MPA/MSMHC Dual Degree

Master of Public Administration/Master of Science in Mental Health Counseling

Learn more about this dual degree

This 28-course program consists of:

  • Eight required MPA courses (24 credits)
  • Two MPA electives (6 credits)
  • Fourteen required Counseling courses (48 credits)
  • Four Counseling electives (12 credits)

The Mental Health Counseling degree requirements must be completed during the first two years of full-time program matriculation, beginning in the fall semester.

Upon completion of all MPA and MSMHC requirements, students receive two degrees.

Degree Requirements: 28 courses, 90 credits

MPA Requirements: 10 courses, 30 credits

MPA Core (8 courses, 24 credits)

Credits:

3

Description:

This introductory graduate-level course provides an overview of public administration and service and serves as a basis for further advanced studies in the MPA program. This course covers the structure, functions, and process of public service organizations at various levels, including governments and nonprofit organizations. Students explore historical trends, ethical considerations, and political rationale for the present operations of public service.

Credits:

3

Description:

This course demonstrates how issues, problems, and questions surrounding public policies, program operations, and administrative systems can be structured as hypotheses and made amendable to resolution through the application of social science research techniques. The elements of research design such as surveys, true experiments, quasi-experiments, case studies and non-experimental studies are described, as well as sampling techniques and descriptive statistics. Ethical issues related to employment of these methods in the policy making process are also explored. The course content is presented as a way to reduce managerial uncertainty regarding alternative courses of action.

Credits:

3

Description:

This course introduces the fundamentals of budgeting, financial management, and revenue systems. Course goals include: A heightened awareness of the democratic ideals and values that must inform budgeting and financial management decisions, including a commitment to ethics, transparency and accountability; an understanding of the budget process and the distinctive features of budgetary decisions making; an understanding of the critical linkage between budgeting and financial management systems and the capacity of an organization to achieve its strategic goals; the ability to use the budget and financial reports as planning and management tools; knowledge of the basic principles of taxation as well as the structures and functions of federal, state, and local revenue systems. The course emphasizes knowledge and skills essential to the full range of public service careers.

Prerequisites:

PAD 712

Credits:

3

Description:

Pre-requisite: PAD 712 Quantitative analysis introduces basic statistical techniques used to analyze and draw conclusions from citizen and client surveys; program and policy evaluations; and performance and operations data. These techniques include chi square, lambda, gamma, correlations, and analysis of variance, t test correlations, and multivariate regression. Knowledge of these statistical techniques empowers managers by giving them the ability to evaluate the work of consultants, access the policy and management of literature, and analyze data using the analytical tools available in commonly uses statistical software, such as Microsoft Excel and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).

Credits:

3

Description:

This course will explore complex issues in public and non-profit human resource management (HRM) by examining policies and practices that support and enhance the value and contribution of individuals in these organizations.

Credits:

3

Description:

Students explore small groups and organization operations, practices, behaviors, and structures. They develop techniques for maximizing efficiency and/or effectiveness; evaluations analysis; concepts and applications of Classicists; leadership; organizational development, and result-oriented management; as well as elements of reorganization, innovation and change.

Credits:

3

Description:

Leadership is a critical ingredient of successful communities and organizations. This course develops a diagnostic framework as well as strategies and tactics to mobilized adaptive work, engage multiple government, no-profit, and business stakeholders, and build awareness and momentum for actions at all levels of government and community and in one's organization. It introduces the catalytic model of leadership and applies it to the ethical handling of societal and organizational problems. Students' leadership competencies are reviewed and improved. This course is designed for people from diverse backgrounds with varied experienced in the leadership role.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students that have completed 30 credits.

Credits:

3

Description:

Prerequisite: Students must have completed 30 credit hours. Students will integrate the substance of previous courses in order to develop a capacity for strategic management based on a personal perspective of the role of the professional manager in the policy making process. This holistic perspective is expressed in an extensive research paper that describes the leadership role of the professional manager and defines a basis for ethical action. The course features the review of research articles, the discussion of case studies, and a consideration of future trends in public and non-profit management.

MPA Electives (2 courses, 6 credits)

Choose from any PAD 800- or 900-level courses

Students must complete 30 credit hours in the Institute for Public Service; PAD and COUNS electives are not interchangeable.

Mental Health Counseling (MHC) Requirements: 18 courses, 60 credits

MHC Core (5 courses, 15 credits)

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students

Credits:

3

Description:

This course examines the process of human development across the lifespan. While it will focus primarily on psychological processes, the intersection with biological and social processes will be explored as well. The major psychological theories of cognitive, social and emotional development will be covered as will the foundations for individual differences. Special emphasis will be placed on topics of interest to people entering the counseling professions. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

Principles, concepts and methods of research design and statistics associated with psychological and educational research. Practical applications of research studies to a diverse range of interests in education, psychology and counseling. Offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

An overview of the legal issues confronting counselors, human services providers and administrators. Study of regulatory and licensing matters, standards of care, confidentiality laws, mental health and disability laws and family law, constitutional issues, malpractice and legal/ethical dilemmas in human services.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

A survey of problems and issues confronting cultural diversity. The study of ethnicity and sexual orientation as they influence the development of identity. Implications for counseling strategies. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

A study of the practical and theoretical aspects of counseling small groups. There will be provision for a laboratory experience in which students participate in a group and study the dynamics of behavior as this group develops. Group stages of development and leadership skills will also be examined. Normally offered yearly.

Counseling Requirements (8 courses, 30 credits)

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students

Credits:

3

Description:

Analysis of selected counseling theories representative of the field of counseling psychology. Theories will be selected from the following areas: Psychoanalytic, Psychosocial, Rational, Cognitive Behavioral/Learning Theory, Person-Centered, and Existential Theory. Treatment goals and techniques will be explored.

Prerequisites:

TAKE COUNS-717. Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

The study of the nature of mental disorders; central concepts and processes. Psychogenesis, psychodynamics, role of anxiety, and clinical assessment using the DSM-IV.

Prerequisites:

COUNS-713(may be taken concurrently). Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

Evaluating, administering, scoring, interpreting, and reporting results of standardized tests of personality, academic performance, cognitive functioning, aptitude, and achievement. Self-study development and assessment of testing programs. Critical issues in testing. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

An introduction to the fundamental techniques and methods of interpersonal relationships, self-examination, and field visits in relation to the role of the professional counselor. The course will involve skill building through role playing, video and/or audio taping. Normally offered spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

Application of skills in an assigned field placement (school, agency or industry). Students will spend fifteen hours per week in field work and participate in weekly group sessions at the University for the evaluation of progress. Open only to degree candidates in Mental Health Counseling. Offered fall semester.

Prerequisites:

Take COUNS-738. Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

Continuation of COUNS 738 with an opportunity to assume increased responsibility for clients under supervision. Failure to successfully complete the practicum field experience for any reason following two attempts will result in termination from the program. Offered spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Take COUNS-738 COUNS-739. Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

6

Description:

Application of skills in an approved field placement (school, clinic, hospital, agency, industry) totaling 300 clock hours. The opportunity to develop advanced skills and to integrate professional knowledge appropriate to the field experience. Failure to successfully complete the practicum field experience for any reason following two attempts will result in termination from the program. Offered fall semester.

Prerequisites:

Take COUNS-740. Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

6

Description:

Continuation of Counseling Internship I with advanced responsibilities totaling 300 clock hours. Exploration of an area of individual specialization. Failure to successfully complete the practicum field experience for any reason following two attempts will result in termination from the program. Offered spring semester.

Note: COUNS-740 and COUNS-741 are each taken for 6 credits.

Special Treatment Issue Requirement (1 course, 3 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

A study of the origin, contributing factors, and implications of drug and alcohol misuse. Various stages and manifestations of abuse/ dependence will be considered and current treatment modalities will be explored.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

The anatomy, physiology and psychology of human sexual functioning are reviewed. Etiology, interpersonal dynamics, and treatment of sexual dysfunctions are reviewed.

Note: Other option may be taken as an elective.

MHC Electives (4 courses, 12 credits)

Choose four of the following:

Prerequisites:

COUNS-717. Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

The interface of psychology and the law will be examined in the context of forensic evaluations performed for courts, attorneys and related agencies or facilities. Topics ranging from Competency to Stand Trial and Criminal Responsibility to termination of parental rights and custody and visitation evaluations will be explored. Practical applications of the skills and knowledge domains needed to perform forensic evaluations will be emphasized, as will the study of relevant laws and regulations as applied to forensic assessment. Discussion will include specialized forensic topics such as the evaluation of juvenile sexual offenders and the forensic use of psychological testing.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

Selected models of family therapy will be explored. Special emphasis will be placed on assessment and the acquisition of treatment strategies proven to be effective for counselors in helping families cope with developmental stresses. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

This course explores the major psychological disorders of childhood and adolescence from biological, psychological, and sociocultural perspectives. Attention-deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders, Feeding and Eating Disorders, anxiety and depression are among the disorders explored. Student interest determines other topics. Assessment, treatment, and outcome studies are also discussed. Completion of EHS 701 or EHS 712 is recommended before taking this course. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

An opportunity to learn the history of domestic violence including battering, child abuse and child neglect, and the legal response to it. Focus will be on Massachusetts Law and its response, especially the Abuse Prevention Act, its application and enforcement, and on laws protecting children from abuse and neglect. Filings, law office issues and special issues in dealing with battered women and abused and neglected children will be included with the psychological issues, cultural issues, and advocacy possibilities. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

1.00- 3.00

Description:

Members of the Department will meet with students to direct their research in areas of special interest to them. Projects will be authorized upon the recommendations of the Department Chairperson and with the approval of the Dean.

Note: Coursework in related disciplines may be elected, subject to approval.

MHC Practicum and Internship

It is during the Counseling Skills Lab (COUNS-737) and the Counseling Practica (COUNS-738 and COUNS-739) that a student demonstrates the ability to translate training into professional judgments and techniques. Students are required to apply formally for the Counseling Internship and to consult with their faculty advisors regarding their field placements. The Counseling Skills Laboratory and the Practicum must be completed with a grade of “B” (3.0) or higher. After two failed attempts to satisfactorily complete the clinical practicum and/or internship, students will be subject to dismissal from the program at the discretion of faculty. Student engagement in unethical behavior as defined by the American Counseling Association (ACA) will be subject to discipline, including potential dismissal from the program, at the time the indiscretion occurs.

Public Administration Courses

Credits:

3

Description:

This introductory graduate-level course provides an overview of public administration and service and serves as a basis for further advanced studies in the MPA program. This course covers the structure, functions, and process of public service organizations at various levels, including governments and nonprofit organizations. Students explore historical trends, ethical considerations, and political rationale for the present operations of public service.

Credits:

3

Description:

This course demonstrates how issues, problems, and questions surrounding public policies, program operations, and administrative systems can be structured as hypotheses and made amendable to resolution through the application of social science research techniques. The elements of research design such as surveys, true experiments, quasi-experiments, case studies and non-experimental studies are described, as well as sampling techniques and descriptive statistics. Ethical issues related to employment of these methods in the policy making process are also explored. The course content is presented as a way to reduce managerial uncertainty regarding alternative courses of action.

Credits:

3

Description:

This course introduces the fundamentals of budgeting, financial management, and revenue systems. Course goals include: A heightened awareness of the democratic ideals and values that must inform budgeting and financial management decisions, including a commitment to ethics, transparency and accountability; an understanding of the budget process and the distinctive features of budgetary decisions making; an understanding of the critical linkage between budgeting and financial management systems and the capacity of an organization to achieve its strategic goals; the ability to use the budget and financial reports as planning and management tools; knowledge of the basic principles of taxation as well as the structures and functions of federal, state, and local revenue systems. The course emphasizes knowledge and skills essential to the full range of public service careers.

Prerequisites:

PAD 712

Credits:

3

Description:

Pre-requisite: PAD 712 Quantitative analysis introduces basic statistical techniques used to analyze and draw conclusions from citizen and client surveys; program and policy evaluations; and performance and operations data. These techniques include chi square, lambda, gamma, correlations, and analysis of variance, t test correlations, and multivariate regression. Knowledge of these statistical techniques empowers managers by giving them the ability to evaluate the work of consultants, access the policy and management of literature, and analyze data using the analytical tools available in commonly uses statistical software, such as Microsoft Excel and the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).

Credits:

3

Description:

This course will explore complex issues in public and non-profit human resource management (HRM) by examining policies and practices that support and enhance the value and contribution of individuals in these organizations.

Credits:

3

Description:

Students explore small groups and organization operations, practices, behaviors, and structures. They develop techniques for maximizing efficiency and/or effectiveness; evaluations analysis; concepts and applications of Classicists; leadership; organizational development, and result-oriented management; as well as elements of reorganization, innovation and change.

Credits:

3

Description:

Leadership is a critical ingredient of successful communities and organizations. This course develops a diagnostic framework as well as strategies and tactics to mobilized adaptive work, engage multiple government, no-profit, and business stakeholders, and build awareness and momentum for actions at all levels of government and community and in one's organization. It introduces the catalytic model of leadership and applies it to the ethical handling of societal and organizational problems. Students' leadership competencies are reviewed and improved. This course is designed for people from diverse backgrounds with varied experienced in the leadership role.

Credits:

3

Description:

Students review the basis for administrative practice. They learn legal interpretation of statutes, regulations, and proposed legislation that impact public administration and public policy.

Credits:

3

Description:

Instructor's signature required for registration. Students examine the interrelations among the federal executive, Congressional committees, constituency groups, and federal administrative agencies in the formulation and implementation of federal policies. Also discussed are managerial functions (e.g., personnel regulations, program evaluations, and intergovernmental design). This course includes a 3-day travel seminar to Washington D.C.

Credits:

3

Description:

Examination of patterns of intergovernmental operations and administration. Special emphasis on changing techniques of intergovernmental management and emerging patterns of intergovernmental relations. Issues such as regionalism, program mandates, and resource management will be explored.

Credits:

3

Description:

The primary focus will be on understanding the operational and strategic leadership aspects of managing mission driven, public service organizations. Specific emphasis will be placed on nonprofit corporations, including coursework that explores the legal, structural, and operational issues that are particular to such organizations.

Credits:

3

Description:

This is an intensive analysis of selected public policy challenges. Using a combination of case studies, theoretical writings, and real-time intelligence and reports, students discuss and compare the substance, practices, and impacts of contemporary public policy issues. Through this examination students will consider operations and methodologies used to understand and tackle public policy systems analysis. Examples are used to demonstrate how these analytical methods can be used to make more informed policy decisions and assessments. Topics for this course will vary and students may take this course more than once as long as the topic (title) is different.

Credits:

3

Description:

This course is built on the premise that state and local government leaders have an obligation to fully develop the human resources, network relationships and physical assets available to them so as to increase the value of their organizations to the public. Through case studies, students will explore the successes and failures of state and local government leaders and their strategies in major policy arenas, such as public safety, health and welfare, education, then environment and economic development. Through readings, students will examine state and local government structures and functions, political culture, and administrative reforms.

Credits:

3

Description:

PAD 819 covers both Grant seeking and Grant writing. Students, individually, but most often in teams, work with a nonprofit or government organization to develop a project idea and prepare a Master Grant Proposal and a Grant Application to be submitted to a most-likely-to-fund Grand maker. Classes focus on step-by-step Grant writing & Grant seeking process, and the instructor also consults with student-Grant writers individually an via Blackboard.

Credits:

3

Description:

A decision-making course focusing on applying high speed information systems to support administrative and managerial functions. PMIS incorporates organizational assessments leading to purchasing computer hardware and software, office automation, and diverse communications including electronic automation, and diverse communications including electronic mail, Internet, telecommunications, and networking. Current events, professional journals and the technology presently used will be highlighted.

Credits:

3

Description:

An introduction to the health system, its origins, its components, and how they are organized and interrelated; determinants of health and disease; the role of professions, institutions, consumers, and government; landmark legislation, and social responses to the system.

Credits:

3

Description:

Recessions and economic stagnation, loss of economic base, and natural disasters have significant consequences for the effectiveness of governments and nonprofits, yet during times of fiscal crisis these organizations carry more responsibility as people look to these organizations for leadership and relief from hardships. This course addresses strategies to prepare for and cope with fiscal crises. Students will learn to assess economic and financial vulnerability, develop management and budget methodologies that are adaptable to changing economic conditions, and develop strategies to ensure long-term financial viability and effectiveness of governments and nonprofits.

Credits:

3

Description:

Students develop techniques and directives related to communication processing. Both interpersonal communication and electronic information flow will be examined. Communication skills, styles, and strategies will be stressed through use of all media. Students will also analyze the theory and practice of public service marketing in relation to the administration of multiple sectors including private, public, nonprofit and health care by looking at innovative public service products and services.

Credits:

3

Description:

Participants in this course will examine a variety of innovations that attempt to reap the benefits of diverse engagement by bringing together varied parties to forge new solutions to public service challenges. Across a variety of policy areas, practitioners have developed innovative policies and practices that engage citizens in public problem-solving, giving power to groups made up of citizens and public employees, and holding them accountable for producing and measuring results. Citizens play a critical and increasingly influential role in government decision-making and performance. As a result, leaders must understand the complexity of citizen participation and build skills for effective citizen engagement.

Credits:

3

Description:

Students examine disability issues of health, mental health, substance abuse, special education, long-term illnesses including HIV/AIDS, sensory impairments, and early-life and end-of-life issues, including genetics.

Credits:

3

Description:

In this course, students study the ethical, moral, and legal dilemmas in public and private managerial operations. The gray areas of decision-making provide case studies for exploration of effective ethical practices. Management approaches to deter fraud, waste, abuse, and corrupt practices are identified as are the tools and strategies to strengthen the organizational ethic and culture in business and government. Ethical management strategies designed to improve productivity within organizations are explored.

Credits:

3

Description:

Students learn effective approaches to leadership by examining leadership models, styles, and strategies. Emphasis is placed on the values and ethics of successful managerial leadership in public, private, and nonprofit sectors

Prerequisites:

Registration requires instructor approval

Credits:

3

Description:

An opportunity will provided for students to research, experience, analyze, and compare public policy development and implementation in the United States, and in other nations like Dublin, Ireland, and San Juan, Puerto Rico. The course consists of classroom lectures and independent research on the Suffolk campus as well as at a university related center in another country. Students may pick their specific research topics from a variety of public policy and program subject areas. This course may be taken twice, for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits:

3

Description:

Workplace and labor law affects every manager's ability to achieve the goals and objectives of the organization. Ignorance of the relevant statutes and case law leads to misunderstanding, mismanagement, and substantial legal costs and controversies. This course reviews some of the more significant legal requirements associated with recruitment and selection, performance appraisal, discipline, wages and benefits, etc. Teaching method includes lecture and case analysis.

Credits:

3

Description:

This course is designed to build financial management skills for students who wish to start or advance nonprofit management careers and for students who are likely to interact with nonprofits, through grants, contracts, or partnerships. The course focuses on the effective allocation of resources to programs which, in turn, have been designed to achieve the strategic goals of a nonprofit organization. From this point of view, financial management is not a disconnected management function, but an integral part of what managers do to fulfill as nonprofit organization's mission. Basic financial management knowledge and skills - including financial analysis, budgeting, full-cost accounting, pricing services, performance measurement, control of operations and financial reporting are taught within the context of the organization's strategic goals.

Credits:

3

Description:

This course provides a practical framework for understanding the legal and ethical challenges continually faced by nonprofit human and social service organizations. Students learn about the various levels of legal influence, including federal, state, and city," as well as the ""internal"" laws of the corporation\"

Credits:

3

Description:

This course provides an in-depth look at today's philanthropic trends, patterns, and best practices in fundraising techniques.

Credits:

3

Description:

Instructor's signature required for registration. Students with no public administration work experience will be required to take PAD 859 (Internship) at admission. This is a 3-credit course that requires both class attendance and a 300-hour work requirement. If you are required to take PAD 859, it will count as one of your PAD elective. If you are interested in a career change, and you are not required to take the internship at admission, you may take PAD 859 as an elective.

Credits:

3

Description:

Regardless of your interest or field, data is essential to public managers on a daily basis. Through readings, lectures, casework, guest speakers, and field visits, students will be immersed in both the successes and limitations of this pioneering tool that has reshaped public policy. Through course work students will mine and manipulate data to propose public policy changes that can affect a program, a community, a state, or a country of their choosing. This relevant course is designed to prepare students to be effective leaders in an ever changing world.

Credits:

3

Description:

Linda Melconian served as a Massachusetts State Senator from 1983 to 2005 and was appointed the first woman Majority Floor Leader of the Massachusetts Senate in 1999. Previously, she served as Assistant Counsel to U.S. Speaker of the House Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. She brings years-worth of experience and immense wisdom into all of her courses. Professor Melconian will use her years of experience working on Beacon Hill and getting things done to give students an inside look at how politics & government work at the state level. This incredibly relevant course is designed to give students the tools, connections, and knowledge they need to navigate state government in whatever career they choose.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to students that have completed 30 credits.

Credits:

3

Description:

Prerequisite: Students must have completed 30 credit hours. Students will integrate the substance of previous courses in order to develop a capacity for strategic management based on a personal perspective of the role of the professional manager in the policy making process. This holistic perspective is expressed in an extensive research paper that describes the leadership role of the professional manager and defines a basis for ethical action. The course features the review of research articles, the discussion of case studies, and a consideration of future trends in public and non-profit management.

Credits:

3

Description:

When offered this course focuses upon a special topic in the field of public administration. The course may be retaken for credit when the topics differ. Courses are wither three or 1.5 credits. Examples of 1.5 credit courses are: lobbying, housing, transportation, and managed care.

Credits:

1.00- 6.00

Description:

Instructor and Dean's Approval required for registration. This elective course option involves a student- initiated proposal to a willing and appropriate faculty member for a directed study project. The faculty member and student must concur on a written proposal and final report. Approval by the Office of the Dean is necessary prior to registration.

Counseling Courses

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students

Credits:

3

Description:

This course examines the process of human development across the lifespan. While it will focus primarily on psychological processes, the intersection with biological and social processes will be explored as well. The major psychological theories of cognitive, social and emotional development will be covered as will the foundations for individual differences. Special emphasis will be placed on topics of interest to people entering the counseling professions. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students

Credits:

3

Description:

Analysis of selected counseling theories representative of the field of counseling psychology. Theories will be selected from the following areas: Psychoanalytic, Psychosocial, Rational, Cognitive Behavioral/Learning Theory, Person-Centered, and Existential Theory. Treatment goals and techniques will be explored.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

Principles, concepts and methods of research design and statistics associated with psychological and educational research. Practical applications of research studies to a diverse range of interests in education, psychology and counseling. Offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

TAKE COUNS-717. Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

The study of the nature of mental disorders; central concepts and processes. Psychogenesis, psychodynamics, role of anxiety, and clinical assessment using the DSM-IV.

Prerequisites:

COUNS-713(may be taken concurrently). Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

Evaluating, administering, scoring, interpreting, and reporting results of standardized tests of personality, academic performance, cognitive functioning, aptitude, and achievement. Self-study development and assessment of testing programs. Critical issues in testing. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

COUNS-717. Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

The interface of psychology and the law will be examined in the context of forensic evaluations performed for courts, attorneys and related agencies or facilities. Topics ranging from Competency to Stand Trial and Criminal Responsibility to termination of parental rights and custody and visitation evaluations will be explored. Practical applications of the skills and knowledge domains needed to perform forensic evaluations will be emphasized, as will the study of relevant laws and regulations as applied to forensic assessment. Discussion will include specialized forensic topics such as the evaluation of juvenile sexual offenders and the forensic use of psychological testing.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

Selected models of family therapy will be explored. Special emphasis will be placed on assessment and the acquisition of treatment strategies proven to be effective for counselors in helping families cope with developmental stresses. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

A study of the origin, contributing factors, and implications of drug and alcohol misuse. Various stages and manifestations of abuse/ dependence will be considered and current treatment modalities will be explored.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

An overview of the legal issues confronting counselors, human services providers and administrators. Study of regulatory and licensing matters, standards of care, confidentiality laws, mental health and disability laws and family law, constitutional issues, malpractice and legal/ethical dilemmas in human services.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

The anatomy, physiology and psychology of human sexual functioning are reviewed. Etiology, interpersonal dynamics, and treatment of sexual dysfunctions are reviewed.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

This course explores the major psychological disorders of childhood and adolescence from biological, psychological, and sociocultural perspectives. Attention-deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders, Feeding and Eating Disorders, anxiety and depression are among the disorders explored. Student interest determines other topics. Assessment, treatment, and outcome studies are also discussed. Completion of EHS 701 or EHS 712 is recommended before taking this course. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

A survey of problems and issues confronting cultural diversity. The study of ethnicity and sexual orientation as they influence the development of identity. Implications for counseling strategies. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

A study of the practical and theoretical aspects of counseling small groups. There will be provision for a laboratory experience in which students participate in a group and study the dynamics of behavior as this group develops. Group stages of development and leadership skills will also be examined. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

An introduction to the fundamental techniques and methods of interpersonal relationships, self-examination, and field visits in relation to the role of the professional counselor. The course will involve skill building through role playing, video and/or audio taping. Normally offered spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

Application of skills in an assigned field placement (school, agency or industry). Students will spend fifteen hours per week in field work and participate in weekly group sessions at the University for the evaluation of progress. Open only to degree candidates in Mental Health Counseling. Offered fall semester.

Prerequisites:

Take COUNS-738. Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

Continuation of COUNS 738 with an opportunity to assume increased responsibility for clients under supervision. Failure to successfully complete the practicum field experience for any reason following two attempts will result in termination from the program. Offered spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Take COUNS-738 COUNS-739. Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

6

Description:

Application of skills in an approved field placement (school, clinic, hospital, agency, industry) totaling 300 clock hours. The opportunity to develop advanced skills and to integrate professional knowledge appropriate to the field experience. Failure to successfully complete the practicum field experience for any reason following two attempts will result in termination from the program. Offered fall semester.

Prerequisites:

Take COUNS-740. Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

6

Description:

Continuation of Counseling Internship I with advanced responsibilities totaling 300 clock hours. Exploration of an area of individual specialization. Failure to successfully complete the practicum field experience for any reason following two attempts will result in termination from the program. Offered spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

3

Description:

An opportunity to learn the history of domestic violence including battering, child abuse and child neglect, and the legal response to it. Focus will be on Massachusetts Law and its response, especially the Abuse Prevention Act, its application and enforcement, and on laws protecting children from abuse and neglect. Filings, law office issues and special issues in dealing with battered women and abused and neglected children will be included with the psychological issues, cultural issues, and advocacy possibilities. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students only. Program Director approval required for all other students.

Credits:

1.00- 3.00

Description:

Members of the Department will meet with students to direct their research in areas of special interest to them. Projects will be authorized upon the recommendations of the Department Chairperson and with the approval of the Dean.