Law

Law Major

Learn more about this major

Degree Requirements - 126 credits

Students can earn a bachelor of arts degree with this major.  See the requirements for the bachelor of arts degree.

Students can earn a bachelor of science degree with this major.  See the requirements for the bachelor of science degree.

Major Requirements: 11 courses, 42-44 credits

Core Requirements (9 courses, 36 credits)

Credits:

4

Description:

An introduction to the American political system and constitutional framework. Focus will be on the interplay of various institutions (the Presidency, Congress and the Judiciary) in creating public policies. Contemporary public issues will be discussed, as will the role of political theory in shaping American democracy. Attention will be given to the role of the news media, public opinion, political ideology, political parties and interest groups in the American system.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course examines a range of contemporary issues introducing students to the U.S. Constitution and the fundamental concepts of constitutional law. Students discuss and analyze topics including separation of powers, federalism, freedom of speech, the death penalty, gun control, and civil rights. We will explore current constitutional challenges and their relationship to law and society.

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces the student to the responsibilities of paralegals and to the culture of the legal profession. Topics include the development of paralegalism as a profession, the definition of the practice of law, ethical considerations, interviewing techniques, legal research, law office management, and client relationships. Normally offered each semester.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course provides an introductory overview of the American legal system, legal reasoning, and the legal profession. Students will learn about the structure of the federal government and the relation between state and federal systems, with a focus on the courts and the litigation process. Students will read primary legal materials such as judicial opinions and statutes and will complete assignments that provide opportunities to engage in legal reasoning, analysis, argument, and research. The course will also provide theoretical perspectives on the role of law in society, as well as a brief look at the legal profession and the work that lawyers do. This course is not a legal specialty course.

Prerequisites:

Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

The Rules of Civil Procedure dictate the steps taken in state and federal lawsuits. This course will acquaint students with rules and the practical requirements of the rules, from filing a complaint to clarifying a judgment and to the duties of paralegals in a litigation office. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

The existence and validity of a contract is determined by specific rules. Students will learn about formation through offer and acceptance, contract enforceability, the necessity of consideration, and breach of contract and will draft contract provisions as a paralegal might in a law office. Normally offered each semester. Sophomore status required.

Prerequisites:

Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

How to use the law library, perform legal research, write legal analysis in memorandum form, and use computers as a research tool. Initial focus is on learning how to find legal materials, including federal and state case law, statutory law, and administrative law. Use of finding tools such as digests, encyclopedias, and CALR will be studied, as will shepardizing. Focus also on legal writing, from letters through case analysis. Normally offered fall semester. Sophomore Status Required

Prerequisites:

ALS-361 OR LAWU-301

Credits:

4

Description:

Building on the skills in LAW 301 - Legal Research & Writing I, this course continues the focus on learning how to find legal materials and how to summarize research results. Writing skills will be strengthened through various exercises and revisions. Skill development in legal analysis, writing legal memoranda, and using computer assisted legal research with Westlaw and Lexis will be emphasized.

Prerequisites:

Paralegal Certificate or Senior standing and at least 15 hours of paralegal courses.

Credits:

4

Description:

A one-semester internship in either a law office, a governmental agency, insurance company, or a for-profit or non-profit corporation, depending on the positions available during each semester. Once a week seminars will discuss such topics as ethical considerations in a law office, experiences gained as a paralegal interns, and seeking paralegal employment. Prerequisites: Senior status and at least 15 hours of Paralegal Studies or permission of instructor.

Elective Courses (2 courses, 6-8 credits)

Choose one from Elective Group 1:

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Presents an in-depth study of corporate crime and financial fraud. Examines accounting devices and schemes employed to defraud stakeholders, failure of industry watchdogs, and the regulatory and legislative environment. Topics include: corporate governance, corporate finance, corporate compliance programs, ethical misconduct by outside legal, accounting,investment and banking professionals, Sarbanes Oxley Act, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act,Organizational Sentencing guidelines, mail fraud, wire fraud, money laundering,conspiracy, securities violations, qui tam litigation(whistleblowers)and financial accounting crimes.

Credits:

4

Description:

How do laws governing the political process affect and impact political power relationships? This course investigates topics including redistricting, the right to vote, voter turnout and mobilization, election administration, the Voting Rights Act, and political parties. Students will have a choice of either serving as poll workers during the November election or organizing and conducting research of potential voters. Students will gain hands-on experience in actual research design, election administration, and non-partisan get-out-the-vote activities. In addition, students will gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between attitudes, opinion, and voting behavior in American politics and institutions.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course examines criminal law in the United States from a broad perspective. It will present the general principles and doctrines that affect the whole criminal law, such as elements of criminal offenses, defenses to crime, and perspectives on crime and criminal law. In addition, students will learn the elements of specific crimes, such as homicide, criminal sexual conduct, terrorism and related crimes, crimes against public morals, and crimes against property. Discussions of the direction of the criminal law and constitutional limitations on government will be presented as preparation for future study. This course is not a legal specialty course.

Prerequisites:

Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

An opportunity to learn the history of domestic violence including battering, child abuse and child neglect, and the legal response to it. Focus will be on Massachusetts Law and its response, especially the Abuse Prevention Act, its application and enforcement, and on laws protecting children from abuse and neglect. Filings, law office issues and special issues in dealing with battered women and abused and neglected children will be included with the psychological issues, cultural issues, and advocacy possibilities. Normally offered yearly. Sophomore status required. Cultural Diversity A

Prerequisites:

Take LAWU-101, LAWU-280, or LAWU-340

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will provide undergraduate students with an introduction to the many ways that gender and sexuality are affected by, and affect, the law in the United States. Subjects explored will include the history and context of sex-based and orientation-based discrimination in American law, the primacy of gender as it affects and is affected by law, and special cases of transgender and intersex ideation within American legal constructs. Particular emphasis will be placed on the law of sexuality and gender in the workplace, in education, in criminal law, and within social relationships such as families. This course is not a legal specialty course.

Prerequisites:

Take LAWU-101

Credits:

4

Description:

Family law includes marriage, divorce, support, custody, property division, and abuse prevention petitions. Essentially an area of state law, it is often the backbone of general practice law firms. The role of paralegals in a family law office will be studied.

Prerequisites:

Take LAWU-101

Credits:

4

Description:

This course provides a basic overview of key issues in contemporary education law and policy. Relevant local, state, and federal laws will be reviewed as well as education policy issues, including civil rights, student safety and discipline. This course covers the core educational entitlements granted to all students with disabilities in the public education system. The course covers major federal legislation such as the IDEA, ADA and Section 504, as well as major Supreme Court and other important cases.

Prerequisites:

Take LAWU-101

Credits:

4

Description:

The nature of the employment relationship and and overview of constitutional and federal statutory provisions which affect the employment relationship will be studied. Particular emphasis on the Civil Rights Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Statutory provisions regarding benefits and employment-related entitlements will also be studied

Prerequisites:

Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

Study of the immigration and nationality laws of the United States focusing on the interplay of the administrative agencies which administer those laws: Justice Department, Labor Department, and State Department. Topics include the immigrant selection system; the issuance of non-immigrant visas; grounds for excluding aliens and waiver of excludability; grounds for removal; change of status, and refugee and asylum status. Special emphasis on the paralegal's role in representing and communicating sensitively with aliens.

Prerequisites:

Take LAWU-101

Credits:

4

Description:

With the globalization of the world economy, legal professional and business people require knowledge of international law more than ever. This course offers students a survey of selected materials in public international law. Covered will be the practical and theoretical issues of international law, from the Law of the Sea to business implications to definitions of war and international concepts of justice.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

This class will focus on the general role that law plays in public life. Instead of studying what the current laws are, the class emphasizes the challenges in analyzing, interpreting, and constructing law. Among the most important questions will be how we should evaluate or reform existing legal systems. Readings may include formative cases, recent legal studies, and classic texts by figures such as Grotius, Bentham, Holmes, Hart, and Dworkin. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every other year.

Credits:

4

Description:

Considers the problems surrounding the legal definition and handling of juveniles who confront the law as offenders, clients and victims. Attention is devoted to the study of the special legal categories and procedures established for juveniles, the problems facing professionals providing juvenile services and the most significant directions of legal and social change affecting youth in our society. Normally offered every year. Fulfills the Sociology Department's Social Policy requirement.

Credits:

4

Description:

What happens if you commit a crime on an Indian reservation? Who will prosecute you and how will they punish you? This course will explore the roots of tribal legal systems and criminal law, both the Native and American influences. You will gain an understanding of tribal government, legal systems, criminal law, and the role of tradition in contemporary tribal law. The course will also examine the conflict between Native and Non-Native perspectives on several cases: sovereignty, rights to cultural practices, women, freedom of religion, and land.

Credits:

4

Description:

An overview of issues and social variables involved in the pre-arrest and arrest stages followed by a more in-depth analysis of pre-trial, trial, sentencing, and correctional phases. Sociological and criminal justice models are examined and compared with the actual processes and purported functions of criminal justice agencies. Required for all majors in the Crime and Justice Concentration.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will look at the special opportunities and obligations of those in the health and legal professions to protect human rights. There will be an overview of human rights doctrine and key documents. Students will learn to apply human rights principles to particular occupations in the health and legal professions.

Credits:

4

Description:

Law and legal systems are examined in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on the manner in which legal structures and processes interact with other social arrangements and are transformed over time.

Credits:

4

Description:

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the principles of restorative justice and to examine the programs, practices and policies within schools, juvenile justice and the adult criminal justice system which implement a restorative practices. Restorative justice is a different philosophy of responding to harm which provides new roles for the victim, offender, community and professionals . We will compare a restorative approach to crime with the traditional system of discipline and crime control and critique the shortcomings of an adversarial or retributive response to criminal behavior. We will explore the theoretical and historical origins of traditional justice systems and restorative approaches. We will also examine how these ideas are being applied in practical partnerships between the justice system and the community here in the United States and around the world.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course examines U.S. Immigration legislation and policies, focusing on how and why various immigration laws and policies have been established and implemented throughout history. We will address the intersection between immigration policy and race, ethnicity, nationality and socioeconomic status, as well as explore the effects that immigration laws have had on various immigrant groups and society in general.

Choose an additional course from Group 1 or one from Elective Group 2:

Credits:

4

Description:

Modern applications of argument in political, social, and legal situations. Emphasis on development of arguments, analysis, use of evidence, and delivery of oral and written assignments.

Credits:

1.00- 8.00

Description:

Intensive research on topics in debate and active participation in the University forensics program. ECR

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces the field of business law. Provides an overview of the organization and operation of the American legal system, court system and legal procedure. Examines selected business law topics such as contracts, torts, criminal law,agency, and business organizations. Attention is given to the ways in which business law manifests important social and ethical precepts.

Prerequisites:

BLE 214

Credits:

3.00

Description:

One of the greatest threats to business is the potential for litigation. Lawsuits can seriously hurt profits and even lead to bankruptcy. Even when businesses win in court, they still lose, what with the cost of the legal defense and the possibility of adverse publicity and decreased consumer confidence. Managers need to know how to avoid the potential for litigation and be aware of the areas of their business that provide the greatest risks to their enterprise. This course covers common ways in which businesses can protect themselves from common lawsuits ranging from product defects to environmental and worker safety to employee discrimination and harassment. Students will learn how to establish systems that will put their companies ahead legally.

Prerequisites:

BLE 214

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Surveys the global legal environment of business. Emphasizes case analysis of topics such as: sovereignty, extraterritoriality, treaties, international contracts, arbitration, and the European Union. Explores the managerial and economic significance of these topics.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the legal rights, responsibilities, and constraints on the media and on media professionals. Focus on defamation, copyright, obscenity, broadcast regulation, and media-related tort law.

Prerequisites:

FS-L103 concurrently

Credits:

3

Description:

Application of the principles of forensic science in evaluating physical evidence, with emphasis on its role in criminal investigation. Class experiences may include guest lectures and field trips. 3-hour lecture. Normally offered Fall

Prerequisites:

FS-103 concurrently

Credits:

1

Description:

Laboratory experiences related to the collection and analysis of physical evidence as performed by forensic science professionals. Experiments may include forensic microscopy, drug analysis, forensic serology, physical patterns, fingerprint and firearm evidence analysis techniques. 3-hour laboratory. Normally offered Fall

Credits:

4

Description:

This course examines the public policy-making role of the court system and examines questions such as whether and how courts can spur political and social reform. The direct and secondary effects of key court decisions will be examined. Case studies may focus on issues like civil rights and pro-choice court cases and political activism. The course will also examine the basics of policy-related legal research.

Prerequisites:

GPA at least 3.3

Credits:

4

Description:

This friendly, interactive introduction to intellectual property covers the fundamental pillars of copyrights,patents, trademarks, and trade secret, and more far-reaching topics like international and internet intellectual property, and indigenous people and IP. The course is open to all majors,because it is relevant to anyone who deals with creative works, inventions, discoveries, or business. This undergraduate course will be taught at the Suffolk Law School by a member of its faculty.

Credits:

4

Description:

Corporations, which are one of the dominant institutions of the early 21st century, are driven not by the public good, but by the profit motive. Decisions made by two industries dominated by corporations, the food industry and the tobacco industry, have a tremendous negative impact on America's public health. What, if anything, can be done to counteract the harm caused by Fast Food & Big Tobacco?

Credits:

4

Description:

Moot Court consists of simulated arguments in front of the Supreme Court of the United States. Students brief approximately 20 Supreme Court cases and apply them to a hypothetical case before the Court. Students form written and oral arguments based on two constitutional questions in the hypothetical. Two person teams will develop legal oral arguments in favor of their clients. Students learn how to compose written briefs, develop a knowledge of case law, learn how to effectively respond to questioning, and develop forensic skills, and courtroom demeanor. Moot Court is a great preparation course for undergraduate students planning to attend law school.

Prerequisites:

Junior status or above

Credits:

4

Description:

This course explains the main components of the international legal system. It begins by exploring the rules, principles and norms that govern the relationship among states, the different cultural and philosophical legal perspectives and the history of the international legal system. The second part of the course covers the study of the sources and subjects of the international law, the jurisdiction of states, the peaceful settlement of disputes, the use of force and the legal personality of international actors. The third part of the course addresses a number of significant topics derived from the process of globalization legal norms: human rights, humanitarian intervention, law of the sea, environmental law, and economic relations.

Credits:

4

Description:

Ethical issues are central in law for lawyers, paralegals, judges, jurors and anyone working within or touched by the legal system. This course examines philosophical questions, practical issues, and social theories of law, primarily through the use of legal materials, to analyze legal ethical theory. The course considers how major theories are characterized within the American legal system, including the presumption of innocence, due process guarantees, the right to counsel, and other fundamental legal concepts. Normally offered alternate years.

Prerequisites:

Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

The role of computers and software in the law office as it affects the paralegal Lectures and hands-on applications will focus on the changing technology of computer hardware through fact scenarios that students will use to track changes from introduction to resolution in litigation. Focus on software applications involving word processing, spreadsheets, billing, diary and scheduling, research, and use of the Internet.

Prerequisites:

Take LAWU-101

Credits:

4

Description:

State laws affect the disposition of an individual's estate at death, and upon death, the estate must be probated in court. Focus on estate information gathering, drafting of wills, and the probate of estates for those with and without wills. Emphasis on the role of the paralegal in a law office handling wills and probate.

Prerequisites:

Take LAWU-101

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will present common law real estate principles and the effect of federal agencies on the buying and selling of real property. Sample forms including leases, purchase and sale agreements, and closing forms are reviewed and drafted.

Prerequisites:

Take LAWU-101

Credits:

4

Description:

A survey of the law of the protection of ideas, trade secrets, inventions, artistic creations, and reputation. The course will briefly review the bases for patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret protection, the distinction among the various forms of intellectual property, and the statutory and common law methods of enforcing rights.

Prerequisites:

Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

Credits:

4

Description:

"Corporations are unique business entities and specialized ""citizens"" of the state. This course will examine the special rules for establishing and maintaining a corporation\"

Prerequisites:

Take LAWU-101

Credits:

4

Description:

Federal and state administrative agencies such as FTC, NLRB, and EEOC are extensive sources of law. Familiarity with these agencies is useful in many areas where a paralegal might work. Additionally, Worker's Compensation law is uniquely suited to assist the student in acquiring a practical understanding of the administrative law area, and its legal, administrative, economic, and social foundations will be studied.

Prerequisites:

ALS 362 or LAWU 211, or permission of instructor

Credits:

4

Description:

Building on the skills introduced in LAW 211, Litigation, this course will provide a thorough study of the rules of evidence, the process of discovery, and the preparation of a case for a trial, as well as the roles of arbitration, mediation, and negotiation in litigation and other legal disputes. Theory will be combined with practical applications for prospective paralegals, such as deposition abstracting, gathering and preserving evidence, and techniques on how to prepare a case for ADR.

Prerequisites:

Instructor's consent required

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Individual program of reading and research on an approved topic under the supervision of a member of the department. Only for qualified juniors or seniors. Offered every semester.

Credits:

4

Description:

An introduction to formal (or semi-formal) study of the basic types of deductive arguments (propositional and syllogistic logic). 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Note: Both the BA and the BS in Law include all requirements to complete the Certificate in Paralegal Studies. Thus, Law majors cannot apply to the Paralegal Certificate program.

     

    Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

    Law Learning Goals & Objectives

    Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.

    Learning Goals Learning Objectives
    Students will...
    Students will be able to...
    Understand legal concepts
  • Communicate effectively orally and in writing
  • Use critical thinking skills
  • Be effective legal researchers
  • Understand ethical behavior in the workplace
  • Make ethical decisions in the workplace
  • Appreciate importance of professional ethics and demonstrate understanding of code of ethics which apply to attorneys as well as paralegals
  • Understand legal analysis and research
  • Effectively use legal research tools, including technology
  • Master new resources, including secondary authority, legislative histories, and administrative materials
  • Understand legal analytic method
  • Understand legal procedure and the role of the paralegal in the American legal system
  • Analyze rules of precedent in substantive legal areas
  • Apply legal principles to real life cases
  • Law Minor

    Learn more about this minor

    Minor Requirements: 5 courses, 19-20 credits

    Required Courses (3 courses, 12 credits)

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course examines a range of contemporary issues introducing students to the U.S. Constitution and the fundamental concepts of constitutional law. Students discuss and analyze topics including separation of powers, federalism, freedom of speech, the death penalty, gun control, and civil rights. We will explore current constitutional challenges and their relationship to law and society.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Introduces the student to the responsibilities of paralegals and to the culture of the legal profession. Topics include the development of paralegalism as a profession, the definition of the practice of law, ethical considerations, interviewing techniques, legal research, law office management, and client relationships. Normally offered each semester.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course provides an introductory overview of the American legal system, legal reasoning, and the legal profession. Students will learn about the structure of the federal government and the relation between state and federal systems, with a focus on the courts and the litigation process. Students will read primary legal materials such as judicial opinions and statutes and will complete assignments that provide opportunities to engage in legal reasoning, analysis, argument, and research. The course will also provide theoretical perspectives on the role of law in society, as well as a brief look at the legal profession and the work that lawyers do. This course is not a legal specialty course.

    Electives (2 courses, 7-8 credits)

    Choose two courses from the following list:

    Credits:

    3.00

    Description:

    Presents an in-depth study of corporate crime and financial fraud. Examines accounting devices and schemes employed to defraud stakeholders, failure of industry watchdogs, and the regulatory and legislative environment. Topics include: corporate governance, corporate finance, corporate compliance programs, ethical misconduct by outside legal, accounting,investment and banking professionals, Sarbanes Oxley Act, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act,Organizational Sentencing guidelines, mail fraud, wire fraud, money laundering,conspiracy, securities violations, qui tam litigation(whistleblowers)and financial accounting crimes.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course examines the public policy-making role of the court system and examines questions such as whether and how courts can spur political and social reform. The direct and secondary effects of key court decisions will be examined. Case studies may focus on issues like civil rights and pro-choice court cases and political activism. The course will also examine the basics of policy-related legal research.

    Prerequisites:

    GPA at least 3.3

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This friendly, interactive introduction to intellectual property covers the fundamental pillars of copyrights,patents, trademarks, and trade secret, and more far-reaching topics like international and internet intellectual property, and indigenous people and IP. The course is open to all majors,because it is relevant to anyone who deals with creative works, inventions, discoveries, or business. This undergraduate course will be taught at the Suffolk Law School by a member of its faculty.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Corporations, which are one of the dominant institutions of the early 21st century, are driven not by the public good, but by the profit motive. Decisions made by two industries dominated by corporations, the food industry and the tobacco industry, have a tremendous negative impact on America's public health. What, if anything, can be done to counteract the harm caused by Fast Food & Big Tobacco?

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    How do laws governing the political process affect and impact political power relationships? This course investigates topics including redistricting, the right to vote, voter turnout and mobilization, election administration, the Voting Rights Act, and political parties. Students will have a choice of either serving as poll workers during the November election or organizing and conducting research of potential voters. Students will gain hands-on experience in actual research design, election administration, and non-partisan get-out-the-vote activities. In addition, students will gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between attitudes, opinion, and voting behavior in American politics and institutions.

    Prerequisites:

    Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The Rules of Civil Procedure dictate the steps taken in state and federal lawsuits. This course will acquaint students with rules and the practical requirements of the rules, from filing a complaint to clarifying a judgment and to the duties of paralegals in a litigation office. Normally offered each semester.

    Prerequisites:

    Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The existence and validity of a contract is determined by specific rules. Students will learn about formation through offer and acceptance, contract enforceability, the necessity of consideration, and breach of contract and will draft contract provisions as a paralegal might in a law office. Normally offered each semester. Sophomore status required.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course examines criminal law in the United States from a broad perspective. It will present the general principles and doctrines that affect the whole criminal law, such as elements of criminal offenses, defenses to crime, and perspectives on crime and criminal law. In addition, students will learn the elements of specific crimes, such as homicide, criminal sexual conduct, terrorism and related crimes, crimes against public morals, and crimes against property. Discussions of the direction of the criminal law and constitutional limitations on government will be presented as preparation for future study. This course is not a legal specialty course.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Ethical issues are central in law for lawyers, paralegals, judges, jurors and anyone working within or touched by the legal system. This course examines philosophical questions, practical issues, and social theories of law, primarily through the use of legal materials, to analyze legal ethical theory. The course considers how major theories are characterized within the American legal system, including the presumption of innocence, due process guarantees, the right to counsel, and other fundamental legal concepts. Normally offered alternate years.

    Prerequisites:

    Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The role of computers and software in the law office as it affects the paralegal Lectures and hands-on applications will focus on the changing technology of computer hardware through fact scenarios that students will use to track changes from introduction to resolution in litigation. Focus on software applications involving word processing, spreadsheets, billing, diary and scheduling, research, and use of the Internet.

    Prerequisites:

    Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    An opportunity to learn the history of domestic violence including battering, child abuse and child neglect, and the legal response to it. Focus will be on Massachusetts Law and its response, especially the Abuse Prevention Act, its application and enforcement, and on laws protecting children from abuse and neglect. Filings, law office issues and special issues in dealing with battered women and abused and neglected children will be included with the psychological issues, cultural issues, and advocacy possibilities. Normally offered yearly. Sophomore status required. Cultural Diversity A

    Prerequisites:

    Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    How to use the law library, perform legal research, write legal analysis in memorandum form, and use computers as a research tool. Initial focus is on learning how to find legal materials, including federal and state case law, statutory law, and administrative law. Use of finding tools such as digests, encyclopedias, and CALR will be studied, as will shepardizing. Focus also on legal writing, from letters through case analysis. Normally offered fall semester. Sophomore Status Required

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101, LAWU-280, or LAWU-340

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course will provide undergraduate students with an introduction to the many ways that gender and sexuality are affected by, and affect, the law in the United States. Subjects explored will include the history and context of sex-based and orientation-based discrimination in American law, the primacy of gender as it affects and is affected by law, and special cases of transgender and intersex ideation within American legal constructs. Particular emphasis will be placed on the law of sexuality and gender in the workplace, in education, in criminal law, and within social relationships such as families. This course is not a legal specialty course.

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    State laws affect the disposition of an individual's estate at death, and upon death, the estate must be probated in court. Focus on estate information gathering, drafting of wills, and the probate of estates for those with and without wills. Emphasis on the role of the paralegal in a law office handling wills and probate.

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course will present common law real estate principles and the effect of federal agencies on the buying and selling of real property. Sample forms including leases, purchase and sale agreements, and closing forms are reviewed and drafted.

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Family law includes marriage, divorce, support, custody, property division, and abuse prevention petitions. Essentially an area of state law, it is often the backbone of general practice law firms. The role of paralegals in a family law office will be studied.

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course provides a basic overview of key issues in contemporary education law and policy. Relevant local, state, and federal laws will be reviewed as well as education policy issues, including civil rights, student safety and discipline. This course covers the core educational entitlements granted to all students with disabilities in the public education system. The course covers major federal legislation such as the IDEA, ADA and Section 504, as well as major Supreme Court and other important cases.

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    A survey of the law of the protection of ideas, trade secrets, inventions, artistic creations, and reputation. The course will briefly review the bases for patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret protection, the distinction among the various forms of intellectual property, and the statutory and common law methods of enforcing rights.

    Prerequisites:

    Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    "Corporations are unique business entities and specialized ""citizens"" of the state. This course will examine the special rules for establishing and maintaining a corporation\"

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The nature of the employment relationship and and overview of constitutional and federal statutory provisions which affect the employment relationship will be studied. Particular emphasis on the Civil Rights Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Statutory provisions regarding benefits and employment-related entitlements will also be studied

    Prerequisites:

    Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Study of the immigration and nationality laws of the United States focusing on the interplay of the administrative agencies which administer those laws: Justice Department, Labor Department, and State Department. Topics include the immigrant selection system; the issuance of non-immigrant visas; grounds for excluding aliens and waiver of excludability; grounds for removal; change of status, and refugee and asylum status. Special emphasis on the paralegal's role in representing and communicating sensitively with aliens.

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    With the globalization of the world economy, legal professional and business people require knowledge of international law more than ever. This course offers students a survey of selected materials in public international law. Covered will be the practical and theoretical issues of international law, from the Law of the Sea to business implications to definitions of war and international concepts of justice.

    Prerequisites:

    ALS 362 or LAWU 211, or permission of instructor

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Building on the skills introduced in LAW 211, Litigation, this course will provide a thorough study of the rules of evidence, the process of discovery, and the preparation of a case for a trial, as well as the roles of arbitration, mediation, and negotiation in litigation and other legal disputes. Theory will be combined with practical applications for prospective paralegals, such as deposition abstracting, gathering and preserving evidence, and techniques on how to prepare a case for ADR.

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This class will focus on the general role that law plays in public life. Instead of studying what the current laws are, the class emphasizes the challenges in analyzing, interpreting, and constructing law. Among the most important questions will be how we should evaluate or reform existing legal systems. Readings may include formative cases, recent legal studies, and classic texts by figures such as Grotius, Bentham, Holmes, Hart, and Dworkin. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every other year.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Considers the problems surrounding the legal definition and handling of juveniles who confront the law as offenders, clients and victims. Attention is devoted to the study of the special legal categories and procedures established for juveniles, the problems facing professionals providing juvenile services and the most significant directions of legal and social change affecting youth in our society. Normally offered every year. Fulfills the Sociology Department's Social Policy requirement.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    What happens if you commit a crime on an Indian reservation? Who will prosecute you and how will they punish you? This course will explore the roots of tribal legal systems and criminal law, both the Native and American influences. You will gain an understanding of tribal government, legal systems, criminal law, and the role of tradition in contemporary tribal law. The course will also examine the conflict between Native and Non-Native perspectives on several cases: sovereignty, rights to cultural practices, women, freedom of religion, and land.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    An overview of issues and social variables involved in the pre-arrest and arrest stages followed by a more in-depth analysis of pre-trial, trial, sentencing, and correctional phases. Sociological and criminal justice models are examined and compared with the actual processes and purported functions of criminal justice agencies. Required for all majors in the Crime and Justice Concentration.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course will look at the special opportunities and obligations of those in the health and legal professions to protect human rights. There will be an overview of human rights doctrine and key documents. Students will learn to apply human rights principles to particular occupations in the health and legal professions.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Law and legal systems are examined in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on the manner in which legal structures and processes interact with other social arrangements and are transformed over time.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the principles of restorative justice and to examine the programs, practices and policies within schools, juvenile justice and the adult criminal justice system which implement a restorative practices. Restorative justice is a different philosophy of responding to harm which provides new roles for the victim, offender, community and professionals . We will compare a restorative approach to crime with the traditional system of discipline and crime control and critique the shortcomings of an adversarial or retributive response to criminal behavior. We will explore the theoretical and historical origins of traditional justice systems and restorative approaches. We will also examine how these ideas are being applied in practical partnerships between the justice system and the community here in the United States and around the world.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course examines U.S. Immigration legislation and policies, focusing on how and why various immigration laws and policies have been established and implemented throughout history. We will address the intersection between immigration policy and race, ethnicity, nationality and socioeconomic status, as well as explore the effects that immigration laws have had on various immigrant groups and society in general.

    Note: The minor in Law is not intended to prepare students to work as paralegals and does not do so.

    Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

    Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major or double major combination to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

    Associate's Degree in Paralegal Studies

    Suffolk's Associate's degree in Paralegal Studies meets the rigorous standards established by the American Bar Association.

    Certificate in Paralegal Studies

    Suffolk's Certificate in Paralegal Studies meets the rigorous standards established by the American Bar Association.

    Honors

    To complete requirements for honors in the major, a candidate must:

    1. Graduate with a major GPA of 3.5 or higher
    2. Graduate with an overall GPA of 3.25 or higher
    3. Complete at least 20 credits of LAWU courses at Suffolk University
    4. Complete a research paper and receive a grade of A- or better
      1. Note: The research paper may be completed either for an honorized LAWU course, or may be a research paper of individual design, supervised by a full time Law program professor through independent study.
    5. Present the research paper orally either:
      1. In the honorized course with the assent and discussion of the professor
      2. At the annual spring Government Department Student Research Conference (typically held in April)
    6. CAS Honors Program students only: All CAS Honors Program students must comply with all requirements of the CAS Honors Program in order to receive honors in Law, including the requirement to present work from the senior honors experience at the Honors Symposium or Pecha Kucha event

    To become a candidate for honors in the major, a student must:

    CAS Honors Program students only: CAS Honors Program students who fulfill the above criteria are assumed to be candidates for departmental honors and should consult with a major advisor(s) during junior year about registering for major honors requirements as described above

    All other students:

    1. Have a major GPA of 3.5 or higher
    2. Have an overall GPA of 3.25 or higher
    3. Have completed a minimum of 12 credits of LAWU coursework
    4. Apply to the honors coordinator before senior year

    Law Courses

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Introduces the student to the responsibilities of paralegals and to the culture of the legal profession. Topics include the development of paralegalism as a profession, the definition of the practice of law, ethical considerations, interviewing techniques, legal research, law office management, and client relationships. Normally offered each semester.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course provides an introductory overview of the American legal system, legal reasoning, and the legal profession. Students will learn about the structure of the federal government and the relation between state and federal systems, with a focus on the courts and the litigation process. Students will read primary legal materials such as judicial opinions and statutes and will complete assignments that provide opportunities to engage in legal reasoning, analysis, argument, and research. The course will also provide theoretical perspectives on the role of law in society, as well as a brief look at the legal profession and the work that lawyers do. This course is not a legal specialty course.

    Prerequisites:

    Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The Rules of Civil Procedure dictate the steps taken in state and federal lawsuits. This course will acquaint students with rules and the practical requirements of the rules, from filing a complaint to clarifying a judgment and to the duties of paralegals in a litigation office. Normally offered each semester.

    Prerequisites:

    Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The existence and validity of a contract is determined by specific rules. Students will learn about formation through offer and acceptance, contract enforceability, the necessity of consideration, and breach of contract and will draft contract provisions as a paralegal might in a law office. Normally offered each semester. Sophomore status required.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course examines criminal law in the United States from a broad perspective. It will present the general principles and doctrines that affect the whole criminal law, such as elements of criminal offenses, defenses to crime, and perspectives on crime and criminal law. In addition, students will learn the elements of specific crimes, such as homicide, criminal sexual conduct, terrorism and related crimes, crimes against public morals, and crimes against property. Discussions of the direction of the criminal law and constitutional limitations on government will be presented as preparation for future study. This course is not a legal specialty course.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Ethical issues are central in law for lawyers, paralegals, judges, jurors and anyone working within or touched by the legal system. This course examines philosophical questions, practical issues, and social theories of law, primarily through the use of legal materials, to analyze legal ethical theory. The course considers how major theories are characterized within the American legal system, including the presumption of innocence, due process guarantees, the right to counsel, and other fundamental legal concepts. Normally offered alternate years.

    Prerequisites:

    Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The role of computers and software in the law office as it affects the paralegal Lectures and hands-on applications will focus on the changing technology of computer hardware through fact scenarios that students will use to track changes from introduction to resolution in litigation. Focus on software applications involving word processing, spreadsheets, billing, diary and scheduling, research, and use of the Internet.

    Prerequisites:

    Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    An opportunity to learn the history of domestic violence including battering, child abuse and child neglect, and the legal response to it. Focus will be on Massachusetts Law and its response, especially the Abuse Prevention Act, its application and enforcement, and on laws protecting children from abuse and neglect. Filings, law office issues and special issues in dealing with battered women and abused and neglected children will be included with the psychological issues, cultural issues, and advocacy possibilities. Normally offered yearly. Sophomore status required. Cultural Diversity A

    Prerequisites:

    Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    How to use the law library, perform legal research, write legal analysis in memorandum form, and use computers as a research tool. Initial focus is on learning how to find legal materials, including federal and state case law, statutory law, and administrative law. Use of finding tools such as digests, encyclopedias, and CALR will be studied, as will shepardizing. Focus also on legal writing, from letters through case analysis. Normally offered fall semester. Sophomore Status Required

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101, LAWU-280, or LAWU-340

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course will provide undergraduate students with an introduction to the many ways that gender and sexuality are affected by, and affect, the law in the United States. Subjects explored will include the history and context of sex-based and orientation-based discrimination in American law, the primacy of gender as it affects and is affected by law, and special cases of transgender and intersex ideation within American legal constructs. Particular emphasis will be placed on the law of sexuality and gender in the workplace, in education, in criminal law, and within social relationships such as families. This course is not a legal specialty course.

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    State laws affect the disposition of an individual's estate at death, and upon death, the estate must be probated in court. Focus on estate information gathering, drafting of wills, and the probate of estates for those with and without wills. Emphasis on the role of the paralegal in a law office handling wills and probate.

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course will present common law real estate principles and the effect of federal agencies on the buying and selling of real property. Sample forms including leases, purchase and sale agreements, and closing forms are reviewed and drafted.

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Family law includes marriage, divorce, support, custody, property division, and abuse prevention petitions. Essentially an area of state law, it is often the backbone of general practice law firms. The role of paralegals in a family law office will be studied.

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course provides a basic overview of key issues in contemporary education law and policy. Relevant local, state, and federal laws will be reviewed as well as education policy issues, including civil rights, student safety and discipline. This course covers the core educational entitlements granted to all students with disabilities in the public education system. The course covers major federal legislation such as the IDEA, ADA and Section 504, as well as major Supreme Court and other important cases.

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    A survey of the law of the protection of ideas, trade secrets, inventions, artistic creations, and reputation. The course will briefly review the bases for patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret protection, the distinction among the various forms of intellectual property, and the statutory and common law methods of enforcing rights.

    Prerequisites:

    Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    "Corporations are unique business entities and specialized ""citizens"" of the state. This course will examine the special rules for establishing and maintaining a corporation\"

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Federal and state administrative agencies such as FTC, NLRB, and EEOC are extensive sources of law. Familiarity with these agencies is useful in many areas where a paralegal might work. Additionally, Worker's Compensation law is uniquely suited to assist the student in acquiring a practical understanding of the administrative law area, and its legal, administrative, economic, and social foundations will be studied.

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The nature of the employment relationship and and overview of constitutional and federal statutory provisions which affect the employment relationship will be studied. Particular emphasis on the Civil Rights Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Statutory provisions regarding benefits and employment-related entitlements will also be studied

    Prerequisites:

    Certificate or Sophomore status, or Instructor's consent

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Study of the immigration and nationality laws of the United States focusing on the interplay of the administrative agencies which administer those laws: Justice Department, Labor Department, and State Department. Topics include the immigrant selection system; the issuance of non-immigrant visas; grounds for excluding aliens and waiver of excludability; grounds for removal; change of status, and refugee and asylum status. Special emphasis on the paralegal's role in representing and communicating sensitively with aliens.

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-101

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    With the globalization of the world economy, legal professional and business people require knowledge of international law more than ever. This course offers students a survey of selected materials in public international law. Covered will be the practical and theoretical issues of international law, from the Law of the Sea to business implications to definitions of war and international concepts of justice.

    Prerequisites:

    ALS-361 OR LAWU-301

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Building on the skills in LAW 301 - Legal Research & Writing I, this course continues the focus on learning how to find legal materials and how to summarize research results. Writing skills will be strengthened through various exercises and revisions. Skill development in legal analysis, writing legal memoranda, and using computer assisted legal research with Westlaw and Lexis will be emphasized.

    Prerequisites:

    ALS 362 or LAWU 211, or permission of instructor

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Building on the skills introduced in LAW 211, Litigation, this course will provide a thorough study of the rules of evidence, the process of discovery, and the preparation of a case for a trial, as well as the roles of arbitration, mediation, and negotiation in litigation and other legal disputes. Theory will be combined with practical applications for prospective paralegals, such as deposition abstracting, gathering and preserving evidence, and techniques on how to prepare a case for ADR.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    In this course, students will have an opportunity to examine the foundations of legal theory and practice in a common law system in several practice areas. Specifically, the course will focus on the development of the American legal system as a common law system, the importance of case law, the distinctions between common law and civil law legal systems, the role of precedent, and the development of the law in specific areas of practice as informed by modern and traditional legal scholarship.

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's consent required

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Individual program of reading and research on an approved topic under the supervision of a member of the department. Only for qualified juniors or seniors. Offered every semester.

    Prerequisites:

    Paralegal Certificate or Senior standing and at least 15 hours of paralegal courses.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    A one-semester internship in either a law office, a governmental agency, insurance company, or a for-profit or non-profit corporation, depending on the positions available during each semester. Once a week seminars will discuss such topics as ethical considerations in a law office, experiences gained as a paralegal interns, and seeking paralegal employment. Prerequisites: Senior status and at least 15 hours of Paralegal Studies or permission of instructor.

    Prerequisites:

    Take LAWU-280; Junior standing or higher

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course is intended not only to instruct students about the law of domestic violence but also as a practical, hands-on experience in assisting clients in obtaining and enforcing 209A restraining orders and/or addressing these issues within Family Law proceedings in cooperation with the FAC, specifically Christine Butler and Maritza Karmely. Guest speakers will provide further insight from the perspectives of criminal proceedings involving domestic violence, batterers' intervention programs and shelters for survivors and their children. In addition, students will be required to analyze the causes and patterns of domestic violence and multi-disciplinary responses to these as set forth in the opinions of various writers.

    Prerequisites:

    LAWU-101 and LAWU-201; Junior Status or Higher; Instructor Permission Required

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course will provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to learn about the foundational principles of federal Indian law, the history of federal (and state) policies towards Indians and tribes, their impact on tribal-federal and state engagement today, as well as international human rights law and advocacy. The course will also provide opportunities to apply this knowledge practically in working with law students from the Suffolk University Law School's Indigenous Peoples Rights Clinic, who work with tribal governments in the region. This course is intended not only to instruct students about federal Indian law and international human rights law, but also to provide a practical, hands-on experience working with tribal governments and indigenous organizations. Undergraduate students will assist Law Students by providing background research and support, document preparation, and other assistance as the Law Students draft laws and policies for tribes, or research and drafts submissions to human rights bodies. Students will attend meetings with tribal government officials and may also have an opportunity to work directly with a tribal government department or official (this would be dependent on needs of Tribe).

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor consent required

    Credits:

    1.00-12.00

    Description:

    Internships and practicum in Law are available prior to the start of each semester. Offered Fall and Spring.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Ethical issues are central in law for lawyers, paralegals, judges, jurors and anyone working within or touched by the legal system. This course examines philosophical questions, practical issues, and social theories of law, primarily through the use of legal materials, to analyze legal ethical theory. The course considers how major theories are characterized within the American legal system, including the presumption of innocence, due process guarantees, the right to counsel, and other fundamental legal concepts. Normally offered alternate years.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course examines criminal law in the United States from a broad perspective. It will present the general principles and doctrines that affect the whole criminal law, such as elements of criminal offenses, defenses to crime, and perspectives on crime and criminal law. In addition, students will learn the elements of specific crimes, such as homicide, criminal sexual conduct, terrorism and related crimes, crimes against public morals, and crimes against property. Discussions of the direction of the criminal law and constitutional limitations on government will be presented as preparation for future study.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Introduces the student to the responsibilities of paralegals and to the culture of the legal profession. Topics include the development of paralegalism as a profession, the definition of the practice of law, ethical considerations, interviewing techniques, legal research, law office management, and client relationships. Normally offered each semester.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    How to use the law library, perform legal research, write legal analysis in memorandum form, and use computers as a research tool. Initial focus is on learning how to find legal materials, including federal and state case law, statutory law, and administrative law. Use of finding tools such as digests, encyclopedias, and CALR will be studied, as will Shepardizing. Focus also on legal writing, from letters through case analysis. Normally offered fall semester. Sophomore Status Required

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The Rules of Civil Procedure dictate the steps taken in state and federal lawsuits. This course will acquaint students with rules and the practical requirements of the rules, from filing a complaint to clarifying a judgment and to the duties of paralegals in a litigation office. Normally offered each semester.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The existence and validity of a contract is determined by specific rules. Students will learn about formation through offer and acceptance, contract enforceability, the necessity of consideration, and breach of contract and will draft contract provisions as a paralegal might in a law office. Normally offered each semester. Sophomore status required.

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-264 or ALS-360 or instructor's permission

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    "Corporations are unique business entities and specialized ""citizens"" of the state. This course will examine the special rules for establishing and maintaining a corporation\"

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course will present common law real estate principles and the effect of federal agencies on the buying and selling of real property. Sample forms including leases, purchase and sale agreements, and closing forms are reviewed and drafted. Normally offered alternate years.

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-264 or ALS-360;

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Family law includes marriage, divorce, support, custody, property division, and abuse prevention petitions. Essentially an area of state law, it is often the backbone of general practice law firms. The role of paralegals in a family law office will be studied. Normally offered yearly.

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-360 or ALS-362

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Federal and state administrative agencies such as FTC, NLRB, and EEOC are extensive sources of law. Familiarity with these agencies is useful in many areas where a paralegal might work. Additionally, Worker's Compensation law is uniquely suited to assist the student in acquiring a practical understanding of the administrative law area, and its legal, administrative, economic, and social foundations will be studied. Normally offered alternate years.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course provides a basic overview of key issues in contemporary education law and policy. Relevant local, state, and federal laws will be reviewed as well as education policy issues, including civil rights, student safety and discipline. This course will also cover the core educational entitlements granted to all students with disabilities in the public education system. It will focus on the substantive legal protections designed to ensure that students with disabilities receive a Free and Appropriate Public Education, and on the various procedural protections for students and parents. The course will cover major federal legislation such as the IDEA, ADA and Section 504, as well as major Supreme Court and other important cases. The course will cover fundamental legal issues balancing the interests of the public, schools, students, and parents. Additionally, since paralegals have become an important part of education law enforcement and practice, several assignments will focus on practical paralegal work.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Many civil suits arise when the negligence of an individual creates injury to another. Elements of negligence law and specific types of cases such as automobile accidents and medical malpractice will be studied, with an emphasis on practical aspects of drafting and research for the prospective paralegal. Normally offered yearly.

    Prerequisites:

    ALS 362, or permission of instructor

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Building on the skills introduced in ALS 362, Civil Litigation, this course will provide a thorough study of the rules of evidence, the process of discovery, and the preparation of a case for a trial, as well as the roles of arbitration, mediation, and negotiation in litigation and other legal disputes. Theory will be combined with practical applications for prospective paralegals, such as deposition abstracting, gathering and preserving evidence, and techniques on how to prepare a case for ADR. Normally offered yearly.

    Prerequisites:

    Senior standing and at least 15 hours of paralegal courses, or instructor's permission.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    A one-semester internship in either a law office, a governmental agency, insurance company, or a for-profit or non-profit corporation, depending on the positions available during each semester. Once a week seminars will discuss such topics as ethical considerations in a law office, experiences gained as a paralegal interns, and seeking paralegal employment. For specific placements/information, students must contact the Director of Paralegal Studies prior to the start of each semester. Prerequisites: Senior status and at least 15 hours of Paralegal Studies or permission of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered spring and summer. ECR

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-264 or ALS-360;

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Study of the immigration and nationality laws of the United States focusing on the interplay of the administrative agencies which administer those laws: Justice Department, Labor Department, and State Department. Topics include the immigrant selection system; the issuance of non-immigrant visas; grounds for excluding aliens and waiver of excludability; grounds for removal; change of status, and refugee and asylum status. Special emphasis on the paralegal's role in representing and communicating sensitively with aliens. Normally offered yearly.

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-264 or ALS-360;

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    A survey of the law of the protection of ideas, trade secrets, inventions, artistic creations, and reputation. The course will briefly review the bases for patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret protection, the distinction among the various forms of intellectual property, and the statutory and common law methods of enforcing rights. Normally offered yearly.

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-361;

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Building on the skills in ALS 361 - Legal Research & Writing I, this course continues the focus on learning how to find legal materials and how to summarize research results. Writing skills will be strengthened through various exercises and revisions. Skill development in legal analysis, writing legal memoranda, and using computer assisted legal research with Westlaw and Lexis will be emphasized. Normally offered spring semester.

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-264 or ALS-360; or instructor's permission

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The nature of the employment relationship and and overview of constitutional and federal statutory provisions that affect the employment relationship will be studied. Particular emphasis on the Civil Rights Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Statutory provisions regarding benefits and employment-related entitlements will also be studied. Normally offered yearly.

    Prerequisites:

    Take ALS-264 or ALS-360; or instructor's permission

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    An opportunity to learn the history of domestic violence including battering, child abuse and child neglect, and the legal response to it. Focus will be on Massachusetts Law and its response, especially the Abuse Prevention Act, its application and enforcement, and on laws protecting children from abuse and neglect. Filings, law office issues and special issues in dealing with battered women and abused and neglected children will be included with the psychological issues, cultural issues, and advocacy possibilities. Normally offered yearly. Sophomore status required. Cultural Diversity A

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor's consent required

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Individual program of reading and research on an approved topic under the supervision of a member of the department. Only for qualified juniors or seniors. Offered every semester.