, reflect upon, and conduct inquiry into the narratives and social conversations they feel are part of their own personal journeys.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will provide an introduction to the literature written about medicine and medical research. We will study the ways in which narrative complexly represents illness, disability, doctor-patient relationships, health insurance, and other medical issues, including the end of life. The nonfiction books, short stories, and poems we read this semester are written from the viewpoints of patients, doctors, researchers, and literary critics, and provide us with nuanced, often ethically-challenging examples of how literary techniques-plot, character, point of view, image and metaphor-work to reveal the subjective experiences of diagnosis, treatment, healing, and paying in the world of medicine, and how these experiences ultimately ask questions about what makes life and the body worth valuing. Our readings will explore the intersections between storytelling and science in an effort to better understand the relationship between self and society.

Prerequisites:

CAS Honors students only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will provide an introduction to the literature written about medicine and medical research. We will study the ways in which narrative complexly represents illness, disability, doctor-patient relationships, health insurance, and other medical issues, including the end of life. The nonfiction books, short stories, and poems we read this semester are written from the viewpoints of patients, doctors, researchers, and literary critics, and provide us with nuanced, often ethically-challenging examples of how literary techniques-plot, character, point of view, image and metaphor-work to reveal the subjective experiences of diagnosis, treatment, healing, and paying in the world of medicine, and how these experiences ultimately ask questions about what makes life and the body worth valuing. Our readings will explore the intersections between storytelling and science in an effort to better understand the relationship between self and society.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course studies different genres of sports literature, such as fiction, non-fiction, and poetry, as well as the literary elements and writer's craft used to create these literary works. As an object of literary study, sporting contests, spectacles, and athletes themselves, provide authors rich characters and complex scenes to explore themes about cultural values, social roles, and also personal struggle and success. Throughout the semester, students will examine literature connected to such sports as ice hockey, baseball, basketball, tennis, wrestling, and rodeo, to look deeply into not only human nature, but also how stories about sports may transcend the sport itself.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A study of the major genres in creative writing (poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction) in which students will read as writers. Students will write a combination of analytical and original works, and learn the format and processes of writing workshops of writing workshops. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

English Majors and Minors or Instructor Permission

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of major writers of England from the beginning to the mid-18th century. Regularly assigned essays on the reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct, and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

English Majors and Minors or Instructor Permission

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of major English writers from the mid-18th century to the present. Regularly assigned essays on the reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

English Majors and Minors or Instructor Permission

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of major American writing from its origins through 1865. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct, and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

English Majors and Minors or Instructor Permission

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of major American writing from 1865 through the present. Regularly assigned essays on reading provide the basis for individualized instruction in clear, correct, and persuasive writing. Offered every semester.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The class will consider various theoretical approaches to the TV Series Mad Men beginning with ideas gleaned from the discourse of visual literacy and proceed by applying textual analysis adapted from more traditional modes of literary studies and film analysis. A combination of critical and evaluative critiques will be examined, including book-length studies of the series and essays based on the series' appeal to style, American popular culture, advertising, gender roles, race, and 60s nostalgia. The recent phenomenon of the series recap will serve as a touchstone to the class's collective viewing of the first two seasons of the series.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to CAS Honor Students

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will focus on the cultural phenomenon of the TV Series Mad Men, considered by many to be the foremost example of Quality TV produced during the so-called "golden age of television" and engage with it on visual, cultural, literary and filmic levels. The basic premise of the course is that the current practice of "binge watching" one's favorite shows should be a heightened experience rather than a guilty pleasure, one akin to reading a novel. Watching a complex and sophisticated TV narrative involves taking into account the viewer's positionality as a filmic consumer, textual critic and social commentator. The class will consider various theoretical approaches to television narrative, beginning with ideas gleaned from the discourse of visual literacy, and proceed by applying textual analysis adapted from the more traditional modes of literary studies and film analysis. A combination of critical and evaluative sources will be examined, including book-length studies of the series, individual essays based on the series' appeal to style, American popular culture, advertising, gender roles, race, and 60s nostalgia. Additionally, the recent phenomenon of the "series recap" will serve as the touchstone to the class's collective viewing of the series and students will be challenged to synthesize and assess these popular on-line critiques as they draft their own recaps and creative readings of the episodes. The entire first two seasons of Mad Men will be studied and the invaluable resource of director/producer commentaries will be incorporated into the study of the series with a view to acquiring critical insights and analytical skills that may be applied to other quality TV series that students currently enjoy watching.

Prerequisites:

Take WRI-102

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is an exploration of careers in Teaching English and Composition at the secondary and post-secondary level. Students will engage with theories of teaching and learning, practice designing assignments and lesson plans, and compose pedagogy statements that outline their informed stance on teaching. Students will consider the theoretical and practical aspects, or praxis, of a career in teaching as they learn about the day-to-day work of English teachers and the big ideas and commitments that drive people to teach.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course seeks to answer the following questions. What is literature? Why do we study literature? What methods aid the study of literature? What are English Studies all about? This course extends reading and writing skills, and provides more specialized terms, knowledge, and approaches to prepare students for study at the junior and senior level. Topics vary from term to term.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to medieval literature, this course will focus on short readings from various genres, such as the lyric, chronicle, fable, with emphasis on the romance.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course provides a thorough review and analysis of the rules of standard English grammar and usage, including the debate between prescriptive and descriptive grammar, the origin and authority of the rules taught in school and in handbooks of English, and the insights of modern linguistics. Normally offered alternate years

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to Periclean Athens, the golden age of classical Greek literature and thought. Close readings of selections from the historians Herodotus and Thucydides, the dramatists Aeschylus and Euripides, the poetry of Pindar, and Plato's great work on politics, The Republic. Cross-listed with History 336.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Ancient Greek and Roman myths, their motifs, themes and interpretations. Normally offered every third year.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course serves as the vehicle for training students who have been hired as writing tutors at CLAS. Students will be trained a one-on-one basis and will discuss a tutoring experience they have had in CLAS the previous week each class.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of ENG 320. This course serves as the vehicle for training students who have been hired as writing tutors at CLAS. Students will be trained a one-on-one basis and will discuss a tutoring experience they have had in CLAS the previous week each class.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Shakespeare's background and development as a dramatist through an examination of selected comedies. Collateral reading of the minor plays and Shakespeare criticism. Normally offered every third semester.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Shakespeare's major tragedies reflecting the range, resourcefulness, and power of his dramaturgy. Collateral reading in Shakespeare criticism. Normally offered every third semester.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A thematic study of Shakespeare's plays from the major genres- comedies, tragedies, histories, and romances. The course will examine playtexts, original source-texts, modern adaptations, and a range of Shakespearean criticism. The theme for this course will change yearly.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to Periclean Athens, the golden age of classical Greek literature and thought. Close readings of selections from the historians Herodotus and Thucydides, the dramatists Aeschylus and Euripides, the poetry of Pindar, and Plato's great work on politics, The Republic. Cross-listed with ENG 316.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will explore the concept of decadence as a transitional literary movement bridging the 19th and 20th centuries beginning with the proto-decadent writings of E.A. Poe and proceeding to foundational texts such as Baudelaire's The Flowers of Evil and Wilde's Dorian Gray. Later manifestations of decadence in 20th century England, Europe and America will also be explored (Cavafy, H.D., Waugh, Isherwood, Kushner) with a view to understanding the ongoing relevance of decadence and the current debate over cultural decline. Readings will include poetic, narrative and dramatic works as well as seminal texts and manifestos defining the movement. Film adaptations will also be viewed.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course we will read widely in the poetry and prose of the Romantic Period (1780-1830), including the work of well-known Romantic poets such as Wordsworth, Byron, and Keats as well as other important authors including Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Shelley, Charlotte Smith, and Olaudah Equiano. We will place the influential works of these authors in the context of their turbulent historical period and their often-dramatic lives, considering what Romantic literature has to tell us about the individual, scientific advancement, the environment, social justice, and the act of authorship itself.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course focuses on Gothic literature by women writers, from its origins in the 18th century to the present, focusing primarily on 20th century writers. The novels, short stories, and films we will discuss involve haunted houses, secret chambers, madness, and other Gothic tropes. Writers to be studied will include Charlotte Bronte, Daphne du Maurier, Shirley Jackson, Jean Rhys, Angela Carter, and others.

Prerequisites:

Take WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces Jane Austen's major novels, including Pride and Prejudice and Mansfield Park, along with relevant current scholarship and contextualizing historical material. Contemporary parodies, updates, and film adaptations of Austen's work will also be considered. Topics to include the history of the novel, gender and authorship, and narrative theory.

Prerequisites:

Take WRI-102 or WRI-H103. Restricted to CAS Honors Students Only.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces Jane Austen's major novels, including Pride and Prejudice and Mansfield Park, along with relevant current scholarship and contextualizing historical material. Contemporary parodies, updates, and film adaptations of Austen's work will also be considered. Topics to include the history of the novel, gender and authorship, and narrative theory.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores American and African American literature in the context of cosmopolitan thought and revolutionary action. This course considers how writers balance their interest in building a national culture with their desire for global adventure and their concern for matters of race, gender, politics, and civil rights that transcend their time and place. Includes readings from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as well as a contemporary American journalist's memoir about life in the Middle East.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An extended study of three major novels by Hawthorne, Melville and Stowe as prototypes of the Great American Novel: an elusive achievement that seeks to capture the essence of American experience. This course confronts issues of sin and redemption, ambition and failure, racial and national identity, and aesthetic and cultural value, and it assesses the imaginative influence of these foundational narratives in two contemporary rewritings by Mukherjee and Reed. This course requires prior approval in order to count towards the Women's and Gender Studies Minor. Students should consult with the instructor and the director of the WGS Minor no later than the first week of classes.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An investigation of the lives and works of two of nineteenth-century America's greatest and most original poets. Topics will include types of poetic language and formal structure, the work of the poetic imagination in transforming observations of the world into art, and the ways in which poets process the idea of death and the reality of war. Finally, this course examines Whitman and Dickinson's impact on American popular culture as well as on the writings of modern poets and literary critics.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

African-American writing from the beginning through the present. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

Take WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Study of 19th and 20th century writing on the American West by American women in the form of novels, memoirs, and short stories. Regularly assigned reading responses and essays on the readings as well as discussion questions and quizzes provide the basis for the study of the gendering of the "frontier" and literature of the West by American women authors.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The course will cover major works of American fiction from the period between the end of the American war in Vietnam and the present. The course will emphasize fiction reflecting America's cultural diversity and current trends in fiction.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to selected Asian-American writers with an emphasis on socio-cultural issues, such as race, gender and ethnicity. Authors include Bulosan, Hwang, Jen, Kingston, Lee, Mukherjee, Odada, and Tan.

Prerequisites:

ENG-212

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An intensive workshop in which the student will be required to write original fiction. The focus of the course will be on the student's own work, submitted on a weekly basis. The course will also provide the student writer with practical experience in matters of plot, character, dialogue, structure, etc. Normally offered annually.

Prerequisites:

ENG-212

Credits:

4.00

Description:

For students interested in writing autobiography and/or other forms of the personal essay. Topics can include childhood, place, sexuality, religion, work, the nature of memory. The focus will be on the writing process, with students presenting work-in-progress to the class for discussion and revision. The student should plan to read models of creative non-fiction. Normally offered annually.

Prerequisites:

ENG-212

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An intensive workshop course in which the student will be required to write original poetry for each class meeting. The focus of the course will be on the student's own work. We will examine the highly individual processes of composition and revision, and the methods writers use to keep their own practice of poetry alive and well. We will also examine as many of the constituent elements of poetry as possible, from image and rhythm to line and structure. Normally offered annually.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students interested in the world of literary publishing will explore both traditional print and online publishing models, the importance of literary journals, and the best practices of literary citizenship, including how to write reviews, conduct author interviews, and promote the work of journals and presses through blogging and other social media. Students will learn from a variety of industry professionals, and work to produce original content that furthers the mission of Suffolk's two literary journals: Salamander, which is nationally distributed twice a year and edited professionally, and Venture, which is produced annually and edited by Suffolk students.

Prerequisites:

WRI 102 or WRI H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

John Theibault, Director of the South Jersey Center for Digital Humanities, defines this burgeoning field as "an umbrella concept bringing together all of the different ways in which the computer, and especially the internet, have transformed humanities work. It includes using computer methods to mark and analyze analog humanities products, adapting the distinctive features of the World Wide Web for the production and presentation of humanities research, and bringing humanities methods to the evaluation of the entirely new genres of expression made possible by computers." Writing for Digital Media will focus on the latter two of these priorities: using digital tools for creative and communicative purposes, and understanding the rhetorical implications of writing in digital formats and spaces. Certainly, we can observe how traditional, analog forms of writing have been adapted for digital spaces in the proliferation of online magazines, newspapers, and literary journals, but digital technologies have also invented new genres of writing that English majors and other CAS students will find worthwhile to study alongside traditional fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry genres such as blogs, wikis, GIFS, text visualizations, social media narratives, crowdsourced documents, Twitter essays, interactive maps and calendars, and many more. These new genres can satisfy creative urges to use intermedia, organize information into user-friendly presentations, such as infographics, websites, and public-access archives, and communicate information about a company, nonprofit organization, product, initiative, or event.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course studies 19th and 20th century women writers and questions the type of women who write, what they write about, and why they write. Themes we examine include domesticity, assimilation, and madness. Authors studied in the past have included Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, Anzia Yezierska, Nella Larsen, and Sylvia Plath. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course explores how literature helps us imagine better worlds and survive when things go horribly wrong. In his book Utopia, Thomas More created a fictional island that was both a "good place" and "no place," and ever since, writers and dreamers have tried to build their own utopias on principles of equality, simplicity, and happiness. As we discuss novels, poems, manifestos, and films from the 19th through the 21st centuries, we will consider how dystopias reflect anxieties about technology, gender inequality, racial injustice, and climate change as well as how utopias give us hope for our shared future.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this class we will explore an often-ignored aspect of literature: the physical way, manuscripts, books, e-readers, it has been produced and circulated to readers through the centuries. Through lectures, hands-on workshops, field trips, and written assignments, we will practice skills including paper- and ink-making, critical editing, and printing. Students will learn about the relationship between writing and its material contexts, and work with a wide range of historical literary materials in local archives, from handwritten manuscripts to Victorian magazines. In understanding how the book has developed through history, the class will reconsider the old saying, "don't judge a book by its cover!"

Prerequisites:

Any ENG course except for WRI-101

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course studies the expressive and cognitive approaches to the writing process through personal journal writing, metaphor use and a review of grammar and stylistics. Written assignments emphasize discovery and invention as well as the revising of academic prose. Normally offered every other year.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course explores research and writing in the context of qualitative research, field work and bibliography. This course requires a lengthy report and project based on extended field work of at least 25 hours at an off-campus research site chosen by the student, approved by the instructor, and validated by a field site representative.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An Exploration of Post-colonial literature and how the "empire writes back" following the collapse of European colonialism. Special emphasis will be placed on the legacy of British Colonial rule and the contemporary use of literature and the English Language to both resist and problematize Eurocentric cultural assumptions. Authors studied will include E.M. Foster, Salman Rushdie, J.M. Coetzee, Anita Desai, Hanif Kureishi, and Zadie Smith, among others. Students will be introduced to Post-colonial critical theory and view film adaptations of literary texts.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the rhetoric of memoirs written primarily by international figures who seek to use personal stories to shape readers' perspectives on political issues. After a brief introduction to rhetorical theory and to the genre of memoir, this course will examine contemporary memoirs that address such issues as racism, sexism, religious extremism, war, and genocide.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course studies a variety of workplace writing including summaries,memos, letters, directions, descriptions, reports and other technical and professional documents. Students may be required to complete certain assignments in collaborative teams. Document design and layout will also be emphasized. Normally offered alternate years

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Writers of the Irish Literary Revival, from the 1890s to the 1930s. Readings from Yeats, Joyce, Synge, O'Casey, and O'Flaherty. The influence of Anglo-Irish history on Irish writers.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103 with a minimum grade of B+

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A survey of writings in Modern Greek from 1821 to the present exploring Hellenism and the Greek cultural identity. Authors studied will include Kostis Palamas, Georgios Vizyinos, Alexandros Papadiamantis, Stratis Myrivilis, Photis Kontoglou, Dido Sotiriou, George Seferis, Constantine Cavafy, and Odysseas Elytis. A section of the syllabus will be reserved for the Greek-American/diaspora writers Helen Papanikolas, Elia Kazan, Jeffrey Eugenides, Olga Broumas, and Tryfon Tolides. Films and music traditions will be sampled as well.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This class will engage with the major novels and selected literary writings of two of the twentieth century's most important modernist voices, Virginia Woolf and E.M. Forster. We will approach their writings within the intellectual framework of British modernism and the cultural context of the Bloomsbury Group out of which they emerged. Special attention will be paid to their theoretical writings on fiction as well as their respective contributions to feminism and queer theory. The class will also view cinematic adaptations of certain novels and discuss how these films have contributed to the enduring appeal and status of these texts as classics of twentieth-century fiction.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A survey of major works of literature and thought crucial to the transformation of pagan models of reason to Christian systems of belief, including works by Plato and Plotinus, St. Augustine and Dante. Of central concern is the changing conception of love, from Eros to Agape. Note: This course is cross-listed with HST 339.

Prerequisites:

Any 200-level English course

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A study of these poems by the Roman poet with a focus on the issues of translation.

Prerequisites:

Any 200-level English course

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A week by week reading of the Mesopotamian Epic that predates the Iliad by one thousand years, and is a masterpiece of heroic endurance and tragic insight. Discussions will be led by David Ferry, whose beautiful translation the class will use as text.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course will conduct close reading and discussion of selections from classical Greek and Roman texts, as well as from ancient Mesopotamian texts, highlighting passages that trace the descent to the underworld. Some of these readings include: the realm of the shades in Gilgamesh, the myth of Orpheus and Eurydice in Virgil, Homer's Odysseus and Achilles in Hades, the source of the River Styx in Pausanias.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will examine some of the fiction, non-fiction, and poetry produced in response to the Vietnam War and the most recent war in Iraq. In addition to comparing the literature that has emerged from these two very different wars, these texts will also be examined in relation to peace studies, a field in which there is an emerging consensus that literature and the arts must play a central role in examining questions of war and peace.

Prerequisites:

Any 200 level ENG course.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A close reading of verse passages from various texts of narrative and lyric poetry. In particular the Roman absorption of, and resistance to, their Greek literary inheritance will be stressed.

Prerequisites:

Any 200-level English course

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course represents a journey through the poetry of Horace, contemporary of Virgil and celebrated poet of the Pax Romana. Discussions will be led by David Ferry, whose beautiful translation of Horace's poetry the class will use as text.

Prerequisites:

Take ENG-212

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Salamander is a nationally known professional literary journal published from the Suffolk University English Department. In the Salamander Practicum course

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course offers an introduction to the Golden Age of Roman culture and power. Close readings of selections from major historians, poets, political thinkers, and philosophers will be examined in the context of Augustan Rome. Topics such as pietas, virtus, and gravitas, as well as the competing claims of public duty and private devotion, stoic maxim and erotic love lyric, will be discussed from the perspectives of writers such as Virgil, Livy, Tacitus, Horace, Catullus, and Lucretius. Note: This course is cross-listed with HST 304. Normally offered in alternate years.

Prerequisites:

Take WRI-102 or WRI-H103. CAS Honors students, English majors and minors with 3.5 GPA, or instructor permission.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Why have so many great American writers (and their literary characters) left the United States, seeking inspiration and fulfillment elsewhere? Following three essential themes- consumption, liberation, and critique- this Honors seminar travels alongside writers from the 19th-century past to the 21st-century present as it investigates the extent to which American literature has benefited from their adventurous spirit and cosmopolitan outlook. What does Ernest Hemingway's celebration of the pleasures of Europe in A Moveable Feast have in common with Elizabeth Gilbert's pursuit of personal contentment in Eat, Pray, Love? In what ways does Frederick Douglass's transatlantic antislavery activism in My Bondage and My Freedom anticipate James Baldwin's exploration of LGBTQ identity in Giovanni's Room? Can we trace journalist Suzy Hansen's vision of today's "post-American world" back to pioneering foreign correspondent Margaret Fuller's insistence that the U.S. could do better in its practice of democracy? As we interrogate familiar myths of expatriates as members of a "Lost Generation," we will reflect on how much writers and readers actually gain from critical distance that puts American experiences in perspective.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

By special arrangement, a junior or senior may pursue an independent research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Consent of instructor and chairperson required. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103; Honors students only

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

By special arrangement, a junior or senior may pursue an independent research project under the supervision of a faculty member. Consent of instructor and chairperson required. Offered every semester.