MSCJS/MSMHC Dual Degree

Master of Science in Crime and Justice Studies/Master of Science in Mental Health Counseling

Learn more about this dual degree

MSCJS/MSMHC Dual Degree Requirements: 26 courses, 84 credits

The 84-credit dual Master of Science in Crime & Justice Studies/Master of Science in Mental Health Counseling (MSCJS/MSMHC) program consists of 26 courses; eight in the Crime & Justice Studies Program (MSCJS) and 18 in the Mental Health Counseling Program (MSMHC). The dual degree must be declared during the first year of matriculation. Mental Health Counseling degree requirements must be completed during the first two years of full-time MSMHC program matriculation, beginning in the fall semester.

Upon completion of all MSCJS and MSMHC requirements, students receive two degrees.

Crime and Justice Studies Requirements: 8 courses, 24 credits

Core Requirements (3 courses, 9 credits)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Core required course for Master of Science in Crime and Justice Program. This course will examine the relationship among crime, criminal justice and the community as well as the impact of crime on local neighborhoods and community institutions. The role of the community in the criminal justice system and processes of social control are also examined. Topics covered include: local measurement of crime statistics; community policing; prevention and early intervention strategies; community corrections and intermediate sanctions. Strategies for empowering local communities to address the quality of life in the urban environment are also explored.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Core required course for Master of Science in Crime and Justice Studies. A sociological investigation of the relationship between crime and justice in contemporary American society. The possibilities and limits of traditional approaches to crime control are examined in the context of our search for harmony, justice and social change. Problems in evaluating the techniques, goals, and effectiveness of criminal justice agencies and organizations are considered as well as models for rethinking the scope and nature of our responses to crime.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Core required course for Master of Science in Crime and Justice Studies. This course introduces students to the foundations of statistical analysis. Topics include: measures of central tendency; dispersion; probability; sampling distributions; hypothesis testing; correlations; and regression. Using SPSS software, students will be required to apply statistical concepts to existing data resulting in a completed research project.

Electives (5 courses, 15 credits)

Choose five of the following:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will examine the major issues in the adult correctional system. Traditional incarceration as well as pretrial and post-conviction alternatives will be explored. Covered topics may include: prison and jail overcrowding; issues in classification; mental health and incarceration; substance abuse treatment within the prison setting; prison security and disturbances; vocational and educational programming within prisons; ethics and corrections.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines the array of issues concerned with the administration and operation of the juvenile justice system. The historical, philosophical, and legal foundations of the juvenile justice system will be examined along with the legal and philosophical changes within the system in contemporary period. Special attention will be given to the Massachusetts model of juvenile corrections and treatment.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines the administration of justice in the community courts. Topics include the role of the judge; relationships between prosecutors, defense lawyers, and the courts; the relationship between the courts and the police; the pros and cons of plea bargaining' the goals of sentencing; and the clash between victim's rights and defendant's rights. Difficult kinds of cases will be addressed, such as cases of domestic violence, child sexual abuse, and crime relating to substance abuse. Questions concerning judicial accountability and the role of judges in the community will also be raised.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Restorative justice is a philosophical framework which poses an alternative to our current way of thinking about crime and justice. Through restorative justice, all the stakeholders to crime - victims, offenders, families, the wider community and the state - are active in response to crime. This course examines both the theoretical foundation of restorative justice rooted in a variety of legal and religious traditions; and the array of practices associated with restorative justice from around the world. Restorative justice philosophy and practice has impacted all areas of the criminal justice system including policing, probation, courts and the correctional programming for juvenile and adult offenders. Students will be afforded a hands-on experience through role-playing, guest speakers and field trips in the application of restorative values to contemporary justice system. Students will examine the meaning of justice in their own experiences, and be challenged to envision a community-based restorative response to crime and violence.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This seminar focuses on two interrelated types of violence, battering and sexual assault. Both of these crimes have been the subject of intense political organizing, cultural controversy, and criminal justice reform over the past 25 years. Together these issues currently account for a significant portion of the work of the police and courts. The research literature on these topics has increased dramatically in recent years. There are now many studies of women victimized by batterings and rape, and of men who commit these crimes. There is a growing body of research on institutional responses to such violence, particularly criminal justice responses. There is new literature on the racial and class dimensions of this violence, on trauma and recovery, and on battering in lesbian and gay relationships. This course examines these crimes from psychological, sociological, and criminal justice perspectives.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will focus on the policy implications of various sociological theories of crime and punishment. Focus will be on the analysis of various alternative policies within the criminal justice system both within the U.S. and in Europe. Attention will be given to the politics of crime control and to the role of the media, citizen groups and other interest groups in shaping criminal justice policy.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In recent years, public attention to victims of crime has grown enormously. The reasons for this are complex. They include the effects of political organizing by crime victims; increased media attention to crime (often driven by crime stories as entertainment and advertising vehicles); the exploitation of crime victims by politicians; and long-standing community frustrations with the criminal legal system. This course will examine the rise of public attention to crime, the variety of social movements addressing victims of crime, the response of the criminal justice system to victims, and the problems and possibilities regarding new developments concerning crime victims. The course takes the perspective of a critical victimology in that the course materials question official definitions of crime, popular definitions of victims and offenders, and traditional beliefs about justice. Rather than seeing victims and offenders as entirely separate categories, a number of the books address individuals who are both victims and offenders. New developments in "restorative justice" will be presented as an emerging alternative to current problems that victims have reported with the criminal legal system.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Thematic investigations of problems and topics in criminal justice. Special topics include but are not limited to the areas of domestic violence and sexual assault; children and crime; crime; justice and popular culture; restorative justice; community policing; drugs and the law, drug policy, crime mapping, counterterrorism policy, female offenders and criminalistics.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

There are many different ways that communities have responded to violence against women. Both in the United States and around the world, the most common methods have involved either punishment for offenders, efforts to create safety for victims, or attempts to reform offenders. A new set of antiviolence approaches are being developed that go beyond the goals of punishment, safety, and reform. These new approaches, which are loosely grouped together as "community-based responses," seek to mobilizing specific communities against violence; organize women across communities of color; and challenge the theories, practices, and politics of existing antiviolence efforts. These new approaches are the focus of this course.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines two subjects throughout the semester: substantive criminal law (e.g. what is money laundering, the insanity defense, conspiracy?); and criminal procedure: 4th Amendment (search and seizure), 5th Amendment (due process, self-incrimination, double jeopardy, etc.), 6th Amendment (right to a lawyer, public trial, etc..), 8th Amendment (cruel and unusual punishment), 14th Amendment (due process, equal protection of law), 1st Amendment (interaction of criminal law with free expression and with religious rights), and 2nd Amendment (firearms). Unlike other similar undergraduate and graduate courses, this one emphasizes principles and case summaries, de-emphasizes actual cases and case names, and does not entail teaching how to brief (summarize) cases.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines crime and justice in the context of the social inequalities of race, class, and gender. Surprisingly, this is a recent focus within criminology. And yet, without attention to the intersections of race, class, and gender, it is difficult to make sense of victimization, crime, or punishment in the United States today. The course readings include some of the most recent theoretical and empirical studies of these issues. The goals of the course are to develop an understanding of what a race, class, and gender analysis is, and why this is important for individuals working in criminal justice, mental health, and related fields.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This class explores the images of the traditional "bad" girl in films. The course examines the idea of moving beyond merely the delinquent, many images in film suggest that girls and women who break with the socially condoned role of femininity are somehow bad. Girls and women who have power or challenge authority are often portrayed in films as deviant and therefore "bad." Girls and women who are "frigid" are just as "bad" as their sexually promiscuous silver-screen opposites. This course further focuses on the impact of these images on real life social roles for girls and women as well as the symbiotic relationship between fact and fiction.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an overview of the best practices in positive youth development and juvenile programming for delinquency prevention; intervention and treatment. This seminar will explore the cutting edge of programming for youth in a wide range of community-based and institutional settings including schools, social services, and juvenile corrections.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an overview of youth gangs and their sociological underpinnings, which are rooted in poverty and racism. Theories of gang formation and individual gang membership will be examined closely. Study topics include the history of gangs, gangs and criminal behavior, socio-cultural importance of gangs, and strategies to control gang behavior as well as community responses more generally. The course will utilize current gang issues in the US generally and in Massachusetts in particular as a basis to better understand the nuances of youth gangs.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: Permission of the director must be obtained prior to arranging a practicum. 3 credits

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This practicum is designed for the working professional graduate student who does not anticipate a career change but intends to seek advancement in their profession. The purpose of this practicum is to allow the student (1) to integrate what they learned in the classroom with their professional career, (2) to anticipate future opportunities in their profession, and (3) to develop a formal network of well-established colleagues. Students register for one semester and must meet with the practicum advisor in the semester prior to the practicum. Library research, interviewing, and a presentation will be required. Prerequisite: Permission of the director must be obtained prior to arranging a practicum.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: Permission of the director must be obtained prior to arranging a practicum. 3 credits

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This practicum is designed for the working professional graduate student who does not anticipate a career change but intends to seek advancement in their profession. The purpose of this practicum is to allow the student (1) to integrate what they learned in the classroom with their professional career, (2) to anticipate future opportunities in their profession, and (3) to develop a formal network of well-established colleagues. Students register for one semester and must meet with the practicum advisor in the semester prior to the practicum. Library research, interviewing, and a presentation will be required.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the director must be obtained prior to arranging an internship. 3.0 GPA.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Placements are designed for the student who has no previous experience in a criminal justice agency or for the professional who wants to make a career change. The primary objective is to provide the student with the opportunity to experience the day-to-day functioning of a criminal justice agency. The student may register for one or two semesters and must meet with the internship advisor in the semester prior to the placement. A minimum commitment of working one day per week per semester (total minimum of 110 hours per semester) is required.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the director must be obtained prior to arranging an internship. 3.0 GPA

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Placements are designed for the student who has no previous experience in criminal justice or for the professional who wants to make a career change. The primary objective is to provide the student with the opportunity to experience the day-to-day functioning of a criminal justice agency. The student may register for one or two semesters and must meet with the internship advisor in the semester prior to the placement. A minimum commitment of working one day per week per semester (total minimum of 110 hours per semester) is required.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students pursue an in-depth research project under the direction of a qualified member of the graduate faculty.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Drug policy encompasses complex and multi-faceted issues. In comprehending these issues, students will examine the complexity of America's drug policy through a lens of sociology, law, history, economics, geography, and cultural norms. Further, students will explore subjects of class, race, and gender of America's drug policies to gain a more comprehensive grasp the intended and unintended consequences of those policies both nationally and globally. We will evaluate the historical path that these policies have taken from addressing the drug problem from the demand side of providing treatment and preventative programs to the supply side of investing resources in limiting the supply of drugs available in the country.

Mental Health Counseling Requirements: 18 courses, 60 credits

Core Requirements (5 courses, 15 credits)

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines the process of human development across the lifespan. While it will focus primarily on psychological processes, the intersection with biological and social processes will be explored as well. The major psychological theories of cognitive, social and emotional development will be covered as will the foundations for individual differences. Special emphasis will be placed on topics of interest to people entering the counseling professions. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Principles, concepts and methods of research design and statistics associated with psychological and educational research. Practical applications of research studies to a diverse range of interests in education, psychology and counseling. Offered yearly.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An overview of the legal issues confronting counselors, human services providers and administrators. Study of regulatory and licensing matters, standards of care, confidentiality laws, mental health and disability laws and family law, constitutional issues, malpractice and legal/ethical dilemmas in human services.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A survey of problems and issues confronting cultural diversity. The study of ethnicity and sexual orientation as they influence the development of identity. Implications for counseling strategies. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A study of the practical and theoretical aspects of counseling small groups. There will be provision for a laboratory experience in which students participate in a group and study the dynamics of behavior as this group develops. Group stages of development and leadership skills will also be examined. Normally offered yearly.

Counseling Requirements (8 courses, 30 credits)

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Analysis of selected counseling theories representative of the field of counseling psychology. Theories will be selected from the following areas: Psychoanalytic, Psychosocial, Rational, Cognitive Behavioral/Learning Theory, Person-Centered, and Existential Theory. Treatment goals and techniques will be explored.

Prerequisites:

TAKE COUNS-717

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The study of the nature of mental disorders; central concepts and processes. Psychogenesis, psychodynamics, role of anxiety, and clinical assessment using the DSM-IV.

Prerequisites:

COUNS-713(may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Evaluating, administering, scoring, interpreting, and reporting results of standardized tests of personality, academic performance, cognitive functioning, aptitude, and achievement. Self-study development and assessment of testing programs. Critical issues in testing. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An introduction to the fundamental techniques and methods of interpersonal relationships, self-examination, and field visits in relation to the role of the professional counselor. The course will involve skill building through role playing, video and/or audio taping. Normally offered spring semester.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Application of skills in an assigned field placement (school, agency or industry). Students will spend fifteen hours per week in field work and participate in weekly group sessions at the University for the evaluation of progress. Open only to degree candidates in Mental Health Counseling. Offered fall semester.

Prerequisites:

Take COUNS-738

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Continuation of COUNS 738 with an opportunity to assume increased responsibility for clients under supervision. Failure to successfully complete the practicum field experience for any reason following two attempts will result in termination from the program. Offered spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Take COUNS-738 COUNS-739;

Credits:

6.00

Description:

Application of skills in an approved field placement (school, clinic, hospital, agency, industry) totaling 300 clock hours. The opportunity to develop advanced skills and to integrate professional knowledge appropriate to the field experience. Failure to successfully complete the practicum field experience for any reason following two attempts will result in termination from the program. Offered fall semester.

Prerequisites:

Take COUNS-740;

Credits:

6.00

Description:

Continuation of Counseling Internship I with advanced responsibilities totaling 300 clock hours. Exploration of an area of individual specialization. Failure to successfully complete the practicum field experience for any reason following two attempts will result in termination from the program. Offered spring semester.

Note: COUNS-740 and COUNS-741 are each taken for 6 credits.

Special Treatment Issue Requirement (1 course, 3 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A study of the origin, contributing factors, and implications of drug and alcohol misuse. Various stages and manifestations of abuse/ dependence will be considered and current treatment modalities will be explored.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The anatomy, physiology and psychology of human sexual functioning are reviewed. Etiology, interpersonal dynamics, and treatment of sexual dysfunctions are reviewed.

Note: Other option may be taken as an elective.

Electives (4 courses, 12 credits)

Choose four of the following:

Prerequisites:

COUNS-717;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The interface of psychology and the law will be examined in the context of forensic evaluations performed for courts, attorneys and related agencies or facilities. Topics ranging from Competency to Stand Trial and Criminal Responsibility to termination of parental rights and custody and visitation evaluations will be explored. Practical applications of the skills and knowledge domains needed to perform forensic evaluations will be emphasized, as will the study of relevant laws and regulations as applied to forensic assessment. Discussion will include specialized forensic topics such as the evaluation of juvenile sexual offenders and the forensic use of psychological testing.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Selected models of family therapy will be explored. Special emphasis will be placed on assessment and the acquisition of treatment strategies proven to be effective for counselors in helping families cope with developmental stresses. Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course explores the major psychological disorders of childhood and adolescence from biological, psychological, and sociocultural perspectives. Attention-deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders, Feeding and Eating Disorders, anxiety and depression are among the disorders explored. Student interest determines other topics. Assessment, treatment, and outcome studies are also discussed. Completion of EHS 701 or EHS 712 is recommended before taking this course. Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An opportunity to learn the history of domestic violence including battering, child abuse and child neglect, and the legal response to it. Focus will be on Massachusetts Law and its response, especially the Abuse Prevention Act, its application and enforcement, and on laws protecting children from abuse and neglect. Filings, law office issues and special issues in dealing with battered women and abused and neglected children will be included with the psychological issues, cultural issues, and advocacy possibilities. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

1.00- 3.00

Description:

Members of the Department will meet with students to direct their research in areas of special interest to them. Projects will be authorized upon the recommendations of the Department Chairperson and with the approval of the Dean.

Note: Coursework in related disciplines may be elected, subject to approval.

Practicum & Internship

It is during the Counseling Skills Lab (COUNS-737) and the Mental Health Counseling Practica (COUNS-738 and COUNS-739) that a student demonstrates the ability to translate training into professional judgments and techniques. Students are required to apply formally for the Counseling Internship and to consult with their faculty advisors regarding their field placements. The Counseling Skills Laboratory and the Practicum must be completed with a grade of “B” (3.0) or higher. After two failed attempts to satisfactorily complete the clinical practicum and/or internship, students will be subject to dismissal from the program at the discretion of faculty. Student engagement in unethical behavior as defined by the American Counseling Association (ACA) will be subject to discipline, including potential dismissal from the program, at the time the indiscretion occurs.

Crime & Justice Studies Courses

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Core required course for Master of Science in Crime and Justice Program. This course will examine the relationship among crime, criminal justice and the community as well as the impact of crime on local neighborhoods and community institutions. The role of the community in the criminal justice system and processes of social control are also examined. Topics covered include: local measurement of crime statistics; community policing; prevention and early intervention strategies; community corrections and intermediate sanctions. Strategies for empowering local communities to address the quality of life in the urban environment are also explored.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will examine the major issues in the adult correctional system. Traditional incarceration as well as pretrial and post-conviction alternatives will be explored. Covered topics may include: prison and jail overcrowding; issues in classification; mental health and incarceration; substance abuse treatment within the prison setting; prison security and disturbances; vocational and educational programming within prisons; ethics and corrections.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines the array of issues concerned with the administration and operation of the juvenile justice system. The historical, philosophical, and legal foundations of the juvenile justice system will be examined along with the legal and philosophical changes within the system in contemporary period. Special attention will be given to the Massachusetts model of juvenile corrections and treatment.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines the administration of justice in the community courts. Topics include the role of the judge; relationships between prosecutors, defense lawyers, and the courts; the relationship between the courts and the police; the pros and cons of plea bargaining' the goals of sentencing; and the clash between victim's rights and defendant's rights. Difficult kinds of cases will be addressed, such as cases of domestic violence, child sexual abuse, and crime relating to substance abuse. Questions concerning judicial accountability and the role of judges in the community will also be raised.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Restorative justice is a philosophical framework which poses an alternative to our current way of thinking about crime and justice. Through restorative justice, all the stakeholders to crime - victims, offenders, families, the wider community and the state - are active in response to crime. This course examines both the theoretical foundation of restorative justice rooted in a variety of legal and religious traditions; and the array of practices associated with restorative justice from around the world. Restorative justice philosophy and practice has impacted all areas of the criminal justice system including policing, probation, courts and the correctional programming for juvenile and adult offenders. Students will be afforded a hands-on experience through role-playing, guest speakers and field trips in the application of restorative values to contemporary justice system. Students will examine the meaning of justice in their own experiences, and be challenged to envision a community-based restorative response to crime and violence.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This seminar focuses on two interrelated types of violence, battering and sexual assault. Both of these crimes have been the subject of intense political organizing, cultural controversy, and criminal justice reform over the past 25 years. Together these issues currently account for a significant portion of the work of the police and courts. The research literature on these topics has increased dramatically in recent years. There are now many studies of women victimized by batterings and rape, and of men who commit these crimes. There is a growing body of research on institutional responses to such violence, particularly criminal justice responses. There is new literature on the racial and class dimensions of this violence, on trauma and recovery, and on battering in lesbian and gay relationships. This course examines these crimes from psychological, sociological, and criminal justice perspectives.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will focus on the policy implications of various sociological theories of crime and punishment. Focus will be on the analysis of various alternative policies within the criminal justice system both within the U.S. and in Europe. Attention will be given to the politics of crime control and to the role of the media, citizen groups and other interest groups in shaping criminal justice policy.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In recent years, public attention to victims of crime has grown enormously. The reasons for this are complex. They include the effects of political organizing by crime victims; increased media attention to crime (often driven by crime stories as entertainment and advertising vehicles); the exploitation of crime victims by politicians; and long-standing community frustrations with the criminal legal system. This course will examine the rise of public attention to crime, the variety of social movements addressing victims of crime, the response of the criminal justice system to victims, and the problems and possibilities regarding new developments concerning crime victims. The course takes the perspective of a critical victimology in that the course materials question official definitions of crime, popular definitions of victims and offenders, and traditional beliefs about justice. Rather than seeing victims and offenders as entirely separate categories, a number of the books address individuals who are both victims and offenders. New developments in "restorative justice" will be presented as an emerging alternative to current problems that victims have reported with the criminal legal system.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Thematic investigations of problems and topics in criminal justice. Special topics include but are not limited to the areas of domestic violence and sexual assault; children and crime; crime; justice and popular culture; restorative justice; community policing; drugs and the law, drug policy, crime mapping, counterterrorism policy, female offenders and criminalistics.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

There are many different ways that communities have responded to violence against women. Both in the United States and around the world, the most common methods have involved either punishment for offenders, efforts to create safety for victims, or attempts to reform offenders. A new set of antiviolence approaches are being developed that go beyond the goals of punishment, safety, and reform. These new approaches, which are loosely grouped together as "community-based responses," seek to mobilizing specific communities against violence; organize women across communities of color; and challenge the theories, practices, and politics of existing antiviolence efforts. These new approaches are the focus of this course.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Core required course for Master of Science in Crime and Justice Studies. A sociological investigation of the relationship between crime and justice in contemporary American society. The possibilities and limits of traditional approaches to crime control are examined in the context of our search for harmony, justice and social change. Problems in evaluating the techniques, goals, and effectiveness of criminal justice agencies and organizations are considered as well as models for rethinking the scope and nature of our responses to crime.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Core required course for Master of Science in Crime and Justice Studies. This course provides students with the fundamental tools for evaluating, designing and implementing basic and applied empirical research in criminal justice. The association between theories and research methods used in the study of criminal justice is explored through a variety of related data sources. Topics covered include: the principles of research design; issues in measurement; modes of observation; basic methods of data analysis; and ethical concerns. Students will obtain hands-on experience in project design through the development of their own research proposal.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines two subjects throughout the semester: substantive criminal law (e.g. what is money laundering, the insanity defense, conspiracy?); and criminal procedure: 4th Amendment (search and seizure), 5th Amendment (due process, self-incrimination, double jeopardy, etc.), 6th Amendment (right to a lawyer, public trial, etc..), 8th Amendment (cruel and unusual punishment), 14th Amendment (due process, equal protection of law), 1st Amendment (interaction of criminal law with free expression and with religious rights), and 2nd Amendment (firearms). Unlike other similar undergraduate and graduate courses, this one emphasizes principles and case summaries, de-emphasizes actual cases and case names, and does not entail teaching how to brief (summarize) cases.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines crime and justice in the context of the social inequalities of race, class, and gender. Surprisingly, this is a recent focus within criminology. And yet, without attention to the intersections of race, class, and gender, it is difficult to make sense of victimization, crime, or punishment in the United States today. The course readings include some of the most recent theoretical and empirical studies of these issues. The goals of the course are to develop an understanding of what a race, class, and gender analysis is, and why this is important for individuals working in criminal justice, mental health, and related fields.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Core required course for Master of Science in Crime and Justice Studies. This course introduces students to the foundations of statistical analysis. Topics include: measures of central tendency; dispersion; probability; sampling distributions; hypothesis testing; correlations; and regression. Using SPSS software, students will be required to apply statistical concepts to existing data resulting in a completed research project.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This class explores the images of the traditional "bad" girl in films. The course examines the idea of moving beyond merely the delinquent, many images in film suggest that girls and women who break with the socially condoned role of femininity are somehow bad. Girls and women who have power or challenge authority are often portrayed in films as deviant and therefore "bad." Girls and women who are "frigid" are just as "bad" as their sexually promiscuous silver-screen opposites. This course further focuses on the impact of these images on real life social roles for girls and women as well as the symbiotic relationship between fact and fiction.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an overview of the best practices in positive youth development and juvenile programming for delinquency prevention; intervention and treatment. This seminar will explore the cutting edge of programming for youth in a wide range of community-based and institutional settings including schools, social services, and juvenile corrections.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course will present a survey of the current scholastic research and debates on adolescence and their risks and resilience to problem behaviors. We will address the lives of teens focusing on vulnerabilities and risks, as well as protective factors including the role of peers, risk behaviors, exposure to violence, school achievement, family structures, and sexual behaviors. The course will also emphasize life-persistent versus adolescent-limited behaviors.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an overview of youth gangs and their sociological underpinnings, which are rooted in poverty and racism. Theories of gang formation and individual gang membership will be examined closely. Study topics include the history of gangs, gangs and criminal behavior, socio-cultural importance of gangs, and strategies to control gang behavior as well as community responses more generally. The course will utilize current gang issues in the US generally and in Massachusetts in particular as a basis to better understand the nuances of youth gangs.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: Permission of the director must be obtained prior to arranging a practicum. 3 credits

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This practicum is designed for the working professional graduate student who does not anticipate a career change but intends to seek advancement in their profession. The purpose of this practicum is to allow the student (1) to integrate what they learned in the classroom with their professional career, (2) to anticipate future opportunities in their profession, and (3) to develop a formal network of well-established colleagues. Students register for one semester and must meet with the practicum advisor in the semester prior to the practicum. Library research, interviewing, and a presentation will be required. Prerequisite: Permission of the director must be obtained prior to arranging a practicum.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: Permission of the director must be obtained prior to arranging a practicum. 3 credits

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This practicum is designed for the working professional graduate student who does not anticipate a career change but intends to seek advancement in their profession. The purpose of this practicum is to allow the student (1) to integrate what they learned in the classroom with their professional career, (2) to anticipate future opportunities in their profession, and (3) to develop a formal network of well-established colleagues. Students register for one semester and must meet with the practicum advisor in the semester prior to the practicum. Library research, interviewing, and a presentation will be required.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the director must be obtained prior to arranging an internship. 3.0 GPA.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Placements are designed for the student who has no previous experience in a criminal justice agency or for the professional who wants to make a career change. The primary objective is to provide the student with the opportunity to experience the day-to-day functioning of a criminal justice agency. The student may register for one or two semesters and must meet with the internship advisor in the semester prior to the placement. A minimum commitment of working one day per week per semester (total minimum of 110 hours per semester) is required.

Prerequisites:

Permission of the director must be obtained prior to arranging an internship. 3.0 GPA

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Placements are designed for the student who has no previous experience in criminal justice or for the professional who wants to make a career change. The primary objective is to provide the student with the opportunity to experience the day-to-day functioning of a criminal justice agency. The student may register for one or two semesters and must meet with the internship advisor in the semester prior to the placement. A minimum commitment of working one day per week per semester (total minimum of 110 hours per semester) is required.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students pursue an in-depth research project under the direction of a qualified member of the graduate faculty.

Counseling Courses

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines the process of human development across the lifespan. While it will focus primarily on psychological processes, the intersection with biological and social processes will be explored as well. The major psychological theories of cognitive, social and emotional development will be covered as will the foundations for individual differences. Special emphasis will be placed on topics of interest to people entering the counseling professions. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

Restricted to Mental Health Counseling students

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Analysis of selected counseling theories representative of the field of counseling psychology. Theories will be selected from the following areas: Psychoanalytic, Psychosocial, Rational, Cognitive Behavioral/Learning Theory, Person-Centered, and Existential Theory. Treatment goals and techniques will be explored.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Principles, concepts and methods of research design and statistics associated with psychological and educational research. Practical applications of research studies to a diverse range of interests in education, psychology and counseling. Offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

TAKE COUNS-717

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The study of the nature of mental disorders; central concepts and processes. Psychogenesis, psychodynamics, role of anxiety, and clinical assessment using the DSM-IV.

Prerequisites:

COUNS-713(may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Evaluating, administering, scoring, interpreting, and reporting results of standardized tests of personality, academic performance, cognitive functioning, aptitude, and achievement. Self-study development and assessment of testing programs. Critical issues in testing. Normally offered yearly.

Prerequisites:

COUNS-717;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The interface of psychology and the law will be examined in the context of forensic evaluations performed for courts, attorneys and related agencies or facilities. Topics ranging from Competency to Stand Trial and Criminal Responsibility to termination of parental rights and custody and visitation evaluations will be explored. Practical applications of the skills and knowledge domains needed to perform forensic evaluations will be emphasized, as will the study of relevant laws and regulations as applied to forensic assessment. Discussion will include specialized forensic topics such as the evaluation of juvenile sexual offenders and the forensic use of psychological testing.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Selected models of family therapy will be explored. Special emphasis will be placed on assessment and the acquisition of treatment strategies proven to be effective for counselors in helping families cope with developmental stresses. Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A study of the origin, contributing factors, and implications of drug and alcohol misuse. Various stages and manifestations of abuse/ dependence will be considered and current treatment modalities will be explored.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An overview of the legal issues confronting counselors, human services providers and administrators. Study of regulatory and licensing matters, standards of care, confidentiality laws, mental health and disability laws and family law, constitutional issues, malpractice and legal/ethical dilemmas in human services.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The anatomy, physiology and psychology of human sexual functioning are reviewed. Etiology, interpersonal dynamics, and treatment of sexual dysfunctions are reviewed.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course explores the major psychological disorders of childhood and adolescence from biological, psychological, and sociocultural perspectives. Attention-deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders, Feeding and Eating Disorders, anxiety and depression are among the disorders explored. Student interest determines other topics. Assessment, treatment, and outcome studies are also discussed. Completion of EHS 701 or EHS 712 is recommended before taking this course. Normally offered alternate years.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A survey of problems and issues confronting cultural diversity. The study of ethnicity and sexual orientation as they influence the development of identity. Implications for counseling strategies. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A study of the practical and theoretical aspects of counseling small groups. There will be provision for a laboratory experience in which students participate in a group and study the dynamics of behavior as this group develops. Group stages of development and leadership skills will also be examined. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An introduction to the fundamental techniques and methods of interpersonal relationships, self-examination, and field visits in relation to the role of the professional counselor. The course will involve skill building through role playing, video and/or audio taping. Normally offered spring semester.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Application of skills in an assigned field placement (school, agency or industry). Students will spend fifteen hours per week in field work and participate in weekly group sessions at the University for the evaluation of progress. Open only to degree candidates in Mental Health Counseling. Offered fall semester.

Prerequisites:

Take COUNS-738

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Continuation of COUNS 738 with an opportunity to assume increased responsibility for clients under supervision. Failure to successfully complete the practicum field experience for any reason following two attempts will result in termination from the program. Offered spring semester.

Prerequisites:

Take COUNS-738 COUNS-739;

Credits:

6.00

Description:

Application of skills in an approved field placement (school, clinic, hospital, agency, industry) totaling 300 clock hours. The opportunity to develop advanced skills and to integrate professional knowledge appropriate to the field experience. Failure to successfully complete the practicum field experience for any reason following two attempts will result in termination from the program. Offered fall semester.

Prerequisites:

Take COUNS-740;

Credits:

6.00

Description:

Continuation of Counseling Internship I with advanced responsibilities totaling 300 clock hours. Exploration of an area of individual specialization. Failure to successfully complete the practicum field experience for any reason following two attempts will result in termination from the program. Offered spring semester.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An opportunity to learn the history of domestic violence including battering, child abuse and child neglect, and the legal response to it. Focus will be on Massachusetts Law and its response, especially the Abuse Prevention Act, its application and enforcement, and on laws protecting children from abuse and neglect. Filings, law office issues and special issues in dealing with battered women and abused and neglected children will be included with the psychological issues, cultural issues, and advocacy possibilities. Normally offered yearly.

Credits:

1.00- 3.00

Description:

Members of the Department will meet with students to direct their research in areas of special interest to them. Projects will be authorized upon the recommendations of the Department Chairperson and with the approval of the Dean.