Asian Studies

Asian Studies Minor

Learn more about this minor

Minor Requirements: 5 courses, 17-20 credits

The minor requires a minimum of five courses from at least two departments, up to two of which may consist of Asian Language courses.

Choose five of the following:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history, politics, economics, philosophy, geography, arts, and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy, religious and cultural exchanges, international relations, Asian experience in America, and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

Credits:

4

Description:

There are more Chinese restaurants in the U.S. than MacDonald's, Burger Kings and KFC'S combined. This course examines the unique American phenomenon of Chinese food from a historical and anthropological viewpoint. Students will gain a better appreciation and understanding of the subject through the course and will probably never look at local Chinese takeout the same way afterwards

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Engages in an internship in a business or non-profit organization that deals with Asia or an Asian American community. Students may complete the internship either in Asia or in the U.S. Students will complete appropriate exercises and reports to document their learning. (1 course, 4-12 credits; can be taken multiple times in different semesters)

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Works directly with a faculty member on an agreed topic related to Asia or an Asian language. Past topics include: intermediate Chinese and Japanese; Asian popular culture.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students critically analyze Asian popular culture since the 1980s using a cultural ethnographic approach. Students apply the lenses of gender, identity, globalization, and business strategies to examine pop phenomena such as Korean Wave, Cool Japan, and Cantonese popular music.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

By examining the film texts of Hong Kong auteurs such as John Woo, Wong Kar-wai, Tsui Hark, Andrew Lau, and Alan Mak, the course examines issues such as film genres, colonization/decolonization, transnational political economy, the Greater Chinese media market, and the diaspora.

Prerequisites:

WRI-102 or WRI-H103

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An introduction to selected Asian-American writers with an emphasis on socio-cultural issues, such as race, gender and ethnicity. Authors include Bulosan, Hwang, Jen, Kingston, Lee, Mukherjee, Odada, and Tan.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Discusses Chinese civilization from its origins to its recent rise as a world power. Spark students' interest in China and enable them to relate Chinese history and society to their lives and careers.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

China, Japan, and Korea - East Asia's critical players - share many historical influences, but each has a distinct culture, and they competed with each other for much of the twentieth century, proud of their achievements but feeling threatened by their neighbors. Lectures interspersed with movies and documentaries to show how East Asia has developed in the past one-hundred-plus years.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces the peoples of Asia and the cultures they have created. Particular attention is paid to the lives of the common people in both historical and contemporary times. By understanding the richness and complexities of daily life in Asia, we will understand the continuities and discontinuities brought on by social, cultural, and economic changes. We will gain an appreciation of our fellow human beings in Asia.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the history of samurai and its cultural meaning for Japanese society. It examines not only how the samurai class developed into a major political force, but also how it has been represented by literatures and films in different eras.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The exposition and critical evaluation of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Islam. Special attention is given to foundation principles as well as to the similarities and differences of each of these philosophies to basic ideas in Western philosophy. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An historical survey of Buddhist philosophy. We will explore Buddhist origins, central teachings, devotional and meditational practices,ritual and institutions as developed from classical to modern times. Special attention given to the philosophical diversity of the Buddhist world view. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years. C b

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A survey of the main developments in Chinese Philosophy. The course begins with the early dynastic concept of humanism and then turns to Confucius and Mencius. Having developed the central Confucian doctrines, students next examine the Taoist response to Confucianism in the writings of Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu. The course then considers Zen Buddhism, which is called Ch'an Buddhism in China, where it originated. In particular, students study the concept of sudden enlightenment before turning to the Neo-Confucian scholars.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces China studies as a subfield of comparative politics. Covers topics such as history political structure communist revolution political and economic development authoritarian resilience current issues and foreign policy. Compares China with other countries in and outside of Asia.

Prerequisites:

Junior Status required

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines cultural and historic backgrounds, political systems, political and economic development, and international relations of countries in North and South East Asia. Provides with the understanding of the main regional trends and offers case studies of some of the political systems in the region. Applies the concepts and theories learned in the previous international relations, comparative politics courses and other social science courses. * I do not include specific country names to make the description flexible for changes. In my class, I cover countries such as China, North and South Korea, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Philippines, and Burma.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines theoretical and empirical approaches that provide insight into Asian viewpoints on socialization practices, family systems, health/well-being, cultural traditions/values, and spiritual philosophy/literature. Explores the diversity among Asian cultures in terms of language, history, religion/spiritual faith, and healthcare practices, all of which play a significant role in shaping the psychological characteristics, interpersonal relationships, and work dynamics of Asians and Asian immigrants.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will examine a variety of Eastern religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shintoism. Possible connections to be explored will be the impact of these traditions on others, such as Pacific Islands and African religion, as well as the growing place of Eastern religion in the West. This course will explore the history and structure of each tradition, while attempting to recognize the similarities and the differences among them. Attention will be given to the reading of original texts when available. Requiring students to observe religious ceremonies will enhance practical understanding of many of the above traditions. Normally offered every year. Cultural Diversity B

Credits:

4.00

Description:

With a focus on some selected ethnic groups from Asia, "Asia in America" studies the history and current status of Asian Americans in Boston and other parts of the country. We will examine the major reasons why these immigrants chose to leave their home country as well as their expectations and experiences here in America. We will also discuss the issues Asian immigrants have faced in this adopted "home" as well as the connections and conflicts among different ethnic groups or even within the same ethnic group due to political and socio-economic reasons. The course will include some level of community engagement, through Chinatown tour and service, which may enable us to have a direct contact with the Asian American population and reflect on what is being discussed in class. Through this course, we hope to gain a better understanding of the racial and cultural history of the country and arrive at a deep appreciation of the dynamics of cultural interactions in the twenty-first century. The course fulfills the SCGP requirement.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the eleven countries and 600 million people of Southeast Asia starting with foundations- geography and environment- and then looking at the human imprint, in the form of the history, religions, and cultures of the region. An examination of contemporary issues related to demography, politics, and (especially) economics.

Language course options:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin) with an emphasis on developing conversational skills by using authentic materials such as video, audio, and various print media that teach fundamental grammatical patterns and vocabulary in functional contexts. Basic reading and writing (in Simplified Characters) are also taught.

Prerequisites:

CHIN-101 or Instructor's consent.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Continues to develop proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking Modern Standard Chinese (Mandarin). Helps to develop listening comprehension skills with the use of authentic materials, such as print media, audio, and video materials. Advanced beginning level of reading and writing of Simplified Chinese characters is taught.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Practice in both oral and written language skills. Class activities are organized around cultural themes. Weekly laboratory sessions required.

Prerequisites:

KOR-101 or Instructor's consent.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A continuation of KOR 101. Continues to develop proficiency in reading, writing, and speaking Korean. Helps to develop listening comprehension skills with the use of authentic materials, such as print media, audio, and video materials. Advanced beginning level of reading and writing of Korean characters is taught.

Residency Requirement Policy: in the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Minor Programs Policy: a student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major or double major combination to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

Asian Studies Courses

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An interdisciplinary introduction to Asian Studies will touch upon the history, politics, economics, philosophy, geography, arts, and cultures of Asia. Sample topics include political economy, religious and cultural exchanges, international relations, Asian experience in America, and the role of Asia in the twenty-first century. Students will develop conceptual frameworks for exploring the subjects covered by the Asian Studies curriculum.

Credits:

4

Description:

There are more Chinese restaurants in the U.S. than MacDonald's, Burger Kings and KFC'S combined. This course examines the unique American phenomenon of Chinese food from a historical and anthropological viewpoint. Students will gain a better appreciation and understanding of the subject through the course and will probably never look at local Chinese takeout the same way afterwards

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Engages in an internship in a business or non-profit organization that deals with Asia or an Asian American community. Students may complete the internship either in Asia or in the U.S. Students will complete appropriate exercises and reports to document their learning. (1 course, 4-12 credits; can be taken multiple times in different semesters)

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Works directly with a faculty member on an agreed topic related to Asia or an Asian language. Past topics include: intermediate Chinese and Japanese; Asian popular culture.

Prerequisites:

Instructor consent required

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Students will reflect on their college career and develop a personal strategy for attaining professional goals. They will understand ethical guidelines and professional conventions by examining the differences between American work culture and Asian work culture; by applying this understanding to a transnational/diverse professional world. Students will understand what the job market and graduate school opportunities are like for Asian Studies graduates.

Prerequisites:

Students must be in the CAS Honors Program, have a 3.5 overall grade point average, and a 3.7 grade point average in the major. Registration must be approved by the Asian Studies Director.

Credits:

1.00- 8.00

Description:

Students will work with an Asian Studies advisor to undertake a research project that will produce a 25-page paper that is suitable for an undergraduate academic conference in Asian Studies or relevant disciplines. Students must be in the CAS Honors Program, have a 3.5 overall grade point average, and a 3.7 grade point average in the major. Registration must be approved by the Asian Studies Director. May be taken in the fall and/or spring in the senior year.