Finance

The Finance Department prepares students for professional careers in global financial services industries. Teaching is oriented towards both theoretical concepts and practical knowledge.

Finance Major

Learn more about this major

Finance Major Requirements

Finance majors study financial management and emerging trends in the finance field. Students are exposed to the theory and practice in corporate finance, financial institutions, investments, international finance, financial planning, insurance, real estate and other related areas. The finance major provides students with important analytical tools and practical skills necessary for managing portfolios of securities, analyzing corporate investment and financing decisions, and controlling and planning the flow of funds within an enterprise.

The BSBA in Finance requires completion of a minimum of 21 credit hours in finance. A cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in the finance major and a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 overall must be maintained to graduate. Students may choose to specialize in one of four concentration areas–Investments, Corporate Finance, Financial Institutions, or Financial Planning.

Choosing a concentration is optional.

Finance Required Courses (4 courses, 12 credits)

 

Prerequisites:

FIN-200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Intermediate Finance expands on basic financial concepts and introduces more advanced topics. Material emphasizes solutions to problems of capital structure, investment and financing. Other major topics include distribution policy, working capital management, derivative corporate securities, and corporate restructuring.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the investment of funds by individuals and institutions. Focuses on analysis of investments and security markets, and the mechanics of trading and investing. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, futures, and options.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the financing, investment and working capital management process of multinational corporations, considering such variables as exchange risk, political risk, accounting regulations and tax laws.

Prerequisites:

FIN 311; Two FIN major required or elective courses; Senior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth study of current finance theory and methodology applicable to the firm through case analyses, computer work and recent publications. It is a capstone course where students learn how to integrate financial theories and principles to reach optimal financial decisions in practice.

Elective Courses (3 courses, 9 credits)

Choose three (3) from the following:

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course includes the theory, practice and problems of risk bearing in business and personal pursuits including life, property and casualty insurance and dealing with contract analysis and investments as well as corporate risk management.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course focuses primarily on real estate investment and many different approaches are discussed. The course examines related areas of law, finance, insurance, taxation, appraisal and brokerage.

Prerequisites:

EC 101; EC 102; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers characteristics, structure and function of money and capital markets with a focus on the recent events relating to financial markets and their impact on the corporate financing behavior and the interrelationship among the various financial markets. Also, each type of financial institution and its internationalization are discussed.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to expose the student to the wide range of financial planning tools and techniques available today to the professional financial planner as well as to the individual. By the end of the course the student should be able to construct a sensible and workable financial plan for a "client."

Prerequisites:

FIN-315

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to fixed income securities and related capital markets. It covers such topics as bond valuation, bond portfolio management, Treasury securities and markets, fixed income derivatives, mortgage- and asset-backed securities, and convertible bonds. As a part of their studies, students will be trained in using Bloomberg terminal and will receive Bloomberg certification upon completion of this course.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is focused on the security analysis of stocks with the goal of managing the Suffolk University student-run portfolio. The material is pertinent to the security analyst - particularly the equity analyst who must issue a buy, hold or sell recommendations on stocks. By the end of the course, the student should feel competent in writing a thorough, credible equity research report or investment analysis that meets the highest standards of professionalism.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. It is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of a business entity. It also covers comparative financial statements and trend and ratio analysis.

Prerequisites:

FIN 315; Junior standing;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth analysis of derivatives: futures, options, and swaps. The course explains why these securities exist, where and how they are traded, how to employ them in managing risk, and how to accurately price them. It also covers the use of these derivatives in the context hedging or speculation.

Prerequisites:

FIN 315, Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an advanced course in investment analysis stressing efficient frontier and diversification. Also studies portfolio construction and management, and the tradeoff of risk versus return.

Prerequisites:

FIN 311 or permission of instructor, Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course develops the practical techniques and decision rules in the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects. Teaching is oriented towards discussion of readings and case studies. Readings should provide students with understanding of capital budgeting techniques, and case studies should allow them to apply the techniques to real-world problems with the help of the computer.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an introduction to estate planning, including a discussion of wills, intestacy, and tax consequences of estate planning techniques. The course will prepare students to discuss the necessity, objectives and techniques of estate planning with clients. It will introduce students to the consequences of intestacy and the uses of wills. Additionally, students will learn the basic concepts of the federal estate, gift and income tax rules that apply to certain estate plans and how to use them for the benefit of clients.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines financial planning for retirement and presents a comprehensive process for doing such a planning. Among the main topics covered are setting financial objectives for retirement, planning for adequate retirement income, social security and other governmental benefits, understanding qualified and non- qualified plans, pre- and post-retirement investment planning, planning for long-term care, and planning for incapacity.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course focuses on concepts and basic tools for identifying, measuring, and managing risks, such as interest rate risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, market risk and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing; SBS Honors or 3.2 GPA or higher

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course analyzes the origins and consequences of the current financial situation from a variety of different economic and political perspectives. It offers students the opportunity to explore the chain of events that preceded the global financial crisis, monitor markets on a real-time basis (using Bloomberg) and provides a forum to discuss solutions and independently generate ideas. Among the main topics covered are asset pricing, derivative securities, financial engineering, risk management and the role of financial institutions, central banks and government agencies in global markets.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315 and Junior standing; Restricted to SBS Honors, or GPA 3.2 or higher.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course will augment and extend students' finance skills, tools and concepts learned in core finance and investment courses and blend the theory with real world application. The course utilizes the Chartered Financial Analyst Institute Investment Series textbook to facilitate the mastery of quantitative methods, data analytics and their application in today's investment process for stocks, bonds, futures and options. In addition to review of time value of money, discounted cash flow and statistical/probability analysis, the course will cover advanced concepts such as correlation and regression and their real world application in finance and investments. An important part of the course will be the ability to distinguish useful information from the overwhelming quantity of available data. Additional topics will include valuation methods/models, quantitative investment strategies, technical analysis, trading strategies & execution of transactions, quantitative/algorithmic & high frequency trading. Material will be reinforced with hands-on application of utilizing real time trading and market data platforms. Microsoft Excel, applications utilized in the financial industry, statistical/mathematical and programming platforms will be used extensively throughout the course. Guest speakers will be scheduled to speak about certain topics and their experiences.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the mutual fund industry and its evolution into the brokerage business. The course focuses on developing this foundation knowledge through classroom discussions and case analysis with guest experts in the various aspects of mutual funds.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines professional issues in financial planning, including ethical considerations, regulation and certification requirements, written communication skills, and professional responsibility. Students are expected to utilize skills obtained in other courses and work experiences in the completion of a comprehensive personal finance case, other mini-case studies, and calculation templates.

Prerequisites:

instructor's (full time), chair's, dean's approval

Credits:

1.00- 6.00

Description:

Independent study allows students to expand their classroom experience by completing research in an area of interest not already covered by Suffolk courses. The student designs a unique project and finds a full-time faculty member with expertise in that topic who agrees to sponsor it and provide feedback as the proposal is refined. A well designed and executed research project broadens and/or deepens learning in a major or minor area of study and may also enhance a student's marketability to potential future employers. Students cannot register for an Independent Study until a full proposal is approved by the faculty sponsor, department chair, and academic dean. Many Independent study proposals require revisions before approval is granted; even with revisions independent study approval is NOT guaranteed. Students are strongly encouraged to submit a proposal in enough time to register for a different course if the proposal is not accepted. For complete instructions, see the SBS Independent/Directed Study Agreement and Proposal form available online.

Required Experiential Component (Non-Credit)

Finance majors must complete 150 hours of pre-professional finance experience prior to graduating. Experience may be acquired through an internship, part- or full-time employment, or cooperative education. Students must register for FIN 560, Finance Practicum, during or immediately before the semester in which they complete the required 150 hours. The experiential component carries no academic credit, nor requires any tuition, and will be graded pass/fail. Approval of this experience must be obtained from the Finance Department.

Prerequisites:

Must obtain approval from FIN dept

Credits:

0.00

Description:

Required of all Finance majors. Majors will have an approved 150 hours of finance experience. Experience may be acquired through internship, part- or full-time employment or cooperative education. Zero Credit

Accelerated Degrees

If you’re earning an undergraduate business degree at Suffolk or another U.S. institution, you may qualify to earn both your Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in just 5 years.

Learning Goals & Objectives

Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.

Learning Goals
Learning Objectives
Students will… Upon completion of the program, each student should be able to...
Understand ethical aspects of decision making in a finance context.
  • Understand basic structure of ethical arguments (Utilitarian, Economic, Legal, Kantian) and the relation to financial decisions.
  • Identify conflicts of interests and pressures that could lead to unethical financial conduct.
  • Understand what kinds of questions are helpful to ask oneself when confronting a financial ethical dilemma.
  • Understand that what is legal may not always be ethical and that what is ethical may sometimes not be legal.
  • Appreciate that ethical norms vary across different countries and cultures.
  • Demonstrate overall awareness of ethical issues as they relate to business practices.
Demonstrate global awareness of financial issues.
  • Articulate fundamental challenges in global business or investment.
  • Understand the difference in approach to purely domestic vs. global business or investment.
  • Incorporate risk analysis into global business or investment decisions.
  • Understand the expected consequences of the suggested solution in a global environment.
  • Demonstrate overall global competency.
Exhibit an ability to apply Finance concepts to financial management problems.
  • Identify the current problem.
  • Correctly determine the necessary technical skills for problem-solving.
  • Correctly perform the technical skills in problem-solving.
  • Understand how to interpret the results.
  • Demonstrate overall technical efficiency in problem solving.

Finance Minors

Learn more about this minor

Finance Minor for Business Students (3 courses, 9 credits)

Select three (3) from the following courses beyond completion of FIN 200:

Prerequisites:

FIN-200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Intermediate Finance expands on basic financial concepts and introduces more advanced topics. Material emphasizes solutions to problems of capital structure, investment and financing. Other major topics include distribution policy, working capital management, derivative corporate securities, and corporate restructuring.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course includes the theory, practice and problems of risk bearing in business and personal pursuits including life, property and casualty insurance and dealing with contract analysis and investments as well as corporate risk management.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the investment of funds by individuals and institutions. Focuses on analysis of investments and security markets, and the mechanics of trading and investing. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, futures, and options.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course focuses primarily on real estate investment and many different approaches are discussed. The course examines related areas of law, finance, insurance, taxation, appraisal and brokerage.

Prerequisites:

EC 101; EC 102; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers characteristics, structure and function of money and capital markets with a focus on the recent events relating to financial markets and their impact on the corporate financing behavior and the interrelationship among the various financial markets. Also, each type of financial institution and its internationalization are discussed.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to expose the student to the wide range of financial planning tools and techniques available today to the professional financial planner as well as to the individual. By the end of the course the student should be able to construct a sensible and workable financial plan for a "client."

Prerequisites:

FIN-315

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to fixed income securities and related capital markets. It covers such topics as bond valuation, bond portfolio management, Treasury securities and markets, fixed income derivatives, mortgage- and asset-backed securities, and convertible bonds. As a part of their studies, students will be trained in using Bloomberg terminal and will receive Bloomberg certification upon completion of this course.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is focused on the security analysis of stocks with the goal of managing the Suffolk University student-run portfolio. The material is pertinent to the security analyst - particularly the equity analyst who must issue a buy, hold or sell recommendations on stocks. By the end of the course, the student should feel competent in writing a thorough, credible equity research report or investment analysis that meets the highest standards of professionalism.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. It is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of a business entity. It also covers comparative financial statements and trend and ratio analysis.

Prerequisites:

FIN 315; Junior standing;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth analysis of derivatives: futures, options, and swaps. The course explains why these securities exist, where and how they are traded, how to employ them in managing risk, and how to accurately price them. It also covers the use of these derivatives in the context hedging or speculation.

Prerequisites:

FIN 315, Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an advanced course in investment analysis stressing efficient frontier and diversification. Also studies portfolio construction and management, and the tradeoff of risk versus return.

Prerequisites:

FIN 311 or permission of instructor, Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course develops the practical techniques and decision rules in the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects. Teaching is oriented towards discussion of readings and case studies. Readings should provide students with understanding of capital budgeting techniques, and case studies should allow them to apply the techniques to real-world problems with the help of the computer.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the financing, investment and working capital management process of multinational corporations, considering such variables as exchange risk, political risk, accounting regulations and tax laws.

Prerequisites:

FIN 311; Two FIN major required or elective courses; Senior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth study of current finance theory and methodology applicable to the firm through case analyses, computer work and recent publications. It is a capstone course where students learn how to integrate financial theories and principles to reach optimal financial decisions in practice.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an introduction to estate planning, including a discussion of wills, intestacy, and tax consequences of estate planning techniques. The course will prepare students to discuss the necessity, objectives and techniques of estate planning with clients. It will introduce students to the consequences of intestacy and the uses of wills. Additionally, students will learn the basic concepts of the federal estate, gift and income tax rules that apply to certain estate plans and how to use them for the benefit of clients.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines financial planning for retirement and presents a comprehensive process for doing such a planning. Among the main topics covered are setting financial objectives for retirement, planning for adequate retirement income, social security and other governmental benefits, understanding qualified and non- qualified plans, pre- and post-retirement investment planning, planning for long-term care, and planning for incapacity.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course focuses on concepts and basic tools for identifying, measuring, and managing risks, such as interest rate risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, market risk and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing; SBS Honors or 3.2 GPA or higher

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course analyzes the origins and consequences of the current financial situation from a variety of different economic and political perspectives. It offers students the opportunity to explore the chain of events that preceded the global financial crisis, monitor markets on a real-time basis (using Bloomberg) and provides a forum to discuss solutions and independently generate ideas. Among the main topics covered are asset pricing, derivative securities, financial engineering, risk management and the role of financial institutions, central banks and government agencies in global markets.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315 and Junior standing; Restricted to SBS Honors, or GPA 3.2 or higher.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course will augment and extend students' finance skills, tools and concepts learned in core finance and investment courses and blend the theory with real world application. The course utilizes the Chartered Financial Analyst Institute Investment Series textbook to facilitate the mastery of quantitative methods, data analytics and their application in today's investment process for stocks, bonds, futures and options. In addition to review of time value of money, discounted cash flow and statistical/probability analysis, the course will cover advanced concepts such as correlation and regression and their real world application in finance and investments. An important part of the course will be the ability to distinguish useful information from the overwhelming quantity of available data. Additional topics will include valuation methods/models, quantitative investment strategies, technical analysis, trading strategies & execution of transactions, quantitative/algorithmic & high frequency trading. Material will be reinforced with hands-on application of utilizing real time trading and market data platforms. Microsoft Excel, applications utilized in the financial industry, statistical/mathematical and programming platforms will be used extensively throughout the course. Guest speakers will be scheduled to speak about certain topics and their experiences.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the mutual fund industry and its evolution into the brokerage business. The course focuses on developing this foundation knowledge through classroom discussions and case analysis with guest experts in the various aspects of mutual funds.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines professional issues in financial planning, including ethical considerations, regulation and certification requirements, written communication skills, and professional responsibility. Students are expected to utilize skills obtained in other courses and work experiences in the completion of a comprehensive personal finance case, other mini-case studies, and calculation templates.

Finance Minor for College of Arts & Sciences Students (4 courses, 12 credits)

CAS students are required to take FIN 200 Business Finance and three (3) of the following courses:

Prerequisites:

FIN-200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Intermediate Finance expands on basic financial concepts and introduces more advanced topics. Material emphasizes solutions to problems of capital structure, investment and financing. Other major topics include distribution policy, working capital management, derivative corporate securities, and corporate restructuring.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course includes the theory, practice and problems of risk bearing in business and personal pursuits including life, property and casualty insurance and dealing with contract analysis and investments as well as corporate risk management.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the investment of funds by individuals and institutions. Focuses on analysis of investments and security markets, and the mechanics of trading and investing. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, futures, and options.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course focuses primarily on real estate investment and many different approaches are discussed. The course examines related areas of law, finance, insurance, taxation, appraisal and brokerage.

Prerequisites:

EC 101; EC 102; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers characteristics, structure and function of money and capital markets with a focus on the recent events relating to financial markets and their impact on the corporate financing behavior and the interrelationship among the various financial markets. Also, each type of financial institution and its internationalization are discussed.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to expose the student to the wide range of financial planning tools and techniques available today to the professional financial planner as well as to the individual. By the end of the course the student should be able to construct a sensible and workable financial plan for a "client."

Prerequisites:

FIN-315

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to fixed income securities and related capital markets. It covers such topics as bond valuation, bond portfolio management, Treasury securities and markets, fixed income derivatives, mortgage- and asset-backed securities, and convertible bonds. As a part of their studies, students will be trained in using Bloomberg terminal and will receive Bloomberg certification upon completion of this course.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is focused on the security analysis of stocks with the goal of managing the Suffolk University student-run portfolio. The material is pertinent to the security analyst - particularly the equity analyst who must issue a buy, hold or sell recommendations on stocks. By the end of the course, the student should feel competent in writing a thorough, credible equity research report or investment analysis that meets the highest standards of professionalism.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. It is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of a business entity. It also covers comparative financial statements and trend and ratio analysis.

Prerequisites:

FIN 315; Junior standing;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth analysis of derivatives: futures, options, and swaps. The course explains why these securities exist, where and how they are traded, how to employ them in managing risk, and how to accurately price them. It also covers the use of these derivatives in the context hedging or speculation.

Prerequisites:

FIN 315, Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an advanced course in investment analysis stressing efficient frontier and diversification. Also studies portfolio construction and management, and the tradeoff of risk versus return.

Prerequisites:

FIN 311 or permission of instructor, Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course develops the practical techniques and decision rules in the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects. Teaching is oriented towards discussion of readings and case studies. Readings should provide students with understanding of capital budgeting techniques, and case studies should allow them to apply the techniques to real-world problems with the help of the computer.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the financing, investment and working capital management process of multinational corporations, considering such variables as exchange risk, political risk, accounting regulations and tax laws.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an introduction to estate planning, including a discussion of wills, intestacy, and tax consequences of estate planning techniques. The course will prepare students to discuss the necessity, objectives and techniques of estate planning with clients. It will introduce students to the consequences of intestacy and the uses of wills. Additionally, students will learn the basic concepts of the federal estate, gift and income tax rules that apply to certain estate plans and how to use them for the benefit of clients.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines financial planning for retirement and presents a comprehensive process for doing such a planning. Among the main topics covered are setting financial objectives for retirement, planning for adequate retirement income, social security and other governmental benefits, understanding qualified and non- qualified plans, pre- and post-retirement investment planning, planning for long-term care, and planning for incapacity.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course focuses on concepts and basic tools for identifying, measuring, and managing risks, such as interest rate risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, market risk and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing; SBS Honors or 3.2 GPA or higher

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course analyzes the origins and consequences of the current financial situation from a variety of different economic and political perspectives. It offers students the opportunity to explore the chain of events that preceded the global financial crisis, monitor markets on a real-time basis (using Bloomberg) and provides a forum to discuss solutions and independently generate ideas. Among the main topics covered are asset pricing, derivative securities, financial engineering, risk management and the role of financial institutions, central banks and government agencies in global markets.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315 and Junior standing; Restricted to SBS Honors, or GPA 3.2 or higher.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course will augment and extend students' finance skills, tools and concepts learned in core finance and investment courses and blend the theory with real world application. The course utilizes the Chartered Financial Analyst Institute Investment Series textbook to facilitate the mastery of quantitative methods, data analytics and their application in today's investment process for stocks, bonds, futures and options. In addition to review of time value of money, discounted cash flow and statistical/probability analysis, the course will cover advanced concepts such as correlation and regression and their real world application in finance and investments. An important part of the course will be the ability to distinguish useful information from the overwhelming quantity of available data. Additional topics will include valuation methods/models, quantitative investment strategies, technical analysis, trading strategies & execution of transactions, quantitative/algorithmic & high frequency trading. Material will be reinforced with hands-on application of utilizing real time trading and market data platforms. Microsoft Excel, applications utilized in the financial industry, statistical/mathematical and programming platforms will be used extensively throughout the course. Guest speakers will be scheduled to speak about certain topics and their experiences.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the mutual fund industry and its evolution into the brokerage business. The course focuses on developing this foundation knowledge through classroom discussions and case analysis with guest experts in the various aspects of mutual funds.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines professional issues in financial planning, including ethical considerations, regulation and certification requirements, written communication skills, and professional responsibility. Students are expected to utilize skills obtained in other courses and work experiences in the completion of a comprehensive personal finance case, other mini-case studies, and calculation templates.

Investments Minor (3 courses, 9 credits)

Required courses:

Prerequisites:

FIN 315; Junior standing;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth analysis of derivatives: futures, options, and swaps. The course explains why these securities exist, where and how they are traded, how to employ them in managing risk, and how to accurately price them. It also covers the use of these derivatives in the context hedging or speculation.

Prerequisites:

FIN 315, Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an advanced course in investment analysis stressing efficient frontier and diversification. Also studies portfolio construction and management, and the tradeoff of risk versus return.

Choose one (1);

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course focuses primarily on real estate investment and many different approaches are discussed. The course examines related areas of law, finance, insurance, taxation, appraisal and brokerage.

Prerequisites:

EC 101; EC 102; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers characteristics, structure and function of money and capital markets with a focus on the recent events relating to financial markets and their impact on the corporate financing behavior and the interrelationship among the various financial markets. Also, each type of financial institution and its internationalization are discussed.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to fixed income securities and related capital markets. It covers such topics as bond valuation, bond portfolio management, Treasury securities and markets, fixed income derivatives, mortgage- and asset-backed securities, and convertible bonds. As a part of their studies, students will be trained in using Bloomberg terminal and will receive Bloomberg certification upon completion of this course.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is focused on the security analysis of stocks with the goal of managing the Suffolk University student-run portfolio. The material is pertinent to the security analyst - particularly the equity analyst who must issue a buy, hold or sell recommendations on stocks. By the end of the course, the student should feel competent in writing a thorough, credible equity research report or investment analysis that meets the highest standards of professionalism.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. It is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of a business entity. It also covers comparative financial statements and trend and ratio analysis.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the mutual fund industry and its evolution into the brokerage business. The course focuses on developing this foundation knowledge through classroom discussions and case analysis with guest experts in the various aspects of mutual funds.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315 and Junior standing; Restricted to SBS Honors, or GPA 3.2 or higher.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course will augment and extend students' finance skills, tools and concepts learned in core finance and investment courses and blend the theory with real world application. The course utilizes the Chartered Financial Analyst Institute Investment Series textbook to facilitate the mastery of quantitative methods, data analytics and their application in today's investment process for stocks, bonds, futures and options. In addition to review of time value of money, discounted cash flow and statistical/probability analysis, the course will cover advanced concepts such as correlation and regression and their real world application in finance and investments. An important part of the course will be the ability to distinguish useful information from the overwhelming quantity of available data. Additional topics will include valuation methods/models, quantitative investment strategies, technical analysis, trading strategies & execution of transactions, quantitative/algorithmic & high frequency trading. Material will be reinforced with hands-on application of utilizing real time trading and market data platforms. Microsoft Excel, applications utilized in the financial industry, statistical/mathematical and programming platforms will be used extensively throughout the course. Guest speakers will be scheduled to speak about certain topics and their experiences.

Corporate Finance Minor (3 courses, 9 credits)

Required courses:

Prerequisites:

FIN-200; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. It is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of a business entity. It also covers comparative financial statements and trend and ratio analysis.

Prerequisites:

FIN 311 or permission of instructor, Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course develops the practical techniques and decision rules in the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects. Teaching is oriented towards discussion of readings and case studies. Readings should provide students with understanding of capital budgeting techniques, and case studies should allow them to apply the techniques to real-world problems with the help of the computer.

 

Choose One (1):

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course focuses primarily on real estate investment and many different approaches are discussed. The course examines related areas of law, finance, insurance, taxation, appraisal and brokerage.

Prerequisites:

FIN 315; Junior standing;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth analysis of derivatives: futures, options, and swaps. The course explains why these securities exist, where and how they are traded, how to employ them in managing risk, and how to accurately price them. It also covers the use of these derivatives in the context hedging or speculation.

Financial Institutions Minor (3 courses, 9 credits)

Required courses:

Prerequisites:

EC 101; EC 102; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers characteristics, structure and function of money and capital markets with a focus on the recent events relating to financial markets and their impact on the corporate financing behavior and the interrelationship among the various financial markets. Also, each type of financial institution and its internationalization are discussed.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course focuses on concepts and basic tools for identifying, measuring, and managing risks, such as interest rate risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, market risk and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

 

Choose one (1):

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course includes the theory, practice and problems of risk bearing in business and personal pursuits including life, property and casualty insurance and dealing with contract analysis and investments as well as corporate risk management.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the mutual fund industry and its evolution into the brokerage business. The course focuses on developing this foundation knowledge through classroom discussions and case analysis with guest experts in the various aspects of mutual funds.

 

Finance Concentrations

Finance Concentrations

Finance majors may choose to specialize in one of four (4) areas. All majors complete the four (4) required core courses (FIN 311, FIN 315, FIN 417 and FIN 419) as well as the required Finance Practicum, FIN 560. In addition to these requirements, finance majors who choose to specialize follow the instructions for their area of interest.

Investments

Required courses:

Prerequisites:

FIN 315; Junior standing;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth analysis of derivatives: futures, options, and swaps. The course explains why these securities exist, where and how they are traded, how to employ them in managing risk, and how to accurately price them. It also covers the use of these derivatives in the context hedging or speculation.

Prerequisites:

FIN 315, Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an advanced course in investment analysis stressing efficient frontier and diversification. Also studies portfolio construction and management, and the tradeoff of risk versus return.

Choose one (1):

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course focuses primarily on real estate investment and many different approaches are discussed. The course examines related areas of law, finance, insurance, taxation, appraisal and brokerage.

Prerequisites:

EC 101; EC 102; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers characteristics, structure and function of money and capital markets with a focus on the recent events relating to financial markets and their impact on the corporate financing behavior and the interrelationship among the various financial markets. Also, each type of financial institution and its internationalization are discussed.

Prerequisites:

FIN 311; Two FIN major required or elective courses; Senior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth study of current finance theory and methodology applicable to the firm through case analyses, computer work and recent publications. It is a capstone course where students learn how to integrate financial theories and principles to reach optimal financial decisions in practice.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to fixed income securities and related capital markets. It covers such topics as bond valuation, bond portfolio management, Treasury securities and markets, fixed income derivatives, mortgage- and asset-backed securities, and convertible bonds. As a part of their studies, students will be trained in using Bloomberg terminal and will receive Bloomberg certification upon completion of this course.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is focused on the security analysis of stocks with the goal of managing the Suffolk University student-run portfolio. The material is pertinent to the security analyst - particularly the equity analyst who must issue a buy, hold or sell recommendations on stocks. By the end of the course, the student should feel competent in writing a thorough, credible equity research report or investment analysis that meets the highest standards of professionalism.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. It is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of a business entity. It also covers comparative financial statements and trend and ratio analysis.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the mutual fund industry and its evolution into the brokerage business. The course focuses on developing this foundation knowledge through classroom discussions and case analysis with guest experts in the various aspects of mutual funds.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315 and Junior standing; Restricted to SBS Honors, or GPA 3.2 or higher.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course will augment and extend students' finance skills, tools and concepts learned in core finance and investment courses and blend the theory with real world application. The course utilizes the Chartered Financial Analyst Institute Investment Series textbook to facilitate the mastery of quantitative methods, data analytics and their application in today's investment process for stocks, bonds, futures and options. In addition to review of time value of money, discounted cash flow and statistical/probability analysis, the course will cover advanced concepts such as correlation and regression and their real world application in finance and investments. An important part of the course will be the ability to distinguish useful information from the overwhelming quantity of available data. Additional topics will include valuation methods/models, quantitative investment strategies, technical analysis, trading strategies & execution of transactions, quantitative/algorithmic & high frequency trading. Material will be reinforced with hands-on application of utilizing real time trading and market data platforms. Microsoft Excel, applications utilized in the financial industry, statistical/mathematical and programming platforms will be used extensively throughout the course. Guest speakers will be scheduled to speak about certain topics and their experiences.

Corporate Finance

Required courses:

Prerequisites:

FIN-200; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. It is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of a business entity. It also covers comparative financial statements and trend and ratio analysis.

Prerequisites:

FIN 311 or permission of instructor, Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course develops the practical techniques and decision rules in the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects. Teaching is oriented towards discussion of readings and case studies. Readings should provide students with understanding of capital budgeting techniques, and case studies should allow them to apply the techniques to real-world problems with the help of the computer.

Choose one (1):

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course focuses primarily on real estate investment and many different approaches are discussed. The course examines related areas of law, finance, insurance, taxation, appraisal and brokerage.

Prerequisites:

FIN 315; Junior standing;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth analysis of derivatives: futures, options, and swaps. The course explains why these securities exist, where and how they are traded, how to employ them in managing risk, and how to accurately price them. It also covers the use of these derivatives in the context hedging or speculation.

Financial Institutions

Required courses:

Prerequisites:

EC 101; EC 102; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers characteristics, structure and function of money and capital markets with a focus on the recent events relating to financial markets and their impact on the corporate financing behavior and the interrelationship among the various financial markets. Also, each type of financial institution and its internationalization are discussed.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course focuses on concepts and basic tools for identifying, measuring, and managing risks, such as interest rate risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, market risk and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Choose one (1):

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course includes the theory, practice and problems of risk bearing in business and personal pursuits including life, property and casualty insurance and dealing with contract analysis and investments as well as corporate risk management.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the mutual fund industry and its evolution into the brokerage business. The course focuses on developing this foundation knowledge through classroom discussions and case analysis with guest experts in the various aspects of mutual funds.

Financial Planning

Financial Planning (FP) offers a valuable opportunity for students to pursue a career in financial planning. Financial planners analyze and provide advice on all areas of a person’s financial life: investment management, retirement planning, estate planning, income tax management and insurance. In most cases, financial planners’ analyses and recommendations are provided to clients in a written financial plan. The planner may then coordinate the implementation of the plan and periodically review it to account for changes in the client’s life and current economic conditions.

Finance majors who choose to specialize in Financial Planning complete all of the following requirements:

Prerequisites:

ACCT 202

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Focuses on the federal income taxation of individuals with some discussion of business taxation. Explores the basic structure of individual income taxation, including the individual tax formula, income, deductions, and credits, and provides an introduction to property transactions. Emphasizes how tax laws affect everyday personal and business decisions.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course includes the theory, practice and problems of risk bearing in business and personal pursuits including life, property and casualty insurance and dealing with contract analysis and investments as well as corporate risk management.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to expose the student to the wide range of financial planning tools and techniques available today to the professional financial planner as well as to the individual. By the end of the course the student should be able to construct a sensible and workable financial plan for a "client."

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an introduction to estate planning, including a discussion of wills, intestacy, and tax consequences of estate planning techniques. The course will prepare students to discuss the necessity, objectives and techniques of estate planning with clients. It will introduce students to the consequences of intestacy and the uses of wills. Additionally, students will learn the basic concepts of the federal estate, gift and income tax rules that apply to certain estate plans and how to use them for the benefit of clients.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines financial planning for retirement and presents a comprehensive process for doing such a planning. Among the main topics covered are setting financial objectives for retirement, planning for adequate retirement income, social security and other governmental benefits, understanding qualified and non- qualified plans, pre- and post-retirement investment planning, planning for long-term care, and planning for incapacity.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines professional issues in financial planning, including ethical considerations, regulation and certification requirements, written communication skills, and professional responsibility. Students are expected to utilize skills obtained in other courses and work experiences in the completion of a comprehensive personal finance case, other mini-case studies, and calculation templates.

The program was approved by the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) Board. Upon completion of the program, students are entitled to take the CFP exam administered by the CFP Board, which is an integral part of the prestigious CFP certification process.

More information about the CFP exam is available.

Finance Certificate in Financial Planning

Learn more about this certificate

Certificate Program in Financial Planning

This non-degree program is offered as a flexible and affordable program for working professionals whose responsibilities are currently or expected to be related to financial planning. This certificate program requires the completion of the following eight courses (provided that the students demonstrate proficiency in prerequisites) with a “pass” grade:

Prerequisites:

MATH 128 or higher; ACCT 201; STATS 240 or 250 (can take concurrently with FPP 200)

Credits:

Description:

This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focuses on basis financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

Credits:

Description:

This course includes the theory, practice and problems of risk-bearing in business and personal pursuit including life, property and casualty insurance and dealing with contract analysis and investments as well as corporate risk management.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

Credits:

Description:

This course covers the investment of funds by individuals and institutions. Focuses on analysis of investments and security markets, and the mechanics of trading and investing. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed including stocks, bonds,futures and options.

Prerequisites:

ACCT 202; take either FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

Credits:

Description:

A study of basic federal taxation as it applies to individuals, partnerships and corporations. Expertise in the preparation of tax returns is developed. Prerequisite: ACCT 202 MATH 134 OR MATH 161 OR MATH 165.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

Credits:

Description:

This course is designed to expose the student to the wide range of financial planning tools and techniques available today to the professional financial planner as well as to the individual. By the end of the course the student should be able to construct a sensible and workable financial plan for a client.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

Credits:

Description:

This course provides an introduction to estate planning, including a discussion of wills, intestacy, and tax consequences of estate planning techniques. The course will prepare students to discuss the necessity, objectives, and techniques of estate planning with clients. It will introduce students to the consequences of intestacy and the uses of wills. Additionally, students will learn the basic concepts of the federal estate, gift, and income tax rules that apply to certain estate plans and how to use them for the benefit of clients.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

Credits:

Description:

This course examines financial planning for retirement and presents a comprehensive process for doing such a planning. Among the main topics covered are setting financial objectives for retirement, planning for adequate retirement income, social security and other governmental benefits, understanding qualified and non- qualified plans, pre- and post-retirement investment planning, planning for long-term care, and planning for incapacity.

Prerequisites:

FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines professional issues in financial planning, including ethical considerations, regulation and certification requirements, written communication skills, and professional responsibility. Students are expected to utilize skills obtained in other courses and work experiences in the completion of a comprehensive personal finance case, other mini-case studies, and calculation templates.

It should be noted that FPP 200 is an introduction to finance. Its prerequisites are:

Prerequisites:

Math 128 or higher. REMINDER: STATS 240 is a required prerequisite MKT 220, FIN 200 and ISOM 201(prerequisite for ISOM 319)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Topics include: data presentation, measures of central locations and dispersion, probability and probability distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression models. The use of Excel and SPSS will be emphasized throughout the course. 1 term - 4 credits (4 hours per week). Normally offered each semester. STATS 240 satisfies the same requirements as STATS 250

 

or

Prerequisites:

MATH 128 or higher. REMINDER: STATS 250 is a required prerequisite MKT 220, FIN 200 and ISOM 201(prerequisite for ISOM 319)

Credits:

4.00

Description:

Application of statistical analysis to real-world business and economic problems. Topics include data presentation, descriptive statistics including measures of location and dispersion, introduction to probability, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions including binomial and normal distributions, sampling and sampling distributions, statistical inference including estimation and hypothesis testing, simple and multiple regression analysis. The use of computers is emphasized throughout the course. Normally offered each semester.

Prerequisites:

MATH-128 or higher and WRI-102 or WRI-H103 or SBS-220

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Introduces students to the accounting cycle, the financial statements, and the theory underlying accounting as information. Provides users of accounting information with a basic understanding of how to appraise and manage a business. Addresses current accounting topics, including relevant ethical and international issues found in the financial press.

Prerequisites:

MATH level 2, or Mathshop, or MATH-104

Credits:

4.00

Description:

From the ISBN on a book, to buying a car, from the size of small chips in a cell phone, to the size of the national debt, or just reading a graph in the daily newspaper, mathematics plays an important and vital role in countless areas of life and your future career and courses included. Mathematics is both an art and a tool created by humans. The common bond is a way of thinking and a way of reasoning to describe and solve problems of many types. This course uses the context of modern real life problems to introduce math needed for literacy and problem solving in contemporary life and work. It uses a minimal amount of algebra and focuses on math models, concepts and basic math manipulations. It encourages students to move from anxiety about math, to using formulas well, to thinking critically in the math context to use math to solve problems and pose new problems. Topics include scientific notation, basic financial math, linear, exponential and polynomial models and an introduction to probability. (Formerly Math 132)

*A Math course higher than MATH 128 is also acceptable.

*STATS 240 or STATS 250 can be taken concurrently with FPP 200.

These eight FPP courses cover the foundation topics required by the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) Board. Students may apply for admission in fall, spring, or summer sessions. Upon completion of this certificate program, the students are eligible to take the CFP exam administered by the CFP Board, which is an integral part of the prestigious CFP certification process. More information about the CFP exam is available.

Admission to the Certificate Program in Financial Planning requires a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution. Students applying for admission should contact the Undergraduate Admission Office at 617-573-8460, for more information. Those who have already taken the above courses from an accredited institution may waive a maximum of three (3) courses.

Gainful Employment Disclosure

Finance Undergraduate Courses

Finance Undergraduate Courses

Prerequisites:

ACCT-201, MATH-128 or higher, and STATS-240 or STATS-250 (can be taken concurrently with FIN-200); Sophomore standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focuses on basic financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation. Formally FIN 310.

Prerequisites:

ACCT-201, MATH-128 or higher, STATS-240 or STATS-250 (can be taken concurrently); Sophomore standing; SBS Honors or 3.2 GPA or higher

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focuses on basic financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation. Formally FIN 310.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course can be viewed as a "survival guide" or a "road map" to the universe of financial instruments available as well as the basic tools needed to make informed decisions. The course is intended to address the concerns of individuals in determining their financial needs and managing their financial resources. Finance 210 is a free elective only and may not be counted towards the finance major or minor.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Intermediate Finance expands on basic financial concepts and introduces more advanced topics. Material emphasizes solutions to problems of capital structure, investment and financing. Other major topics include distribution policy, working capital management, derivative corporate securities, and corporate restructuring.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200; Restricted to SBS Honors, or GPA 3.2 or higher.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

Intermediate Finance expands on basic financial concepts and introduces more advanced topics. Material emphasizes solutions to problems of capital structure, investment and financing. Other major topics include distribution policy, working capital management, derivative corporate securities, and corporate restructuring.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 (formerly FIN 310); Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course includes the theory, practice and problems of risk bearing in business and personal pursuits including life, property and casualty insurance and dealing with contract analysis and investments as well as corporate risk management.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the investment of funds by individuals and institutions. Focuses on analysis of investments and security markets, and the mechanics of trading and investing. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, futures, and options.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing; Restricted to SBS Honors, or GPA 3.2 or higher.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the investment of funds by individuals and institutions. Focuses on analysis of investments and security markets, and the mechanics of trading and investing. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed, including stocks, bonds, futures, and options.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course focuses primarily on real estate investment and many different approaches are discussed. The course examines related areas of law, finance, insurance, taxation, appraisal and brokerage.

Prerequisites:

EC 101; EC 102; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers characteristics, structure and function of money and capital markets with a focus on the recent events relating to financial markets and their impact on the corporate financing behavior and the interrelationship among the various financial markets. Also, each type of financial institution and its internationalization are discussed.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

Credits:

Description:

This course is designed to expose the student to the wide range of financial planning tools and techniques available today to the professional financial planner as well as to the individual. By the end of the course the student should be able to construct a sensible and workable financial plan for a client.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to fixed income securities and related capital markets. It covers such topics as bond valuation, bond portfolio management, Treasury securities and markets, fixed income derivatives, mortgage- and asset-backed securities, and convertible bonds. As a part of their studies, students will be trained in using Bloomberg terminal and will receive Bloomberg certification upon completion of this course.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is focused on the security analysis of stocks with the goal of managing the Suffolk University student-run portfolio. The material is pertinent to the security analyst - particularly the equity analyst who must issue a buy, hold or sell recommendations on stocks. By the end of the course, the student should feel competent in writing a thorough, credible equity research report or investment analysis that meets the highest standards of professionalism.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200; Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. It is designed to help investors and managers in their assessment of a business entity. It also covers comparative financial statements and trend and ratio analysis.

Prerequisites:

FIN 315; Junior standing;

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth analysis of derivatives: futures, options, and swaps. The course explains why these securities exist, where and how they are traded, how to employ them in managing risk, and how to accurately price them. It also covers the use of these derivatives in the context hedging or speculation.

Prerequisites:

FIN 315, Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an advanced course in investment analysis stressing efficient frontier and diversification. Also studies portfolio construction and management, and the tradeoff of risk versus return.

Prerequisites:

FIN 311 or permission of instructor, Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course develops the practical techniques and decision rules in the evaluation and selection of long-term investment projects. Teaching is oriented towards discussion of readings and case studies. Readings should provide students with understanding of capital budgeting techniques, and case studies should allow them to apply the techniques to real-world problems with the help of the computer.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course covers the financing, investment and working capital management process of multinational corporations, considering such variables as exchange risk, political risk, accounting regulations and tax laws.

Prerequisites:

FIN 311; Two FIN major required or elective courses; Senior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth study of current finance theory and methodology applicable to the firm through case analyses, computer work and recent publications. It is a capstone course where students learn how to integrate financial theories and principles to reach optimal financial decisions in practice.

Prerequisites:

FIN 311; Two FIN major required or elective courses; Senior standing; SBS Honors or 3.2 GPA or higher

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is an in-depth study of current finance theory and methodology applicable to the firm through case analyses, computer work and recent publications. It is a capstone course where students learn how to integrate financial theories and principles to reach optimal financial decisions in practice.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course provides an introduction to estate planning, including a discussion of wills, intestacy, and tax consequences of estate planning techniques. The course will prepare students to discuss the necessity, objectives and techniques of estate planning with clients. It will introduce students to the consequences of intestacy and the uses of wills. Additionally, students will learn the basic concepts of the federal estate, gift and income tax rules that apply to certain estate plans and how to use them for the benefit of clients.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines financial planning for retirement and presents a comprehensive process for doing such a planning. Among the main topics covered are setting financial objectives for retirement, planning for adequate retirement income, social security and other governmental benefits, understanding qualified and non- qualified plans, pre- and post-retirement investment planning, planning for long-term care, and planning for incapacity.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course introduces students to the management of international financial-services firms and methods through which financial institutions manage risk. The course focuses on concepts and basic tools for identifying, measuring, and managing risks, such as interest rate risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, market risk and operational risk. The course also introduces key regulations and important ethical issues in the financial-services industry.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing; SBS Honors or 3.2 GPA or higher

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course analyzes the origins and consequences of the current financial situation from a variety of different economic and political perspectives. It offers students the opportunity to explore the chain of events that preceded the global financial crisis, monitor markets on a real-time basis (using Bloomberg) and provides a forum to discuss solutions and independently generate ideas. Among the main topics covered are asset pricing, derivative securities, financial engineering, risk management and the role of financial institutions, central banks and government agencies in global markets.

Prerequisites:

FIN-315 and Junior standing; Restricted to SBS Honors, or GPA 3.2 or higher.

Credits:

3.00

Description:

The course will augment and extend students' finance skills, tools and concepts learned in core finance and investment courses and blend the theory with real world application. The course utilizes the Chartered Financial Analyst Institute Investment Series textbook to facilitate the mastery of quantitative methods, data analytics and their application in today's investment process for stocks, bonds, futures and options. In addition to review of time value of money, discounted cash flow and statistical/probability analysis, the course will cover advanced concepts such as correlation and regression and their real world application in finance and investments. An important part of the course will be the ability to distinguish useful information from the overwhelming quantity of available data. Additional topics will include valuation methods/models, quantitative investment strategies, technical analysis, trading strategies & execution of transactions, quantitative/algorithmic & high frequency trading. Material will be reinforced with hands-on application of utilizing real time trading and market data platforms. Microsoft Excel, applications utilized in the financial industry, statistical/mathematical and programming platforms will be used extensively throughout the course. Guest speakers will be scheduled to speak about certain topics and their experiences.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course introduces students to the mutual fund industry and its evolution into the brokerage business. The course focuses on developing this foundation knowledge through classroom discussions and case analysis with guest experts in the various aspects of mutual funds.

Prerequisites:

FIN-200

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines professional issues in financial planning, including ethical considerations, regulation and certification requirements, written communication skills, and professional responsibility. Students are expected to utilize skills obtained in other courses and work experiences in the completion of a comprehensive personal finance case, other mini-case studies, and calculation templates.

Prerequisites:

instructor's (full time), chair's, dean's approval

Credits:

1.00- 6.00

Description:

Independent study allows students to expand their classroom experience by completing research in an area of interest not already covered by Suffolk courses. The student designs a unique project and finds a full-time faculty member with expertise in that topic who agrees to sponsor it and provide feedback as the proposal is refined. A well designed and executed research project broadens and/or deepens learning in a major or minor area of study and may also enhance a student's marketability to potential future employers. Students cannot register for an Independent Study until a full proposal is approved by the faculty sponsor, department chair, and academic dean. Many Independent study proposals require revisions before approval is granted; even with revisions independent study approval is NOT guaranteed. Students are strongly encouraged to submit a proposal in enough time to register for a different course if the proposal is not accepted. For complete instructions, see the SBS Independent/Directed Study Agreement and Proposal form available online.

Prerequisites:

Must obtain approval from FIN dept

Credits:

0.00

Description:

Required of all Finance majors. Majors will have an approved 150 hours of finance experience. Experience may be acquired through internship, part- or full-time employment or cooperative education. Zero Credit

Prerequisites:

MATH 128 or higher; ACCT 201; STATS 240 or 250 (can take concurrently with FPP 200)

Credits:

Description:

This course is a study of the functions of business finance and focuses on basis financial principles such as time value of money, risk and return tradeoffs, and asset valuation.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

Credits:

Description:

This course includes the theory, practice and problems of risk-bearing in business and personal pursuit including life, property and casualty insurance and dealing with contract analysis and investments as well as corporate risk management.

Prerequisites:

ACCT 202; take either FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

Credits:

Description:

A study of basic federal taxation as it applies to individuals, partnerships and corporations. Expertise in the preparation of tax returns is developed. Prerequisite: ACCT 202 MATH 134 OR MATH 161 OR MATH 165.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200 and Junior standing

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course is designed to expose the student to the wide range of financial planning tools and techniques available today to the professional financial planner as well as to the individual. By the end of the course the student should be able to construct a sensible and workable financial plan for a "client."

Prerequisites:

FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

Credits:

Description:

This course covers the investment of funds by individuals and institutions. Focuses on analysis of investments and security markets, and the mechanics of trading and investing. A variety of investment vehicles are discussed including stocks, bonds,futures and options.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

Credits:

Description:

This course provides an introduction to estate planning, including a discussion of wills, intestacy, and tax consequences of estate planning techniques. The course will prepare students to discuss the necessity, objectives, and techniques of estate planning with clients. It will introduce students to the consequences of intestacy and the uses of wills. Additionally, students will learn the basic concepts of the federal estate, gift, and income tax rules that apply to certain estate plans and how to use them for the benefit of clients.

Prerequisites:

FIN 200(formerly FIN 310) or FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

Credits:

Description:

This course examines financial planning for retirement and presents a comprehensive process for doing such a planning. Among the main topics covered are setting financial objectives for retirement, planning for adequate retirement income, social security and other governmental benefits, understanding qualified and non- qualified plans, pre- and post-retirement investment planning, planning for long-term care, and planning for incapacity.

Prerequisites:

FPP 200(formerly FPP 310);

Credits:

3.00

Description:

This course examines professional issues in financial planning, including ethical considerations, regulation and certification requirements, written communication skills, and professional responsibility. Students are expected to utilize skills obtained in other courses and work experiences in the completion of a comprehensive personal finance case, other mini-case studies, and calculation templates.