Government

Government Major

Learn more about this major

Degree Requirements - 126 credits

Students can earn a bachelor of arts degree with this major.  See the requirements for the bachelor of arts degree.

Students can earn a bachelor of science degree with this major.  See the requirements for the bachelor of science degree.

Major Requirements: 11-12 courses, 41-45 credits

Core Requirements (4 courses, 13 credits)

Credits:

4

Description:

An introduction to the American political system and constitutional framework. Focus will be on the interplay of various institutions (the Presidency, Congress and the Judiciary) in creating public policies. Contemporary public issues will be discussed, as will the role of political theory in shaping American democracy. Attention will be given to the role of the news media, public opinion, political ideology, political parties and interest groups in the American system.

Credits:

4

Description:

Students learn to read, analyze, and conduct political science research as well as learning the steps to writing a research paper, including developing a research question, writing a literature review, selecting a research design, and properly citing sources. Students will develop an understanding of approaches to researching and measuring political phenomena.

Prerequisites:

Sophomore Standing GVT 110 and 120 and Math 128 or higher.

Credits:

4

Description:

Quantitative analysis is quickly changing the way we understand and engage in politics, how we implement policy, and how organizations across the world make decisions. In this course, we will learn the fundamental principles of statistical inference and develop the necessary programming skills to answer a wide range of political and policy oriented questions with data analysis. Who is most likely to win the upcoming presidential election? Do countries become less democratic when leaders are assassinated? Is there racial discrimination in the labor market? These are just a few of the questions we will work on in the course.

Prerequisites:

Senior status

Credits:

1

Description:

This course is designed to provide all Government degree-seeking students with a team-taught capstone experience. In this course, we will collectively discuss and consider career, professional and academic experience for the Government major, including learning more about the fields of public policy, public service, law, nonprofit management, international development, and nongovernmental organization management. This course focuses on career entry and transition, networking for career success, impression management concept and skills, and related life-long learning skills. Students articulate and reflect on academic, work, and co-curricular experiences from the perspective of professionals entering or advancing their careers. Pre-requisite: Senior standing.

Complete requirements for ONE of the four concentrations (7-8 courses, 28-32 credits):

  1. American Politics
  2. Public Policy and Law
  3. International Relations
  4. Political Theory

Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

Government Learning Goals & Objectives

Learning goals and objectives reflect the educational outcomes achieved by students through the completion of this program. These transferable skills prepare Suffolk students for success in the workplace, in graduate school, and in their local and global communities.

Learning Goals Learning Objectives
Students will...
Students will be able to...
Develop skills in using social science research methods to analyze social and political issues
  • Conduct research in the field of political science
  • Perform data analysis
  • Critically evaluate political science analytically
  • Clearly interpret and communicate, both in written and oral form, the results of the analysis
  • Acquire broad background knowledge in the field of political science through study of one of four sub-fields
  • Define political science as a discipline
  • Use a knowledge base of political science concepts to analyze public policy programs
  • Become informed, engaged citizens
  • Connect classroom learning with the experience of working in government, politics, or public affairs
  • Develop capacity to think critically about local, state, national, and global politics

  • Government Concentrations

    American Politics Concentration: 7 courses, 28 credits

    Introductory Concentration Requirement (1 course, 4 credits)

    Choose one of the following:

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Introduces the main actors, ideas, institutions, and processes that shape the international system. Analyzes key international developments, including imperialism, nationalism, the causes of wars and peace, and globalization. Integrates international relations concepts with history to explain the unprecedented levels of prosperity and violence in Europe, particularly in light of its dominant role in recent centuries. Emphasizes contemporary developments taking place in other regions such as Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Helps students understand the global arena as a space of complex interconnections and sets the foundations for other courses in international relations and regional studies. Normally offered every semester. This course sets the foundations for other courses in International Relations and Regional Studies

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    Introduces various approaches of comparative politics, such as institutionalism, structuralism, political culture, corporatism, state-society relationship, political economy, etc. Applies the different approaches to explain how various factors affect government institutions, sociopolitical and economic development in different societies. An effort is made to include countries from all regions of the world. Normally offered every semester.

    Advanced Concentration Requirements (3 courses, 12 credits)

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110 or GVT 120 or instructor's permission

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course will provide an examination of the institutions involved in the American policy-making process. The student will learn about the presidential system that exists in the United States. The course will focus on a relationship between the President and Congress and how that relationship impedes or facilitates the public policy process, including the budgetary process. The course will include a discussion of the president's role as head of the executive branch, and the implementation of congressional policies. Attention will be given to the role of the judiciary in the policy process. Normally offered every year.

    Prerequisites:

    GVT 110 or instructor's permission

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course examines the process and politics of agenda-setting and public policy formulation in the United States. The primary focus is on understanding the complex interaction between institutions and actors involved in public policy making at the federal level, although many of these observations are transferrable to other levels of government (state and local) and other political systems. Students will learn by doing as they become elected Members of Congress in a semester-long legislative simulation. Normally offered every fall.

    Credits:

    4

    Description:

    This course provides an introduction to the importance of written communication in the public discourse and in public decision-making. The course will examine some of the tools for producing relevant, useful material in the professional public policy analysis arena. The course will also study the various kinds of written communication the policy makers and advocates regularly utilize. The course also provides an introduction to the constraints that surround effective communication in public policymaking. Students will engage in drafting several different kinds of public policy analyses.

    Electives (3 courses, 12 credits)

    Choose three GVT electives, including internship options. Students are strongly encouraged, in consultation with their advisors, to select courses that provide a broad and balanced knowledge of American Politics.

      International Relations Concentration: 8 courses, 31-32 credits

      Students with a concentration in International Relations must earn the BA degree.

      Concentration Requirements (4 courses, 16 credits)

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Introduces the main actors, ideas, institutions, and processes that shape the international system. Analyzes key international developments, including imperialism, nationalism, the causes of wars and peace, and globalization. Integrates international relations concepts with history to explain the unprecedented levels of prosperity and violence in Europe, particularly in light of its dominant role in recent centuries. Emphasizes contemporary developments taking place in other regions such as Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Helps students understand the global arena as a space of complex interconnections and sets the foundations for other courses in international relations and regional studies. Normally offered every semester. This course sets the foundations for other courses in International Relations and Regional Studies

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Introduces various approaches of comparative politics, such as institutionalism, structuralism, political culture, corporatism, state-society relationship, political economy, etc. Applies the different approaches to explain how various factors affect government institutions, sociopolitical and economic development in different societies. An effort is made to include countries from all regions of the world. Normally offered every semester.

      Prerequisites:

      GVT 110, GVT 115, and GVT 120 or consent of instructor.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Review of major approaches to the study of international relations. Definition of concepts such as power, nationalism, imperialism, and dependency. Special attention to the use of force and conflict resolution. Special class project. Normally offered every year.

      Prerequisites:

      GVT 281 and GVT 261 or instructors consent

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course explores the main premises and approaches to study Global Political Economy. After analyzing the history and development of the international system, it studies how states and markets are interconnected in the creation and reform of economic and political international institutions in the globalization process. It also focuses on the most acute problems of the current international system in the area of IPE, namely, environmental degradation, external debt, poverty, increasing gap between rich and poor countries, and trade conflicts. Offered every year.

      Economics Requirement (1 course, 3-4 credits)

      Choose one Economics course (preferably Macroeconomics). These courses can be found on the Economics page in the Academic Catalog.

      Electives (3 courses, 12 credits)

      Choose three of the following:

      Prerequisites:

      Not open to freshmen

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the interaction between gender and globalization. It discusses the centrality of gender in international development by focusing on gender as one of the most critical factors that affect the success or the failure of globalization. Critically reviewing general theories of globalization, the course presents a historical overview of gender and development. It then explores selected topics: global restructuring and feminization of the labor force, gender in multinational corporations, gender and international migration, sex-tourism, AIDS, and the impact of the state, religion, and culture in creating social dislocations and inequalities. Finally, we will consider strategies of change and diverse forms of resistance by women. Offered as needed. Cultural Diversity B

      Prerequisites:

      GVT 281 and GVT 261

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the dynamic evolution of the debates on International Security as well as the transformations in the main global and regional security institutions such as UN and NATO. Based upon International Relations perspectives, it analyzes the traditional definitions of security at the national, regional and international levels of analysis since 1945. Likewise, it studies how states and international institutions have revisited the concepts, policies and strategies of security since the end of the Cold War and after the September 11 events, from realist perspectives to the Copenhagen School of security studies. Offered every year.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior status or higher

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course introduces the concept and practices of transitional justice, which addresses current and past human rights violations. We review the various mechanisms of transitional justice, including: criminal prosecution; lustrations; truth and reconciliation commissions; reparations; and apologies. Our focus will be on understanding the nature of the political and moral dilemmas encountered by countries that consider and apply these mechanisms. We will consider broad theoretical questions as well as specific examples (e.g., Germany after the Holocaust; The South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission; The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda). The course will also emphasize the practical implications of transitional justice: how do we empirically measure the effects of transitional justice; what is the role of traditional mechanisms of justice; how does one balance between the global human rights regime and local realities; what is the relationship between gender and religion and transitional justice; and, what is the role of transitional justice mechanisms in conflict resolution.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior status or higher, CAS Honors Program

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course introduces the concept and practices of transitional justice, which addresses current and past human rights violations. We review the various mechanisms of transitional justice, including: criminal prosecution; lustrations; truth and reconciliation commissions; reparations; and apologies. Our focus will be on understanding the nature of the political and moral dilemmas encountered by countries that consider and apply these mechanisms. We will consider broad theoretical questions as well as specific examples (e.g., Germany after the Holocaust; The South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission; The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda). The course will also emphasize the practical implications of transitional justice: how do we empirically measure the effects of transitional justice; what is the role of traditional mechanisms of justice; how does one balance between the global human rights regime and local realities; what is the relationship between gender and religion and transitional justice; and, what is the role of transitional justice mechanisms in conflict resolution.

      Prerequisites:

      Open to Juniors and Seniors

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      An analysis of the origins and the local, regional, and international dimensions of the Palestinian-Israeli-Arab conflict, this course will examine the conflict through the eyes of the major protagonists and the roles played by them from the early twentieth century to the present: Zionists/Israelis, Palestinians and other Arabs, British, Americans, Soviets. We will also explore the questions of why this conflict has captured the world's attention and why it has gone unresolved since World War II. Finally, we will examine the possibilities and attempts for resolution of what appears to be an intractable human tragedy.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This class examines the way in which national identity, global and regional economics and international development intersect. It uses the professionalization of the sport of hockey and its subsequent spread around the globe as its case. It will look at the rise of the pro game, the way in which it shapes national identity in the Canadian case, the way in which the pro business model has changed in response to broad socio-economic changes in North America and geo-political shifts around the globe, especially in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union.

      Prerequisites:

      GVT 281 and GVT 261

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      A decision-making approach to understanding the domestic and institutional context of U.S. foreign policy. Includes analysis of continuity and change since WWII using case studies of critical decisions, e.g., Korea, Cuba, Vietnam, etc. Not open to freshmen. Prerequisites: GVT 110, GVT 120, GVT 261 or instructor's consent. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course is designed to provide students with a basic grounding in political institutions and processes in contemporary Spain. Political developments are presented in their socio-economic context, with special emphasis on the Spanish transition from a dictatorship to a democracy. Attention is also given to the issue of the Basque and Catalan nationalism, as well as the process of European integration. Prerequisite: GVT 281 or instructor's consent. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years at the Madrid Campus.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This class will examine the political systems of the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom. It will look at the development of the Republic of Ireland from 1916 until the present paying particular attention to the role that the Irish Government has played in fostering economic development and social stability. It will further look at the country's relationships with the European Union and United States of America. The class will present Northern Ireland and the efforts to resolve the troubles there in as the nexus between these foreign relations, domestic politics in both countries and the relationship between the two of them. A key part of the class will be examining the way in which the British political system functions and is organized, paying particular attention to the multicultural and devolutionary policies that the UK government has enacted in the recent past. The impact that these changes in policy have had in resolving the conflict in Northern Ireland will be examined in depth.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Why did 17 European countries surrender the sovereign control of their currency and create the Euro? Will Turkey become a member of the European Union? Will Europeans continue free riding the security protection of the United States? Is the integration process another layer of bureaucracy or an institutional instrument to dean with the permanent crises in Europe? There are some of the questions guiding the discussions in the class.

      Prerequisites:

      GVT 110 and GVT 120

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      The political development of Africa in colonial and post-colonial periods. Analysis of the evolution of governmental institutions includes economic, social and personal factors; political forces at work in present day Africa.

      Prerequisites:

      Not open to freshmen.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Introduces the main political, economic, and social processes in South Asian countries. Provides with the understanding of the main regional trends and offers case studies of some of the political systems in the region. Applies the concepts and theories learned in the previous international relations, comparative politics courses and other social science courses. Topics include colonialism, religious/identity politics, democratization, economic development, ethnic conflict, terrorism, environmental protection, and human security. *On GVT 385, the original course description covers not only South Asian countries but also Western Asian ones too such as Afghanistan. When I taught the course I focused on South Asian countries, such as India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. Current political trends in the Caribbean and in selected Central American nations. Emphasis will be placed on comparative analysis of public policies in the region, as well as on external factors which impact on politics in the Caribbean and Central America. Students will use academic sources in their analysis, as well as novels and other literary sources for the background of their analysis.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Introduces China studies as a subfield of comparative politics. Covers topics such as history, political structure, communist revolution, political and economic development, authoritarian resilience, current issues, and foreign policy. Compares China with other countries in and outside of Asia.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior or Senior status required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the evolution of Latin America in the context of globalization. The first part analyzes the main political and economic trends of Latin America as a region, while the second presents the main challenges Mexico is facing today in the area of security. The third part moves forward into the detailed explanation of the transformations of the largest South American countries such as Colombia, Argentina, Chile and Venezuela, among others. The final section looks at the relationship between Latin America and the United States.

      Prerequisites:

      At least 54 credits required.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This class will examine the ways in which political marketing is conducted across the globe. It will look at a variety of political systems and cultures in an effort to discern which techniques work best with which political systems and political cultures. The cases will be drawn from all 7 continents and a wide diversity of socio-political cultures. Cases are likely to include Canada, New Zealand, India, Japan, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Argentina, Russia and many others. By the end of the class, students should have a strong sense of how political marketing is done globally and which techniques work best with which systems.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior Status required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Examines cultural and historic backgrounds, political systems, political and economic development, and international relations of countries in North and South East Asia. Provides with the understanding of the main regional trends and offers case studies of some of the political systems in the region. Applies the concepts and theories learned in the previous international relations, comparative politics courses and other social science courses. * I do not include specific country names to make the description flexible for changes. In my class, I cover countries such as China, North and South Korea, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Philippines, and Burma.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior Status required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      In the 20th century the general public became aware of the need for following a sustainable lifestyle. Non-governmental organizations, governmental institutions and individuals began to study environmental problems and issues to enhance the concept of conservation of nature and the protection of the planet's biodiversity among other important concepts. However, as we enter the 21st century, we are finding ourselves involved in new environmental threats such as increasingly disturbing natural disasters, eco-terrorism and endless extreme poverty. This course is aimed at learning the basic environmental aspects that affect society and nature as a whole, along with the new issues that are arising and leading scientists to continue new lines of research in the field of environmental conservation and awareness, knowing also that the key to hope lies in the field of environmental education. Offered on the Madrid Campus only.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior status or above

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course explains the main components of the international legal system. It begins by exploring the rules, principles and norms that govern the relationship among states, the different cultural and philosophical legal perspectives and the history of the international legal system. The second part of the course covers the study of the sources and subjects of the international law, the jurisdiction of states, the peaceful settlement of disputes, the use of force and the legal personality of international actors. The third part of the course addresses a number of significant topics derived from the process of globalization legal norms: human rights, humanitarian intervention, law of the sea, environmental law, and economic relations.

      Prerequisites:

      GVT-261 Junior Status required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course explores the institutional structures, political processes, and impact of international governmental and nongovernmental organizations. It analyzes their increasingly prominent role in efforts to resolve a wide range of global problems and contribution to strengthen the current system of global governance. While the course covers the problems of international security, global distribution of wealth, deterioration of the environmental system, and threats to social welfare, it focuses on the interaction between the United Nations System and regional organizations, on the one hand, and the role of non-governmental organizations in cooperating or competing to solve specific problems in the area of international relations.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior Status required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the intertwined nature of the globalization and regionalization processes from the perspective of global political economy. The first part of the course provides the basic elements and indicators to understand the main challenges the international economy is facing such as crisis, protectionism, and underdevelopment, inter alia. The second part presents the evolution of globalization and regionalism in the past decades. The third and final section compares how the distinct regions in the world are dealing with local and global problems; particularly attention is paid to the European Union, NAFTA, Mercosur and APEC.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior status

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      How do we explain the appearance or absence of social movements? What social or individual factors explain their development and decline? Who joins social movements? Who does not? Why? What ideas or ideals animate those who do participate? What is it like to be part of a social movement? What effect do they or have they had on politics, power and efforts at social change? These are some of the questions that have traditionally shaped debates over social movements, both domestically and internationally. They will form the analytical core of the work in this course. By critically evaluating several competing schools of thought in social movement theory and history we will attempt to highlight the social forces that have, at varying points in times, facilitated, maintained, as well as blocked the development of social movements in the US and beyond.

      Prerequisites:

      TAKE GVT-281 OR INSTRUCTOR'S CONSENT Junior Status required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Interlocking themes making the contemporary Middle East an area of chronic conflict: Big Power rivalries; social and political change within individual countries; unity and Arab rivalry involved in Arab nationalism; the Palestinian-Israeli-Arab dispute. Normally offered alternate years. Cultural Diversity B

      Prerequisites:

      Instructor's consent required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      A two-week intensive seminar in Washington DC; the first week will focus on a look inside the defense and intelligence community in the US government; the second week will examine issues, threats, and challenges in global society. The seminar, carried out in partnership with The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars, will include briefing sessions with security officials, site visits, small group meetings, keeping a journal, and academic papers. There will also be some further academic work after you return to Suffolk. Prerequisites: Registration in this course requires advance application. The seminar is offered in May, and applications are due by March 1. Interested students should consult the instructor for further details.

      Prerequisites:

      INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      APPROVAL OF DEPT. CHAIRPERSON. Specially arranged study trip to a foreign country for the purpose of obtaining knowledge through direct experience and observation. Includes prearranged site visits, meetings, required reading and written assignments. ECR

      Prerequisites:

      Instructor's consent

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course provides an introduction to the study of the role of the United Nations System in the globalization era. The course is divided in two main sections. The first is based on a series of readings, lectures and discussion on the rules, principles and norms which govern the relationship among states and the UN system; it also covers traditional topics such as the sources and subjects of international law, the jurisdiction of states, the peaceful settlement of disputes, the use of force and the legal personality of international actors, human rights, humanitarian intervention, global environment, used of armed forces, as well as economic relations. The second part of the course is based on a required study trip to the UN headquarters in order to experience a direct contact with policy-makers within the UN system in a diversity of areas such as security, aid and peacekeeping areas.

      Prerequisites:

      Government major, sophomore status. Applications to participate must be approved by the Instructor. It is the responsibility of students to arrange internship placements in advance of the course.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course is designed to enhance the academic learning students achieve in a substantive government, politics, issue advocacy, public policy or public administration related, supervised, internship that is concurrent with the seminar. Students will use their experiences in the internship of their choosing as a basis for reflection, analysis, skills and career development. Individual learning goals and objectives will be formulated for each student, based on their placement, interest and career goals. Internships must be a minimum of 120 hours in total and approved by the instructor in advance.

      Prerequisites:

      Sophomore standing and instructor's permission required

      Credits:

      12

      Description:

      A full-time, one-semester internship in Washington, D.C. Consult the Department office for more details. ECR

      Prerequisites:

      Sophomore standing and Instructor's permission required

      Credits:

      8

      Description:

      A full-time summer internship in Washington D.C. Consult the Department for more details. ECR

      Prerequisites:

      Concurrent enrollment in GVT 523 or GVT 524; sophomore standing; Instructor permission.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      ECR

      Prerequisites:

      Junior standing; GVT 528 & GVT 529 Concurrent; Instructor permission.

      Credits:

      8

      Description:

      A full-time, one-semester International Internship in London. Students must also complete academic work designed to enhance experiential learning and professional development in their internship abroad that is supervised by a Suffolk instructor. Course work will include developing individualized learning goals and objectives for their internships, journaling, mid-term self-evaluation and a final research paper.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior standing; GVT 528 & GVT 529 Concurrent; Instructor permission

      Credits:

      8

      Description:

      A full-time, one-semester International Internship in Brussels. Students must also complete academic work designed to enhance experiential learning and professional development in their internship abroad that is supervised by a Suffolk instructor. Course work will include developing individualized learning goals and objectives for their internships, journaling, mid-term self-evaluation and a final research paper.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior standing; GVT 528 & GVT 529 Concurrent; Instructor permission

      Credits:

      8

      Description:

      A full-time, one-semester International Internship in Edinburgh. Student must also complete academic work designed to enhance experiential learning and professional development in their internship abroad that is supervised by a Suffolk instructor. Course work will include developing individualized learning goals and objectives for their internships, journaling, mid-term self-evaluation and a final research paper.

      Prerequisites:

      Instructor consent required

      Credits:

      1.00-12.00

      Description:

      Internships and practicum in Government are available prior to the start of each semester. Offered Fall and Spring.

      Public Policy and Law Concentration: 7 courses, 28 credits

      Introductory Concentration Requirement (1 course, 4 credits)

      Choose one of the following:

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Introduces the main actors, ideas, institutions, and processes that shape the international system. Analyzes key international developments, including imperialism, nationalism, the causes of wars and peace, and globalization. Integrates international relations concepts with history to explain the unprecedented levels of prosperity and violence in Europe, particularly in light of its dominant role in recent centuries. Emphasizes contemporary developments taking place in other regions such as Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Helps students understand the global arena as a space of complex interconnections and sets the foundations for other courses in international relations and regional studies. Normally offered every semester. This course sets the foundations for other courses in International Relations and Regional Studies

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Introduces various approaches of comparative politics, such as institutionalism, structuralism, political culture, corporatism, state-society relationship, political economy, etc. Applies the different approaches to explain how various factors affect government institutions, sociopolitical and economic development in different societies. An effort is made to include countries from all regions of the world. Normally offered every semester.

      Advanced Concentration Requirements (4 courses, 16 credits)

      Prerequisites:

      GVT 110 or instructor's permission

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the process and politics of agenda-setting and public policy formulation in the United States. The primary focus is on understanding the complex interaction between institutions and actors involved in public policy making at the federal level, although many of these observations are transferrable to other levels of government (state and local) and other political systems. Students will learn by doing as they become elected Members of Congress in a semester-long legislative simulation. Normally offered every fall.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines a range of contemporary issues introducing students to the U.S. Constitution and the fundamental concepts of constitutional law. Students discuss and analyze topics including separation of powers, federalism, freedom of speech, the death penalty, gun control, and civil rights. We will explore current constitutional challenges and their relationship to law and society.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the public policy-making role of the court system and examines questions such as whether and how courts can spur political and social reform. The direct and secondary effects of key court decisions will be examined. Case studies may focus on issues like civil rights and pro-choice court cases and political activism. The course will also examine the basics of policy-related legal research.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course provides an introduction to the importance of written communication in the public discourse and in public decision-making. The course will examine some of the tools for producing relevant, useful material in the professional public policy analysis arena. The course will also study the various kinds of written communication the policy makers and advocates regularly utilize. The course also provides an introduction to the constraints that surround effective communication in public policymaking. Students will engage in drafting several different kinds of public policy analyses.

      Electives (2 courses, 8 credits)

      Choose two GVT electives, including internship options. Students are strongly encouraged, in consultation with their advisors, to select courses that provide a broad and balanced knowledge of Public Policy and Law.

      Political Theory Concentration: 7 courses, 28 credits

      Introductory Concentration Requirement (1 course, 4 credits)

      Choose one of the following:

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Introduces the main actors, ideas, institutions, and processes that shape the international system. Analyzes key international developments, including imperialism, nationalism, the causes of wars and peace, and globalization. Integrates international relations concepts with history to explain the unprecedented levels of prosperity and violence in Europe, particularly in light of its dominant role in recent centuries. Emphasizes contemporary developments taking place in other regions such as Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Helps students understand the global arena as a space of complex interconnections and sets the foundations for other courses in international relations and regional studies. Normally offered every semester. This course sets the foundations for other courses in International Relations and Regional Studies

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Introduces various approaches of comparative politics, such as institutionalism, structuralism, political culture, corporatism, state-society relationship, political economy, etc. Applies the different approaches to explain how various factors affect government institutions, sociopolitical and economic development in different societies. An effort is made to include countries from all regions of the world. Normally offered every semester.

      Advanced Concentration Requirements (2 courses, 8 credits)

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the political ideas of major thinkers of Western civilization, beginning with the ancient Greek philosophers and continuing through the 14th Century. Theorists studied (in English translation) include, among others, Plato, Aristotle, Thucydides, Cicero, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, and Christine de Pizan. One term, 4 semester hours.

      Prerequisites:

      Sophomore standing

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the political ides of the major thinkers of Western civilization from the time of Machiavelli to the present. Theorist studied (in English translation) include, among others, Machiavelli, Bodin, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Mill, Marx, Wollstonecraft, Beauvoir, and Dewey. One term, 4 semester hours. No Prerequisites.

      Concentration Electives (4 courses, 16 credits)

      Choose four of the following:

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      "This course explores the relationship between politics & religion in the United States. How and why does religion influence politics in the U.S? What does freedom of religion mean in the U.S.? Why do some groups today erroneously claim that the U.S. was founded as a ""Christian nation""? This course also examines what major world religions say about the status and responsibilities of the state and the roles that minority religious groups (Buddhism\"

      Prerequisites:

      open to juniors and seniors only

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Reading and discussion of original works by significant American political thinkers. Readings vary, but might include The Federalist and works by Paine, Jefferson, Calhoun, Thoreau, Sumner, Reed, Dewey, Lippman, Goodman, King, Malcolm X, Carmichael, Hamilton, Friedan and Dillinger. Offered every year.

      Prerequisites:

      Open to Juniors and Seniors only.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course focuses on those political thinkers, such as socialists, feminists, anarchists, pacifists, and ecologists, who have opposed established order and sought to change it. Topics covered include utopian visions (e.g., Owen, Morris, Bellamy, Gilman), criticism of existing institutions (Wollstonecraft, Marx, Fanon, de Beauvoir) and strategies for change (Goldman, Malcolm, Lenin, Cabral). The emphasis is on reading original theoretical works, with several writings assignments. Normally offered every third year.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course is an introduction to the philosophy of feminist thought. Feminist theories of epistemology, metaphysics and morality will be examined as critiques of traditional philosophy,. Feminist perspectives and methodologies include radical, liberal, postmodern," as well as more recent trends in ecofeminism. Special emphasis will be placed on explicit and implicit practices of alienation and exclusion as they have unfolded in the ""gendering"" of thought\"

      Prerequisites:

      Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or Instructor's consent

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This class will focus on the general role that law plays in public life. Instead of studying what the current laws are, the class emphasizes the challenges in analyzing, interpreting, and constructing law. Among the most important questions will be how we should evaluate or reform existing legal systems. Readings may include formative cases, recent legal studies, and classic texts by figures such as Grotius, Bentham, Holmes, Hart, and Dworkin. Prerequisite: One course in Philosophy or consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every other year.

      Prerequisites:

      PHIL-119, PHIL-123, PHIL-127 or PHIL-120

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course will address in depth one or more specific issues in applied ethics. Topics will vary and may range from applied issues in political thought, such as just war theory or transitional justice, to specific questions in professional ethics or social policy, such as end-of-life care, economic justice, or the role of technology in the human future. Prerequisite: PHIL 119, or 123, or 127. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every other year.

      Prerequisites:

      PHIL-119, PHIL-123, PHIL-127 or PHIL-120

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      An examination of the moral issues involved in the interaction of humans with their natural environment. Topics include: the environmental crisis, human-centered vs. nature-centered ethics, intrinsic value in nature, obligations to future generations, the importance of preserving endangered species and wilderness, radical ecology, eco-feminism, and the role of social justice in environmental issues. Prerequisite: PHIL 119, or 123, or 127. 1 term -4 credits. Normally offered every year.

      Prerequisites:

      Prerequisite: Phil 119, or 123, or 127.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      An examination of the moral problems facing health-care practitioners, their patients, and others involved with the practice of medicine in today's society. Issues include euthanasia, the ethics of medical experimentation, the use of reproductive technologies, genetic counseling and genetic engineering, truth-telling and confidentiality in doctor-patient relationships, the cost and availability of medical care. Normally offered every third year.

      Prerequisites:

      Take 1 PHIL course level 200 or higher; or take GVT-275 or GVT-276; Instructor consent required.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Examines how classical works of ancient and medieval moral and political philosophy raise questions and themes that persist in challenges facing contemporary public policy and personal ethics. Topics covered will include the nature of moral duties, the connection between happiness and morality, citizenship and virtue, the meaning of a good life, the attractions and limitations of moral relativism, the foundations of legitimate government, arguments for and against democracy, realism and idealism in statecraft, and the relationship between law and ethics. Authors may include the Pre-Socratic thinkers, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, and Aquinas, among others.

      Prerequisites:

      PHIL-210, PHIL-211, 1 400-level PHIL course, and Instructor consent

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Continues the examination of themes addressed in PHIL 401/701, with a focus on how radical change, from the early modern era to the present, poses both challenges and opportunities for thought and action. In addition to issues from PHIL 401/701, themes may include revolution and reaction, the role of science and technology, the clash between universalism and particularism, distributive justice and the economy, liberty and equality, faith and secularism, and others. Authors may include Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche, as well as contemporary thinkers.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      A detailed exposition and evaluation of a specific topic or of the views of one major philosophical thinker or group of thinkers. Readings from both primary and secondary sources. Prerequisite: PHIL 210 or 211 or consent of instructor. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

      Students are strongly encouraged, in consultation with their advisors, to select courses that provide a broad and balanced knowledge of Political Theory.

      Government Minor

      Learn more about this minor

      Minor Requirements: 5 courses, 20 credits

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      An introduction to the American political system and constitutional framework. Focus will be on the interplay of various institutions (the Presidency, Congress and the Judiciary) in creating public policies. Contemporary public issues will be discussed, as will the role of political theory in shaping American democracy. Attention will be given to the role of the news media, public opinion, political ideology, political parties and interest groups in the American system.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Students learn to read, analyze, and conduct political science research as well as learning the steps to writing a research paper, including developing a research question, writing a literature review, selecting a research design, and properly citing sources. Students will develop an understanding of approaches to researching and measuring political phenomena.

      Choose any three additional Government courses. Two must be at the 200-level and at least one must be at the 300-, 400- or 500-level.

       

      Residency Requirement Policy: In the College of Arts and Sciences, a two-course (8 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for completion of a minor and a four-course (16 credit) residency requirement must be satisfied for the completion of a major.

      Minor Programs Policy: A student declaring a minor may use no more than two courses from a major or double major combination to fulfill the requirements for the minor. No more than one course from one minor may count toward the fulfillment of a second minor. Students may not minor in a subject in which they are also completing a major. For more information, see the Minor Programs section of the CAS Degree Requirements page.

      Accelerated Bachelor's/Master's in Applied Politics or Global Public Policy

      Learn more about this accelerated degree

      Degree Requirements

      1. Students admitted to this dual degree program must meet all the requirements of the undergraduate Government major (BA or BS) offered by the department of Government
      2. Students must also meet all requirements for the Master’s degree in Applied Politics (MAAP) or Global Public Policy (MAGPP).
      3. Students will take two Government graduate courses during their senior year; one during the fall semester and one during the spring semester. The two graduate courses taken during the senior year will count toward BOTH the undergraduate and graduate degree requirements. Credit hours will be awarded based on the graduate course description.
      4. The graduate courses taken during the senior year will be determined by the Government graduate program director.
      5. Students are subject to the usual standards for academic standing, i.e., undergraduate standards for undergraduate courses and graduate standards for graduate courses.

      Upon successful completion of all of the degree requirements, a student will receive a dual Bachelor’s and Master’s degree. The exact degree will be awarded based on the specific undergraduate program the student completes. A student may permanently exit the dual degree program and opt to graduate with a Bachelor’s degree if all the requirements for a Bachelor’s degree have been met. In this case, the graduate courses taken in the senior year will be counted as 4-credit courses applied toward the undergraduate degree requirements.

      Honors

      To complete requirements for honors in the major, a candidate must:

      1. Graduate with a major GPA of 3.4
      2. Graduate with an overall GPA of 3.0
      3. Complete a major written assignment for two different 300- or 400-level GVT courses, and receive a grade of A- or better on both papers (Note: Courses must be taught by a full-time faculty member)
      4. Present 1 of the 2 papers at the Government Department Spring Student Research Conference
      5. Fill out the Honors Completion Form with all the appropriate signatures and submit it to the honors coordinator
      6. CAS Honors Program students only: In addition to presenting the work as described above, present work from the senior honors experience present at the Honors Symposium or the Honors Pecha Kucha

      To become a candidate for honors in the major, a student must:

      1. Have a major GPA or 3.4 or higher
      2. Have an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher
      3. Have completed at least 8 credits in Government courses at Suffolk University
      4. Apply to the honors coordinator by completing a Google form no later than April 1st of junior year

      Societies

      Pi Sigma Alpha: the National Political Science Honor Society Sigma Lambda Chapter at Suffolk University

      Pi Sigma Alpha is the national political science honor society. To be eligible for membership, you must have earned at least 12 credits in Government, and must either:

      • Have earned at least 63 credits, with a cumulative grade point average of 3.5, and an average of 3.5 in Government courses, or
      • Have earned at least 92 credits, with a cumulative grade point average of 3.3, and an average of 3.3 in Government courses.

      Government Courses

      Prerequisites:

      Instructor consent required

      Credits:

      0

      Description:

      This intensive and fun class combines in-depth training on creating and running winning campaigns, including candidate campaigns and issue-oriented campaigns. The class includes site visits to campaign offices and leading political strategy firms. Students will broaden their networks, meeting guest speakers from government, public policy, and nonprofits and participate in hands-on activities that help students learn fundraising, media and messaging, campaign strategy, field operations, and technology. The class fee includes food, transportation and special materials.

      Prerequisites:

      Instructor Consent Required

      Credits:

      0

      Description:

      This intensive and fun class combines in-depth training on creating and running winning campaigns, including candidate campaigns and issue-oriented campaigns. The class includes site visits to campaign offices and leading political strategy firms. Students will broaden their networks, meeting guest speakers from government, public policy, and nonprofits and participate in hands-on activities that help students learn fundraising, media and messaging, campaign strategy, field operations, and technology. The class fee includes food, transportation and special materials.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      An introduction to the American political system and constitutional framework. Focus will be on the interplay of various institutions (the Presidency, Congress and the Judiciary) in creating public policies. Contemporary public issues will be discussed, as will the role of political theory in shaping American democracy. Attention will be given to the role of the news media, public opinion, political ideology, political parties and interest groups in the American system.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Special honors section of GVT 110. Offered every fall.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Introduces the main actors, ideas, institutions, and processes that shape the international system. Analyzes key international developments, including imperialism, nationalism, the causes of wars and peace, and globalization. Integrates international relations concepts with history to explain the unprecedented levels of prosperity and violence in Europe, particularly in light of its dominant role in recent centuries. Emphasizes contemporary developments taking place in other regions such as Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Helps students understand the global arena as a space of complex interconnections and sets the foundations for other courses in international relations and regional studies. Normally offered every semester. This course sets the foundations for other courses in International Relations and Regional Studies

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Students learn to read, analyze, and conduct political science research as well as learning the steps to writing a research paper, including developing a research question, writing a literature review, selecting a research design, and properly citing sources. Students will develop an understanding of approaches to researching and measuring political phenomena.

      Prerequisites:

      Honors student or at least 3.3 GPA

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      A special honors section of Research Methods. Students will be introduced to the subfields of political science and learn to analyze political writings. Focus will be on the use of the scientific method for research on politics and government. Students will learn the steps in writing a research paper, including developing the research question and selecting a research design. Attention will be given to the use of statistical analysis and public opinion polling in political research.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Introduces various approaches of comparative politics, such as institutionalism, structuralism, political culture, corporatism, state-society relationship, political economy, etc. Applies the different approaches to explain how various factors affect government institutions, sociopolitical and economic development in different societies. An effort is made to include countries from all regions of the world. Normally offered every semester.

      Prerequisites:

      Sophomore Standing GVT 110 and 120 and Math 128 or higher.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Quantitative analysis is quickly changing the way we understand and engage in politics, how we implement policy, and how organizations across the world make decisions. In this course, we will learn the fundamental principles of statistical inference and develop the necessary programming skills to answer a wide range of political and policy oriented questions with data analysis. Who is most likely to win the upcoming presidential election? Do countries become less democratic when leaders are assassinated? Is there racial discrimination in the labor market? These are just a few of the questions we will work on in the course.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      An examination of women's place in the Constitution; policy concerns; and political participation. Attention will be given to women's societal roles and attitudes towards women of different classes and races and the ways in which these roles and attitudes influence women's political participation. Attention will also be given to the theories and perspectives of the current women's movement as they influence policy considerations. Cultural Diversity A

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      "This course explores the relationship between politics & religion in the United States. How and why does religion influence politics in the U.S? What does freedom of religion mean in the U.S.? Why do some groups today erroneously claim that the U.S. was founded as a ""Christian nation""? This course also examines what major world religions say about the status and responsibilities of the state and the roles that minority religious groups (Buddhism\"

      Prerequisites:

      GVT 110 or GVT 120 or instructor's permission

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course will provide an examination of the institutions involved in the American policy-making process. The student will learn about the presidential system that exists in the United States. The course will focus on a relationship between the President and Congress and how that relationship impedes or facilitates the public policy process, including the budgetary process. The course will include a discussion of the president's role as head of the executive branch, and the implementation of congressional policies. Attention will be given to the role of the judiciary in the policy process. Normally offered every year.

      Prerequisites:

      GVT 110 or instructor's permission

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the process and politics of agenda-setting and public policy formulation in the United States. The primary focus is on understanding the complex interaction between institutions and actors involved in public policy making at the federal level, although many of these observations are transferrable to other levels of government (state and local) and other political systems. Students will learn by doing as they become elected Members of Congress in a semester-long legislative simulation. Normally offered every fall.

      Prerequisites:

      CAS Honors students only. GVT 110 and GVT 120 or instructor's permission

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the process and politics of agenda-setting and public policy formulation in the United States. The primary focus is on understanding the complex interaction between institutions and actors involved in public policy making at the federal level, although many of these observations are transferrable to other levels of government (state and local) and other political systems. Students will learn by doing as they become elected Members of Congress in a semester-long legislative simulation. Normally offered every fall.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines a range of contemporary issues introducing students to the U.S. Constitution and the fundamental concepts of constitutional law. Students discuss and analyze topics including separation of powers, federalism, freedom of speech, the death penalty, gun control, and civil rights. We will explore current constitutional challenges and their relationship to law and society.

      Prerequisites:

      Honors student or at least 3.3 GPA

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines a range of contemporary issues introducing students to the U.S. Constitution and the fundamental concepts of constitutional law. Students discuss and analyze topics including separation of powers, federalism, freedom of speech, the death penalty, gun control, and civil rights. We will explore current constitutional challenges and their relationship to law and society.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the public policy-making role of the court system and examines questions such as whether and how courts can spur political and social reform. The direct and secondary effects of key court decisions will be examined. Case studies may focus on issues like civil rights and pro-choice court cases and political activism. The course will also examine the basics of policy-related legal research.

      Prerequisites:

      GPA at least 3.3

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This friendly, interactive introduction to intellectual property covers the fundamental pillars of copyrights,patents, trademarks, and trade secret, and more far-reaching topics like international and internet intellectual property, and indigenous people and IP. The course is open to all majors,because it is relevant to anyone who deals with creative works, inventions, discoveries, or business. This undergraduate course will be taught at the Suffolk Law School by a member of its faculty.

      Prerequisites:

      GPA at least 3.3 or Honors student only.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This friendly, interactive introduction to intellectual property covers the fundamental pillars of copyrights,patents, trademarks, and trade secret, and more far-reaching topics like international and internet intellectual property, and indigenous people and IP. The course is open to all majors,because it is relevant to anyone who deals with creative works, inventions, discoveries, or business. This undergraduate course will be taught at the Suffolk Law School by a member of its faculty.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      The development, structure and functions of state governments with emphasis on the government of Massachusetts; the various forms of local government in cities and towns; analysis of the relationships between local, state and federal governments. Normally offered alternate years.

      Prerequisites:

      GVT 110, GVT 115, and GVT 120 or consent of instructor.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Review of major approaches to the study of international relations. Definition of concepts such as power, nationalism, imperialism, and dependency. Special attention to the use of force and conflict resolution. Special class project. Normally offered every year.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the political ideas of major thinkers of Western civilization, beginning with the ancient Greek philosophers and continuing through the 14th Century. Theorists studied (in English translation) include, among others, Plato, Aristotle, Thucydides, Cicero, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, and Christine de Pizan. One term, 4 semester hours.

      Prerequisites:

      Sophomore standing

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the political ides of the major thinkers of Western civilization from the time of Machiavelli to the present. Theorist studied (in English translation) include, among others, Machiavelli, Bodin, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Mill, Marx, Wollstonecraft, Beauvoir, and Dewey. One term, 4 semester hours. No Prerequisites.

      Prerequisites:

      GVT 110, GVT 115, and GVT 120 or consent of instructor; Sophomore status or higher

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Introduces various approaches of comparative politics, such as institutionalism, structuralism, political culture, corporatism, state-society relationship, political economy, etc. Applies the different approaches to explain how various factors affect government institutions, sociopolitical and economic development in different societies. An effort is made to include countries from all regions of the world. Normally offered every semester.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the impact and influence of women on public policy from the inside, as formal actors in government and partisan institutions, and from the outside, via civic organizations as both non-citizens and citizens. The course uses a comparative approach to explore systematically the ways in which women have navigated, sometimes successfully, intersectional realities of class, race, gender identity and ideological orientation to influence public policy. The first half of the course concentrates on women in politics and the second examines specific policy areas, such as reproductive choice and equity issues. Normally offered alternate years.

      Prerequisites:

      Not open to freshmen

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the interaction between gender and globalization. It discusses the centrality of gender in international development by focusing on gender as one of the most critical factors that affect the success or the failure of globalization. Critically reviewing general theories of globalization, the course presents a historical overview of gender and development. It then explores selected topics: global restructuring and feminization of the labor force, gender in multinational corporations, gender and international migration, sex-tourism, AIDS, and the impact of the state, religion, and culture in creating social dislocations and inequalities. Finally, we will consider strategies of change and diverse forms of resistance by women. Offered as needed. Cultural Diversity B

      Prerequisites:

      GVT 281 and GVT 261

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the dynamic evolution of the debates on International Security as well as the transformations in the main global and regional security institutions such as UN and NATO. Based upon International Relations perspectives, it analyzes the traditional definitions of security at the national, regional and international levels of analysis since 1945. Likewise, it studies how states and international institutions have revisited the concepts, policies and strategies of security since the end of the Cold War and after the September 11 events, from realist perspectives to the Copenhagen School of security studies. Offered every year.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior status or higher

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course introduces the concept and practices of transitional justice, which addresses current and past human rights violations. We review the various mechanisms of transitional justice, including: criminal prosecution; lustrations; truth and reconciliation commissions; reparations; and apologies. Our focus will be on understanding the nature of the political and moral dilemmas encountered by countries that consider and apply these mechanisms. We will consider broad theoretical questions as well as specific examples (e.g., Germany after the Holocaust; The South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission; The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda). The course will also emphasize the practical implications of transitional justice: how do we empirically measure the effects of transitional justice; what is the role of traditional mechanisms of justice; how does one balance between the global human rights regime and local realities; what is the relationship between gender and religion and transitional justice; and, what is the role of transitional justice mechanisms in conflict resolution.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior status or higher, CAS Honors Program

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course introduces the concept and practices of transitional justice, which addresses current and past human rights violations. We review the various mechanisms of transitional justice, including: criminal prosecution; lustrations; truth and reconciliation commissions; reparations; and apologies. Our focus will be on understanding the nature of the political and moral dilemmas encountered by countries that consider and apply these mechanisms. We will consider broad theoretical questions as well as specific examples (e.g., Germany after the Holocaust; The South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission; The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda). The course will also emphasize the practical implications of transitional justice: how do we empirically measure the effects of transitional justice; what is the role of traditional mechanisms of justice; how does one balance between the global human rights regime and local realities; what is the relationship between gender and religion and transitional justice; and, what is the role of transitional justice mechanisms in conflict resolution.

      Prerequisites:

      GVT 281 and GVT 261 or instructors consent

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course explores the main premises and approaches to study Global Political Economy. After analyzing the history and development of the international system, it studies how states and markets are interconnected in the creation and reform of economic and political international institutions in the globalization process. It also focuses on the most acute problems of the current international system in the area of IPE, namely, environmental degradation, external debt, poverty, increasing gap between rich and poor countries, and trade conflicts. Offered every year.

      Prerequisites:

      Open to Juniors and Seniors

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      An analysis of the origins and the local, regional, and international dimensions of the Palestinian-Israeli-Arab conflict, this course will examine the conflict through the eyes of the major protagonists and the roles played by them from the early twentieth century to the present: Zionists/Israelis, Palestinians and other Arabs, British, Americans, Soviets. We will also explore the questions of why this conflict has captured the world's attention and why it has gone unresolved since World War II. Finally, we will examine the possibilities and attempts for resolution of what appears to be an intractable human tragedy.

      Prerequisites:

      OPEN TO JUNIORS & SENIORS

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Everything needed to design, carry out, and interpret a political survey. Topics covered will include questionnaire design, sampling, interviewing, coding data, and univariate and bivariate analysis of the results. Multivariate analysis will be discussed but not studied in-depth. An actual survey will be conducted as a class project. Normally offered every year.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Corporations, which are one of the dominant institutions of the early 21st century, are driven not by the public good, but by the profit motive. Decisions made by two industries dominated by corporations, the food industry and the tobacco industry, have a tremendous negative impact on America's public health. What, if anything, can be done to counteract the harm caused by Fast Food & Big Tobacco?

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Moot Court consists of simulated arguments in front of the Supreme Court of the United States. Students brief approximately 20 Supreme Court cases and apply them to a hypothetical case before the Court. Students form written and oral arguments based on two constitutional questions in the hypothetical. Two person teams will develop legal oral arguments in favor of their clients. Students learn how to compose written briefs, develop a knowledge of case law, learn how to effectively respond to questioning, and develop forensic skills, and courtroom demeanor. Moot Court is a great preparation course for undergraduate students planning to attend law school.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course provides an introduction to the importance of written communication in the public discourse and in public decision-making. The course will examine some of the tools for producing relevant, useful material in the professional public policy analysis arena. The course will also study the various kinds of written communication the policy makers and advocates regularly utilize. The course also provides an introduction to the constraints that surround effective communication in public policymaking. Students will engage in drafting several different kinds of public policy analyses.

      Prerequisites:

      GVT 110 AND GVT 120 OR INSTRUCTOR'S CONSENT

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Perspectives on the role and problems of the presidency in American political life; the nature and difficulties of presidential influence and effectiveness, presidential authority within our system of government, and the impact of presidential character. Normally offered alternate years.

      Prerequisites:

      GVT 110 and GVT 120 or instructor's consent

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      The structure and functioning of legislatures. Particular emphasis on the U.S. Congress, how it works and how it compares with other legislatures. The role of legislatures in a democracy. Normally offered alternate years.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This class examines the way in which national identity, global and regional economics and international development intersect. It uses the professionalization of the sport of hockey and its subsequent spread around the globe as its case. It will look at the rise of the pro game, the way in which it shapes national identity in the Canadian case, the way in which the pro business model has changed in response to broad socio-economic changes in North America and geo-political shifts around the globe, especially in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      How do laws governing the political process affect and impact political power relationships? This course investigates topics including redistricting, the right to vote, voter turnout and mobilization, election administration, the Voting Rights Act, and political parties. Students will have a choice of either serving as poll workers during the November election or organizing and conducting research of potential voters. Students will gain hands-on experience in actual research design, election administration, and non-partisan get-out-the-vote activities. In addition, students will gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between attitudes, opinion, and voting behavior in American politics and institutions.

      Prerequisites:

      GVT 281 and GVT 261

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      A decision-making approach to understanding the domestic and institutional context of U.S. foreign policy. Includes analysis of continuity and change since WWII using case studies of critical decisions, e.g., Korea, Cuba, Vietnam, etc. Not open to freshmen. Prerequisites: GVT 110, GVT 120, GVT 261 or instructor's consent. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every year.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Pivoting off accelerating U.S. presidential election and events around the world, the course will examine strengths, weaknesses, and biases inherent in news coverage of state, national, and international affairs; delve into peculiarities of each U.S. government branch; analyze coverage of 2020 campaign for focus on issues, personalities, and horse-race. Course will be taught by veteran reporter and diplomat.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course is designed to provide students with a basic grounding in political institutions and processes in contemporary Spain. Political developments are presented in their socio-economic context, with special emphasis on the Spanish transition from a dictatorship to a democracy. Attention is also given to the issue of the Basque and Catalan nationalism, as well as the process of European integration. Prerequisite: GVT 281 or instructor's consent. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered alternate years at the Madrid Campus.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This class will examine the political systems of the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom. It will look at the development of the Republic of Ireland from 1916 until the present paying particular attention to the role that the Irish Government has played in fostering economic development and social stability. It will further look at the country's relationships with the European Union and United States of America. The class will present Northern Ireland and the efforts to resolve the troubles there in as the nexus between these foreign relations, domestic politics in both countries and the relationship between the two of them. A key part of the class will be examining the way in which the British political system functions and is organized, paying particular attention to the multicultural and devolutionary policies that the UK government has enacted in the recent past. The impact that these changes in policy have had in resolving the conflict in Northern Ireland will be examined in depth.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Why did 17 European countries surrender the sovereign control of their currency and create the Euro? Will Turkey become a member of the European Union? Will Europeans continue free riding the security protection of the United States? Is the integration process another layer of bureaucracy or an institutional instrument to dean with the permanent crises in Europe? There are some of the questions guiding the discussions in the class.

      Prerequisites:

      GVT 110 and GVT 120

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      The political development of Africa in colonial and post-colonial periods. Analysis of the evolution of governmental institutions includes economic, social and personal factors; political forces at work in present day Africa.

      Prerequisites:

      Not open to freshmen.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Introduces the main political, economic, and social processes in South Asian countries. Provides with the understanding of the main regional trends and offers case studies of some of the political systems in the region. Applies the concepts and theories learned in the previous international relations, comparative politics courses and other social science courses. Topics include colonialism, religious/identity politics, democratization, economic development, ethnic conflict, terrorism, environmental protection, and human security. *On GVT 385, the original course description covers not only South Asian countries but also Western Asian ones too such as Afghanistan. When I taught the course I focused on South Asian countries, such as India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal.

      Prerequisites:

      Instructors Consent

      Credits:

      1

      Description:

      This course will briefly examine the political history of what would become Yugoslavia, beginning in the interwar period and following the process of unification of the South Slav state. After analyzing Yugoslavian politics during the Tito era, attention will turn to what happened to this state after Tito's death in 1980. Students will be expected to understand the controversies over what caused the break-up of Yugoslavia, and will read many opposing interpretations of the events that began in the 1990s and continue today. Offered at the Madrid Campus.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      In this course students meet community needs by engaging in service-learning outside the classroom. Current political trends in the Caribbean and in selected Central American nations. Emphasis will be placed on comparative analysis of public policies in the region, as well as on external factors which impact on politics in the Caribbean and Central America. Students will use academic sources in their analysis, as well as novels and other literary sources for the background of their analysis.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Introduces China studies as a subfield of comparative politics. Covers topics such as history, political structure, communist revolution, political and economic development, authoritarian resilience, current issues, and foreign policy. Compares China with other countries in and outside of Asia.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior or Senior status required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the evolution of Latin America in the context of globalization. The first part analyzes the main political and economic trends of Latin America as a region, while the second presents the main challenges Mexico is facing today in the area of security. The third part moves forward into the detailed explanation of the transformations of the largest South American countries such as Colombia, Argentina, Chile and Venezuela, among others. The final section looks at the relationship between Latin America and the United States.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior status or above

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This class will examine the techniques used to market political candidates, parties, issues, interest groups and think tanks in the modern American polity, as well as in Canada and the EU. The class will examine the causes and impact of the change that many observers have seen in the American polity from a civil to a consumptive political culture and question the extent to which this is a U.S. based versus more global phenomenon. At the same time, the class will aim to provide the student will a hands-on understanding of the way in which various marketing techniques are employed to sell politics. The techniques will include message development, branding, micro-targeting, and political marketing campaign strategy by looking at a series of cases from around the world. Cases examined will include the Barack Obama , Hillary Clinton and John McCain campaigns from 2008, the effort to brand the Conservative Party and New Labour in the United Kingdom.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior status or above, CAS Honors Program

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This class will examine the techniques used to market political candidates, parties, issues, interest groups and think tanks in the modern American polity, as well as in Canada and the EU. The class will examine the causes and impact of the change that many observers have seen in the American polity from a civil to a consumptive political culture and question the extent to which this is a U.S. based versus more global phenomenon. At the same time, the class will aim to provide the student will a hands-on understanding of the way in which various marketing techniques are employed to sell politics. The techniques will include message development, branding, micro-targeting, and political marketing campaign strategy by looking at a series of cases from around the world. Cases examined will include the Barack Obama , Hillary Clinton and John McCain campaigns from 2008, the effort to brand the Conservative Party and New Labour in the United Kingdom.

      Prerequisites:

      At least 54 credits required.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This class will examine the ways in which political marketing is conducted across the globe. It will look at a variety of political systems and cultures in an effort to discern which techniques work best with which political systems and political cultures. The cases will be drawn from all 7 continents and a wide diversity of socio-political cultures. Cases are likely to include Canada, New Zealand, India, Japan, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Argentina, Russia and many others. By the end of the class, students should have a strong sense of how political marketing is done globally and which techniques work best with which systems.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior Status required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Examines cultural and historic backgrounds, political systems, political and economic development, and international relations of countries in North and South East Asia. Provides with the understanding of the main regional trends and offers case studies of some of the political systems in the region. Applies the concepts and theories learned in the previous international relations, comparative politics courses and other social science courses. * I do not include specific country names to make the description flexible for changes. In my class, I cover countries such as China, North and South Korea, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Philippines, and Burma.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior Status required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines how American governmental institutions, political actors, and processes have both shaped and responded to one of the most significant and complex issues of public policy facing the nation: immigration to the United States. This class will explore a number of intriguing and difficult policy topics related to the almost unprecedented level of immigration that the U.S. has been experiencing. The focus of the class will include the following: admissions, citizenship, deportation and detention (including that of suspected terrorists), refugee/asylum law, and highly contested issues of today, such as definitions of citizenship, immigrant rights, and border enforcement. A major objective of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to conduct their own original research in American politics by delving into some aspect of immigration as a public policy issue.

      Prerequisites:

      This course will have a service learning component Junior Status required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      From Rio to the Boston Harbor Project, this course examines the policies and politics of the environment. It examines the origins of the environmental movement in the United States focusing on the development and present function of government and non-government organizations responsible for the development and implementation of global, national, state and local environmental policies.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior Status required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      In the 20th century the general public became aware of the need for following a sustainable lifestyle. Non-governmental organizations, governmental institutions and individuals began to study environmental problems and issues to enhance the concept of conservation of nature and the protection of the planet's biodiversity among other important concepts. However, as we enter the 21st century, we are finding ourselves involved in new environmental threats such as increasingly disturbing natural disasters, eco-terrorism and endless extreme poverty. This course is aimed at learning the basic environmental aspects that affect society and nature as a whole, along with the new issues that are arising and leading scientists to continue new lines of research in the field of environmental conservation and awareness, knowing also that the key to hope lies in the field of environmental education. Offered on the Madrid Campus only.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior Status required

      Credits:

      2

      Description:

      Designed to introduce students to the nuts and bolts of preparing to run for office or guiding a candidate through the process. Students learn how to file nomination papers, develop a field team, and create a general branding strategy.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior Status required

      Credits:

      1

      Description:

      Students learn the basics of how candidates successfully introduce their candidacy to the public. From announcing the campaign to conducting meet and greets to producing candidate photos, this course guides to through the process of effectively defining the candidate.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior status required

      Credits:

      1

      Description:

      Students learn the fundamentals of how to maximize positive media coverage with attention paid to generating endorsements, developing non-paid media, and persuading voters.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior status or above

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course explains the main components of the international legal system. It begins by exploring the rules, principles and norms that govern the relationship among states, the different cultural and philosophical legal perspectives and the history of the international legal system. The second part of the course covers the study of the sources and subjects of the international law, the jurisdiction of states, the peaceful settlement of disputes, the use of force and the legal personality of international actors. The third part of the course addresses a number of significant topics derived from the process of globalization legal norms: human rights, humanitarian intervention, law of the sea, environmental law, and economic relations.

      Prerequisites:

      GVT-261 Junior Status required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course explores the institutional structures, political processes, and impact of international governmental and nongovernmental organizations. It analyzes their increasingly prominent role in efforts to resolve a wide range of global problems and contribution to strengthen the current system of global governance. While the course covers the problems of international security, global distribution of wealth, deterioration of the environmental system, and threats to social welfare, it focuses on the interaction between the United Nations System and regional organizations, on the one hand, and the role of non-governmental organizations in cooperating or competing to solve specific problems in the area of international relations.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior Status required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course examines the intertwined nature of the globalization and regionalization processes from the perspective of global political economy. The first part of the course provides the basic elements and indicators to understand the main challenges the international economy is facing such as crisis, protectionism, and underdevelopment, inter alia. The second part presents the evolution of globalization and regionalism in the past decades. The third and final section compares how the distinct regions in the world are dealing with local and global problems; particularly attention is paid to the European Union, NAFTA, Mercosur and APEC.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior status

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      How do we explain the appearance or absence of social movements? What social or individual factors explain their development and decline? Who joins social movements? Who does not? Why? What ideas or ideals animate those who do participate? What is it like to be part of a social movement? What effect do they or have they had on politics, power and efforts at social change? These are some of the questions that have traditionally shaped debates over social movements, both domestically and internationally. They will form the analytical core of the work in this course. By critically evaluating several competing schools of thought in social movement theory and history we will attempt to highlight the social forces that have, at varying points in times, facilitated, maintained, as well as blocked the development of social movements in the US and beyond.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Recent years have witnessed what is widely described as a global retreat of democracy and a concurrent rise of illiberalism and populism of both the right and left variants. Some observers argue that this alarmist assessment is unwarranted and that a more nuanced and careful evaluation of the data does not support a conclusion that democracy is on life support. Which perspective is right? Is democracy really under threat at home and abroad? If so, why and what, if anything, could or should we do about it? This course will critically and systematically evaluate the risks to democracy both in the U.S. and globally as an empirical question, through the lens of social science, theory and history. This course is being taught as part of a cross-university collaborative in which students from more than a dozen campuses follow similar syllabi, collaborate on select assignments, contribute research to a global database on Democratic Erosion and will engage with students at other universities.

      Prerequisites:

      open to juniors and seniors only

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Reading and discussion of original works by significant American political thinkers. Readings vary, but might include The Federalist and works by Paine, Jefferson, Calhoun, Thoreau, Sumner, Reed, Dewey, Lippman, Goodman, King, Malcolm X, Carmichael, Hamilton, Friedan and Dillinger. Offered every year.

      Prerequisites:

      Open to Juniors and Seniors only.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course focuses on those political thinkers, such as socialists, feminists, anarchists, pacifists, and ecologists, who have opposed established order and sought to change it. Topics covered include utopian visions (e.g., Owen, Morris, Bellamy, Gilman), criticism of existing institutions (Wollstonecraft, Marx, Fanon, de Beauvoir) and strategies for change (Goldman, Malcolm, Lenin, Cabral). The emphasis is on reading original theoretical works, with several writings assignments. Normally offered every third year.

      Prerequisites:

      TAKE GVT-281 OR INSTRUCTOR'S CONSENT Junior Status required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Interlocking themes making the contemporary Middle East an area of chronic conflict: Big Power rivalries; social and political change within individual countries; unity and Arab rivalry involved in Arab nationalism; the Palestinian-Israeli-Arab dispute. Normally offered alternate years. Cultural Diversity B

      Prerequisites:

      Senior status

      Credits:

      1

      Description:

      This course is designed to provide all Government degree-seeking students with a team-taught capstone experience. In this course, we will collectively discuss and consider career, professional and academic experience for the Government major, including learning more about the fields of public policy, public service, law, nonprofit management, international development, and nongovernmental organization management. This course focuses on career entry and transition, networking for career success, impression management concept and skills, and related life-long learning skills. Students articulate and reflect on academic, work, and co-curricular experiences from the perspective of professionals entering or advancing their careers. Pre-requisite: Senior standing.

      Prerequisites:

      Instructor permission required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      An intensive off-campus experience, normally of two-week's duration, arranged through The Washington Center in Washington, D.C. Topics vary. Students will be graded by both an on-site evaluator and an assigned Government Department faculty member. In addition, students are normally required to meet three times during the semester of registration, keep a journal of the off-campus experience and to write a significant research paper based on the topic of the academic seminar.

      Prerequisites:

      Instructor's consent required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      A two-week intensive seminar in Washington DC; the first week will focus on a look inside the defense and intelligence community in the US government; the second week will examine issues, threats, and challenges in global society. The seminar, carried out in partnership with The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars, will include briefing sessions with security officials, site visits, small group meetings, keeping a journal, and academic papers. There will also be some further academic work after you return to Suffolk. Prerequisites: Registration in this course requires advance application. The seminar is offered in May, and applications are due by March 1. Interested students should consult the instructor for further details.

      Prerequisites:

      Instructor permission required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      An opportunity to do an internship through The Washington Center at either the Republican National Convention or the Democratic National Convention. Students will learn what goes on behind the scenes and interact with important public figures influential in setting public policy at various levels of government. The week prior to the convention is spent in Washington, D.C. studying the electoral process, becoming familiar with conventions operations and preparing for convention fieldwork assignments. Students will hear from a wide variety of speakers, including members of the media, party officials, and other political personalities. Students are then assigned as volunteers to assist with the work of the convention during the second week.

      Prerequisites:

      INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION This course fulfills the Expanded Classroom Requirement

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      APPROVAL OF DEPT. CHAIRPERSON. Specially arranged study trip to a foreign country for the purpose of obtaining knowledge through direct experience and observation. Includes prearranged site visits, meetings, required reading and written assignments. ECR

      Prerequisites:

      Instructor's consent

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course provides an introduction to the study of the role of the United Nations System in the globalization era. The course is divided in two main sections. The first is based on a series of readings, lectures and discussion on the rules, principles and norms which govern the relationship among states and the UN system; it also covers traditional topics such as the sources and subjects of international law, the jurisdiction of states, the peaceful settlement of disputes, the use of force and the legal personality of international actors, human rights, humanitarian intervention, global environment, used of armed forces, as well as economic relations. The second part of the course is based on a required study trip to the UN headquarters in order to experience a direct contact with policy-makers within the UN system in a diversity of areas such as security, aid and peacekeeping areas.

      Prerequisites:

      Instructor's consent required

      Credits:

      1.00- 4.00

      Description:

      Individual program of reading and research on an approved topic under the supervision of a member of the department. Only for qualified juniors or seniors. Offered every semester.

      Prerequisites:

      Government major, sophomore status. Applications to participate must be approved by the Instructor. It is the responsibility of students to arrange internship placements in advance of the course.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This course is designed to enhance the academic learning students achieve in a substantive government, politics, issue advocacy, public policy or public administration related, supervised, internship that is concurrent with the seminar. Students will use their experiences in the internship of their choosing as a basis for reflection, analysis, skills and career development. Individual learning goals and objectives will be formulated for each student, based on their placement, interest and career goals. Internships must be a minimum of 120 hours in total and approved by the instructor in advance.

      Prerequisites:

      Sophomore standing and instructor's permission required

      Credits:

      12

      Description:

      A full-time, one-semester internship in Washington, D.C. Consult the Department office for more details. ECR

      Prerequisites:

      CAS Honors students only. Sophomore standing and instructor's permission required

      Credits:

      12

      Description:

      A full-time, one-semester internship in Washington, D.C. Consult the Department office for more details. ECR

      Prerequisites:

      Sophomore standing and Instructor's permission required

      Credits:

      8

      Description:

      A full-time summer internship in Washington D.C. Consult the Department for more details. ECR

      Prerequisites:

      Concurrent enrollment in GVT 523 or GVT 524; sophomore standing; Instructor permission.

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      ECR

      Prerequisites:

      Junior standing; GVT 528 & GVT 529 Concurrent; Instructor permission.

      Credits:

      8

      Description:

      A full-time, one-semester International Internship in London. Students must also complete academic work designed to enhance experiential learning and professional development in their internship abroad that is supervised by a Suffolk instructor. Course work will include developing individualized learning goals and objectives for their internships, journaling, mid-term self-evaluation and a final research paper.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior standing; GVT 528 & GVT 529 Concurrent; Instructor permission

      Credits:

      8

      Description:

      A full-time, one-semester International Internship in Brussels. Students must also complete academic work designed to enhance experiential learning and professional development in their internship abroad that is supervised by a Suffolk instructor. Course work will include developing individualized learning goals and objectives for their internships, journaling, mid-term self-evaluation and a final research paper.

      Prerequisites:

      Junior standing; GVT 528 & GVT 529 Concurrent; Instructor permission

      Credits:

      8

      Description:

      A full-time, one-semester International Internship in Edinburgh. Student must also complete academic work designed to enhance experiential learning and professional development in their internship abroad that is supervised by a Suffolk instructor. Course work will include developing individualized learning goals and objectives for their internships, journaling, mid-term self-evaluation and a final research paper.

      Prerequisites:

      Instructor consent required

      Credits:

      1.00-12.00

      Description:

      Internships and practicum in Government are available prior to the start of each semester. Offered Fall and Spring.

      Prerequisites:

      Instructor Consent Required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      This intensive and fun class combines in-depth training on creating and running winning campaigns, including candidate campaigns and issue-oriented campaigns. The class includes site visits to campaign offices and leading political strategy firms. Students will broaden their networks, meeting guest speakers from government, public policy, and nonprofits and participate in hands-on activities that help students learn fundraising, media and messaging, campaign strategy, field operations, and technology. The class fee includes food, transportation and special materials.

      Prerequisites:

      Instructor's consent required

      Credits:

      4

      Description:

      Individual program of reading, research, writing on an approved topic under the supervision of a member of the department, for students in all tracks who meet the criteria for departmental honors and who wish to prepare a thesis for submission to the honors committee. Must be taken in the first semester of the senior year. Prerequisites: Grade point average 3.0 overall, 3.4 in major; completion of a minimum of 6 credits in Government at Suffolk University; advisor's signed consent; application approved by honors committee in spring of applicant's junior year. 1 term - 4 credits. Normally offered every fall.