Asian Studies

Asian Studies Major

Learn more about this major
 

Major Requirements: 11-15 courses, 37-54 credits

Core Requirements: 3 courses, 6 credits

Credits:

4

Description:

An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history, politics, economics, philosophy, geography, arts, and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy, religious and cultural exchanges, international relations, Asian experience in America, and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

Prerequisites:

Instructor consent required

Credits:

1

Description:

Students will reflect on their college career and develop a personal strategy for attaining professional goals. They will understand ethical guidelines and professional conventions by examining the differences between American work culture and Asian work culture; by applying this understanding to a transnational/diverse professional world. Students will understand what the job market and graduate school opportunities are like for Asian Studies graduates.

Prerequisites:

CAS 101. CAS students only. SBS students by special permission. Restricted to the following majors: Art History, Asian Studies, Biology, Economics, English, French, History, Humanities, International Economics, Music History, Philosophy, Physics, Radiation Science, Spanish, and Undeclared. Instructor consent required for all other majors.

Credits:

1

Description:

This course engages students in the early stages of career planning. Students will explore their interests, skills, values, and strengths, which will allow them to begin setting appropriate goals for professional development. Once students understand themselves in relation to the world of work, they will learn how to research careers and employment paths that fit with their goals.

Electives (7 courses, 27-28 credits)

Choose seven courses from at least three departments, with no more than 20 credits from any one department. Some Seminar for Freshmen courses may qualify with the approval of the Program Director.

Credits:

4

Description:

Surveys painting, sculpture, and architecture in Asia from prehistoric times to the modern era, including the Middle East, India, China, Korea, and Japan. Emphasizes the connection between visual arts, belief systems, and historical contexts with a focus on Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam as well as secular literature.

Credits:

4

Description:

There are more Chinese restaurants in the U.S. than MacDonald's, Burger Kings and KFC'S combined. This course examines the unique American phenomenon of Chinese food from a historical and anthropological viewpoint. Students will gain a better appreciation and understanding of the subject through the course and will probably never look at local Chinese takeout the same way afterwards

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Works directly with a faculty member on an agreed topic related to Asia or an Asian language. Past topics include: intermediate Chinese and Japanese; Asian popular culture.

Prerequisites:

Students must be in the CAS Honors Program, have a 3.5 overall grade point average, and a 3.7 grade point average in the major. Registration must be approved by the Asian Studies Director.

Credits:

1.00- 8.00

Description:

Students will work with an Asian Studies advisor to undertake a research project that will produce a 25-page paper that is suitable for an undergraduate academic conference in Asian Studies or relevant disciplines. Students must be in the CAS Honors Program, have a 3.5 overall grade point average, and a 3.7 grade point average in the major. Registration must be approved by the Asian Studies Director. May be taken in the fall and/or spring in the senior year.

Credits:

3

Description:

This is an introductory and interdisciplinary course on Chinese civilization and traditional Chinese literature. It will provide the student with a brief introduction to the cultural legacy and literature of China from the archaeological origins of Chinese civilization to the present time. The diverse origins of China's civilization are stressed as topics in political, social, and economic history are explored, with a focus on developments in language, literature, and art. This course is a good introduction to further study of Chinese history and culture and, in particular, provides a valuable context for themes treated in Modern China.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students critically analyze Asian popular culture since the 1980s using a cultural ethnographic approach. Students apply the lenses of gender, identity, globalization, and business strategies to examine pop phenomena such as Korean Wave, Cool Japan, and Cantonese popular music.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

By examining the film texts of Hong Kong auteurs such as John Woo, Wong Kar-wai, Tsui Hark, Andrew Lau, and Alan Mak, the course examines issues such as film genres, colonization/decolonization, transnational political economy, the Greater Chinese media market, and the diaspora.

Prerequisites:

Take EC-101

Credits:

4

Description:

More than half of the world population lives in urban areas. This course sets out to explain the existence, growth, geographic patterns, and impact of cities, and the effects of public policy on urban form, structure, and activity. It addresses the urban issues of transportation, congestion, housing, crime, poverty and inequality, governance, and the environment, and asks how planning and policy can tackle these. The context of these discussions is the megacities of Asia: 24 of the world's 37 megacities (those with ten million or more inhabitants) are in Asia, where they are home to almost 500 million people. The choices made by these cities will be considered in comparative perspective, including with Boston, New York, Paris, and London.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4

Description:

An introduction to selected Asian-American writers with an emphasis on socio-cultural issues, such as race, gender and ethnicity. Authors include Bulosan, Hwang, Jen, Kingston, Lee, Mukherjee, Odada, and Tan.

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces China studies as a subfield of comparative politics. Covers topics such as history, political structure, communist revolution, political and economic development, authoritarian resilience, current issues, and foreign policy. Compares China with other countries in and outside of Asia.

Prerequisites:

Junior Status required

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines cultural and historic backgrounds, political systems, political and economic development, and international relations of countries in North and South East Asia. Provides with the understanding of the main regional trends and offers case studies of some of the political systems in the region. Applies the concepts and theories learned in the previous international relations, comparative politics courses and other social science courses. * I do not include specific country names to make the description flexible for changes. In my class, I cover countries such as China, North and South Korea, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Philippines, and Burma.

Credits:

4

Description:

Presenting the major trends relevant to social, cultural, and economic transformations that can be seen in Asia today. Especially, students will explore the following trends: the Diaspora of the Chinese and Indian People; the hold of Traditional Religious Beliefs in a Modernizing Asia such as the influences of Buddhism and Islam; the preservation of Martial Values and in Militarism in Asia; Issues related to Gender and Sexuality; Pop Culture among young people in Asia.

Credits:

4

Description:

Discusses Chinese civilization from its origins to its recent rise as a world power. Spark students' interest in China and enable them to relate Chinese history and society to their lives and careers.

Credits:

4

Description:

Outlines the history of Chinese martial arts in five movies, highlighting Chinese views of violence, personal loyalty, government, and justice.

Credits:

4

Description:

China, Japan, and Korea - East Asia's critical players - share many historical influences, but each has a distinct culture, and they competed with each other for much of the twentieth century, proud of their achievements but feeling threatened by their neighbors. Lectures interspersed with movies and documentaries to show how East Asia has developed in the past one-hundred-plus years.

Credits:

4

Description:

Discusses the rise of China as the world's largest economy and its impact on our life through films, media, and history.

Credits:

4

Description:

In this course each student will select a topic about Asia that they wish to study. Virtually any topic, to be approved by the professor, is acceptable. The goal will be to write a five to seven page paper about that topic by the end of the course. As a class, we will work together through each step of the process of defining a topic, gathering materials about it, and organizing and reporting the final paper.

Credits:

4

Description:

Introduces the peoples of Asia and the cultures they have created. Particular attention is paid to the lives of the common people in both historical and contemporary times. By understanding the richness and complexities of daily life in Asia, we will understand the continuities and discontinuities brought on by social, cultural, and economic changes. We will gain an appreciation of our fellow human beings in Asia.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the history of samurai and its cultural meaning for Japanese society. It examines not only how the samurai class developed into a major political force, but also how it has been represented by literatures and films in different eras.

Credits:

4

Description:

The exposition and critical evaluation of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Islam. Special attention is given to foundation principles as well as to the similarities and differences of each of these philosophies to basic ideas in Western philosophy. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

Credits:

4

Description:

An historical survey of Buddhist philosophy. We will explore Buddhist origins, central teachings, devotional and meditational practices, ritual and institutions as developed from classical to modern times. Special attention given to the philosophical diversity of the Buddhist world view. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

Credits:

4

Description:

A survey of the main developments in Chinese Philosophy. The course begins with the early dynastic concept of humanism and then turns to Confucius and Mencius. Having developed the central Confucian doctrines, students next examine the Taoist response to Confucianism in the writings of Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu. The course then considers Zen Buddhism, which is called Ch'an Buddhism in China, where it originated. In particular, students study the concept of sudden enlightenment before turning to the Neo-Confucian scholars.

Credits:

4

Description:

Examines theoretical and empirical approaches that provide insight into Asian viewpoints on socialization practices, family systems, health/well-being, cultural traditions/values, and spiritual philosophy/literature. Explores the diversity among Asian cultures in terms of language, history, religion/spiritual faith, and healthcare practices, all of which play a significant role in shaping the psychological characteristics, interpersonal relationships, and work dynamics of Asians and Asian immigrants.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course will examine a variety of Eastern religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shintoism. Possible connections to be explored will be the impact of these traditions on others, such as Pacific Islands and African religion, as well as the growing place of Eastern religion in the West. This course will explore the history and structure of each tradition, while attempting to recognize the similarities and the differences among them. Attention will be given to the reading of original texts when available. Requiring students to observe religious ceremonies will enhance practical understanding of many of the above traditions. Normally offered every year. Cultural Diversity B

Credits:

4

Description:

With a focus on some selected ethnic groups from Asia," ""Asia in America"" studies the history and current status of Asian Americans in Boston and other parts of the country. We will examine the major reasons why these immigrants chose to leave their home country as well as their expectations and experiences here in America. We will also discuss the issues Asian immigrants have faced in this adopted ""home"" as well as the connections and conflicts among different ethnic groups or even within the same ethnic group due to political and socio-economic reasons. The course will include some level of community engagement\"

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores the eleven countries and 600 million people of Southeast Asia starting with foundations- geography and environment- and then looking at the human imprint, in the form of the history, religions, and cultures of the region. An examination of contemporary issues related to demography, politics, and (especially) economics.

Note: AS-510 and AS-H555 must be taken for a minimum of 4 credits to count as a major elective.

Students who choose the following courses and complete some specific reading and writing assignments may count them toward the Asian Studies major requirements. However, students need to consult the instructor and get the approval of the Asian Studies program director no later than the first week of the class.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of communication variations and cultural viewpoints and their impact on cross-cultural communication. A special emphasis is placed on rituals and message patterns in non-Western cultures.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A critique of the circulation of media goods and ideologies from both a cultural and political/economic perspective. Topics include global Hollywood, the images of Muslim women in transnational media, the information society, and global social movements.

Credits:

4

Description:

"Why do so many countries remain so poor? Why have some (e.g. the Asian ""tigers"") grown so rapidly? Why have most of the countries of Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union been slow to ignite economic growth? These questions are addressed by looking at domestic factors (government policies\"

Credits:

4

Description:

The study of how economic and human activity is distributed across space, the reasons for these spatial distributions, and the processes that change the spatial organization of economic activity over time. Topics include: maps, map projections, and geographic information systems; population geography; the organization and location of cities, towns and villages; transportation and communication policy; industrial location; the geography of world trade; and geographic features of economic development. The course takes a global perspective, and draws on cases and examples from all over the world. Cultural Diversity B

Prerequisites:

EC 101 and EC 102

Credits:

4

Description:

This course examines theories of international trade. The policy implications of each theory are explored and the effect of trade on the welfare of the nation is examined. Also the development of trade blocs and the the political economy of trade are studied. Normally offered every year.

Credits:

4

Description:

This course examines the specific needs and challenges of the various language and cultural groups in schools. Topics include: theories of 1st and 2nd language acquisition, strategies for teaching academic content, modifying instruction in the mainstream classroom, creating classroom cultures that invite all students into learning, the role of advocacy and professional collaboration in ESL, and analysis of policies related to assessment and placement of English Language Learners.

Prerequisites:

Take EDUC-315

Credits:

4

Description:

Students will have opportunities to put the theories and techniques learned in EDUC 315- Strategies for Working with English Learners into practice. Students will be placed in various Suffolk University sites or classrooms where they will work to meet the specific needs and challenges of educating various language and cultural groups. Students will be required to spend 30 hours working in their placements. Students will attend a weekly seminar where connections between theory and practice are explored, experiences are shared, and Teaching & Service Portfolios will be created.

Credits:

4

Description:

This is the second of the two-course series of Empires and Globalization in World History. Course discusses the origins and development of globalization and capitalism from the perspective of economic history. Major issues include state-making, wars, and the rivalry among early modern empires, economic development, the Industrial Revolution and the formation of the global trade system. The specific topics may change every year due to new academic developments and publications.

Credits:

4

Description:

Enables students to examine, as well as develop an awareness and appreciation of, diversity within today's society. Providing an overview of the major racial, ethnic, and cultural groups in the U.S., the focus is on the ways in which cultural awareness enhances professional helping relationships and improves the operation of human services systems.

Prerequisites:

Prerequisite: SOC 113 or SOC 116.

Credits:

4

Description:

Globalization is shrinking the world. How and why did this happen? This course will explore global change and the global processes which effect key social institutions: culture, the economy and politics. Students will study the processes of globalization and its impact on our lives and people around the globe.

Credits:

4

Description:

An examination of how different cultures understand health and illness. Healing approaches from Asia, Africa and the Americas will be explored.

Credits:

4

Description:

Explores of various cultural worldviews in order to reveal and assess the voices of women from around the world as they respond to important global issues such as sexual violence and gendered oppression. Topics include: national citizenship, sexual politics, legal discourse, aesthetic representation, literary movements, genre, constructions of femininity, sexual identities, and representations of gender in relation to race and class and international cultures, and the relationship of self-image to the body politic.

Language Requirement (0-4 courses, 0-16 credits)

To qualify for the major, students must demonstrate one of the following:

  1. Proficiency in one Asian language at the advanced-intermediate level. This can be fulfilled either:
    1. By successful completion of an Intermediate Level II Asian language course through study abroad or outside courses with an average grade of “B”
    2. Or by passing the same level language test offered by the World Languages & Cultural Studies Department.
  2. Basic knowledge in two Asian languages at the elementary level. This can be fulfilled by successful completion of two Basic Level I Asian language courses with an average grade of “B” or by passing the same level language test offered by the World Languages & Cultural Studies Department.

Study Abroad or an Internship (1 course, 4 credits)

Students must complete either option A or B:

A. A Semester, Summer or Short-Term Study Abroad in Asia (which must bear at least 4 credits)

B. AS-500 Asian Studies Internship

Credits:

4

Description:

Engages in an internship in a business or non-profit organization that deals with Asia or an Asian American community. Students may complete the internship either in Asia or in the U.S. Students will complete appropriate exercises and reports to document their learning. (1 course, 4-12 credits; can be taken multiple times in different semesters)

Note: AS-500 may not double count to fulfill major course requirements if taken as a substitute for study abroad.

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Asian Studies Learning Goals and Objectives

Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.

Learning Goals Learning Objectives
Students will...
Students will be able to...
Gain a general knowledge about the academic discipline of the study of Asia, and a substantial understanding about the chosen theme or area through courses in the concentrated area of study
  • Define Asian Studies as an academic discipline
  • State how the chosen theme/area can be understood from different perspectives
  • Understand the significance of Asia in relation to the U.S. and the world, both in the past and in the twenty-first century
  • Name major historical/contemporary events that impact Asia-US/global relations; students will be able to explain the significance
  • Demonstrate either intermediate-level competence in an Asian language or basic-level competence in two Asian languages in reading, writing, and speaking and develop cultural awareness and sensitivity to the language
  • Read, write, listen, and speak in Chinese/Japanese/Korean in a way that is sufficient for basic communication
  • Directly experience Asian culture through study abroad or an Asian American community project
  • Demonstrate cultural competency through study abroad/working with an Asian American organization
  • State the cultural differences between an Asian workplace and a U.S. workplace
  • Asian Studies Minor

    Learn more about this minor

    Minor Requirements: 5 courses, 17-20 credits

    The minor requires a minimum of five courses (at least 17 credits) from at least two departments, up to two of which may consist of Asian Language courses. For the minor, proficiency in an Asian language does not allow any reduction in the total number of courses.

    Language Course Options:

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Introduces Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin) with an emphasis on developing conversational skills by using authentic materials such as video, audio, and various print media that teach fundamental grammatical patterns and vocabulary in functional contexts. Basic reading and writing (in Simplified Characters) are also taught.

    Prerequisites:

    CHIN 101 or Instructor's consent.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Continues to develop proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin). Helps to develop listening comprehension skills with the use of authentic materials, such as print media, audio, and video materials. Advanced beginning level of reading and writing of Simplified Chinese characters is taught.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Practice in both oral and written language skills. Class activities are organized around cultural themes. Weekly laboratory sessions required.

    Prerequisites:

    KOR-101

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    A continuation of KOR 101. Practice in both oral and written language skills. Class activities are organized around cultural themes that reflect the diversity of the Hispanic world and its interconnections with the rest of the world. Weekly laboratory sessions required.

    Choose five of the following:

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history, politics, economics, philosophy, geography, arts, and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy, religious and cultural exchanges, international relations, Asian experience in America, and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    There are more Chinese restaurants in the U.S. than MacDonald's, Burger Kings and KFC'S combined. This course examines the unique American phenomenon of Chinese food from a historical and anthropological viewpoint. Students will gain a better appreciation and understanding of the subject through the course and will probably never look at local Chinese takeout the same way afterwards

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Engages in an internship in a business or non-profit organization that deals with Asia or an Asian American community. Students may complete the internship either in Asia or in the U.S. Students will complete appropriate exercises and reports to document their learning. (1 course, 4-12 credits; can be taken multiple times in different semesters)

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Works directly with a faculty member on an agreed topic related to Asia or an Asian language. Past topics include: intermediate Chinese and Japanese; Asian popular culture.

    Credits:

    3

    Description:

    This is an introductory and interdisciplinary course on Chinese civilization and traditional Chinese literature. It will provide the student with a brief introduction to the cultural legacy and literature of China from the archaeological origins of Chinese civilization to the present time. The diverse origins of China's civilization are stressed as topics in political, social, and economic history are explored, with a focus on developments in language, literature, and art. This course is a good introduction to further study of Chinese history and culture and, in particular, provides a valuable context for themes treated in Modern China.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    Students critically analyze Asian popular culture since the 1980s using a cultural ethnographic approach. Students apply the lenses of gender, identity, globalization, and business strategies to examine pop phenomena such as Korean Wave, Cool Japan, and Cantonese popular music.

    Credits:

    4.00

    Description:

    By examining the film texts of Hong Kong auteurs such as John Woo, Wong Kar-wai, Tsui Hark, Andrew Lau, and Alan Mak, the course examines issues such as film genres, colonization/decolonization, transnational political economy, the Greater Chinese media market, and the diaspora.

    Prerequisites:

    WRI-102 or WRI-H103

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    An introduction to selected Asian-American writers with an emphasis on socio-cultural issues, such as race, gender and ethnicity. Authors include Bulosan, Hwang, Jen, Kingston, Lee, Mukherjee, Odada, and Tan.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Introduces China studies as a subfield of comparative politics. Covers topics such as history, political structure, communist revolution, political and economic development, authoritarian resilience, current issues, and foreign policy. Compares China with other countries in and outside of Asia.

    Prerequisites:

    Junior Status required

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines cultural and historic backgrounds, political systems, political and economic development, and international relations of countries in North and South East Asia. Provides with the understanding of the main regional trends and offers case studies of some of the political systems in the region. Applies the concepts and theories learned in the previous international relations, comparative politics courses and other social science courses. * I do not include specific country names to make the description flexible for changes. In my class, I cover countries such as China, North and South Korea, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Philippines, and Burma.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Discusses Chinese civilization from its origins to its recent rise as a world power. Spark students' interest in China and enable them to relate Chinese history and society to their lives and careers.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    China, Japan, and Korea - East Asia's critical players - share many historical influences, but each has a distinct culture, and they competed with each other for much of the twentieth century, proud of their achievements but feeling threatened by their neighbors. Lectures interspersed with movies and documentaries to show how East Asia has developed in the past one-hundred-plus years.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Introduces the peoples of Asia and the cultures they have created. Particular attention is paid to the lives of the common people in both historical and contemporary times. By understanding the richness and complexities of daily life in Asia, we will understand the continuities and discontinuities brought on by social, cultural, and economic changes. We will gain an appreciation of our fellow human beings in Asia.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the history of samurai and its cultural meaning for Japanese society. It examines not only how the samurai class developed into a major political force, but also how it has been represented by literatures and films in different eras.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    The exposition and critical evaluation of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Islam. Special attention is given to foundation principles as well as to the similarities and differences of each of these philosophies to basic ideas in Western philosophy. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    An historical survey of Buddhist philosophy. We will explore Buddhist origins, central teachings, devotional and meditational practices, ritual and institutions as developed from classical to modern times. Special attention given to the philosophical diversity of the Buddhist world view. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    A survey of the main developments in Chinese Philosophy. The course begins with the early dynastic concept of humanism and then turns to Confucius and Mencius. Having developed the central Confucian doctrines, students next examine the Taoist response to Confucianism in the writings of Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu. The course then considers Zen Buddhism, which is called Ch'an Buddhism in China, where it originated. In particular, students study the concept of sudden enlightenment before turning to the Neo-Confucian scholars.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Examines theoretical and empirical approaches that provide insight into Asian viewpoints on socialization practices, family systems, health/well-being, cultural traditions/values, and spiritual philosophy/literature. Explores the diversity among Asian cultures in terms of language, history, religion/spiritual faith, and healthcare practices, all of which play a significant role in shaping the psychological characteristics, interpersonal relationships, and work dynamics of Asians and Asian immigrants.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course will examine a variety of Eastern religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shintoism. Possible connections to be explored will be the impact of these traditions on others, such as Pacific Islands and African religion, as well as the growing place of Eastern religion in the West. This course will explore the history and structure of each tradition, while attempting to recognize the similarities and the differences among them. Attention will be given to the reading of original texts when available. Requiring students to observe religious ceremonies will enhance practical understanding of many of the above traditions. Normally offered every year. Cultural Diversity B

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    With a focus on some selected ethnic groups from Asia," ""Asia in America"" studies the history and current status of Asian Americans in Boston and other parts of the country. We will examine the major reasons why these immigrants chose to leave their home country as well as their expectations and experiences here in America. We will also discuss the issues Asian immigrants have faced in this adopted ""home"" as well as the connections and conflicts among different ethnic groups or even within the same ethnic group due to political and socio-economic reasons. The course will include some level of community engagement\"

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Explores the eleven countries and 600 million people of Southeast Asia starting with foundations- geography and environment- and then looking at the human imprint, in the form of the history, religions, and cultures of the region. An examination of contemporary issues related to demography, politics, and (especially) economics.

    Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

    Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major or double major combination to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

    Honors

    To complete requirements for honors in the major, a candidate must

    1. Graduate with a major GPA of 3.6 or higher
    2. Graduate with an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher
    3. Complete AS-H555
    4. CAS Honors Program students only: Present work from the senior honors experience at the Honors Symposium or Pecha Kucha event

    Prerequisites:

    Students must be in the CAS Honors Program, have a 3.5 overall grade point average, and a 3.7 grade point average in the major. Registration must be approved by the Asian Studies Director.

    Credits:

    1.00- 8.00

    Description:

    Students will work with an Asian Studies advisor to undertake a research project that will produce a 25-page paper that is suitable for an undergraduate academic conference in Asian Studies or relevant disciplines. Students must be in the CAS Honors Program, have a 3.5 overall grade point average, and a 3.7 grade point average in the major. Registration must be approved by the Asian Studies Director. May be taken in the fall and/or spring in the senior year.

    Asian Studies Courses

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history, politics, economics, philosophy, geography, arts, and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy, religious and cultural exchanges, international relations, Asian experience in America, and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    There are more Chinese restaurants in the U.S. than MacDonald's, Burger Kings and KFC'S combined. This course examines the unique American phenomenon of Chinese food from a historical and anthropological viewpoint. Students will gain a better appreciation and understanding of the subject through the course and will probably never look at local Chinese takeout the same way afterwards

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Engages in an internship in a business or non-profit organization that deals with Asia or an Asian American community. Students may complete the internship either in Asia or in the U.S. Students will complete appropriate exercises and reports to document their learning. (1 course, 4-12 credits; can be taken multiple times in different semesters)

    Credits:

    1.00- 4.00

    Description:

    Works directly with a faculty member on an agreed topic related to Asia or an Asian language. Past topics include: intermediate Chinese and Japanese; Asian popular culture.

    Prerequisites:

    Instructor consent required

    Credits:

    1

    Description:

    Students will reflect on their college career and develop a personal strategy for attaining professional goals. They will understand ethical guidelines and professional conventions by examining the differences between American work culture and Asian work culture; by applying this understanding to a transnational/diverse professional world. Students will understand what the job market and graduate school opportunities are like for Asian Studies graduates.

    Prerequisites:

    Students must be in the CAS Honors Program, have a 3.5 overall grade point average, and a 3.7 grade point average in the major. Registration must be approved by the Asian Studies Director.

    Credits:

    1.00- 8.00

    Description:

    Students will work with an Asian Studies advisor to undertake a research project that will produce a 25-page paper that is suitable for an undergraduate academic conference in Asian Studies or relevant disciplines. Students must be in the CAS Honors Program, have a 3.5 overall grade point average, and a 3.7 grade point average in the major. Registration must be approved by the Asian Studies Director. May be taken in the fall and/or spring in the senior year.