Business Analytics

Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA)

Learn more about this degree

STEM Classification

The MSBA is a graduate degree program with a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) designation. Due to the demand of graduates with expertise in STEM fields, the Department of Homeland Security permits international students graduating from STEM programs to apply for a 24 month extension of their initial year of Optional Practical Training (OPT). For more detailed information, please visit the ISSO webpage.

MSBA Curriculum

11 Courses
31 Credits

Program Length:
Full-time in as few as 9 months

Part-time in as few as 21 months

The MSBA program features a 1-credit course, six (6) core courses, three (3) electives, and a capstone course.

Students must take courses on campus unless permission to take courses online is granted by the Academic Program Director.C

Required Course (1 credit)

Credits:

1.00

Description:

SBS 700 is the first required course in Suffolk's graduate programs. The course is based on the precepts of experiential learning. Based on the idea that people learn best by participating in meaningful activities, this course provides students with the opportunity to learn about and experience first-hand the many complexities of business and the role of top managers. To accomplish this, students will work in small groups as they take on the roles of top managers in a hands-on behavioral simulation.

Business Analytics Core Courses (18 credits)

SBS 604 may be waived with an ISOM course substitution

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the concepts and applications of data analytics on large data sets for managerial decision making. Students will learn foundation skills needed to extract valuable information out of data, including various descriptive and predictive analytics techniques. Students develop knowledge of data visualization and interpretation coupled with conveying data, results and insights. Issues on data acquisition, storage and management will be discussed.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Analyzes various real world business problems and explores the full scope of MS Excel's formulas, functions and features to create data models and present solutions. Students analyze data, design custom charts, graphs, PivotTables and Pivot charts, create three-dimensional workbooks, build links between files and endow worksheets with decision-making capabilities. Students conduct What-If Analysis, utilizing Scenario Manager, Solver, Data Tables and Goal Seek. This course provides the skills necessary to pass the Microsoft Office Specialist Certification in Excel.

Prerequisites:

This course was formerly ISOM-815

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the importance of information as an organizational resource, role of big data in organizations, and the application of tools to provide high quality information. Students will be able to select the most appropriate data management tool (e.g., SQL vs. non-SQL databases) to business scenarios. Develops the skills needed to succeed in today's big data environment through the application of data management techniques, cases and exercises. Students will become proficient in designing databases using entity relationship modeling and normalization, in building and querying databases of various sizes with Access and SQL (an industry standard), preparing high quality data and applying data visualizing techniques. Students will complete a series of business-oriented hands-on exercises, prepare cases, and complete projects on database design and big data.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides students with an understanding of the nature of enterprise integration and enterprise software, business process reengineering, the implementation within organizations, and strategies for maximizing benefits from enterprise systems. To manage complex business processes in today's multi-national, wired and wireless world, firms need integrated software packages to manage their global business. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems are used to support a wide range of business functions for all companies across industries. With ERP systems, business managers are able to make decisions with accurate, consistent, and current data. Intensive lab projects on the SAP ERP System with real life business scenarios are utilized to reinforce understanding of enterprise systems functionality and business process concepts.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course teaches students how to build and maintain data warehouses, and how to analyze and use this data as a source for business intelligence and competitive advantage. Students study data mining concepts and the use of analytics tools and methods for producing business knowledge. Topics include extraction, transformation and loading; decision support systems; text, web and data mining models as well as data presentation/visualization including dashboards, scorecards and various charts. Students build a data warehouse and practice the extraction and filtering process used to produce high quality data warehouses. Students will use tools such as MS Excel, SAP Lumira, Tableau and SAP Business Warehouse.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Predictive analytics make predictions about unknown future events. It is crucial for companies to ask the right questions, perform rigorous analysis, and take actions that will result in the most desirable outcomes. This course develops students' capability in applying the core concepts and techniques of predictive analytics to identify opportunity, recognize patterns, predict outcomes, and recommend optimal actions within the context of organizational decision-making. Topics include: business analytics life cycle, data pre- processing, linear and nonlinear regression, tree-based methods, model assessment and selection, and resampling methods.

Capstone Course (3 credits)

Should be taken as late in the program as possible.

Prerequisites:

Take ISOM-835

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is built upon the predictive modeling course and covers a broad collect of data mining and business intelligence techniques, including logistic regression, discriminant analysis, support vector machines, clustering methods, network analysis, association rule mining, text mining, etc. It focuses on turning data into business intelligence and eventually use data and analytics to create business value. The course takes a holistic approach of business analytics, starting from identifying and defining business questions, evaluating data quality, cleaning and preparing data to selecting models, interpreting outcomes, and communicating analysis and results to technical and management audiences. Throughout the course, students are involved in hands-on analysis using large sets of real data from a variety of industries. A term project and a formal presentation of the project are required.

Required Electives and Concentration Descriptions (9 credits)

Students must complete three (3) courses, nine (9) credits of electives, 800-level or higher (exception 600- and 700-level MBA courses and 700-level HLTH courses), within the Sawyer Business School and from the approved MSBA electives lists.

If a concentration is declared, three electives must be in one concentration area. The schedule of when courses within a concentration are offered vary by semester. Concentrations include: accounting, finance, fintech, healthcare management or marketing.

Students who declare a concentration must submit an SBS Graduate Program Concentration Request Form. Students are encouraged to meet with their advisor before they declare a concentration.

The concentration appears on the transcript, not the diploma.

Approved MSBA Electives


Credits:

3.00

Description:

This introductory-level accounting course provides students with a solid base in accounting fundamentals, including U.S. GAAP, the conceptual framework, nature of accounts, journal entries, and ultimately, financial statements. Provides in-depth coverage of the process by which accountants analyze, journalize, post, and summarize transactions. Reviews and analyzes multiple examples of current "real life" financial statements. The students would practice data analytics through the analysis of companies' financial ratios. The course includes a discussion of ethical issues facing accounting professionals and time value of money techniques. For MSA, GCA, & MST students, this is the first course in the financial accounting sequence. For MBA students, this potential elective course builds upon concepts learned in MBA 640.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-800 or MSA Program Director permission

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This is the first of two intermediate-level accounting courses that build on students' learning in ACCT 800, going in-depth into measurement and reporting of asset, liability, and stockholders' equity accounts for external financial reporting purposes. Discusses pronouncements of authoritative sources such as the SEC, AICPA, and the FASB. Introduces students to IFRS and their similarities to and differences from U.S. GAAP. Develops strong critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-801 or MSA Program Director permission

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This is the second of two intermediate-level accounting courses. The critical thinking and problem-solving skills developed in ACCT 801 are broadened as this class tackles more complex accounting concepts, including: dilutive securities, earnings per share, investments, revenue recognition, income tax accounting, pensions and leases. Since accounting for many of these areas has been a source of substantial debate and major revisions in recent years, subject matter covered will be topical. Pertinent pronouncements of standard-setting bodies continue to be studied.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines the concepts and practices of cost measurement: variable costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, goal setting and performance monitoring, standard costing, and variance analysis. Students learn how to prepare a financial plan for a business by constructing operating, working capital, and capital budgets. Students study and practice Excel skills and how those are used to build a financial plan, analyze the sensitivity of the financial plan to different changes, examine performance, and measure and control overhead costs. Students study data analytics techniques and perform analyses in support of decisions, such as pricing, setting product line and customer profitability policy, sourcing of products and services, and matching costing systems to strategy. For MSA, GCA, & MST students this is the first managerial accounting course you will take. For MBA students, this potential elective course builds upon concepts learned in MBA 640.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-800 or MBA-640

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the field of auditing, with a concentration in auditing historical financial statements in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, and some exposure to auditing the internal control over financial reporting of large public companies. Covers the environment, standards, regulation, and law of auditing in the US, with some exposure to the international environment. Covers audit planning, risk, and materiality assessments, audit evidence, evaluation of internal control, documentation, and audit reports. Includes researching and resolving practice-oriented problems and practice in using computer-assisted audit techniques and electronic confirmations.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-800 or MBA-640

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines the pervasiveness and genres of fraud and explores the motivations, opportunities, and rationalizations that facilitate fraudulent behavior. Covers methods of detection, investigation, and prevention of financial statement frauds and other types of financial-related frauds.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines the techniques used by forensic accountants to conduct investigations of white collar crime. Students will learn what fraud is, how we prevent it, how we detect it, and how we document our findings. They will learn about the "elements of crime" that must be proven for a specific statute (e.g., Title 26 U.S.C. � 7201 - Tax Evasion) to be successfully prosecuted. A case study will be utilized to demonstrate the investigative process from inception to conclusion. Through the case, students will learn how to: gather and document evidence; write memorandums, affidavits, and recommendation of prosecution reports; conduct investigative interviews by preparing an interview outline, building rapport, asking follow-up questions, and learning to detect deceit; and provide testimony in a mock trial to a (friendly) prosecutor and (aggressive) defense attorney.

Prerequisites:

ACCT 800 or MBA 640, and MBA 650 or program director approval

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course consists of two parts. The first part teaches students how to use Tableau to analyze large data sets and visualize data patterns to derive meaningful, actionable insights. We will utilize different data sets containing detailed information on sales, inventory, and other operational and financial metrics. This part will also introduce some basic tools used in accessing and compiling relevant big data from online resources such as the SEC's EDGAR website and Twitter. Students will be provided with necessary computer code and software to perform textual analysis for company documents and social media posts. The second part focuses on the analysis of financial statement data in an automated fashion. We will employ advanced tools in Excel along with the state-of-the-art data sources including Calcbench to perform financial data analytics and peer benchmarking. Our discussion on financial ratios and credit risk will have an analytical emphasis. This part will conclude with exercises on forecasting income statement data and valuing public companies.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-804 and ACCT-800 or MBA-640 or program director approval

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This case based course, teaches students how to better use information for improved decision making. Students will study how to identify the relevant information that is needed to make decisions. The decisions discussed will span a variety of business areas including accounting, finance, marketing and others. A special emphasis would be put on developing and strengthening the students' presentation skills in both face to face and online environments. Students will learn to speak influentially and effectively about numbers and communicate their conclusions and suggested decisions to different stakeholders.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-800 or MBA-640

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Describes various transaction processing cycles and their use in the structured analysis and design of accounting information systems. Students gain an understanding of Enterprise Resource Planning softwares, Quickbooks, database design, XBRL, implementations of internal controls, and privacy and data security issues.

Prerequisites:

MBA-640 or ACCT-800

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Covers unique aspects of financial reporting in not-for-profit organizations and governmental units. Topics include fund accounting, encumbrance accounting, GASB pronouncements, cost accounting, and budgetary control for government and its agencies, healthcare, educational, religious and other not-for-profit organizations. Students learn how to apply the cost benefit analysis in the resources allocation process, program planning, budgeting and reporting systems.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of financial statements, this course is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of business entity. This course also analyzes financial services industry: bank financial statement analysis with an emphasis on off- balance sheet lending and borrowing, capital structure issues, and innovations in mortgage-backed securities and asset-based financing techniques are covered. Additionally, the tax implications of various derivative securities is studied.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine markets for investment procedures, valuation models, basic analytical techniques, and factors influencing risk/return tradeoffs. This course emphasizes the professional approach to managing investment assets. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, options, and futures.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine techniques and decision-making rules for the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects by corporations and the interaction of investment and financing.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students explore the pricing of options and futures contracts, the characteristics of the markets in which these contracts are traded, options and futures strategies, and the application of these contracts in the hedging of financial positions. In addition, students are exposed to swap markets and a variety of swaps.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the structure and management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course discusses tools for identifying, measuring, evaluating, and managing risks, such as interest rate, credit, foreign exchange, liquidity, market, sovereign, and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and discusses important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to mathematical statistics and basic econometrics. They study fundamental econometric tools as well as hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, linear regressions, simultaneous equations, and models of qualitative choice.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-808, FIN-810, and FIN-814. (FIN-814 can be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine financial theories, techniques, and models applied to the study of corporate financial decisions, aspects of corporate strategy, industry structure, and the functioning of capital markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers corporate financial decisions in an international setting with a focus on foreign exchange management and capital budgeting.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the history, terminology, current developments, future challenges and opportunities related to the application of technology to financial discipline. With an emphasis of case studies and guest lecture, the class will discuss algorithmic trading, predictive behavioral analysis, data-driven decision making, mobile-only services, robo advisers, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, RegTech, InsureTech, innovations in lending, and cybersecurity. Students will be required to complete projects based on a statistical software package.

Prerequisites:

FIN 810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

Prerequisites:

FIN-818

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The nature, techniques, and problems of business forecasting. Covers indicators of business activity, short-run econometrics forecasting models, and the construction of aggregate forecasts as well as forecasts of major economic sectors. Includes long-term predictions and the application of aggregate and sector forecasts for particular industries and firms. Prerequisite: FIN 818.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to the language and principles of real estate. Includes an overview of decision-making in the field, with particular emphasis on investment and asset management.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course is designed to provide information on various types of fixed income securities and markets, theories and concepts of the term structure of interest rates and valuation of fixed income securities, measurement and management of risk for traditional bonds and bonds with embedded options, understanding of the role of derivatives such as mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, swaps and exotic options, credit analysis and bond rating, portfolio management and performance evaluation. This course is generally offered as an intensive elective.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine fundamental equity analysis as the convergence of a number of skills such as accounting, financial, and strategic analysis with detective work and experience. Students practice communicating and defending an argument, use a business analysis framework that helps tie together strategy and finance, practice model building and practical approach to profitability in the markets.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an integrated framework for analyzing and measuring risk with a computer simulation approach. A common set of computational tools will be applied across several different financial applications ranging from options pricing to portfolio design. Extensive time will be spent on estimating and simulating 'Value at Risk' which has been a standard for measuring risk in large financial institutions. We will also compare this with other traditional methods as well as other modern methods, such as extreme value theory at quantifying risk. Computationally intensive methods, such as bootstrapping, and Monte Carlo analysis will be used extensively throughout the course with MATLAB as the primary programming tool.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course explores the origins, components, organization, and operation of the U.S. health system. It prepares students for subsequent healthcare administration courses that delve more deeply into key aspects of the health system. Topics include major current health and health system issues; the history and trends underlying those issues; and the organizations, professions, laws and policies, patients and consumers, payers and other aspects of the health system. Learning activities focus on the relationships among the many parts of the health system.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Builds on Health Systems I: Healthcare in the U.S. by examining the system through the lenses of economics, law, and policy. In order for students to be better prepared to help their organizations adapt effectively to opportunities and constraints presented by the environments in which they operate, they must be able to analyze and evaluate current and evolving healthcare markets, laws and public policies, payment methods, mechanisms for bearing and sharing financial risk, and their impact on healthcare business models and organizational models.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to concepts, analytic tools, and techniques in operations management, including project management, process documentation and analysis, process improvement tools, Lean Six Sigma methodology, queuing theory, forecasting, Theory of Constraints, and supply chain management. Students will understand patient flow and will learn to measure and compare productivity between departments and healthcare organizations, to map processes and identify improvement opportunities, and to apply quantitative methods for optimal managerial decisions. The course builds on the "Evidence-Based Healthcare Management" foundation course. Class exercises, applied concept assignments, and other learning tools enable students to understand ways to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare organizations.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to the new science of analytics in the context of the health and healthcare sectors. Building on the "Evidence-Based Healthcare Management" Foundation course, this course further develops students'competencies in seeking and analyzing data, and presenting findings. Analytics drives innovative solutions through its use of data science, information technology, and deep knowledge of a particular industry sector. This course focuses on applications in population health, community health, business intelligence, and behavior change. Students will have establish competency in obtaining information from multiple data sources, analyzing metrics, applying analytic tools, using systems thinking to frame and solve problems, evaluating the pros and cons of various analytics approaches, and creating solutions through the use of case narratives, use cases, and client presentations.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to a wide range of current innovations as well as innovations that are expected in the future. The course builds students' skills to anticipate, adopt and manage innovation in healthcare. It covers innovation in the organization and delivery of healthcare services as well as in the pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices, and healthcare information technology. In particular, the course explores how innovation happens -- i.e., how players across the healthcare industry create, identify, pursue, and support or impede opportunities for innovation.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The "production" of healthcare is a service of significant personal and social consequence and the quality of that service is high on the agenda of every healthcare leader. A number of trends in the industry are interacting to provide both new challenges and new opportunities for managers in the areas of healthcare quality, patient safety and patient experience. Among those trends are new ways of organizing and delivering services, new technologies, the growth of consumerism and patient-centered care, and new standards and expectations. This course builds on Foundation and Core Level 1 courses as it focuses on the complexities and processes of assuring quality performance in healthcare organizations. Among the topics covered in this course are: creating a culture of safety; establishing and sustaining organizational alignment; quality/safety implications for accreditation and regulatory compliance; and measuring and improving the patient experience.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The success of any healthcare organization depends on the ability of its leaders and managers to continuously identify, evaluate and address the key issues facing the organization. Innovations in technology, products, practices, and organization, which are continuously reshaping healthcare, are among the most important issues. This course introduces students to these types of innovations, as part of the larger healthcare environment, and integrates them into the larger framework of strategic management of healthcare organizations. The course explores the essential elements of strategic management: systems thinking, strategic analysis, and strategy development and implementation. Using healthcare industry publications and provocative case studies, students conduct assessments of external trends, assumptions and implications; identify and assess organizational opportunities and challenges as well as strengths and weaknesses; identify strategic and operational issues; and review and develop strategies and actions to address the issues and achieve success.

Prerequisites:

HLTH-701; Restricted to MHA, MBA, or MPA students. Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

England, as part of the United Kingdom, has a nationalized healthcare system. Given that it leads the systems in other countries on many aspects of care delivery and health outcomes, there is an advantage for healthcare administrators and policymakers in the U.S. to have exposure to this system for what they might learn and apply to improve our own healthcare system. Therefore, the purpose of this global travel seminar is to enable students to explore and answer one overarching question: What can we learn from the healthcare system in England that will enable us to better understand and make needed improvements to the healthcare system in the U.S.? At the macro level, students will learn about and analyze such features of the healthcare system in England as government ownership of healthcare delivery organizations, near-universal insurance coverage, allocation of resources according to national and regional budgets, and reforms to address serious quality and safety deficiencies. At the micro level, students will visit healthcare delivery organizations and meet with healthcare providers, managers and policy makers to get a close look at the realities of the healthcare system, including quality improvement and cost containment initiatives. By the end of this course, students will also understand how the healthcare system in England compares on key dimensions with the healthcare system in the U.S.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is introductory to use Python for business analytics, intended for students with little or no programming experience. Students will learn how to program with Python and how to use it in conjunction with scientific computing modules and libraries to compute, analyze, and visualize data to make analytics-driven decisions in finance, operations, marketing, accounting, and management. By the end of this course, students will have confidence and understanding of how to program in Python, know how to create and manipulate arrays using numpy library, know how to use pandas library to create and analyze data sets, know how to use matplotlib and seaborn libraries to create beautiful data visualization, and have an understanding of scikit-learn for data analytics.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the fundamental principles of information and big data security. Security vulnerabilities, threats and risks will be analyzed. Common types of computer attacks and counter-attacks will be identified. Security technologies such as biometrics, firewalls, intrusion detection systems and cryptography systems will be applied in conjunction with human based safeguards. Business continuity and disaster recovery planning will be covered. Students will then learn how to design and build a layered security defense combining several of the above controls to address the different challenges to data security. The managerial concerns of security and privacy of information will be stressed including the legal and privacy issues. Best practices for planning and auditing security and privacy will then be covered.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces business intelligence and data analytics. Business intelligence and data analytics help organizations in strategic and operational decision making by improving performance management, optimizing customer relations, monitoring business activity, and improving decision support. On a macro-level, the class will discuss business cases for the adoption of business intelligence and data analytics. We will discuss technologies and processes for gathering, storing, accessing, and analyzing data to provide users with better insights and business decisions. On a micro-level, students will use a variety of tools to build their skills in analyzing data to solve business problems. In summary, this course provides a conceptual understanding of business data resources and the development of capabilities for data preparation, warehousing, selection, description, mining, interpretation, visualization, communication, and innovation.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the fundamental principles and concepts for effective management of supply chains via performance drivers such as procurement, facilities, inventory, transportation, and pricing. No company can do better than its supply chain, a complex network of organizations that collaboratively manage transformation processes to deliver final products/services to customers. Managing a supply chain is a tremendous challenge for most firms which, paradoxically, can also be a crucial source of competitive advantage. This is also a "how-to" course with an extensive use of Excel for supply chain managers and analysts who can benefit from experiencing hands-on familiarity with modeling supply chain applications along with data analysis and interpretation.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the basic principles, tools and technique of the Project Management Life Cycle with practical real-life examples and scenarios. The basic concepts will be studied within the framework of the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK (R)Guide) guidelines set forth by the Project Management Institute (PMI). Other project management framework will be described though not in detail. The course will attempt to help students understand the relationship between good project management and successful software management, development and implementation, and the best practices at each stage of project planning, execution, control and closure. The course will also help build skills to research, analyze and report project management case studies that illustrate the topics covered in this course. PMP(R) and (PMBOK(R)Guide) are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.

Prerequisites:

Instructor Permission

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This elective course option involves a student initiated written proposal to a willing and appropriate full-time faculty member for a directed study project. The project should be completed during one semester. The faculty member and student must concur on a written proposal, final project and grading criteria. Approval by the Department Chair and the Dean is necessary before registration.

Prerequisites:

Approval of the student's Program Director and ISOM Department chair required.

Credits:

0.00- 3.00

Description:

Provides a hands-on, practical learning opportunity for a student-initiated experience at a domestic or international organization. Students work closely with the department chair and faculty advisor regarding career-related learning outcomes. Over the course of a semester, students collaborate with their corporate internship supervisor and complete projects in either information systems, operations management, or business analytics. A final written report and presentation are mandatory if this course is taken for credit. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites:

MBA-625 or SBS-604 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides students with Operations Management concepts, techniques, and tools to design, analyze, and improve operational capabilities in any organization. Students will understand and analyze common OM decisions on managing inputs (materials, information, finances, and human resources) and processes to deliver desirable outcomes to customers. Topics covered include operations strategy, process analysis, quality management and lean operations, capacity analysis, inventory management, product development, supply chain management, project management, revenue management and pricing, decision analysis, and forecasting. Software tools used may include MS Excel, Visio, and Project Management. This course will contain experiential learning components related to Boston's world-class industries, which may include guest lectures, simulation exercises, or visits to local organizations.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course deals with the structure and information content of the three principal financial statements of profit-directed companies, namely the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows. It develops skill in using accounting information to analyze the performance and financial condition of a company, and to facilitate decision making, planning and budgeting, and performance appraisal in a managerial context. This course also contains an experiential component by offering guided inquiry and real company cases.

Prerequisites:

1 course from each of the following groups: MBA-615 or SBS-603; MBA-625 or SBS-604; MBA-640 or ACCT-800; These courses may be taken prior to or concurrently with MBA-650.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces the basic principles of corporate finance. The main focus is on fundamental principles such as time value of money, asset valuation, and risk and return tradeoff. Topics to be covered also include cost of capital, capital budgeting, and capital structure.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

At its core, marketing is about providing consumer value. The practice of doing this is changing constantly-driven by rapid and far-reaching changes in technology; globalization; and the evolution of consumer values, practices, and lifestyles. This course will present themes, theories, and trends that are critical for: 1. understanding the business of creating, capturing and sustaining value; 2. introducing students to the global, consumer, and technological realities of marketing in the 21st Century; and 3. providing students with a sound foundation to explore marketing in further depth in upper-level elective courses. This course also contains an experiential component. .

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course teaches students critical thinking and problem solving skills in the context of two essential ingredients of collaboration: leading people and teams, and managing projects. Students will learn concepts and processes that support building and launching high performing teams that can manage complex projects efficiently and effectively. Students will collaborate experientially to solve problems facing Boston's world-class industry clusters.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to three essential ingredients of innovation: Entrepreneurial Thinking, Information Technology in an Age of Disruption, and Law as Framework. Entrepreneurial thinking is a critical element in the creation, growth, and sustainability of an organization. In new ventures, entrepreneurs drive innovation with limited resources and within a flat organization. Information technology, strategically selected and implemented, can provide a significant, competitive advantage. Students will survey the increasingly complex, evolving, and highly competitive business environment in which ethical, legal, economic, and regulatory forces are continuously reshaping the global marketplace both to create and limit competitive opportunities. This course will contain experiential components, relating to Boston's world-class industries.

Prerequisites:

Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Immersion course provides an opportunity for students to link their program work to hands-on experience and visits to real-life global companies. The highly experiential, intensive course combines classroom learning with a direct business and cultural experience. Students will work in teams directly for a client or several clients, solving real challenges, using their analytical skills, knowledge, and experience to develop feasible solutions. Required for all MBA students, the course will be offered globally or nationally to accommodate a variety of student needs.

Prerequisites:

SBS-700, MBA-701, MBA-710, MBA-615(or SBS 603), MBA-625(or SBS 604), MBA-635, MBA-640(or ACCT 800,) MBA-650, MBA-660, MBA-720(or MBA-721), MBA-730, and MBA-745(may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students engage in a variety of learning activities, such as case studies, computer simulations, examinations, project reports, and most especially, experiential exercises involving competition. Students will develop a multi-functional general management perspective. The course is designed to help students integrate and apply their knowledge and techniques learned in the core courses of the MBA program into an overall view of the firm, evaluate the environment, and speculate on the future direction of the organization. Students will also learn about the principal concepts, frameworks, and techniques of strategic management, they will develop the capacity for strategic thinking, and they will examine the organizational and environmental contexts in which strategic management unfolds. This course will make extensive use of experiential activities and projects designed to get students to experience the dynamics of competition right in the classroom.

Prerequisites:

MBA Students not eligble for this course.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course takes multiple approaches to the exploration of leadership. Emphasis is put on individual self-awareness as a critical precursor to leadership success. A wide range of activities, exercises, cases, and simulations are used to develop understanding of the dynamics of leadership. Team building, both as an activity and a topic for study, is used as the model to develop, practice, and improve individual leadership skills.

Prerequisites:

MBA-625, OR SBS-604, OR MBA-622; AND MBA-660

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course explores the role of research in marketing decision-making, including the cost and value of information. The course uses cases and problems to explore problem definition, research design, sampling, questionnaire design, field methods, data analysis and reporting.

Prerequisites:

MBA 660

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to provide you with both a sound theoretical and an applied approach to developing and implementing marketing strategy at multiple levels of the organization - corporate, division, strategic business unit, and product. Special emphasis will be placed on dealing with contemporary marketing issues in the highly competitive global environment. The course presentation will combine lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and a semester-long, team-based project.

Prerequisites:

MBA-660

Credits:

3.00

Description:

SBS graduate level Global Product Innovation (GMC) offers exciting, valuable, and practical global product innovation experience with international educational and/or corporate partners. This project-based course is organized by the Suffolk Marketing Department and an overseas partner school. Teams, consisting of Suffolk Business students and students from the partner school, work on new product or service development and marketing projects targeting one or multiple international markets. The focus will be on the marketing function's input to the innovation process during the pre-launch and launch stages, covering a wide range of issues (such as global market selection, concept generation and evaluation, design and positioning, test marketing, and product launch and tracking). Students will collaborate via virtual teaming technology throughout the semester and report product or service design and marketing plan to the business clients or entering the SBS New Product Competition in the end of the semester. Through a hands-on product innovation project in the global context, students will develop an understanding of the global market dynamism, the diversity of global consumer needs and business practices, and the challenges and advantages of cross-cultural team collaboration.

Prerequisites:

MBA 660

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course addresses the role of the sales manager in today's challenging business environment. As such, the course includes an understanding of direct sales, as well as all facets of sales management such as recruitment, compensation, and management of a sales force. The core of activity is lecture and case study.

Prerequisites:

SBS-604, MKT-810 and MBA-660

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course addresses the practical application of advanced digital marketing techniques. Topics include but are not limited to, advanced search engine optimization (SEO), design of search advertising campaigns across multiple digital platforms in highly competitive markets, analyzing the customer decision journey and, gleaning meaningful insights from user-generated content. Upon successful completion of this program, participants shall be able to independently apply a comprehensive set of digital analytics methodologies, to generate and interpret the actionable insights that enhances a firm's digital campaign and improve the customer experience in the digital space.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-660

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is aimed to understand how to formulate and formalize effective marketing strategies in a world dominated by exponential technological change, and how to understand the logics of this disruptive change. Some of the questions the course will explore are what exponential technologies are and the impact that they have on industries, customer needs and expectations, and how firms can leverage their position to take advantage of these technologies by formulating agile and proactive marketing strategies.

Prerequisites:

MBA 660

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The foundational course in the digital marketing track this course focuses on the consumer of digital media and five big picture marketing strategy challenges confronting marketers in the new digital (mobile +social) marketing era. Challenge 1: Marketing to a smarter, more engaged, empowered consumer; Challenge 2: Marketing to a networked, collaborative, and more social consumer; Challenge 3: Marketing to a more distracted and fickle consumer; Challenge 4: Marketing to a unique, individual consumer; and Challenge 5: Marketing to prosumers or producer-consumers. The course takes on these big picture challenges thorough a deep engagement with and critical analysis of readings and cases. Given this focus the course demands thorough preparation for class and active engagement in the class discussion. The evaluation is assignment and project based.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to help students better understand, practice, and evaluate qualitative market research. The course introduces established and emerging research techniques which require students to actively engage in the process of conducting qualitative research (e.g., study design, data collection, analysis, reporting and storytelling). Statistical approaches including automated text analysis and content analysis are emphasized.

Prerequisites:

MKT-810 previously or concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course, students learn how data analytics transforms businesses and industries, using examples and case studies in multiple industries and contexts. Through applied examples, the use of statistical methods such as linear regression, logistic regression, factor analysis, decision trees, cluster analysis, and optimization will be demonstrated. Students will be using the statistical software, such as SPSS and R, to explore patterns in marketing datasets and build predictive models.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is required for MSA and MSF students and it is also a recommended elective for MBA students with a finance concentration. This course develops an understanding of the concepts, tools, and applications of economics at both the micro and macro level. The focus is on how economic analysis influences decision-making in the public and private sectors and how economic tools can enhance managerial effectiveness and organizational efficiency. The economic role of government and its impact on the business environment in a market economy, the factors that influence firm performance and competitiveness, and the role of financial institutions in the current economic environment are discussed throughout the course.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Focuses on the federal income taxation of individuals with some discussion of business taxation. Explores the basic structure of individual income taxation, including the individual tax formula, income, deductions, and credits, and provides an introduction to property transactions. Emphasizes how tax laws affect everyday personal and business decisions.

Accounting Concentration (9 credits)

Required Course:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course deals with the structure and information content of the three principal financial statements of profit-directed companies, namely the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows. It develops skill in using accounting information to analyze the performance and financial condition of a company, and to facilitate decision making, planning and budgeting, and performance appraisal in a managerial context. This course also contains an experiential component by offering guided inquiry and real company cases.

Select two of the following (if MBA 640 is waived, must select three):

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This introductory-level accounting course provides students with a solid base in accounting fundamentals, including U.S. GAAP, the conceptual framework, nature of accounts, journal entries, and ultimately, financial statements. Provides in-depth coverage of the process by which accountants analyze, journalize, post, and summarize transactions. Reviews and analyzes multiple examples of current "real life" financial statements. The students would practice data analytics through the analysis of companies' financial ratios. The course includes a discussion of ethical issues facing accounting professionals and time value of money techniques. For MSA, GCA, & MST students, this is the first course in the financial accounting sequence. For MBA students, this potential elective course builds upon concepts learned in MBA 640.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-800 or MSA Program Director permission

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This is the first of two intermediate-level accounting courses that build on students' learning in ACCT 800, going in-depth into measurement and reporting of asset, liability, and stockholders' equity accounts for external financial reporting purposes. Discusses pronouncements of authoritative sources such as the SEC, AICPA, and the FASB. Introduces students to IFRS and their similarities to and differences from U.S. GAAP. Develops strong critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-801 or MSA Program Director permission

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This is the second of two intermediate-level accounting courses. The critical thinking and problem-solving skills developed in ACCT 801 are broadened as this class tackles more complex accounting concepts, including: dilutive securities, earnings per share, investments, revenue recognition, income tax accounting, pensions and leases. Since accounting for many of these areas has been a source of substantial debate and major revisions in recent years, subject matter covered will be topical. Pertinent pronouncements of standard-setting bodies continue to be studied.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines the concepts and practices of cost measurement: variable costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, goal setting and performance monitoring, standard costing, and variance analysis. Students learn how to prepare a financial plan for a business by constructing operating, working capital, and capital budgets. Students study and practice Excel skills and how those are used to build a financial plan, analyze the sensitivity of the financial plan to different changes, examine performance, and measure and control overhead costs. Students study data analytics techniques and perform analyses in support of decisions, such as pricing, setting product line and customer profitability policy, sourcing of products and services, and matching costing systems to strategy. For MSA, GCA, & MST students this is the first managerial accounting course you will take. For MBA students, this potential elective course builds upon concepts learned in MBA 640.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-800 or MBA-640

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the field of auditing, with a concentration in auditing historical financial statements in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, and some exposure to auditing the internal control over financial reporting of large public companies. Covers the environment, standards, regulation, and law of auditing in the US, with some exposure to the international environment. Covers audit planning, risk, and materiality assessments, audit evidence, evaluation of internal control, documentation, and audit reports. Includes researching and resolving practice-oriented problems and practice in using computer-assisted audit techniques and electronic confirmations.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-800 or MBA-640

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines the pervasiveness and genres of fraud and explores the motivations, opportunities, and rationalizations that facilitate fraudulent behavior. Covers methods of detection, investigation, and prevention of financial statement frauds and other types of financial-related frauds.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines the techniques used by forensic accountants to conduct investigations of white collar crime. Students will learn what fraud is, how we prevent it, how we detect it, and how we document our findings. They will learn about the "elements of crime" that must be proven for a specific statute (e.g., Title 26 U.S.C. � 7201 - Tax Evasion) to be successfully prosecuted. A case study will be utilized to demonstrate the investigative process from inception to conclusion. Through the case, students will learn how to: gather and document evidence; write memorandums, affidavits, and recommendation of prosecution reports; conduct investigative interviews by preparing an interview outline, building rapport, asking follow-up questions, and learning to detect deceit; and provide testimony in a mock trial to a (friendly) prosecutor and (aggressive) defense attorney.

Prerequisites:

ACCT 800 or MBA 640, and MBA 650 or program director approval

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course consists of two parts. The first part teaches students how to use Tableau to analyze large data sets and visualize data patterns to derive meaningful, actionable insights. We will utilize different data sets containing detailed information on sales, inventory, and other operational and financial metrics. This part will also introduce some basic tools used in accessing and compiling relevant big data from online resources such as the SEC's EDGAR website and Twitter. Students will be provided with necessary computer code and software to perform textual analysis for company documents and social media posts. The second part focuses on the analysis of financial statement data in an automated fashion. We will employ advanced tools in Excel along with the state-of-the-art data sources including Calcbench to perform financial data analytics and peer benchmarking. Our discussion on financial ratios and credit risk will have an analytical emphasis. This part will conclude with exercises on forecasting income statement data and valuing public companies.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-804 and ACCT-800 or MBA-640 or program director approval

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This case based course, teaches students how to better use information for improved decision making. Students will study how to identify the relevant information that is needed to make decisions. The decisions discussed will span a variety of business areas including accounting, finance, marketing and others. A special emphasis would be put on developing and strengthening the students' presentation skills in both face to face and online environments. Students will learn to speak influentially and effectively about numbers and communicate their conclusions and suggested decisions to different stakeholders.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-800 or MBA-640

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Describes various transaction processing cycles and their use in the structured analysis and design of accounting information systems. Students gain an understanding of Enterprise Resource Planning softwares, Quickbooks, database design, XBRL, implementations of internal controls, and privacy and data security issues.

Prerequisites:

MBA-640 or ACCT-800

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Covers unique aspects of financial reporting in not-for-profit organizations and governmental units. Topics include fund accounting, encumbrance accounting, GASB pronouncements, cost accounting, and budgetary control for government and its agencies, healthcare, educational, religious and other not-for-profit organizations. Students learn how to apply the cost benefit analysis in the resources allocation process, program planning, budgeting and reporting systems.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Focuses on the federal income taxation of individuals with some discussion of business taxation. Explores the basic structure of individual income taxation, including the individual tax formula, income, deductions, and credits, and provides an introduction to property transactions. Emphasizes how tax laws affect everyday personal and business decisions.

Finance Concentration (9 credits)

Required Course:

Prerequisites:

1 course from each of the following groups: MBA-615 or SBS-603; MBA-625 or SBS-604; MBA-640 or ACCT-800; These courses may be taken prior to or concurrently with MBA-650.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces the basic principles of corporate finance. The main focus is on fundamental principles such as time value of money, asset valuation, and risk and return tradeoff. Topics to be covered also include cost of capital, capital budgeting, and capital structure.

Select two of the following electives (if MBA 650 is waived, must select three):

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of financial statements, this course is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of business entity. This course also analyzes financial services industry: bank financial statement analysis with an emphasis on off- balance sheet lending and borrowing, capital structure issues, and innovations in mortgage-backed securities and asset-based financing techniques are covered. Additionally, the tax implications of various derivative securities is studied.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine markets for investment procedures, valuation models, basic analytical techniques, and factors influencing risk/return tradeoffs. This course emphasizes the professional approach to managing investment assets. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, options, and futures.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine techniques and decision-making rules for the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects by corporations and the interaction of investment and financing.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students explore the pricing of options and futures contracts, the characteristics of the markets in which these contracts are traded, options and futures strategies, and the application of these contracts in the hedging of financial positions. In addition, students are exposed to swap markets and a variety of swaps.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the structure and management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course discusses tools for identifying, measuring, evaluating, and managing risks, such as interest rate, credit, foreign exchange, liquidity, market, sovereign, and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and discusses important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to mathematical statistics and basic econometrics. They study fundamental econometric tools as well as hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, linear regressions, simultaneous equations, and models of qualitative choice.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-808, FIN-810, and FIN-814. (FIN-814 can be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine financial theories, techniques, and models applied to the study of corporate financial decisions, aspects of corporate strategy, industry structure, and the functioning of capital markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers corporate financial decisions in an international setting with a focus on foreign exchange management and capital budgeting.

Prerequisites:

FIN 810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

Prerequisites:

FIN-818

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The nature, techniques, and problems of business forecasting. Covers indicators of business activity, short-run econometrics forecasting models, and the construction of aggregate forecasts as well as forecasts of major economic sectors. Includes long-term predictions and the application of aggregate and sector forecasts for particular industries and firms. Prerequisite: FIN 818.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to the language and principles of real estate. Includes an overview of decision-making in the field, with particular emphasis on investment and asset management.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course is designed to provide information on various types of fixed income securities and markets, theories and concepts of the term structure of interest rates and valuation of fixed income securities, measurement and management of risk for traditional bonds and bonds with embedded options, understanding of the role of derivatives such as mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, swaps and exotic options, credit analysis and bond rating, portfolio management and performance evaluation. This course is generally offered as an intensive elective.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine fundamental equity analysis as the convergence of a number of skills such as accounting, financial, and strategic analysis with detective work and experience. Students practice communicating and defending an argument, use a business analysis framework that helps tie together strategy and finance, practice model building and practical approach to profitability in the markets.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an integrated framework for analyzing and measuring risk with a computer simulation approach. A common set of computational tools will be applied across several different financial applications ranging from options pricing to portfolio design. Extensive time will be spent on estimating and simulating 'Value at Risk' which has been a standard for measuring risk in large financial institutions. We will also compare this with other traditional methods as well as other modern methods, such as extreme value theory at quantifying risk. Computationally intensive methods, such as bootstrapping, and Monte Carlo analysis will be used extensively throughout the course with MATLAB as the primary programming tool.

FinTech Concentration

Required Courses (2 courses, 6 credits)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is introductory to use Python for business analytics, intended for students with little or no programming experience. Students will learn how to program with Python and how to use it in conjunction with scientific computing modules and libraries to compute, analyze, and visualize data to make analytics-driven decisions in finance, operations, marketing, accounting, and management. By the end of this course, students will have confidence and understanding of how to program in Python, know how to create and manipulate arrays using numpy library, know how to use pandas library to create and analyze data sets, know how to use matplotlib and seaborn libraries to create beautiful data visualization, and have an understanding of scikit-learn for data analytics.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the history, terminology, current developments, future challenges and opportunities related to the application of technology to financial discipline. With an emphasis of case studies and guest lecture, the class will discuss algorithmic trading, predictive behavioral analysis, data-driven decision making, mobile-only services, robo advisers, machine learning, artificial intelligence, cryptocurrencies, Blockchain, RegTech, InsureTech, innovations in lending, and cybersecurity. Students will be required to complete projects based on a statistical software package.

Finance Elective Course (3 credits)

Take one from the following list of electives:

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course is designed to provide information on various types of fixed income securities and markets, theories and concepts of the term structure of interest rates and valuation of fixed income securities, measurement and management of risk for traditional bonds and bonds with embedded options, understanding of the role of derivatives such as mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, swaps and exotic options, credit analysis and bond rating, portfolio management and performance evaluation. This course is generally offered as an intensive elective.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-810;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine fundamental equity analysis as the convergence of a number of skills such as accounting, financial, and strategic analysis with detective work and experience. Students practice communicating and defending an argument, use a business analysis framework that helps tie together strategy and finance, practice model building and practical approach to profitability in the markets.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an integrated framework for analyzing and measuring risk with a computer simulation approach. A common set of computational tools will be applied across several different financial applications ranging from options pricing to portfolio design. Extensive time will be spent on estimating and simulating 'Value at Risk' which has been a standard for measuring risk in large financial institutions. We will also compare this with other traditional methods as well as other modern methods, such as extreme value theory at quantifying risk. Computationally intensive methods, such as bootstrapping, and Monte Carlo analysis will be used extensively throughout the course with MATLAB as the primary programming tool.

Healthcare Management Concentration (9 credits)

Required Courses:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course explores the origins, components, organization, and operation of the U.S. health system. It prepares students for subsequent healthcare administration courses that delve more deeply into key aspects of the health system. Topics include major current health and health system issues; the history and trends underlying those issues; and the organizations, professions, laws and policies, patients and consumers, payers and other aspects of the health system. Learning activities focus on the relationships among the many parts of the health system.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to the new science of analytics in the context of the health and healthcare sectors. Building on the "Evidence-Based Healthcare Management" Foundation course, this course further develops students'competencies in seeking and analyzing data, and presenting findings. Analytics drives innovative solutions through its use of data science, information technology, and deep knowledge of a particular industry sector. This course focuses on applications in population health, community health, business intelligence, and behavior change. Students will have establish competency in obtaining information from multiple data sources, analyzing metrics, applying analytic tools, using systems thinking to frame and solve problems, evaluating the pros and cons of various analytics approaches, and creating solutions through the use of case narratives, use cases, and client presentations.

Select one of the following electives:

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Builds on Health Systems I: Healthcare in the U.S. by examining the system through the lenses of economics, law, and policy. In order for students to be better prepared to help their organizations adapt effectively to opportunities and constraints presented by the environments in which they operate, they must be able to analyze and evaluate current and evolving healthcare markets, laws and public policies, payment methods, mechanisms for bearing and sharing financial risk, and their impact on healthcare business models and organizational models.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to concepts, analytic tools, and techniques in operations management, including project management, process documentation and analysis, process improvement tools, Lean Six Sigma methodology, queuing theory, forecasting, Theory of Constraints, and supply chain management. Students will understand patient flow and will learn to measure and compare productivity between departments and healthcare organizations, to map processes and identify improvement opportunities, and to apply quantitative methods for optimal managerial decisions. The course builds on the "Evidence-Based Healthcare Management" foundation course. Class exercises, applied concept assignments, and other learning tools enable students to understand ways to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare organizations.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to a wide range of current innovations as well as innovations that are expected in the future. The course builds students' skills to anticipate, adopt and manage innovation in healthcare. It covers innovation in the organization and delivery of healthcare services as well as in the pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices, and healthcare information technology. In particular, the course explores how innovation happens -- i.e., how players across the healthcare industry create, identify, pursue, and support or impede opportunities for innovation.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The "production" of healthcare is a service of significant personal and social consequence and the quality of that service is high on the agenda of every healthcare leader. A number of trends in the industry are interacting to provide both new challenges and new opportunities for managers in the areas of healthcare quality, patient safety and patient experience. Among those trends are new ways of organizing and delivering services, new technologies, the growth of consumerism and patient-centered care, and new standards and expectations. This course builds on Foundation and Core Level 1 courses as it focuses on the complexities and processes of assuring quality performance in healthcare organizations. Among the topics covered in this course are: creating a culture of safety; establishing and sustaining organizational alignment; quality/safety implications for accreditation and regulatory compliance; and measuring and improving the patient experience.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The success of any healthcare organization depends on the ability of its leaders and managers to continuously identify, evaluate and address the key issues facing the organization. Innovations in technology, products, practices, and organization, which are continuously reshaping healthcare, are among the most important issues. This course introduces students to these types of innovations, as part of the larger healthcare environment, and integrates them into the larger framework of strategic management of healthcare organizations. The course explores the essential elements of strategic management: systems thinking, strategic analysis, and strategy development and implementation. Using healthcare industry publications and provocative case studies, students conduct assessments of external trends, assumptions and implications; identify and assess organizational opportunities and challenges as well as strengths and weaknesses; identify strategic and operational issues; and review and develop strategies and actions to address the issues and achieve success.

Marketing Concentration (9 credits)

Required Course:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

At its core, marketing is about providing consumer value. The practice of doing this is changing constantly-driven by rapid and far-reaching changes in technology; globalization; and the evolution of consumer values, practices, and lifestyles. This course will present themes, theories, and trends that are critical for: 1. understanding the business of creating, capturing and sustaining value; 2. introducing students to the global, consumer, and technological realities of marketing in the 21st Century; and 3. providing students with a sound foundation to explore marketing in further depth in upper-level elective courses. This course also contains an experiential component. .

Select two of the following electives (if MBA 660 is waived, must select three):

Prerequisites:

MBA-625, OR SBS-604, OR MBA-622; AND MBA-660

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course explores the role of research in marketing decision-making, including the cost and value of information. The course uses cases and problems to explore problem definition, research design, sampling, questionnaire design, field methods, data analysis and reporting.

Prerequisites:

MBA 660

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to provide you with both a sound theoretical and an applied approach to developing and implementing marketing strategy at multiple levels of the organization - corporate, division, strategic business unit, and product. Special emphasis will be placed on dealing with contemporary marketing issues in the highly competitive global environment. The course presentation will combine lectures, case studies, guest speakers, and a semester-long, team-based project.

Prerequisites:

MBA-660

Credits:

3.00

Description:

SBS graduate level Global Product Innovation (GMC) offers exciting, valuable, and practical global product innovation experience with international educational and/or corporate partners. This project-based course is organized by the Suffolk Marketing Department and an overseas partner school. Teams, consisting of Suffolk Business students and students from the partner school, work on new product or service development and marketing projects targeting one or multiple international markets. The focus will be on the marketing function's input to the innovation process during the pre-launch and launch stages, covering a wide range of issues (such as global market selection, concept generation and evaluation, design and positioning, test marketing, and product launch and tracking). Students will collaborate via virtual teaming technology throughout the semester and report product or service design and marketing plan to the business clients or entering the SBS New Product Competition in the end of the semester. Through a hands-on product innovation project in the global context, students will develop an understanding of the global market dynamism, the diversity of global consumer needs and business practices, and the challenges and advantages of cross-cultural team collaboration.

Prerequisites:

MBA 660

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course addresses the role of the sales manager in today's challenging business environment. As such, the course includes an understanding of direct sales, as well as all facets of sales management such as recruitment, compensation, and management of a sales force. The core of activity is lecture and case study.

Prerequisites:

SBS-604, MKT-810 and MBA-660

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course addresses the practical application of advanced digital marketing techniques. Topics include but are not limited to, advanced search engine optimization (SEO), design of search advertising campaigns across multiple digital platforms in highly competitive markets, analyzing the customer decision journey and, gleaning meaningful insights from user-generated content. Upon successful completion of this program, participants shall be able to independently apply a comprehensive set of digital analytics methodologies, to generate and interpret the actionable insights that enhances a firm's digital campaign and improve the customer experience in the digital space.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-660

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is aimed to understand how to formulate and formalize effective marketing strategies in a world dominated by exponential technological change, and how to understand the logics of this disruptive change. Some of the questions the course will explore are what exponential technologies are and the impact that they have on industries, customer needs and expectations, and how firms can leverage their position to take advantage of these technologies by formulating agile and proactive marketing strategies.

Prerequisites:

MBA 660

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The foundational course in the digital marketing track this course focuses on the consumer of digital media and five big picture marketing strategy challenges confronting marketers in the new digital (mobile +social) marketing era. Challenge 1: Marketing to a smarter, more engaged, empowered consumer; Challenge 2: Marketing to a networked, collaborative, and more social consumer; Challenge 3: Marketing to a more distracted and fickle consumer; Challenge 4: Marketing to a unique, individual consumer; and Challenge 5: Marketing to prosumers or producer-consumers. The course takes on these big picture challenges thorough a deep engagement with and critical analysis of readings and cases. Given this focus the course demands thorough preparation for class and active engagement in the class discussion. The evaluation is assignment and project based.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to help students better understand, practice, and evaluate qualitative market research. The course introduces established and emerging research techniques which require students to actively engage in the process of conducting qualitative research (e.g., study design, data collection, analysis, reporting and storytelling). Statistical approaches including automated text analysis and content analysis are emphasized.

Prerequisites:

MKT-810 previously or concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

In this course, students learn how data analytics transforms businesses and industries, using examples and case studies in multiple industries and contexts. Through applied examples, the use of statistical methods such as linear regression, logistic regression, factor analysis, decision trees, cluster analysis, and optimization will be demonstrated. Students will be using the statistical software, such as SPSS and R, to explore patterns in marketing datasets and build predictive models.

Business Analytics Learning Goals & Objectives

Learning Goals Learning Objectives
Demonstrate ability to apply analytical reasoning skills in applying business analytics to solve business challenges (Analytical Reasoning)
  1. Identify the problem and related issues
  2. Identify key assumptions
  3. Generate salient alternatives
  4. Examine the evidence and source of evidence
  5. Identify conclusions, implications, and consequences
Demonstrate application of business analytics knowledge even in new and unfamiliar circumstances through conceptual understanding (Knowledge Integration)
  1. Acknowledge that the project covers different key functional areas in business
  2. Display understanding across different key functional areas in business
  3. Identify the methodologies appropriate to solve the problem
  4. Apply and coordinate the methodologies to get the best solution for the problem
  5. Display understanding of the implications of the solution for each functional area
  6. Demonstrate overall ability to integrate knowledge from the different functional areas
Apply ethical principles to business analytics decision making.(Ethics)
  1. Identify conflicts of interests and pressures that could lead to unethical conduct
  2. Understand what kinds of questions are helpful to ask oneself when confronting an ethical dilemma
  3. Demonstrate the ability to identify and take into account the interests of different stakeholders
  4. Understand how business strategies that facilitate "doing good" can be made consistent with profitability
  5. Understand that what is legal may not always be ethical and that what is ethical may sometimes not be legal
  6. Appreciate that ethical norms vary across different countries and cultures
Demonstrate effective oral communication about the entire business analytics cycle (Oral Communication)
  1. Organize the presentation effectively
  2. Deliver the presentation with attention to volume, clarity, grammatical correctness and precision
  3. Develop the topic
  4. Communicate with the audience
  5. Use communication aids effectively
  6. Summarize the presentation
Demonstrate effective written communication about the entire business analytics cycle (Written Communication)
  1. Develop a topic with supporting details
  2. Organize written communication effectively and logically
  3. Use correct word choice and effective sentence structure
  4. Employ normal conventions of spelling and grammar
  5. Provide examples and supporting evidence
  6. Communicate accurate quantitative results

Waiver Policy

SBS 604, if waived, needs to be substituted with an approved ISOM elective.To substitute an approved elective for SBS 604, a student must successfully complete equivalent academic coursework at the undergraduate/graduate level in the seven (7) years prior to MSBA matriculation, “B” or better, and provide official transcripts (with English translations, if applicable).

 All waivers with substitution are evaluated upon a student's acceptance into the MSBA Program.

All MSBA students must complete a minimum of 31 graduate credits in the Sawyer Business School (10 courses and SBS 700)

Transfer Policy 

Review of any coursework taken previously from an AACSB-accredited MSBA program will be completed on a case-by-case basis. The credits cannot apply to a previously completed degree and must be substituted with an approved elective. Only courses for which an earned grade of "B" or better and taken within seven (7) years prior to enter the MSBA program will be considered.

Students Who Leave Boston Before Their Degree is Complete

Occasionally, Suffolk MSBA students must leave the Boston area having not yet completed their degree. You may be able to transfer in six credits of elective courses from an AACSB-accredited MSBA close to your new place of residence. Courses must be pre-approved by Suffolk’s assistant dean of graduate programs and have a grade of "B" or better.

Students who leave the area may also complete their Suffolk MSBA online.

Transfer Credits from the Moakley Center for Public Management's Certificate Program

Students who have completed a certificate program through the Suffolk University Moakley Center for Public Management may have an opportunity to reduce credit requirements to an SBS graduate degree program (MBA, MMS, MSA, MST, MHA, MSBA, or MSM). All course waivers and/or transfers vary by program and are reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the respective SBS Graduate Programs Office. 

In order for a course to be considered, the following criteria must be met: must have an SBS graduate program course equivalent; received a grade of "B" or better; and successfully completed the certificate prior to enrolling in the SBS graduate degree program. 

Applicants must also meet the admission standards for the SBS graduate degree program to which they are applying.

 

 

Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) Online

Learn more about this degree
 

MSBA Curriculum

11 Courses
31 Credits

Program Length:

  • Part-time in as few as 20 months

The MSBA program features a 1-credit course, six (6) core courses, 3 electives, and a capstone course. 

Required Course (1 credit)

Credits:

1.00

Description:

SBS 700 is the first required course in Suffolk's graduate programs. The course is based on the precepts of experiential learning. Based on the idea that people learn best by participating in meaningful activities, this course provides students with the opportunity to learn about and experience first-hand the many complexities of business and the role of top managers. To accomplish this, students will work in small groups as they take on the roles of top managers in a hands-on behavioral simulation.

Business Analytics Core Courses (18 credits)

SBS 604 may be waived with an ISOM course substitution.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the concepts and applications of data analytics on large data sets for managerial decision making. Students will learn foundation skills needed to extract valuable information out of data, including various descriptive and predictive analytics techniques. Students develop knowledge of data visualization and interpretation coupled with conveying data, results and insights. Issues on data acquisition, storage and management will be discussed.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Analyzes various real world business problems and explores the full scope of MS Excel's formulas, functions and features to create data models and present solutions. Students analyze data, design custom charts, graphs, PivotTables and Pivot charts, create three-dimensional workbooks, build links between files and endow worksheets with decision-making capabilities. Students conduct What-If Analysis, utilizing Scenario Manager, Solver, Data Tables and Goal Seek. This course provides the skills necessary to pass the Microsoft Office Specialist Certification in Excel.

Prerequisites:

This course was formerly ISOM-815

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the importance of information as an organizational resource, role of big data in organizations, and the application of tools to provide high quality information. Students will be able to select the most appropriate data management tool (e.g., SQL vs. non-SQL databases) to business scenarios. Develops the skills needed to succeed in today's big data environment through the application of data management techniques, cases and exercises. Students will become proficient in designing databases using entity relationship modeling and normalization, in building and querying databases of various sizes with Access and SQL (an industry standard), preparing high quality data and applying data visualizing techniques. Students will complete a series of business-oriented hands-on exercises, prepare cases, and complete projects on database design and big data.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides students with an understanding of the nature of enterprise integration and enterprise software, business process reengineering, the implementation within organizations, and strategies for maximizing benefits from enterprise systems. To manage complex business processes in today's multi-national, wired and wireless world, firms need integrated software packages to manage their global business. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems are used to support a wide range of business functions for all companies across industries. With ERP systems, business managers are able to make decisions with accurate, consistent, and current data. Intensive lab projects on the SAP ERP System with real life business scenarios are utilized to reinforce understanding of enterprise systems functionality and business process concepts.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course teaches students how to build and maintain data warehouses, and how to analyze and use this data as a source for business intelligence and competitive advantage. Students study data mining concepts and the use of analytics tools and methods for producing business knowledge. Topics include extraction, transformation and loading; decision support systems; text, web and data mining models as well as data presentation/visualization including dashboards, scorecards and various charts. Students build a data warehouse and practice the extraction and filtering process used to produce high quality data warehouses. Students will use tools such as MS Excel, SAP Lumira, Tableau and SAP Business Warehouse.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Predictive analytics make predictions about unknown future events. It is crucial for companies to ask the right questions, perform rigorous analysis, and take actions that will result in the most desirable outcomes. This course develops students' capability in applying the core concepts and techniques of predictive analytics to identify opportunity, recognize patterns, predict outcomes, and recommend optimal actions within the context of organizational decision-making. Topics include: business analytics life cycle, data pre- processing, linear and nonlinear regression, tree-based methods, model assessment and selection, and resampling methods.

Capstone Course (3 credits)

Should be taken as late in the program as possible.

Prerequisites:

Take ISOM-835

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is built upon the predictive modeling course and covers a broad collect of data mining and business intelligence techniques, including logistic regression, discriminant analysis, support vector machines, clustering methods, network analysis, association rule mining, text mining, etc. It focuses on turning data into business intelligence and eventually use data and analytics to create business value. The course takes a holistic approach of business analytics, starting from identifying and defining business questions, evaluating data quality, cleaning and preparing data to selecting models, interpreting outcomes, and communicating analysis and results to technical and management audiences. Throughout the course, students are involved in hands-on analysis using large sets of real data from a variety of industries. A term project and a formal presentation of the project are required.

Required Electives and Concentration Descriptions (9 credits)

Students must complete three (3) courses, nine (9) credits of electives, 800-level or higher (exception 600- and 700-level MBA courses and 700-level HLTH courses), within the Sawyer Business School and from the approved MSBA electives lists.

If a concentration is declared, three electives must be in one concentration area. The schedule of when courses within a concentration are offered vary by semester. Concentrations include: accounting, finance, fintech, healthcare management or marketing.

Students who declare a concentration must submit an SBS Graduate Program Concentration Request Form. Students are encouraged to meet with their advisor before they declare a concentration.

The concentration appears on the transcript, not the diploma.

Approved MSBA Electives


Credits:

3.00

Description:

This introductory-level accounting course provides students with a solid base in accounting fundamentals, including U.S. GAAP, the conceptual framework, nature of accounts, journal entries, and ultimately, financial statements. Provides in-depth coverage of the process by which accountants analyze, journalize, post, and summarize transactions. Reviews and analyzes multiple examples of current "real life" financial statements. The students would practice data analytics through the analysis of companies' financial ratios. The course includes a discussion of ethical issues facing accounting professionals and time value of money techniques. For MSA, GCA, & MST students, this is the first course in the financial accounting sequence. For MBA students, this potential elective course builds upon concepts learned in MBA 640.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-800 or MSA Program Director permission

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This is the first of two intermediate-level accounting courses that build on students' learning in ACCT 800, going in-depth into measurement and reporting of asset, liability, and stockholders' equity accounts for external financial reporting purposes. Discusses pronouncements of authoritative sources such as the SEC, AICPA, and the FASB. Introduces students to IFRS and their similarities to and differences from U.S. GAAP. Develops strong critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-801 or MSA Program Director permission

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This is the second of two intermediate-level accounting courses. The critical thinking and problem-solving skills developed in ACCT 801 are broadened as this class tackles more complex accounting concepts, including: dilutive securities, earnings per share, investments, revenue recognition, income tax accounting, pensions and leases. Since accounting for many of these areas has been a source of substantial debate and major revisions in recent years, subject matter covered will be topical. Pertinent pronouncements of standard-setting bodies continue to be studied.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines the concepts and practices of cost measurement: variable costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, goal setting and performance monitoring, standard costing, and variance analysis. Students learn how to prepare a financial plan for a business by constructing operating, working capital, and capital budgets. Students study and practice Excel skills and how those are used to build a financial plan, analyze the sensitivity of the financial plan to different changes, examine performance, and measure and control overhead costs. Students study data analytics techniques and perform analyses in support of decisions, such as pricing, setting product line and customer profitability policy, sourcing of products and services, and matching costing systems to strategy. For MSA, GCA, & MST students this is the first managerial accounting course you will take. For MBA students, this potential elective course builds upon concepts learned in MBA 640.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-800 or MBA-640

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the field of auditing, with a concentration in auditing historical financial statements in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, and some exposure to auditing the internal control over financial reporting of large public companies. Covers the environment, standards, regulation, and law of auditing in the US, with some exposure to the international environment. Covers audit planning, risk, and materiality assessments, audit evidence, evaluation of internal control, documentation, and audit reports. Includes researching and resolving practice-oriented problems and practice in using computer-assisted audit techniques and electronic confirmations.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-800 or MBA-640

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines the pervasiveness and genres of fraud and explores the motivations, opportunities, and rationalizations that facilitate fraudulent behavior. Covers methods of detection, investigation, and prevention of financial statement frauds and other types of financial-related frauds.

Prerequisites:

ACCT 800 or MBA 640, and MBA 650 or program director approval

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course consists of two parts. The first part teaches students how to use Tableau to analyze large data sets and visualize data patterns to derive meaningful, actionable insights. We will utilize different data sets containing detailed information on sales, inventory, and other operational and financial metrics. This part will also introduce some basic tools used in accessing and compiling relevant big data from online resources such as the SEC's EDGAR website and Twitter. Students will be provided with necessary computer code and software to perform textual analysis for company documents and social media posts. The second part focuses on the analysis of financial statement data in an automated fashion. We will employ advanced tools in Excel along with the state-of-the-art data sources including Calcbench to perform financial data analytics and peer benchmarking. Our discussion on financial ratios and credit risk will have an analytical emphasis. This part will conclude with exercises on forecasting income statement data and valuing public companies.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-804 and ACCT-800 or MBA-640 or program director approval

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This case based course, teaches students how to better use information for improved decision making. Students will study how to identify the relevant information that is needed to make decisions. The decisions discussed will span a variety of business areas including accounting, finance, marketing and others. A special emphasis would be put on developing and strengthening the students' presentation skills in both face to face and online environments. Students will learn to speak influentially and effectively about numbers and communicate their conclusions and suggested decisions to different stakeholders.

Prerequisites:

MBA-640 or ACCT-800

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Covers unique aspects of financial reporting in not-for-profit organizations and governmental units. Topics include fund accounting, encumbrance accounting, GASB pronouncements, cost accounting, and budgetary control for government and its agencies, healthcare, educational, religious and other not-for-profit organizations. Students learn how to apply the cost benefit analysis in the resources allocation process, program planning, budgeting and reporting systems.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of financial statements, this course is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of business entity. This course also analyzes financial services industry: bank financial statement analysis with an emphasis on off- balance sheet lending and borrowing, capital structure issues, and innovations in mortgage-backed securities and asset-based financing techniques are covered. Additionally, the tax implications of various derivative securities is studied.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine markets for investment procedures, valuation models, basic analytical techniques, and factors influencing risk/return tradeoffs. This course emphasizes the professional approach to managing investment assets. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, options, and futures.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine techniques and decision-making rules for the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects by corporations and the interaction of investment and financing.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students explore the pricing of options and futures contracts, the characteristics of the markets in which these contracts are traded, options and futures strategies, and the application of these contracts in the hedging of financial positions. In addition, students are exposed to swap markets and a variety of swaps.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the structure and management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course discusses tools for identifying, measuring, evaluating, and managing risks, such as interest rate, credit, foreign exchange, liquidity, market, sovereign, and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and discusses important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to mathematical statistics and basic econometrics. They study fundamental econometric tools as well as hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, linear regressions, simultaneous equations, and models of qualitative choice.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-808, FIN-810, and FIN-814. (FIN-814 can be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine financial theories, techniques, and models applied to the study of corporate financial decisions, aspects of corporate strategy, industry structure, and the functioning of capital markets.

Prerequisites:

FIN 810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

Prerequisites:

FIN-818

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The nature, techniques, and problems of business forecasting. Covers indicators of business activity, short-run econometrics forecasting models, and the construction of aggregate forecasts as well as forecasts of major economic sectors. Includes long-term predictions and the application of aggregate and sector forecasts for particular industries and firms. Prerequisite: FIN 818.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course explores the origins, components, organization, and operation of the U.S. health system. It prepares students for subsequent healthcare administration courses that delve more deeply into key aspects of the health system. Topics include major current health and health system issues; the history and trends underlying those issues; and the organizations, professions, laws and policies, patients and consumers, payers and other aspects of the health system. Learning activities focus on the relationships among the many parts of the health system.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Builds on Health Systems I: Healthcare in the U.S. by examining the system through the lenses of economics, law, and policy. In order for students to be better prepared to help their organizations adapt effectively to opportunities and constraints presented by the environments in which they operate, they must be able to analyze and evaluate current and evolving healthcare markets, laws and public policies, payment methods, mechanisms for bearing and sharing financial risk, and their impact on healthcare business models and organizational models.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to concepts, analytic tools, and techniques in operations management, including project management, process documentation and analysis, process improvement tools, Lean Six Sigma methodology, queuing theory, forecasting, Theory of Constraints, and supply chain management. Students will understand patient flow and will learn to measure and compare productivity between departments and healthcare organizations, to map processes and identify improvement opportunities, and to apply quantitative methods for optimal managerial decisions. The course builds on the "Evidence-Based Healthcare Management" foundation course. Class exercises, applied concept assignments, and other learning tools enable students to understand ways to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare organizations.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to the new science of analytics in the context of the health and healthcare sectors. Building on the "Evidence-Based Healthcare Management" Foundation course, this course further develops students'competencies in seeking and analyzing data, and presenting findings. Analytics drives innovative solutions through its use of data science, information technology, and deep knowledge of a particular industry sector. This course focuses on applications in population health, community health, business intelligence, and behavior change. Students will have establish competency in obtaining information from multiple data sources, analyzing metrics, applying analytic tools, using systems thinking to frame and solve problems, evaluating the pros and cons of various analytics approaches, and creating solutions through the use of case narratives, use cases, and client presentations.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to a wide range of current innovations as well as innovations that are expected in the future. The course builds students' skills to anticipate, adopt and manage innovation in healthcare. It covers innovation in the organization and delivery of healthcare services as well as in the pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices, and healthcare information technology. In particular, the course explores how innovation happens -- i.e., how players across the healthcare industry create, identify, pursue, and support or impede opportunities for innovation.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The "production" of healthcare is a service of significant personal and social consequence and the quality of that service is high on the agenda of every healthcare leader. A number of trends in the industry are interacting to provide both new challenges and new opportunities for managers in the areas of healthcare quality, patient safety and patient experience. Among those trends are new ways of organizing and delivering services, new technologies, the growth of consumerism and patient-centered care, and new standards and expectations. This course builds on Foundation and Core Level 1 courses as it focuses on the complexities and processes of assuring quality performance in healthcare organizations. Among the topics covered in this course are: creating a culture of safety; establishing and sustaining organizational alignment; quality/safety implications for accreditation and regulatory compliance; and measuring and improving the patient experience.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The success of any healthcare organization depends on the ability of its leaders and managers to continuously identify, evaluate and address the key issues facing the organization. Innovations in technology, products, practices, and organization, which are continuously reshaping healthcare, are among the most important issues. This course introduces students to these types of innovations, as part of the larger healthcare environment, and integrates them into the larger framework of strategic management of healthcare organizations. The course explores the essential elements of strategic management: systems thinking, strategic analysis, and strategy development and implementation. Using healthcare industry publications and provocative case studies, students conduct assessments of external trends, assumptions and implications; identify and assess organizational opportunities and challenges as well as strengths and weaknesses; identify strategic and operational issues; and review and develop strategies and actions to address the issues and achieve success.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the fundamental principles of information and big data security. Security vulnerabilities, threats and risks will be analyzed. Common types of computer attacks and counter-attacks will be identified. Security technologies such as biometrics, firewalls, intrusion detection systems and cryptography systems will be applied in conjunction with human based safeguards. Business continuity and disaster recovery planning will be covered. Students will then learn how to design and build a layered security defense combining several of the above controls to address the different challenges to data security. The managerial concerns of security and privacy of information will be stressed including the legal and privacy issues. Best practices for planning and auditing security and privacy will then be covered.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces business intelligence and data analytics. Business intelligence and data analytics help organizations in strategic and operational decision making by improving performance management, optimizing customer relations, monitoring business activity, and improving decision support. On a macro-level, the class will discuss business cases for the adoption of business intelligence and data analytics. We will discuss technologies and processes for gathering, storing, accessing, and analyzing data to provide users with better insights and business decisions. On a micro-level, students will use a variety of tools to build their skills in analyzing data to solve business problems. In summary, this course provides a conceptual understanding of business data resources and the development of capabilities for data preparation, warehousing, selection, description, mining, interpretation, visualization, communication, and innovation.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the fundamental principles and concepts for effective management of supply chains via performance drivers such as procurement, facilities, inventory, transportation, and pricing. No company can do better than its supply chain, a complex network of organizations that collaboratively manage transformation processes to deliver final products/services to customers. Managing a supply chain is a tremendous challenge for most firms which, paradoxically, can also be a crucial source of competitive advantage. This is also a "how-to" course with an extensive use of Excel for supply chain managers and analysts who can benefit from experiencing hands-on familiarity with modeling supply chain applications along with data analysis and interpretation.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the basic principles, tools and technique of the Project Management Life Cycle with practical real-life examples and scenarios. The basic concepts will be studied within the framework of the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK (R)Guide) guidelines set forth by the Project Management Institute (PMI). Other project management framework will be described though not in detail. The course will attempt to help students understand the relationship between good project management and successful software management, development and implementation, and the best practices at each stage of project planning, execution, control and closure. The course will also help build skills to research, analyze and report project management case studies that illustrate the topics covered in this course. PMP(R) and (PMBOK(R)Guide) are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.

Prerequisites:

MBA-625 or SBS-604 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides students with Operations Management concepts, techniques, and tools to design, analyze, and improve operational capabilities in any organization. Students will understand and analyze common OM decisions on managing inputs (materials, information, finances, and human resources) and processes to deliver desirable outcomes to customers. Topics covered include operations strategy, process analysis, quality management and lean operations, capacity analysis, inventory management, product development, supply chain management, project management, revenue management and pricing, decision analysis, and forecasting. Software tools used may include MS Excel, Visio, and Project Management. This course will contain experiential learning components related to Boston's world-class industries, which may include guest lectures, simulation exercises, or visits to local organizations.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course deals with the structure and information content of the three principal financial statements of profit-directed companies, namely the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows. It develops skill in using accounting information to analyze the performance and financial condition of a company, and to facilitate decision making, planning and budgeting, and performance appraisal in a managerial context. This course also contains an experiential component by offering guided inquiry and real company cases.

Prerequisites:

1 course from each of the following groups: MBA-615 or SBS-603; MBA-625 or SBS-604; MBA-640 or ACCT-800; These courses may be taken prior to or concurrently with MBA-650.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces the basic principles of corporate finance. The main focus is on fundamental principles such as time value of money, asset valuation, and risk and return tradeoff. Topics to be covered also include cost of capital, capital budgeting, and capital structure.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

At its core, marketing is about providing consumer value. The practice of doing this is changing constantly-driven by rapid and far-reaching changes in technology; globalization; and the evolution of consumer values, practices, and lifestyles. This course will present themes, theories, and trends that are critical for: 1. understanding the business of creating, capturing and sustaining value; 2. introducing students to the global, consumer, and technological realities of marketing in the 21st Century; and 3. providing students with a sound foundation to explore marketing in further depth in upper-level elective courses. This course also contains an experiential component. .

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course teaches students critical thinking and problem solving skills in the context of two essential ingredients of collaboration: leading people and teams, and managing projects. Students will learn concepts and processes that support building and launching high performing teams that can manage complex projects efficiently and effectively. Students will collaborate experientially to solve problems facing Boston's world-class industry clusters.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to three essential ingredients of innovation: Entrepreneurial Thinking, Information Technology in an Age of Disruption, and Law as Framework. Entrepreneurial thinking is a critical element in the creation, growth, and sustainability of an organization. In new ventures, entrepreneurs drive innovation with limited resources and within a flat organization. Information technology, strategically selected and implemented, can provide a significant, competitive advantage. Students will survey the increasingly complex, evolving, and highly competitive business environment in which ethical, legal, economic, and regulatory forces are continuously reshaping the global marketplace both to create and limit competitive opportunities. This course will contain experiential components, relating to Boston's world-class industries.

Prerequisites:

Please email Hillary Sabbagh at hsabbagh@suffolk.edu to register for a travel seminar.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The Immersion course provides an opportunity for students to link their program work to hands-on experience and visits to real-life global companies. The highly experiential, intensive course combines classroom learning with a direct business and cultural experience. Students will work in teams directly for a client or several clients, solving real challenges, using their analytical skills, knowledge, and experience to develop feasible solutions. Required for all MBA students, the course will be offered globally or nationally to accommodate a variety of student needs.

Prerequisites:

SBS-700, MBA-701, MBA-710, MBA-615(or SBS 603), MBA-625(or SBS 604), MBA-635, MBA-640(or ACCT 800,) MBA-650, MBA-660, MBA-720(or MBA-721), MBA-730, and MBA-745(may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students engage in a variety of learning activities, such as case studies, computer simulations, examinations, project reports, and most especially, experiential exercises involving competition. Students will develop a multi-functional general management perspective. The course is designed to help students integrate and apply their knowledge and techniques learned in the core courses of the MBA program into an overall view of the firm, evaluate the environment, and speculate on the future direction of the organization. Students will also learn about the principal concepts, frameworks, and techniques of strategic management, they will develop the capacity for strategic thinking, and they will examine the organizational and environmental contexts in which strategic management unfolds. This course will make extensive use of experiential activities and projects designed to get students to experience the dynamics of competition right in the classroom.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is required for MSA and MSF students and it is also a recommended elective for MBA students with a finance concentration. This course develops an understanding of the concepts, tools, and applications of economics at both the micro and macro level. The focus is on how economic analysis influences decision-making in the public and private sectors and how economic tools can enhance managerial effectiveness and organizational efficiency. The economic role of government and its impact on the business environment in a market economy, the factors that influence firm performance and competitiveness, and the role of financial institutions in the current economic environment are discussed throughout the course.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Focuses on the federal income taxation of individuals with some discussion of business taxation. Explores the basic structure of individual income taxation, including the individual tax formula, income, deductions, and credits, and provides an introduction to property transactions. Emphasizes how tax laws affect everyday personal and business decisions.

Accounting Concentration (9 credits)

Required Course:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course deals with the structure and information content of the three principal financial statements of profit-directed companies, namely the income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows. It develops skill in using accounting information to analyze the performance and financial condition of a company, and to facilitate decision making, planning and budgeting, and performance appraisal in a managerial context. This course also contains an experiential component by offering guided inquiry and real company cases.

Select two of the following (if MBA 640 is waived, must select three):

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This introductory-level accounting course provides students with a solid base in accounting fundamentals, including U.S. GAAP, the conceptual framework, nature of accounts, journal entries, and ultimately, financial statements. Provides in-depth coverage of the process by which accountants analyze, journalize, post, and summarize transactions. Reviews and analyzes multiple examples of current "real life" financial statements. The students would practice data analytics through the analysis of companies' financial ratios. The course includes a discussion of ethical issues facing accounting professionals and time value of money techniques. For MSA, GCA, & MST students, this is the first course in the financial accounting sequence. For MBA students, this potential elective course builds upon concepts learned in MBA 640.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-800 or MSA Program Director permission

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This is the first of two intermediate-level accounting courses that build on students' learning in ACCT 800, going in-depth into measurement and reporting of asset, liability, and stockholders' equity accounts for external financial reporting purposes. Discusses pronouncements of authoritative sources such as the SEC, AICPA, and the FASB. Introduces students to IFRS and their similarities to and differences from U.S. GAAP. Develops strong critical thinking and problem-solving skills.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-801 or MSA Program Director permission

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This is the second of two intermediate-level accounting courses. The critical thinking and problem-solving skills developed in ACCT 801 are broadened as this class tackles more complex accounting concepts, including: dilutive securities, earnings per share, investments, revenue recognition, income tax accounting, pensions and leases. Since accounting for many of these areas has been a source of substantial debate and major revisions in recent years, subject matter covered will be topical. Pertinent pronouncements of standard-setting bodies continue to be studied.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines the concepts and practices of cost measurement: variable costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, goal setting and performance monitoring, standard costing, and variance analysis. Students learn how to prepare a financial plan for a business by constructing operating, working capital, and capital budgets. Students study and practice Excel skills and how those are used to build a financial plan, analyze the sensitivity of the financial plan to different changes, examine performance, and measure and control overhead costs. Students study data analytics techniques and perform analyses in support of decisions, such as pricing, setting product line and customer profitability policy, sourcing of products and services, and matching costing systems to strategy. For MSA, GCA, & MST students this is the first managerial accounting course you will take. For MBA students, this potential elective course builds upon concepts learned in MBA 640.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-800 or MBA-640

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the field of auditing, with a concentration in auditing historical financial statements in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards, and some exposure to auditing the internal control over financial reporting of large public companies. Covers the environment, standards, regulation, and law of auditing in the US, with some exposure to the international environment. Covers audit planning, risk, and materiality assessments, audit evidence, evaluation of internal control, documentation, and audit reports. Includes researching and resolving practice-oriented problems and practice in using computer-assisted audit techniques and electronic confirmations.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-800 or MBA-640

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines the pervasiveness and genres of fraud and explores the motivations, opportunities, and rationalizations that facilitate fraudulent behavior. Covers methods of detection, investigation, and prevention of financial statement frauds and other types of financial-related frauds.

Prerequisites:

ACCT 800 or MBA 640, and MBA 650 or program director approval

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course consists of two parts. The first part teaches students how to use Tableau to analyze large data sets and visualize data patterns to derive meaningful, actionable insights. We will utilize different data sets containing detailed information on sales, inventory, and other operational and financial metrics. This part will also introduce some basic tools used in accessing and compiling relevant big data from online resources such as the SEC's EDGAR website and Twitter. Students will be provided with necessary computer code and software to perform textual analysis for company documents and social media posts. The second part focuses on the analysis of financial statement data in an automated fashion. We will employ advanced tools in Excel along with the state-of-the-art data sources including Calcbench to perform financial data analytics and peer benchmarking. Our discussion on financial ratios and credit risk will have an analytical emphasis. This part will conclude with exercises on forecasting income statement data and valuing public companies.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-804 and ACCT-800 or MBA-640 or program director approval

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This case based course, teaches students how to better use information for improved decision making. Students will study how to identify the relevant information that is needed to make decisions. The decisions discussed will span a variety of business areas including accounting, finance, marketing and others. A special emphasis would be put on developing and strengthening the students' presentation skills in both face to face and online environments. Students will learn to speak influentially and effectively about numbers and communicate their conclusions and suggested decisions to different stakeholders.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-800 or MBA-640

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Describes various transaction processing cycles and their use in the structured analysis and design of accounting information systems. Students gain an understanding of Enterprise Resource Planning softwares, Quickbooks, database design, XBRL, implementations of internal controls, and privacy and data security issues.

Prerequisites:

MBA-640 or ACCT-800

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Covers unique aspects of financial reporting in not-for-profit organizations and governmental units. Topics include fund accounting, encumbrance accounting, GASB pronouncements, cost accounting, and budgetary control for government and its agencies, healthcare, educational, religious and other not-for-profit organizations. Students learn how to apply the cost benefit analysis in the resources allocation process, program planning, budgeting and reporting systems.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Focuses on the federal income taxation of individuals with some discussion of business taxation. Explores the basic structure of individual income taxation, including the individual tax formula, income, deductions, and credits, and provides an introduction to property transactions. Emphasizes how tax laws affect everyday personal and business decisions.

Finance Concentration (9 credits)

Required Course:

Prerequisites:

1 course from each of the following groups: MBA-615 or SBS-603; MBA-625 or SBS-604; MBA-640 or ACCT-800; These courses may be taken prior to or concurrently with MBA-650.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces the basic principles of corporate finance. The main focus is on fundamental principles such as time value of money, asset valuation, and risk and return tradeoff. Topics to be covered also include cost of capital, capital budgeting, and capital structure.

Select two of the following electives (if MBA 650 is waived, must select three):

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

An in-depth analysis of financial statements, this course is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of business entity. This course also analyzes financial services industry: bank financial statement analysis with an emphasis on off- balance sheet lending and borrowing, capital structure issues, and innovations in mortgage-backed securities and asset-based financing techniques are covered. Additionally, the tax implications of various derivative securities is studied.

Prerequisites:

MBA 650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students analyze markets for financial assets, including the money market and various bond and stock markets. They learn determinants of the level and structure of interest rates, the Federal Reserve impact on markets, how financial institutions operate with respect to their sources and uses of funds, essentials of the regulatory structure of financial markets, transaction costs, and interrelations among markets.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine markets for investment procedures, valuation models, basic analytical techniques, and factors influencing risk/return tradeoffs. This course emphasizes the professional approach to managing investment assets. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, options, and futures.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine techniques and decision-making rules for the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects by corporations and the interaction of investment and financing.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students explore the pricing of options and futures contracts, the characteristics of the markets in which these contracts are traded, options and futures strategies, and the application of these contracts in the hedging of financial positions. In addition, students are exposed to swap markets and a variety of swaps.

Prerequisites:

Take MBA-650;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the structure and management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course discusses tools for identifying, measuring, evaluating, and managing risks, such as interest rate, credit, foreign exchange, liquidity, market, sovereign, and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and discusses important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students are introduced to mathematical statistics and basic econometrics. They study fundamental econometric tools as well as hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, linear regressions, simultaneous equations, and models of qualitative choice.

Prerequisites:

Take FIN-808, FIN-810, and FIN-814. (FIN-814 can be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students examine financial theories, techniques, and models applied to the study of corporate financial decisions, aspects of corporate strategy, industry structure, and the functioning of capital markets.

Prerequisites:

FIN 810

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students learn theory and techniques of scientific portfolio management, including the establishment of portfolio objectives, evaluation of portfolio performance, asset allocation strategies, and the use of derivative securities in portfolio insurance.

Prerequisites:

FIN-818

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The nature, techniques, and problems of business forecasting. Covers indicators of business activity, short-run econometrics forecasting models, and the construction of aggregate forecasts as well as forecasts of major economic sectors. Includes long-term predictions and the application of aggregate and sector forecasts for particular industries and firms. Prerequisite: FIN 818.

Prerequisites:

FIN-810 (may be taken concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Students develop a framework for understanding, analyzing, and valuing modern financial instruments. Students examine several types of derivative securities and their use in managing financial risk. While the interests of issuers, intermediaries, and investors will all be considered, the primary emphasis will be on the perspective of corporate financial managers and the use of modern financial technology in the creation of value for shareholders.

Prerequisites:

MBA-650

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces basic corporate valuation models and shows how risk arises in firms and how managing that risk can impact the firm's valuation. It shows different ways and contracts that can be used to change the risk profile of the firm. The course will introduce methods including using derivatives to hedge, and the use of insurance and hybrid insurance contracts, and through the adjustment of the capital structure and other financial policies of the firm (dividend payout strategies, optimal compensation, etc.). Throughout the course we will use various risk metrics to demonstrate the impact the risk management strategy has on the firm's exposure to risk and the value that is created by undertaking the activity.

Healthcare Management Concentration (9 credits)

Required Courses:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course explores the origins, components, organization, and operation of the U.S. health system. It prepares students for subsequent healthcare administration courses that delve more deeply into key aspects of the health system. Topics include major current health and health system issues; the history and trends underlying those issues; and the organizations, professions, laws and policies, patients and consumers, payers and other aspects of the health system. Learning activities focus on the relationships among the many parts of the health system.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to the new science of analytics in the context of the health and healthcare sectors. Building on the "Evidence-Based Healthcare Management" Foundation course, this course further develops students'competencies in seeking and analyzing data, and presenting findings. Analytics drives innovative solutions through its use of data science, information technology, and deep knowledge of a particular industry sector. This course focuses on applications in population health, community health, business intelligence, and behavior change. Students will have establish competency in obtaining information from multiple data sources, analyzing metrics, applying analytic tools, using systems thinking to frame and solve problems, evaluating the pros and cons of various analytics approaches, and creating solutions through the use of case narratives, use cases, and client presentations.

Select one of the following electives:

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Builds on Health Systems I: Healthcare in the U.S. by examining the system through the lenses of economics, law, and policy. In order for students to be better prepared to help their organizations adapt effectively to opportunities and constraints presented by the environments in which they operate, they must be able to analyze and evaluate current and evolving healthcare markets, laws and public policies, payment methods, mechanisms for bearing and sharing financial risk, and their impact on healthcare business models and organizational models.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to concepts, analytic tools, and techniques in operations management, including project management, process documentation and analysis, process improvement tools, Lean Six Sigma methodology, queuing theory, forecasting, Theory of Constraints, and supply chain management. Students will understand patient flow and will learn to measure and compare productivity between departments and healthcare organizations, to map processes and identify improvement opportunities, and to apply quantitative methods for optimal managerial decisions. The course builds on the "Evidence-Based Healthcare Management" foundation course. Class exercises, applied concept assignments, and other learning tools enable students to understand ways to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare organizations.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to a wide range of current innovations as well as innovations that are expected in the future. The course builds students' skills to anticipate, adopt and manage innovation in healthcare. It covers innovation in the organization and delivery of healthcare services as well as in the pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, medical devices, and healthcare information technology. In particular, the course explores how innovation happens -- i.e., how players across the healthcare industry create, identify, pursue, and support or impede opportunities for innovation.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The "production" of healthcare is a service of significant personal and social consequence and the quality of that service is high on the agenda of every healthcare leader. A number of trends in the industry are interacting to provide both new challenges and new opportunities for managers in the areas of healthcare quality, patient safety and patient experience. Among those trends are new ways of organizing and delivering services, new technologies, the growth of consumerism and patient-centered care, and new standards and expectations. This course builds on Foundation and Core Level 1 courses as it focuses on the complexities and processes of assuring quality performance in healthcare organizations. Among the topics covered in this course are: creating a culture of safety; establishing and sustaining organizational alignment; quality/safety implications for accreditation and regulatory compliance; and measuring and improving the patient experience.

Prerequisites:

HLTH 705 (or 701) and HLTH 707 (or 812)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The success of any healthcare organization depends on the ability of its leaders and managers to continuously identify, evaluate and address the key issues facing the organization. Innovations in technology, products, practices, and organization, which are continuously reshaping healthcare, are among the most important issues. This course introduces students to these types of innovations, as part of the larger healthcare environment, and integrates them into the larger framework of strategic management of healthcare organizations. The course explores the essential elements of strategic management: systems thinking, strategic analysis, and strategy development and implementation. Using healthcare industry publications and provocative case studies, students conduct assessments of external trends, assumptions and implications; identify and assess organizational opportunities and challenges as well as strengths and weaknesses; identify strategic and operational issues; and review and develop strategies and actions to address the issues and achieve success.

Waiver Policy

SBS 604, if waived, needs to be substituted with an approved ISOM elective. To substitute an approved elective for SBS 604, a student must successfully complete equivalent academic coursework at the undergraduate/graduate level in the seven (7) years prior to MSBA matriculation, “B” or better, and provide official transcripts (with English translations, if applicable).

 All waivers with substitution are evaluated upon a student's acceptance into the MSBA Program.

All MSBA students must complete a minimum of 31 graduate credits in the Sawyer Business School (10 courses and SBS 700)

Transfer Credit Policy 

Review of any coursework taken previously from an AACSB-accredited MSBA program will be completed on a case-by-case basis. The credits cannot apply to a previously completed degree and must be substituted with an approved elective. Only courses for which an earned grade of "B" or better and taken within seven (7) years prior to enter the MSBA program will be considered.

 

Graduate Certificate in Business Analytics

Learn more about this certificate

Curriculum

5 Courses
15 Credits

Program Length
Part-time in as few as 9 months 

Required Courses (15 credits)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the concepts and applications of data analytics on large data sets for managerial decision making. Students will learn foundation skills needed to extract valuable information out of data, including various descriptive and predictive analytics techniques. Students develop knowledge of data visualization and interpretation coupled with conveying data, results and insights. Issues on data acquisition, storage and management will be discussed.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Analyzes various real world business problems and explores the full scope of MS Excel's formulas, functions and features to create data models and present solutions. Students analyze data, design custom charts, graphs, PivotTables and Pivot charts, create three-dimensional workbooks, build links between files and endow worksheets with decision-making capabilities. Students conduct What-If Analysis, utilizing Scenario Manager, Solver, Data Tables and Goal Seek. This course provides the skills necessary to pass the Microsoft Office Specialist Certification in Excel.

Prerequisites:

This course was formerly ISOM-815

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the importance of information as an organizational resource, role of big data in organizations, and the application of tools to provide high quality information. Students will be able to select the most appropriate data management tool (e.g., SQL vs. non-SQL databases) to business scenarios. Develops the skills needed to succeed in today's big data environment through the application of data management techniques, cases and exercises. Students will become proficient in designing databases using entity relationship modeling and normalization, in building and querying databases of various sizes with Access and SQL (an industry standard), preparing high quality data and applying data visualizing techniques. Students will complete a series of business-oriented hands-on exercises, prepare cases, and complete projects on database design and big data.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides students with an understanding of the nature of enterprise integration and enterprise software, business process reengineering, the implementation within organizations, and strategies for maximizing benefits from enterprise systems. To manage complex business processes in today's multi-national, wired and wireless world, firms need integrated software packages to manage their global business. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems are used to support a wide range of business functions for all companies across industries. With ERP systems, business managers are able to make decisions with accurate, consistent, and current data. Intensive lab projects on the SAP ERP System with real life business scenarios are utilized to reinforce understanding of enterprise systems functionality and business process concepts.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Predictive analytics make predictions about unknown future events. It is crucial for companies to ask the right questions, perform rigorous analysis, and take actions that will result in the most desirable outcomes. This course develops students' capability in applying the core concepts and techniques of predictive analytics to identify opportunity, recognize patterns, predict outcomes, and recommend optimal actions within the context of organizational decision-making. Topics include: business analytics life cycle, data pre- processing, linear and nonlinear regression, tree-based methods, model assessment and selection, and resampling methods.

Course Substitution Policy

To substitute SBS 604 with an approved elective, a student must have successfully completed equivalent academic coursework at the undergraduate/graduate level in the seven years prior to matriculation, "B" or better. To substitute any other business analytics certificate course with an approved elective, a student must have successfully completed equivalent academic coursework at the graduate level in the seven years prior to matriculation, "B" or better. Official transcripts must be provided (with English translation, if applicable). A maximum of 3 credits of coursework can be substituted.

Candidates who apply within one year of completing their graduate certificate will have applicable courses applied to Sawyer Business School (SBS) graduate degree programs in the same discipline as the certificate as long a grade of "B" or better was earned in the course.

Candidates who apply to a degree program, different from their certificate program’s discipline area or beyond one year, will have coursework evaluated on a case by case basis for relevancy, current degree requirements and current Sawyer Business School waiver and transfer policies.