Environmental Science

Environmental Science Major

Learn more about this major

Degree Requirements - 126 credits

Students can earn a bachelor of science degree with this major.  See the requirements for the bachelor of science degree.

Major Requirements: 18 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 69 credits

CUES Shared Core Requirements (6 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 21 credits)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Focuses on the natural environment through the lens of social science and humanities. Students will study texts from those disciplines to acquire a deeper understanding of the values and beliefs that underlie environmental issues. Students will investigate the policy-making processes and institutions through which those issues are decided, and the social inequalities in the distribution of environmental problems. Texts to be studied will range from literature, philosophy, and film to policy statements, impact reports, community advocacy materials, and investigative journalism.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-L111 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Applies the fundamentals of science to environmental issues. Topics include population dynamics and resources, environmental degradation, ecosystems, geologic processes, deforestation, biodiversity, climate change, air, soil, and water resource management, and pollution and risks to health.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-111 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory exercises are used to illustrate topics covered in UES 111. Field testing and analysis of environmental samples. Field trips may be required.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-L225 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides the fundamentals of geographic information science (GIS) including the history of automated mapping. A review of the necessary hardware and software elements used in GIS is presented. Hands-on exercises with computerized mapping software are required.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-225 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Required companion computer laboratory to be taken concurrently with UES 225.

Prerequisites:

UES Majors Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines a contemporary environmental issue for the development of senior project. Students will develop a proposal to address an identified issue from the multiple perspectives (e.g., policy, ethics, environmental justice, science and culture). As appropriate, the proposal will be field tested, demonstrated, or presented to the local community.

Prerequisites:

Environmental Studies or Environmental Science major or minor with junior standing

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Analyzes students' interests, skills, values, and experiences in the context of career planning for the environmental fields. Provides understanding of how to present professional accomplishments, conduct a job search, or prepare for graduate work.

Choose one of the following:

Prerequisites:

MATH-128 or higher

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Application of statistical analysis to real-world business and economic problems. Topics include data presentation, descriptive statistics including measures of location and dispersion, introduction to probability, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions including binomial and normal distributions, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical inference including estimation and hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression analysis. The use of computers is emphasized throughout the course. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

BIO-111 and BIO-L111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduction to the statistical methods used to evaluate biological problems. Sampling, probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, experimental design, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation are some of the topics offered. Software for data handling, graphics, and analysis will be used.

Environmental Science Requirements (6 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 24 credits)

Prerequisites:

BIO-L114 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Rigorous introduction to organismal biology emphasizing evolution, phylogenetics, form, and function. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A series of laboratory experiences in evolution, diversity, anatomy and physiology.

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH-104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH-104 must take MATH-104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-L111.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces atomic structure, the periodic table, the nature of chemical bonds, chemical reactions, and stoichiometry. This course is recommended for science majors or those considering careers in the health sciences.

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH-104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH-104 must take MATH-104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-111.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course introduces the basic principles of chemistry through hands-on laboratory experiments. Students learn safe laboratory practices and fundamental technical skills. These include the determination of mass and volume, making solutions, and synthesizing a product. Emphasis is also placed on understanding and writing scientific literature.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-L112 (concurrently), CHEM-111, CHEM-L111 and MATH-104 or higher

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I. Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces thermochemistry, gases, solution chemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base systems, and thermodynamics.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-112 (concurrently) and CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111 and MATH-104 placement or higher.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I Laboratory. Apply the basic principles of chemistry through discovery laboratory experiments with an emphasis on quantitative analysis. Apply Beer's Law and acid-base titrations. This laboratory is designed around the foundational laboratory skills practiced by science students in a wide variety of majors.

Choose one of the following courses and corresponding laboratory:

Prerequisites:

UES-L255 concurrently and CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112 or permission of instructor

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Investigates the chemical processes (including biologically mediated ones) that affect the cycling and ultimate fate of chemicals in the environment (air, water, and soil). Remediation and treatment methods used to minimize pollutant loads and mitigate their impacts are considered.

Prerequisites:

UES-255 concurrently and CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112 or permission of instructor

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Illustrates chemical processes in the environment and the methods of analysis of contaminants via laboratory exercises and application of instrumental techniques.

Or

Prerequisites:

CHEM-211 or permission of instructor

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A study of the chemical processes (including biologically mediated ones) that affect the cycling and ultimate fate of chemicals in the environment. Topics include air, water, and soil chemistry as well as energy and climate change. The effects of pollutant loads on natural systems and the remediation and treatment methods used to minimize pollutant loads are investigated. 3 hour lecture. Normally offered spring, odd numbered years.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 355 must be taken concurrently. Take CHEM-L211;

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate principles covered by topics in CHEM 355. Prerequisites: CHEM L211, concurrent enrollment in CHEM 355 required. 4-hour laboratory. Normally offered spring, odd numbered years.

Choose one of the following sequences:

Prerequisites:

Take MATH-121 or MATH-134 or MATH-165 or permission of Physics department chair; PHYS-L111 taken concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics. Study of kinematics, vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, energy and work, momentum,heat and thermodynamics, kinetic theory.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-111 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This laboratory course consists of experiments and exercises to illustrate the basic concepts studied in PHYS 111. Introduction to the fundamental principles of physics. Study of kinematics, vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, rigid body statics and dynamics, energy and work, momentum,heat and thermodynamics, kinetic theory. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks and formal reports required.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-111 and PHYS-L11. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS-L112.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Continuation of the fundamental principles of physics. Study of simple harmonic motion, waves, fluids, electric forces and fields, electric potential, DC circuits, electromagnetic induction, magnetic fields, AC circuits, introduction to optics, introduction to atomic, nuclear and particle physics.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-112(concurrently) and PHYS-111 and PHYS-L111

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This laboratory course consists of experiments and exercises to illustrate the basic concepts studied in PHYS 112. Continuation of the fundamental principles of physics. Study of simple harmonic motion, waves, fluids, electric forces and fields, electric potential, DC circuits, electromagnetic induction, magnetic fields, AC circuits, introduction to optics, introduction to atomic, nuclear and particle physics. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks, and formal reports required.

Or

Prerequisites:

MATH-121 or MATH-134 with a grade of C or better. MATH-165 can replace these prerequisites if taken concurrently with PHYS-151. Must take PHYS-L151 concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

PHYS 151 is the first of three courses (PHYS 151, 152, 153) that comprise the calculus-based introductory physics sequence intended for students majoring in the physical sciences, engineering and mathematics. This course covers basic techniques in physics that fall under the topic of classical mechanics and their application in understanding the natural world. Specific topics include the study of vectors, Newton's laws, rotations, kinetic and potential energy, momentum and collisions, rigid body statics and dynamics, fluid mechanics, gravitation, simple harmonic motion, mechanical waves, sound and hearing. The student will learn how to analyze physical situations by using simple models, and also how to solve those models and derive useful conclusions from them. This course will show students how experimental results and mathematical representations are combined to create testable scientific theories.

Prerequisites:

Take PHYS-151 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This laboratory course consists of experiments and exercises to illustrate the basic concepts studied in PHYS 151: measurements, propagation of errors, vectors, Newton's laws, work and energy, momentum, rotations, oscillations, simple harmonic motion, fluid. Knowledge of algebra, trigonometry, differentiation and integration required.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-151 and PHYS-L151. Must be taken concurrently with PHYS-L152.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This calculus-based course continues the topics in physics covered in Physics 151 and begins with temperature and heat, the thermal properties of matter, and the lasw of thermodynamics. It then switches to electromagnetism and covers electric charge and field, Gauss' law, electrical potential and capacitance, electric currents and DC circuits. Next magnetism, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law and AC circuits are discussed. This is followed by Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves.

Prerequisites:

PHYS-152 (concurrently) and PHYS-151 and PHYS-L151

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This laboratory course consists of experiments and exercises to illustrate the basic concepts studied in PHYS 152: heat, gas laws, electric forces, field, and potential, DC and AC circuits, magnetic field, electromagnetic induction, Faraday's law, optics. Calculus, algebra, trigonometry are required. Error propagation, use of Excel, laboratory notebooks, and formal reports required.

Environmental Studies Requirements (2 courses, 8 credits)

Prerequisites:

UES-L211 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Focuses on how environmental conditions affect human, animal and ecological health. Areas may include control of environmental contaminants; public health and infectious disease control; sanitation systems; antibiotic resistance; health issues associated with food production; the effects of industrialization on the environment; and the impact of disasters on environmental health.

Prerequisites:

UES-211 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Illustrates topics covered UES 211 through laboratory exercises. Exercises may include analysis of environmental samples (soil, water, and air). Field trips may be required.

Choose one of the following courses:

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Identifies the environmental effects of economic activity, including polluted water and air, noise, and radiation, and values their costs and benefits. Analyzes mechanisms, including taxes and permits, for achieving a socially preferable level of pollution. Traces role played by institutions, including common ownership, in affecting environmental decay. Resource depletion (of oil, forests, and fisheries) and appropriate policy responses.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

The study of how economic and human activity is distributed across space, the reasons for these spatial distributions, and the processes that change the spatial organization of economic activity over time. Topics include: maps, map projections, and geographic information systems; population geography; the organization and location of cities, towns and villages; transportation and communication policy; industrial location; the geography of world trade; and geographic features of economic development. The course takes a global perspective, and draws on cases and examples from all over the world. Cultural Diversity B

Prerequisites:

Take EC-101

Credits:

4.00

Description:

More than half of the world population lives in urban areas. This course sets out to explain the existence, growth, geographic patterns, and impact of cities, and the effects of public policy on urban form, structure, and activity. It addresses the urban issues of transportation, congestion, housing, crime, poverty and inequality, governance, and the environment, and asks how planning and policy can tackle these. The context of these discussions is the megacities of Asia: 24 of the world's 37 megacities (those with ten million or more inhabitants) are in Asia, where they are home to almost 500 million people. The choices made by these cities will be considered in comparative perspective, including with Boston, New York, Paris, and London.

Prerequisites:

PHIL-119, PHIL-123, PHIL-127 or PHIL-120

Credits:

4.00

Description:

An examination of the moral issues involved in the interaction of humans with their natural environment. Topics include: the environmental crisis, human-centered vs. nature-centered ethics, intrinsic value in nature, obligations to future generations, the importance of preserving endangered species and wilderness, radical ecology, eco-feminism, and the role of social justice in environmental issues. Prerequisite: PHIL 119, or 123, or 127. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

POLS-110 or POLS-120 or instructor's permission

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will provide an examination of the institutions involved in the American policy-making process. The student will learn about the presidential system that exists in the United States. The course will focus on a relationship between the President and Congress and how that relationship impedes or facilitates the public policy process, including the budgetary process. The course will include a discussion of the president's role as head of the executive branch, and the implementation of congressional policies. Attention will be given to the role of the judiciary in the policy process. Normally offered every year.

Prerequisites:

POLS-110 or instructor's permission

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course examines the process and politics of agenda-setting and public policy formulation in the United States. The primary focus is on understanding the complex interaction between institutions and actors involved in public policy making at the federal level, although many of these observations are transferrable to other levels of government (state and local) and other political systems. Students will learn by doing as they become elected Members of Congress in a semester-long legislative simulation. Normally offered every fall.

Prerequisites:

This course will have a service learning component Junior Status required

Credits:

4.00

Description:

From Rio to the Boston Harbor Project, this course examines the policies and politics of the environment. It examines the origins of the environmental movement in the United States focusing on the development and present function of government and non-government organizations responsible for the development and implementation of global, national, state and local environmental policies.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course will explore our natural environment and human interacations with it. We will connect a critical study of society, power, and inequality to the study of our natural environment and the ways it is altered by human behaviors. We will also consider ways to change our society's relationship with the natural environment to keep our earth clean and safe for human society.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Investigates the environmental justice movement, its basis in law, and its leaders. Students will study key topics pertaining to environmental and health disparities and learn about community organizing and advocacy and their application to shape decision-making. Sustainable practices and their integration into daily life to create healthy communities and equity will be considered.

Prerequisites:

Class will meet for 75 minutes a week and then travel over spring break. Instructor's consent is required

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom.Focuses on the history and lasting effect of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) on the physical and political landscape of the United States.Tracks the progression of work of the more than 3 million men who served in the CCC from 1933 to 1942, from the planting of billions of trees to the development of recreational opportunities on federal and state lands. Looks at the role the CCC played in redefining conservation and creating a mainstream environmental movement. Investigates the lasting legacy that the CCC left on the American landscape through the development of other conservation corps programs. Connected with a required Alternative Spring Break trip, this experiential education offering will allow students to experience and complete similar work to that completed by CCC members.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Permaculture is the design of food systems and social structures to provide for human needs while restoring ecosystem health. Examining the interconnections between environmental, social and economic components, Permaculture is informed by the disciplines of systems ecology, ecological design and ethno-ecology.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores local and bioregional food systems through the lens of holistic design and of building a resilient food culture through the ethics of sustainability. Students will examine environmental, social and economic factors of building successful community food systems from seed to table. Provides students with the tools to assess the decisions that direct our current food chain including processing, marketing, and food distribution. Students will make connections to food justice, health, food insecurity while analyzing commercial agriculture and small scale sustainable farming.

Prerequisites:

UES-101 and UES-111 and UES-L111 or permission of instructor

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces various sustainability and development theories and concepts. Promotes discussion of the multidimensional aspects of sustainability and development, encompassing social, ecological and economic theories, policies and practice. Highlights challenges to sustainability and development, focusing on globalization, social justice, politics, economics, specific tools and systems, and how to communicate ideas learned.

Advanced Science Requirements (3 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 12 credits)

Choose three of the following:

Prerequisites:

BIO-254 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111 or BIO-114 and BIO-L114 or Instructor's consent

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduction to the marine environment, its organisms and their specific adaptations. Emphasis on marine and estuarine ecology, intertidal habits, trophic relations, and physiology. Human impacts on the sea: fisheries, mariculture, pollution, introduced species, climate change and seawater acidification, and law of the sea. Taught yearly each fall.

Prerequisites:

BIO-254 (concurrently) and BIO-111 and BIO-L111 or BIO-114 and BIO-L114 or Instructor's consent

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Field trips to local marine environments, museums, and aquaria; field and laboratory study and observations of live, preserved, and models of marine organisms.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114 and BIO-L333 (concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Areas of study include but are not limited to basic principles of population biology, community ecology, trophic dynamics, ecosystem structure and function and evolutionary theory.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114, BIO-L114, and BIO-333 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Field and laboratory experiences in techniques and concepts relevant to ecological theory, data collection, statistical analysis, visual representation and report preparation.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course covers a broad spectrum of aspects of biodiversity and conservation by examining key elements ranging from global patterns in the distribution of life on our planet to the effects our human population is causing on those patterns. Examples from marine and terrestrial animals and plants are used to convey current ideas with a focus on the importance of global biodiversity, and the design of management programs for the conservation of species and ecosystems. 4-credit

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A survey of the occurrence, life history and pathogenicity of the most important arthropod-borne, human diseases both internationally (malaria, dengue, plague, trypanosomiasis, yellow fever, etc.) and within the United States (Lyme disease, EEE, West Nile Virus, and others). Demographic and environmental factors leading to the re-emergence and spread of these diseases will be considered.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112. CHEM-L211 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces basic theories of structure, bonding, and chemical reactivity as specifically applied to modern organic chemistry. Includes functional groups, acid/base chemistry, nomenclature, resonance, spectroscopy, and stereochemistry.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-211.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Introduces synthetic organic chemistry techniques. Includes melting point determination, distillation, crystallization, extraction, chromatographic separations, and infrared spectroscopy. Discusses experimental design within the context of green organic chemistry.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211. Must take CHEM-L212 concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Builds on the core competencies acquired in Organic Chemistry I. Includes detailed mechanistic discussions of substitution elimination and addition reactions. Emphasizes organic synthesis structure determination and spectroscopy.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-211 and CHEM-L211. Must be take CHEM-212 concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This hybrid laboratory course builds on the core competencies acquired in Organic Chemistry Laboratory I and has two mandatory face to face laboratory sessions to develop essential laboratory skill. The remaining lab sessions use a variety of virtual tools including simulations, videos, class discussions and data analysis. Emphasizes the characterization of organic molecules via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Discusses experimental design within the context of green organic chemistry.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-211 and CHEM-L314 (concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Explores the basic techniques of collecting and analyzing data from different types of instrumentation, including: ultraviolet, visible, fluorescence, atomic and emission spectroscopy; chromatographic methods; electrochemical measurements. Students will apply these techniques to problems in chemistry, forensics, and environmental science.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-314 (concurrently) and CHEM-L211

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This hybrid laboratory will be offered with three mandatory face to face sessions to develop essential skills. The rest of the curriculum will be offered in an online format. Explores the basic techniques of collecting and analyzing data from different types of instrumentation, including: ultraviolet, visible, fluorescence, atomic and emission spectroscopy; chromatographic methods; electrochemical measurements. Students will apply these techniques to problems in chemistry, forensics, and environmental science.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-314 and CHEM-L314

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Topics in inorganic chemistry including bonding theories, chemical structures, symmetry and group theory, kinetics and mechanisms of reactions, and spectroscopy. Advanced topics may include bioinorganic chemistry, or organometallics.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-375 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate principles covered by topics in CHEM 375. Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 375 required.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. Develops students' awareness and understanding of wetlands including inland and salt marshes,mangroves, and swamps. The beginning of the semester is devoted to understanding of how these vital ecosystems function with topics including wetland hydrology, biogeochemistry, management,and restoration. The latter portion of the semester is focused on developing a testable citizen science project (e.g. a sampling protocol) for a local salt marsh in conjunction with a local community partner.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111 or BIO-111 andBIO-L111 or BIO-114 and BIO-L114 or UES-111 and UES-L111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students's awareness and understanding of wetlands including inland and salt marshes, mangroves, and swamps will be developed through exploration of these vital ecosystems (topics include wetland biology, management, and restoration) in the primary literature. Students will spend spring break in Costa Rica exploring these vital systems through hands on field-based activities and lectures from local specialists in Costa Rica.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111 and CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112 and BIO-114 and BIO-L114 (or UES-111 and UES-L111)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is designed to identify the ways that scientific knowledge can be used to resolve environmental problems particularly the ocean's role in the biogeochemical cycling of selected elements and the impacts of humans on the cycling of these elements. Sample topics include the chemical composition of seawater from the perspectives of elemental speciation and the impacts of solutes on water's physical behavior; biogeochemical phenomena which control accumulation and preservation of marine sediments; marine chemistry of dioactive and stable isotopes; and how climate change and pollution impact the marine environment with mitigation strategies outlined.

Prerequisites:

UES-111 and UES-L111 or permission of instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the marine and coastal realms and the problems that arise from the human-marine relationship via topics such as: ocean and estuarine circulation, climate change and ocean response, and plant/animal adaptations in these varying ecosystems.

Math Requirement (1 course, 4 credits)

Choose one of the following:

Prerequisites:

MATH-104, MATH-121 or MATH level 4

Credits:

4.00

Description:

A one-semester introduction to differential and integral calculus. Theory is presented informally and topics and techniques are limited to polynomials, rational functions, logarithmic and exponential functions. Topics include a review of precalculus, limits and continuity, derivatives, differentiation rules, applications of derivatives to graphing, minima/maxima, applications of the derivative, marginal analysis, differential equations of growth and decay, anti-derivatives, the definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and area measurements. This course cannot be used to satisfy core or complementary requirements by students majoring in chemistry, computer science, engineering, mathematics, or physics. Several sections offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

MATH-121 with a minimum grade of C, MATH-075, or MATH level 5

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Functions, limits and continuity, squeeze theorem, limits at infinity; instantaneous rate of change, tangent slopes, and the definition of the derivative of a function; power, product, and quotient rules, trig derivatives, chain rule, implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; derivatives of other transcendental functions (inverse trig functions, exponential and log functions, hyperbolic trig functions); applications of the derivative (implicit differentiation, related rates, optimization, differentials, curve sketching, L'Hopital's rule); anti-derivatives; indefinite integrals; Fundamental Theorem; applications (net change). 4 lecture hours plus 1 recitation session each week. Normally offered each semester.

Any math course above MATH-165 may also be chosen.

Students who have taken MATH-165 are encouraged to take PHYS-151/L151 and PHYS-152/L152. Students considering graduate school are encouraged to take MATH-165 and MATH-166.

Internship Option

Internships may be approved for credit by the CUES director. An approved internship for 3- or 4-credits may be used as a concentration course option at the discretion of the CUES director. 

Prerequisites:

Environmental Science and Environmental Studies majors and minors only with junior standing.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Application of the principles and techniques of environmental science or studies to a specific environmental problem through a local internship placement of 10 hours per week (minimum) for 12 weeks. Typically, this experience will include literature research, classroom meetings, and field work in an off-campus environmental agency or NGO.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Application of the principles and techniques of environmental science or studies to a specific environmental problem through a global internship placement of 10 hours per week (minimum) for 12 weeks. Typically, this experience will include literature research, classroom meetings, and field work in an off-campus environmental agency or NGO.

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Environmental Science Learning Goals & Objectives

Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.

Learning Goals Learning Objectives
Students will know/understand Students will be able to...
Science as a process for understanding environmental phenomena and issues
  • Conduct an experiment following standard protocols
  • Recognize the importance of safety protocols
  • Collect data via quantitative and qualitative observations and measurements
  • Interpret the results of an experiment
  • Apply basic statistics and interpret data for significance
How science is communicated
  • Evaluate primary literature
  • Interpret visual representations of data
  • Summarize the discoveries of scientific research
How to communicate scientific findings
  • Orally present findings to others in formal and informal settings
  • Construct a written document in a scientific style, including proper citation of sources
  • Prepare visual representations of data
  • Access and utilize scientific databases
How to work collaboratively
  • Conduct an experiment or gather data as part of a group
  • Participate in group discussions
  • Record protocols and observations
  • Provide constructive feedback to group members
  • Accept feedback from group members
How decisions about the environment are made
  • Describe the historical context of environmental decisions
  • Describe the societal and cultural context of environmental decisions
  • Describe the political context of environmental decisions
  • Describe the ethical context of decisions about the environment
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the process of establishing environmental regulations in the US and globally
  • Analyze how poverty, social injustice, and inequity impact environmental decision making
The physical and chemical characteristics of the natural environment
  • Identify the chemical structures and physical characteristics of the molecules of biotic and abiotic components of the environment
  • Write and use material balances
  • Apply a systems approach to the analysis of urban, suburban, and rural areas
  • Identify the major environmental impacts of human activity
  • Understand and describe technical solutions to environmental problems
That energy can be changed from one form to another, and the need for, and impacts of, human energy use
  • Compare and contrast relevant forms of energy (e.g. kinetic energy vs. potential energy, energy stored in bonds vs. potential energy of concentration gradients)
  • Write and use an energy balance
  • Identify solar and non-solar energy sources and their environmental impacts
  • Identify social justice issues in provision of energy to global population
How to apply systems thinking to environmental problems
  • Use GIS mapping software to analyze an environmental issue or problem
  • Evaluate an environmental problem from multiple disciplines
  • Identify the global environmental systems, including the sources and sinks for environmentally important elements and compounds
  • Distinguish between natural and human-generated environmental phenomenon and understand their interactions
  • Provide the societal, cultural, and regulatory context for an environmental issue or problem
  • Identify multiple stakeholders in an environmental issue and how they impact policy and reform
How to pursue a career in the environmentally related fields
  • Effectively search for and locate pertinent internships and jobs
  • Assess personal qualifications in relation to an internship and/or job description
  • Prepare job application materials including a resume and cover letter

Environmental Science Minor

Learn more about this minor

Minor Requirements: 6 courses, 24 credits

The Environmental Science minor has three required courses and three additional courses demonstrating an emphasis in biology or chemistry.

Core Requirements (3 courses and corresponding laboratories, 12 credits)

Prerequisites:

Take UES-L111 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Applies the fundamentals of science to environmental issues. Topics include population dynamics and resources, environmental degradation, ecosystems, geologic processes, deforestation, biodiversity, climate change, air, soil, and water resource management, and pollution and risks to health.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-111 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory exercises are used to illustrate topics covered in UES 111. Field testing and analysis of environmental samples. Field trips may be required.

Prerequisites:

UES-L211 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Focuses on how environmental conditions affect human, animal and ecological health. Areas may include control of environmental contaminants; public health and infectious disease control; sanitation systems; antibiotic resistance; health issues associated with food production; the effects of industrialization on the environment; and the impact of disasters on environmental health.

Prerequisites:

UES-211 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Illustrates topics covered UES 211 through laboratory exercises. Exercises may include analysis of environmental samples (soil, water, and air). Field trips may be required.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-L225 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides the fundamentals of geographic information science (GIS) including the history of automated mapping. A review of the necessary hardware and software elements used in GIS is presented. Hands-on exercises with computerized mapping software are required.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-225 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Required companion computer laboratory to be taken concurrently with UES 225.

Electives (3 courses and corresponding laboratories where applicable, 12 credits)

Choose one of the following sequences:

Biology Sequence

Prerequisites:

BIO-L114 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Rigorous introduction to organismal biology emphasizing evolution, phylogenetics, form, and function. This is an introductory course required of all biology majors and minors, and some non-biology science majors. This course is not recommended for the non-science student.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

A series of laboratory experiences in evolution, diversity, anatomy and physiology.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114 and BIO-L333 (concurrently)

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Areas of study include but are not limited to basic principles of population biology, community ecology, trophic dynamics, ecosystem structure and function and evolutionary theory.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114, BIO-L114, and BIO-333 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Field and laboratory experiences in techniques and concepts relevant to ecological theory, data collection, statistical analysis, visual representation and report preparation.

Prerequisites:

BIO-114 and BIO-L114

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course covers a broad spectrum of aspects of biodiversity and conservation by examining key elements ranging from global patterns in the distribution of life on our planet to the effects our human population is causing on those patterns. Examples from marine and terrestrial animals and plants are used to convey current ideas with a focus on the importance of global biodiversity, and the design of management programs for the conservation of species and ecosystems. 4-credit

Chemistry Sequence

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH-104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH-104 must take MATH-104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-L111.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces atomic structure, the periodic table, the nature of chemical bonds, chemical reactions, and stoichiometry. This course is recommended for science majors or those considering careers in the health sciences.

Prerequisites:

Placement at MATH-104 or better. Students who do not place at MATH-104 must take MATH-104 concurrently. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM-111.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course introduces the basic principles of chemistry through hands-on laboratory experiments. Students learn safe laboratory practices and fundamental technical skills. These include the determination of mass and volume, making solutions, and synthesizing a product. Emphasis is also placed on understanding and writing scientific literature.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-L112 (concurrently), CHEM-111, CHEM-L111 and MATH-104 or higher

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I. Fundamental principles of chemistry are discussed. Introduces thermochemistry, gases, solution chemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base systems, and thermodynamics.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-112 (concurrently) and CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111 and MATH-104 placement or higher.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry I Laboratory. Apply the basic principles of chemistry through discovery laboratory experiments with an emphasis on quantitative analysis. Apply Beer's Law and acid-base titrations. This laboratory is designed around the foundational laboratory skills practiced by science students in a wide variety of majors.

For one of the three courses, student may select either:

Prerequisites:

UES-L255 concurrently and CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112 or permission of instructor

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Investigates the chemical processes (including biologically mediated ones) that affect the cycling and ultimate fate of chemicals in the environment (air, water, and soil). Remediation and treatment methods used to minimize pollutant loads and mitigate their impacts are considered.

Prerequisites:

UES-255 concurrently and CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112 or permission of instructor

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Illustrates chemical processes in the environment and the methods of analysis of contaminants via laboratory exercises and application of instrumental techniques.

or

Prerequisites:

CHEM-211 or permission of instructor

Credits:

3.00

Description:

A study of the chemical processes (including biologically mediated ones) that affect the cycling and ultimate fate of chemicals in the environment. Topics include air, water, and soil chemistry as well as energy and climate change. The effects of pollutant loads on natural systems and the remediation and treatment methods used to minimize pollutant loads are investigated. 3 hour lecture. Normally offered spring, odd numbered years.

Prerequisites:

CHEM 355 must be taken concurrently. Take CHEM-L211;

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory exercises designed to illustrate principles covered by topics in CHEM 355. Prerequisites: CHEM L211, concurrent enrollment in CHEM 355 required. 4-hour laboratory. Normally offered spring, odd numbered years.

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major or double major combination to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

Honors

To complete requirements for honors in the major, a candidate must:

  1. Graduate with a major GPA of 3.5 or higher
  2. Graduate with an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher
  3. Complete UES-H555 (minimum registration for 4 credits)
  4. Develop and complete an independent study project under the supervision of a member of the CUES Honors Advisory Committee. Depending on the nature of the project, the study may be conducted on or off campus, or involve a combination of both
  5. Defend a thesis to the CUES Honors Advisory Committee
  6. Present findings in a colloquium
  7. CAS Honors Program students only: Also present work from the senior honors experience at the Honors Symposium or Pecha Kucha event

To become a candidate for honors in the major, a student must:

  1. Have a major GPA of 3.5 or higher
  2. Have an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher
  3. Receive an invitation from the CUES Honors Advisory Committee

CUES Courses

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Focuses on the natural environment through the lens of social science and humanities. Students will study texts from those disciplines to acquire a deeper understanding of the values and beliefs that underlie environmental issues. Students will investigate the policy-making processes and institutions through which those issues are decided, and the social inequalities in the distribution of environmental problems. Texts to be studied will range from literature, philosophy, and film to policy statements, impact reports, community advocacy materials, and investigative journalism.

Prerequisites:

UES-L107 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Unmanned autonomous systems (UAS) or Drones are high-tech, intelligent machines capable of traveling by air, land, or sea via a remote connection. This course presents concepts and practical methods of using Unmanned Vehicles in a professional context, particularly for environmental projects. UAVs are increasingly being used in a professional capacity such as cinematography and filming, real estate, construction, surveying, mapping, agriculture, industrial inspections, utilities inspections and many more. The course covers mission planning, operations, field data collection, data processing, legal implications, data analysis and data deliverables. The course and laboratory will include learning flying micro-drones and preparing to pass the Federal Aviation Administration's Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Airmen (Part 107) exam. The course will have an associated Laboratory component in which students will learn how to properly plan effective flight missions, fly safely and legally, develop risk management strategies, analyze the data captured and convert it into a useful data deliverable.

Prerequisites:

UES-107 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Unmanned autonomous systems (UAS) or Drones are high-tech, intelligent machines capable of traveling by air, land, or sea via a remote connection. This course presents concepts and practical methods of using Unmanned Vehicles in a professional context, particularly for environmental projects. UAVs are increasingly being used in a professional capacity such as cinematography and filming, real estate, construction, surveying, mapping, agriculture, industrial inspections, utilities inspections and many more. The course covers mission planning, operations, field data collection, data processing, legal implications, data analysis and data deliverables. The course and laboratory will include learning flying micro-drones and preparing to pass the Federal Aviation Administration's Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Airmen (Part 107) exam. The course will have an associated Laboratory component in which students will learn how to properly plan effective flight missions, fly safely and legally, develop risk management strategies, analyze the data captured and convert it into a useful data deliverable.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Building on the theory and skills learned in UES 107/L-107, UES-L108 is a one credit course which allows students to learn the hands-on skills necessary to safely and effectively operate a drone. This is a skill only learned by focused practice and flying drones on a regular basis. Techniques, tips and best practices will be examined and practiced repeatedly. Successful completion of this course will require passing a practical examination which will consist of flying a micro drone and demonstrating all the various skills that drone pilots need to employ in order to fly safely.

Prerequisites:

SU Upward Bound program participant

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Intensive study of topics in urban sustainability and climate adaptation in the 21st century. Focuses on concepts in sustainable design and urban planning using the STEM disciplines. Technical reading and writing emphasized.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-L111 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Applies the fundamentals of science to environmental issues. Topics include population dynamics and resources, environmental degradation, ecosystems, geologic processes, deforestation, biodiversity, climate change, air, soil, and water resource management, and pollution and risks to health.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-111 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Laboratory exercises are used to illustrate topics covered in UES 111. Field testing and analysis of environmental samples. Field trips may be required.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-111 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Applies the fundamentals of science to environmental issues. Topics include population dynamics and resources; environmental degradation; ecosystems; geologic processes; deforestation; biodiversity; climate change; air, soil, and water resource management; and pollution and risks to human health. All materials for this laboratory inclusive of lectures, exercises, and modules will be provided in a virtual format. Students will need internet access only.

Prerequisites:

Take CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112 previously or concurrently; Environmental Science majors only

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Summarizes and reviews the main organic functional groups of importance in the environment, their reactivity, and their basic mechanisms (ionic or radical) in environmental systems.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-L121 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Examines art and cultural objects through the lens of the biological, chemical, and physical principles of the materials and processes we use to make them. Includes consideration of factors important in art conservation. Provides an environmental context for the manufacture and use of art materials and the preservation of cultural objects.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-121 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Provides hands-on work with pigments, dyes, and other art materials using the basic principles of science and technology. Students will conduct laboratory experiments that produce art objects and other consumer products. Instruction in safe laboratory practices and basic techniques such as determining mass and volume, representing data in the form of tables, graphs, and graphics. Practice in synthesizing compounds like paints and finishes and in evaluating methods of art conservation.

Prerequisites:

UES-L211 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Focuses on how environmental conditions affect human, animal and ecological health. Areas may include control of environmental contaminants; public health and infectious disease control; sanitation systems; antibiotic resistance; health issues associated with food production; the effects of industrialization on the environment; and the impact of disasters on environmental health.

Prerequisites:

UES-211 must be taken concurrently.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Illustrates topics covered UES 211 through laboratory exercises. Exercises may include analysis of environmental samples (soil, water, and air). Field trips may be required.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-L225 concurrently

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Provides the fundamentals of geographic information science (GIS) including the history of automated mapping. A review of the necessary hardware and software elements used in GIS is presented. Hands-on exercises with computerized mapping software are required.

Prerequisites:

Take UES-225 concurrently

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Required companion computer laboratory to be taken concurrently with UES 225.

Prerequisites:

UES-L226 concurrently and UES-107 and UES-L107 and UES-L108

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course deals with project based drone based mapping from the perspective of an environmental scientist or planner. Students will identify a need for geographic data on an environmental project, plan a drone mission, analyze the data and present the visualization through a GIS Map.

Prerequisites:

UES-226 concurrently. UES-107, UES-L107 and UES-L108.

Credits:

1.00

Description:

This lab accompanies UES-226 and allows for hands on work in both gathering data via drone flight missions and then taking that data and creating a map product. Work will follow Project Management protocols.

Prerequisites:

UES-L255 concurrently and CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112 or permission of instructor

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Investigates the chemical processes (including biologically mediated ones) that affect the cycling and ultimate fate of chemicals in the environment (air, water, and soil). Remediation and treatment methods used to minimize pollutant loads and mitigate their impacts are considered.

Prerequisites:

UES-255 concurrently and CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112 or permission of instructor

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Illustrates chemical processes in the environment and the methods of analysis of contaminants via laboratory exercises and application of instrumental techniques.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. Develops students' awareness and understanding of wetlands including inland and salt marshes,mangroves, and swamps. The beginning of the semester is devoted to understanding of how these vital ecosystems function with topics including wetland hydrology, biogeochemistry, management,and restoration. The latter portion of the semester is focused on developing a testable citizen science project (e.g. a sampling protocol) for a local salt marsh in conjunction with a local community partner.

Prerequisites:

Honors student or at least 3.3 GPA

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. Students' awareness and understanding of wetlands including inland and salt marshes, mangroves, and swamps will be developed through exploration of these vital ecosystems (topics include wetland biology, management, and restoration). The latter portion of the semester is focused on developing a testable citizen science project (e.g. a sampling protocol) for a local salt marsh in conjunction with a local community partner where students will be going into the field three times over the course of the semester via pre-arranged private transportation.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Investigates the environmental justice movement, its basis in law, and its leaders. Students will study key topics pertaining to environmental and health disparities and learn about community organizing and advocacy and their application to shape decision-making. Sustainable practices and their integration into daily life to create healthy communities and equity will be considered.

Prerequisites:

Class will meet for 75 minutes a week and then travel over spring break. Instructor's consent is required

Credits:

4.00

Description:

In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom.Focuses on the history and lasting effect of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) on the physical and political landscape of the United States.Tracks the progression of work of the more than 3 million men who served in the CCC from 1933 to 1942, from the planting of billions of trees to the development of recreational opportunities on federal and state lands. Looks at the role the CCC played in redefining conservation and creating a mainstream environmental movement. Investigates the lasting legacy that the CCC left on the American landscape through the development of other conservation corps programs. Connected with a required Alternative Spring Break trip, this experiential education offering will allow students to experience and complete similar work to that completed by CCC members.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Provides an overview of Environmental Education (EE) by investigating how EE has been defined, how the field has changed over time, and how our own connections with the environment can inform our understanding and practice of this work. Students will consider the goals of EE and the variety of approaches utilized in the field to reach those goals. Age appropriate environmental education, place-based education, and urban environmental education will also be studied.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111 or BIO-111 andBIO-L111 or BIO-114 and BIO-L114 or UES-111 and UES-L111

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Students's awareness and understanding of wetlands including inland and salt marshes, mangroves, and swamps will be developed through exploration of these vital ecosystems (topics include wetland biology, management, and restoration) in the primary literature. Students will spend spring break in Costa Rica exploring these vital systems through hands on field-based activities and lectures from local specialists in Costa Rica.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Permaculture is the design of food systems and social structures to provide for human needs while restoring ecosystem health. Examining the interconnections between environmental, social and economic components, Permaculture is informed by the disciplines of systems ecology, ecological design and ethno-ecology.

Credits:

2.00

Description:

Develops students' awareness and understanding of wetlands including inland and salt marshes, mangroves, and swamps. Topics include wetland biology, management, and restoration, focused on through discussion of primary literature.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Develops tudents' awareness and understanding of wetlands including inland and salt marshes, mangroves, and swamps. Topics include wetland biology, management, and restoration, focused on through discussion of primary literature. Exploration continues over spring break through hands on field-based activities and lectures from local specialists.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores how Americans have understood the environment and their relationship to it through analysis of classic environmental texts, historical contexts, and societal perspectives. Analyzes how the environment has changed from pre-colonial times to the present and how these changes have been described through the lens of environmental history. Themes include differing viewpoints of European and indigenous peoples toward the natural environment, the impacts of the Western expansion on native species and landscapes, the rise of industrialism and its impacts on natural resources and ecosystems, and the rise of 20th century environmentalism.

Prerequisites:

UES-111, UES-L111, UES-211, and UES-L211

Credits:

4.00

Description:

How environmental professionals decide what to study, how they select a research design, sample and collect data, analyze results, interpret findings, and write up reports. Students are introduced to the techniques most frequently used by environmental professionals and undertake their own small research project. Required for all environmental studies majors.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores local and bioregional food systems through the lens of holistic design and of building a resilient food culture through the ethics of sustainability. Students will examine environmental, social and economic factors of building successful community food systems from seed to table. Provides students with the tools to assess the decisions that direct our current food chain including processing, marketing, and food distribution. Students will make connections to food justice, health, food insecurity while analyzing commercial agriculture and small scale sustainable farming.

Prerequisites:

UES-101 and UES-111 and UES-L111 or permission of instructor

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Introduces various sustainability and development theories and concepts. Promotes discussion of the multidimensional aspects of sustainability and development, encompassing social, ecological and economic theories, policies and practice. Highlights challenges to sustainability and development, focusing on globalization, social justice, politics, economics, specific tools and systems, and how to communicate ideas learned.

Prerequisites:

UES Majors Only

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Examines a contemporary environmental issue for the development of senior project. Students will develop a proposal to address an identified issue from the multiple perspectives (e.g., policy, ethics, environmental justice, science and culture). As appropriate, the proposal will be field tested, demonstrated, or presented to the local community.

Prerequisites:

CHEM-111 and CHEM-L111 and CHEM-112 and CHEM-L112 and BIO-114 and BIO-L114 (or UES-111 and UES-L111)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

This course is designed to identify the ways that scientific knowledge can be used to resolve environmental problems particularly the ocean's role in the biogeochemical cycling of selected elements and the impacts of humans on the cycling of these elements. Sample topics include the chemical composition of seawater from the perspectives of elemental speciation and the impacts of solutes on water's physical behavior; biogeochemical phenomena which control accumulation and preservation of marine sediments; marine chemistry of dioactive and stable isotopes; and how climate change and pollution impact the marine environment with mitigation strategies outlined.

Prerequisites:

UES Majors Only

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Instructor-led topical project course using a team-based approach to produce project deliverables. Topics vary by semester at the discretion of the instructor with inputs from the student project team.

Prerequisites:

UES-111 and UES-L111 or permission of instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Explores the marine and coastal realms and the problems that arise from the human-marine relationship via topics such as: ocean and estuarine circulation, climate change and ocean response, and plant/animal adaptations in these varying ecosystems.

Credits:

0.00

Description:

This course requires students to complete a minimum of 15 engagement hours per semester. Students gain exposure to a variety of activities related to CUES research and development in a laboratory or field setting with faculty oversight. Permission of instructor required. May be taken more than once.

Prerequisites:

Environmental Science and Environmental Studies majors and minors only with junior standing.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Application of the principles and techniques of environmental science or studies to a specific environmental problem through a local internship placement of 10 hours per week (minimum) for 12 weeks. Typically, this experience will include literature research, classroom meetings, and field work in an off-campus environmental agency or NGO.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

Application of the principles and techniques of environmental science or studies to a specific environmental problem through a global internship placement of 10 hours per week (minimum) for 12 weeks. Typically, this experience will include literature research, classroom meetings, and field work in an off-campus environmental agency or NGO.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

This is an independent study in environmental studies. Topics will vary.

Prerequisites:

An independent study form must be submitted to the CAS Dean's Office.

Credits:

1.00- 4.00

Description:

This is an independent study in environmental studies. Topics will vary.

Prerequisites:

Environmental Studies or Environmental Science major or minor with junior standing

Credits:

1.00

Description:

Analyzes students' interests, skills, values, and experiences in the context of career planning for the environmental fields. Provides understanding of how to present professional accomplishments, conduct a job search, or prepare for graduate work.

Prerequisites:

Grade point average 3.0 overall, 3.4 in major; completion of a minimum of 8 credits in courses that are part of the Environmental Studies major at Suffolk University; consent of instructor.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Individual program of reading, research, writing on an approved topic under the supervision of a member of the CUES Honors Advisory Committee, for CUES majors who are candidates for honors in a CUES major and who wish to prepare a thesis for submission to the honors committee. Must normally be taken in the senior year.

Prerequisites:

UES majors only and instructor consent required. Students must have overall GPA of 3.5 or above, or 3.5 GPA in major.

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Individual program of reading, research, writing on an approved topic under the supervision of a member of the CUES Honors Advisory Committee, for CUES majors who are candidates for honors in a CUES major and who wish to prepare a thesis for submission to the honors committee. Must normally be taken in the senior year.